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Vision 

To provide sustainable services and development to all communities by 2030 with emphasis on 
infrastructure, social and economic development in a safe and healthy environment managed by visionary 
and ethical leadership. 

Mission 

■ To develop the institution and to facilitate institutional transformation 

■ To provide infrastructure and services to all, with emphasis on rural communities, in a sustainable manner 

■ To develop and support sustainable local economic development, through focusing on tourism, agriculture 
development, industrial development which incorporates the youth 

■ To develop and support social development initiatives, particularly those focused on the youth 
and the vulnerable 

■ To ensure good governance through leadership excellence and community participation 

■ To ensure continued sound financial management 

■ To ensure effective and efficient Land Use Management, taking cognizance of sound 
environmental practices 

■ To support job creation through employment programmes 





% / \v/ | 



■ 




Contents 


SECTION A: 

9 

3.2. 

Environmental Analysis 

53 

Executive Summarv 

10 

3.2.1. 

Habitats 

53 

1.1. 

Who We Are 

10 

3.2.2. 

Key Hydrological Features 

54 

1.1.1. 

Spatial Location within KZN 

10 

3.2.3. 

Protected Areas 

54 

1.1.2. 

Demographic Profile 

11 

3.2.4. 

Biodiversity 

55 

1.1.3. 

Land Administration 

11 

3.2.5. 

Climate Change 

55 

1.2. 

Economic Profile 

13 

3.2.6. 

Strategic Environmental Assessment 

56 

1.2.1. 

Employment Status (1 5Yrs - 65Yrs) (201 1 ) 

13 

3.2.7. 

Spatial: Swot Analysis 

57 

1.2.2. 

Economic Sector Contributor 

13 

3.2.8. 

Environmental: Swot Analysis 

58 

1.2.3. 

Household Income 

13 

3.3. 

Disaster Management 

59 

1.3. 

Developing the Umlalazi Integrated Development Plan_ 

_1A 

3.3.1. 

Umlalazi Disaster Risk Management Policy Framework_ 

_59 

1.3.1. 

The IDP, Budget and PMS Process Plan 

15 

3.3.2. 

Risk Profiling 

60 

1.3.2. 

Public Participation 

22 

3.3.3. 

Institutional Arrangements for Disaster Management 

61 

1.3.3. 

The uThungulu District's Framework Plan 

22 

3.3.4. 

Infrastructural Arrangements 

61 

1.4. 

Broad Key Challenges 

22 

3.3.5. 

Operational Plan for Disaster Management 

61 

1.4.1. 

KPA 1: Municipal Transformation and 


3.3.6. 

Identified Role Players 

62 


Organisational Development 

22 

3.3.7. 

Management Structure 

62 

1.4.2. 

KPA 2: Service Delivery 

22 

3.4. 

Demographic Characteristics 

63 

1.4.3. 

KPA 3: Local Economic and Social Development 

23 

3.4.1. 

Demographic Indicators 

63 

1.4.4. 

KPA 4: Municipal Financial Viability and Management 

23 

3.4.2. 

Key Findings (Including Trends) 

69 

1.4.5. 

KPA 5: Good Governance and Public Participation 

23 

3.5. 

Municipal Transformation and 


1.4.6. 

KPA 6: Cross Cutting Issues 

23 


Organisational Development Analysis 

69 

1.5. 

Long Term Vision 

23 

3.5.1. 

Municipal Transformation 

69 

1.5.1. 

Long Term Strategic Goals and Desired Outputs 

23 

3.5.2. 

Organisational Development 

70 

1.5.2. 

Outputs, Outcomes and Deliverables 

24 

3.6. 

Service Delivery and Infrastructure Analysis 

84 

1.6. 

Performance Management 

32 

3.6.1. 

Water and Sanitation 

84 




3.6.2. 

Solid Waste Management 

_91 

SECTION B: 

_33 

3.6.3. 

Transportation Infrastructure 

_93 

1. 

Planning and Development Principles 

_32 

3.6.4. 

Energy 

_94 

2.1. 

Planning and Development Principles 

_34 

3.6.5. 

Access To Community Facilities 

_96 

2. 

Government Priorities 

_35 

3.6.6. 

Human Settlements 

_103 

2.2. 

Government Priorities 

_35 

3.6.7. 

Telecommunications 

_109 

2.2.1. 

National Development Plan Priorities 

_35 

3.6.8. 

Service Delivery and Infrastructure: Swot Analysis 

_110 

2.2.2. 

National Outcomes 

_36 

3.7. 

Local Economic and Social Development Analysis 

_111 

2.2.3. 

5 National Priorities (Including the 6Th KZN Priority) 

_38 

3.7.1. 

Local Economic Development Analysis 

_111 

2.2.4. 

State of the Nation Address 

_38 

3.8. 

Social Development Analysis 

_125 

2.2.5. 

State of the Province Address 

_39 

3.8.1. 

Broad Based Community Needs 

_125 

2.2.6. 

Provincial Growth and Development Strategy (PGDS) Goals 

_39 

3.8.2. 

Safety and Security 

_126 

2.2.7. 

Local Government Back to Basics Strategy 

_39 

3.8.3. 

Nation Building and Social Cohesion 

_131 




3.8.4. 

Community Development with Particular Focus on 


SECTION C: 

_45 


Vulnerable Groups (Special Programmes) 

_131 

Spatial Analysis 

_46 

3.8.5. 

Youth Development 

_132 

3.1.1. 

Regional Context 

_46 

3.8.6. 

Vuma Youth Development Academy 

_132 

3.1.2. 

Administrative Entities 

_A7 

3.8.7. 

The Siza Bonke Works Programme 

_133 

3.1.3. 

Structuring Elements 

_A7 

3.8.8. 

Health 

_133 

3.1.4. 

Existing Nodes and Settlement Patterns 

_48 

3.9. 

Financial Viability and Management Analysis 

_142 

3.1.5. 

Intervention Areas: Corridors 

_49 

3.9.1. 

Capability of the Municipality to 


3.1.6. 

Broad Land Uses 

_49 


Execute Capital Proiects 

_142 

3.1.7. 

Land Ownership 

_50 

3.9.2. 

Indigent Support (Including Free Basic Services) 

_143 

3.1.8. 

Land Reform 

_51 

3.9.3. 

Revenue Enhancement and Protection Strategies 

_143 

3.1.9. 

Private Sector Developments 

_52 

3.9.4. 

Municipal Consumer Debt Position 

_144 

3.1.10. 

Land Capability for Agricultural Production 

_53 

3.9.5. 

Grants and Subsidies 

_144 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

' - > ooooooo<xx>c>d 



Contents 


3.9.6. Municipal Infrastructure Assets 

And Maintenance (Q&M)^ 

3.9.7. Borrowings (DBSA)^ 

3.9.8. Municipality's Credit Rating 

3.9.9. Employee Related Costs (Including Councilor Allowances)_ 

3.1 0. Good Governance Analysis 

3.10.1. National and Provincial Programs 

Rolled-Out At Municipal Level 

3.10.2. IGR Framework 

3.10.3. MUNI-MECMeetings^ 

3.1 0. A. The IDP Representative Forum 

3.10.5. Municipal Structures 

3.1 0.6. The Audit and Performance Audit Committee 

3.10.7. Municipal Risk Management 

3.10.8. Fraud and Corruption 

3.10.9. Municipal Bylaws 

3.1 1 . Public Participation Analysis 

3.11.1. Public Education 

3.1 1 .2. Public Participation 

3.1 1 .3. Performance Management 

3.1 1 .A. Marketing/Branding 

3.1 2. Good Governance and Public Participation: 

Swot Analysis 

3.12.1. Strengths / Opportunities 

3.12.2. Weaknesses / Threats 

3.1 3. Combined Swot Analysis 

3.13.1. Strengths 

3.13.2. Weaknesses 

3.13.3. Opportunities 

3.1 A. Broad Key Challenges 

3.1 A.1 . KPA 1 : Municipal Transformation and 

Organisational Development 

3.1 A.2. KPA 2: Service Delivery 

3.1 A.3. KPA 3: Local Economic and Social Development 

3.1 A.A. KPA A: Municipal Financial Viability and Managemen 

3.1 A.5. KPA 5: Good Governance and Public Participation 

3.1 A.6. KPA 6: Cross Cutting Issues 

SECTION D: 

A. Vision and Mission and Goals and Objectives 

A.1 . Strategic Development Rationale: 

Comparative Advantage Areas 

A.1 .1 . Identified Comparative Advantages 

A.2. Municipal Vision and Mission 

A.2.1. The Municipal Vision 

A.2.2. The Municipal Mission 

A.3. Cross Boarder Alignment with National Outcomes 

and Provincial Goals and Development Strategies 

A.A. Performance Management Areas, Development Goals, 
Strategies and Objectives 

SECTION E: 

5.1 Strategic Mapping 

3 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUIMICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

o<xxxxxx>o<xx>oooooooo<xxx>ooo 


5.1.1. Development Centres^ 182 

5.2 Implementation Plan^ 197 


SECTION F: ^217 

6. Financial Plan^ ^218 

6.1. Capital Budget for 2016/2017 Financial Year_2 18 

6.2. The 5-Year Capital Investment Programme 219 

6.3. A Summary of the Operational Budget (201 6/201 7) 229 

6.A. Projects to be Implemented by Sector Departments 236 

6.A.2. Department of Agriculture 239 

6.A.3. Private Sector Developments 2 AO 

6. A.A. Electricity (Eskom/Mlalazi LM) 2A0 

6.5. Report of the Audit and Performance 

Committee for the 201 3/1 A Finacial Year 2A6 

6.5.2. Audit and Performance Committee Responsibilities 2A6 

6.6. Reports of the Auditor-General And Responses 2A9 

6.6.1. Auditor-General Report for the 

Financial Year Ending 30 June 201 5 2A9 

6.6.2. Responses to Issues Raised by Auditor General in 

His Audit Report for the Year Ended 30 June 2015 252 


SECTION G: 257 

7.1. Annual Operational Plan 258 


SECTION H: 259 

8. Organisational and Individual Performance 

Management System 260 

8.1. Organisational and Individual Performance 

Management System 260 

8.1.1. Performance Management System 260 

8.1.2. Organisational Performance Management Linked to 

Individual Performance Management 261 

8.1.3. Objectives of the Performance Management System 262 

8.1. A. Principles Governing Performance Management 262 

8.1.5. Performance Management Cycle 263 

8.1.6. Corporate Performance 265 

8.1.7. Individual Performance: Section 57 Managers 266 

8.2. Organisational Performance Management 

Scorecard (2016/2-017) 267 


SECTION I: 283 

9. Achievements 28A 

9.1. Social Development 28A 

9.2. Health 28A 

9.3. Local Economic Development 28A 

9. A. Housing Projects 28A 

9.5. Electricty Projects 285 

9.6. Free Basic Services 285 

9.7. Infrastructure Projects 285 


ANNEXURES 287 

Annexure J1: Summary of Projects Per Ward 288 

Annexure J2: Broad Ward Needs (As Per Cbp) 31 2 


JAA 

JA5 

_1A5 

_1A5 

_1A6 

.1A6 

.150 

.151 

.151 

.152 

.155 

.159 

.162 

.162 

.163 

.163 

.163 

.16A 

.16A 

.16A 

.16A 

.16A 

.16A 

.16A 

.16A 

.16A 

.165 

.165 

.165 

.165 

.165 

.165 

.165 

167 

.168 

.168 

.168 

.169 

.169 

.169 

.170 

.173 

181 

.182 


List of Tables 


Table 

1: 

Demographic Profile (Census 2001 & 2011) 

11 

Table 50: 

Current Housing Proiects 

105 

Table 

2: 

Demographic Profile (Census 2001 & 2011) 

13 

Table 51: 

Priority Status of Current Housing Proiects 

105 

Table 

3: 

Process Plan for the 2016/1 7 IDP review 

16 

Table 52: 

Government Departments affected by 


Table 

k\ 

Clustered Ward Community Based Planning Program, 

_22 


Housing Developments 

108 

Table 

5: 

Outputs, Outcomes and Deliverables 

24 

Table 53: 

Household Access to Telecommunications (2011) 

_109 

Table 

6: 

National Development Plan Priorities 

35 

Table 54: 

ICT SWOTAnaIvsis 

110 

Table 

7: 

12 National Outcomes 

36 

Table 55: 

Distribution by Functional Group (StatsSA) 

111 

Table 

8: 

5 National Priorities (including the 6^^ KZN Priority) 

_38 

Table 56: 

Employment Status (15yrs-65yrs) (2011) 

112 

Table 

9: 

PGD5 Goals 

39 

Table 57: 

Employment Status (15yrs-65yrs) (2011) 

112 

Table 

10: 


41 

Table 58: 

uMlalazi LM - Sector Share of the Region 

112 

Table 

11: 

Back to Basics Activity Plan Template 

44 

Table 59: 

Average Annual Household Income In The 


Table 

12: 

Status of Land Claims 

51 


Uthungulu District (2011) 

113 

Table 

13: 

Land Classification Descriptions 

53 

Table 60: 

Household Income (2011) 

113 

Table 

14: 

Ward Risk Profiling 

60 

Table 61: 

Dependency Ration (1996, 2001, 2011) 

114 

Table 

15: 

Status of Disaster Management 

61 

Table 62: 

Strategic Goals of the LED Strategy 

115 

Table 

16: 


62 

Table 63: 

Informal Traders Database 

117 

Table 

17: 

UDM Total Population 

63 

Table 64: 

Economic Contribution for Agriculture 

118 

Table 

18: 

Population Growth - uThungulu DM and LMs within 


Table 65: 


120 



the District (1996 - 2001, 2001 - 2011) 

64 

Table 66: 

uMlalazi LM - Catering and Accommodation 


Table 

19: 

Number of Households 

65 


Sector Employment and GVA 

121 

Table 

20: 

7o of Female Headed Households 

66 

Table 67: 

Economic Contribution for Manufacturing 

122 

Table 

21: 

7o of Households Headed by Children 

66 

Table 68: 

Business services sector employment and GVA 


Table 

22: 

Gender Ratio (2011) 

66 


(Ouantec 2012) 

123 

Table 

23: 

Age Distribution - 1996, 2001 and 201 1 

67 

Table 69: 

Crime Statistics in uMlalazi Municipality 


Table 

24: 

Municipal Powers and Functions 

70 


(Source: SAPS Website) 

130 

Table 

25: 

Staff Composite and Equity 

71 

Table 70: 

UThungulu Major Causes of Death (StatsSA 2011) 

_134 

Table 

26: 


75 

Table 71: 

Education Levels 

136 

Table 

27: 

Engineering Services - Functions and Analysis 

77 

Table 72 


139 

Table 

28: 

Performance and Challenges 

78 

Table 73: 

Summary of Actual Capital Budgets from 


Table 

29: 

Performance and Challenges 

79 


2010/2011 to 2016/2017 

142 

Table 

30: 

Performance Assessment and Challenges 

80 

Table 74: 

Capital Budget: Funding Sources 

142 

Table 

31: 

Achievements 

81 

Table 75: 

Expenditure of Capital Budget over last 5 years 


Table 

32: 

Opportunities for Improvement in Service Delivery 

_81 


(2011 - 2015) 

142 

Table 

33: 


83 

Table 76: 

Eskom Free Basic Electricity 

143 

Table 

34: 

Comparison of Access to Piped Water - 1996, 


Table 77: 

Free Basic Electricity (Municipality) 

143 



2001 and 2011 

85 

Table 78: 

Free Basic Electricity (Municipality) 

143 

Table 

35: 

Access to Piped Water (2011) 

85 

Table 79: 

Municipal Consumer Debt Position over last 5 years 


Table 

36: 

Water Supply Backlog in uThungulu District (201 5/1 6)_ 

_86 


(2011 to 2015) 

144 

Table 

37: 

Community Access to Sanitation Facilities 

87 

Table 80: 

Grants and Subsidies over the last 5 years 


Table 

38: 

Sanitation Backlogs by uThungulu District (201 5/1 6)_ 

_88 


(2011 to 2015) 

144 

Table 

39: 

Funds required for rural water scheme: 

89 

Table 81: 

Municipal Infrastructure Assets and Maintenance 


Table 

40: 

Funds required for rural sanitation/VIP: 

89 


(O&M) over the last 5 years (201 1 to 2016) 

144 

Table 

41: 

Water Tanker Deliveries 

90 

Table 82: 

Municipal Borrowings over the last 5 years 


Table 

42: 

Solid Waste Disposal - 1996, 2001 and 201 1 

91 


(2011 to 2015) 

145 

Table 

43: 

Frequency of Collecting and Responsible Persons 


Table 83: 

Employee Related Costs and Councilor Allowances 




for Refuse Removal (uMlalazi IWMP) 

92 


over the last 5 years (201 1 to 2015) 

145 

Table 

44: 

Electricity Usage - 1996, 2001 and 201 1 

95 

Table 84: 

War Room Meeting Days 

147 

Table 

45: 


95 

Table 85: 

Targets (2011 - 2015) 

150 

Table 

46: 

Completed Electrification Proiects (Jan 2016) 

96 

Table 86: 

Proiects Identified For the EPWP 

150 

Table 

47: 

Formal, Traditional and Informal Dwellings 


Table 87: 

IGR Meeting Schedule 

151 



(1996,2001 and 2011) 

103 

Table 88: 

Council Representatives at uThungulu 


Table 

48: 

Housing Demand in Urban Areas 

104 


District Municipality 

152 

Table 

49: 

Housing Demand in Rural Areas 

104 

Table 89: 


153 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUIMICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 4 

>0000<XXXX>00000000000000000 


List ofTabl&s 



Table 90: 

Table 91: 
Table 92: 
Table 93: 
Table 94: 
Table 95: 
Table 96: 
Table 97: 
Table 98: 
Table 99: 
Table 100: 
Table 101: 

Table 102: 
Table 103: 
Table 104: 
Table 105: 
Table 106: 


Members of the Audit and Performance 

Audit Committee 1 53 

Municipal Public Accounts Committee Members 154 

Bid Specifications Committee Members 157 

Bid Evaluation Committee Members 157 

Bid Adjudication Committee Members 157 

Public Participation Structures^ 158 

Status of Municipal Policies 159 

Unpacking of the four identified Risk Categories 160 

Bylaws adopted since 2003 to current 163 

Public Participation Structures 164 

Cross Boarder Alignment 172 

Strategic Focus Areas, Development Goals, 

Strategies and Objectives 179 

Upper Secondary Centres 182 

Lower Secondary Centres 183 

Tertiary Centres 184 

Primary Corridors 185 

Secondary Corridors 185 


Table 107: 
Table 108: 
Table 109: 

Table 110: 

Table 111: 

Table 112: 

Table 113: 

Table 114: 

Table 115: 
Table 116: 
Table 117: 
Table 118: 


Tertiary Corridors^ ^186 

Implementation Plan ^197 

The following sets out the uMlalazi Municipality's 

Implementation Plan for 2016/2017 ^218 

Sources of Funding for the 5-Year Capital Budget 

(2016/2017 to 2020/2021) 218 

5-Year Draft Capital Budget 

(2016/2017 to 2020/2021) 219 

Summary of Operational Budget 

(2016/2017): Revenue^ ^229 

Summary of Operational Budget 

(2016/2017): Expenditure 233 

Equitable Share Projected Allocations 

for 2016/2017 235 

Audit Committee Attendance 246 

Responses to issues raised by auditor general 252 

264 


Organisational Performance Management 
Scorecard 2016/2017 




Figure 1: uMlalazi LM - Gross Value Added - 

(Source: LED Strategy; 2013) 13 

Figure 2: Household Income (Statistics SA, Census 201 1 ) 1 A 

Figure 3: IDP Process 1A 

Figure A: 32 

Figure 5: National Development Plan Priorities 36 

Figure 6: uThungulu DM - Total Population Size per LM (2011) 63 

Figure 7 : Population Growth of UDM 1996-2001^ 6A 

Figured: Number of Households 6A 

Figure 9: % of Female Headed Households 66 

Figure 10: % of Households Headed by Children 66 

Figure 11: Gender Ratio (2011) Gender Ratio (2011) 66 

Figure 12: Age Distribution (2011) 67 

Figure 13: Distribution of the Highest Level of Education 

(Census 2011) 68 

Figure 1A: Office Bearers Structure 71 

Figure 15: Office of the Mayor 72 

Figure 16: Office of the Deputy Mayor 72 

Figure 1 7 : Office of the Speaker 73 

Figure 18: Office of the Chief Whip 73 

Figure 19: Macro Structure 73 

Figure 20: Access to Piped Water - 1996, 2001, 201 1 85 


Figure 21: Community Access to Sanitation Facilities 87 

Figure 22: Solid Waste Disposal - 1996, 2001 and 201 1 92 

Figure 23: Electricity Usage 93 

Figure 2A: Formal, Traditional and Informal Dwellings 

(1996, 2001 and 2011) ^103 

Figure 25: Household Access to Telecommunications (201 1 ) 1 09 

Figure 26: Distribution by Functional Group 1 1 1 

Figure 27: Employment Status (1 5 yrs to 65yrs) 1 1 2 

Figure 28: Employment Status (15yrs - 65yrs) (2011) 112 

Figure 29: Average Annual Household Income in the 

uThungulu District (201 1) 113 

Figure 30: Household Income (2011) 113 

Figure 31: Dependency Ratio (1996, 2001, 2011) 1 1A 

Figure 32: SMME Sector Share 116 

Figure 33: GVA contribution within manufacturing sector in 

uMlalazi, 201 1 (Quantec 201 2) 1 23 

Figure 3A: EPWP uMlalazi Municipality Co-ordination Structure_1A8 

Figure 35: Four Risk Categories 1 57 

Figure 36: Top 10 Organisational Risks 161 

Figure 37: Performance Management Cycle 263 

Figure 38: 265 





Map1: 

Regional Context 

11 

Map 21: 

Access to Cemeteries 

97 

Map 2: 

Administrative Entities: Electoral Wards and 


Map 22: 

Access to Courts 

98 


Traditional Authority Areas 

12 

Map 23: 

Access to Community Centres / Halls 

99 

Map 3: 


31 

Map 24: 

Access to Pension Pay Points 

100 

Map U: 

Regional Context 

A6 

Map 25: 

Access to Sport Fields / Facilities 

101 

Map 5: 

Administrative Entities: Traditional Authorities 

A7 

Map 26: 

Low Income Households (2011) 

11A 

Map 6: 

uMlalazi LM Locality Map 

AS 

Map 27: 

Dependency Ratio per Ward (2011) 

11A 

Map 7: 

Existing Nodes and Settlements 

AS 

Map 28: 

Agriculture Potential Areas 

118 

Map 8: 

Intervention Areas: Corridors 

A9 

Map 29: 

Access to Health Facilities 

135 

Map 9: 

Broad Land Uses 

50 

Map 30: 

Access to Education Facilities 

137 

Map 10: 

Land Ownership 

50 

Map 31: 

Access to creches 

1A0 

Map 11: 

Status of Land Claims 

51 

Map 32: 

Nodes and Settlements 

187 

Map 12: 

Land Capability 

53 

Map 33: 

Corridors 

188 

Map 13: 

Environmental Features 

5S 

Map 34: 

Areas with Socio-economic Needs 

189 

Map 14: 

Population Density 

63 

Map 35: 

Areas with Infrastructural Needs 

190 

Map 15: 

Settlement Patterns 

65 

Map 36: 

Land Capability for Agricultural Development in 


Map 16: 

Percentage of Households, per Ward, with \ 



Relation to Poverty 

191 


No Access to Piped Water (2011) 

S6 

Map 37: 

Population Density and Access to Nodes 

192 

Map 17: 

Percentage of Households with No Toilets (2011) 

SS 

Map 38: 

Intervention Areas: Human Resources and 


Map 18: 

Water Reticulation 

91 


Community Development 

193 

Map 19: 

Transport Routes 

9A 

Map 39: 

Intervention Areas: Job Creation 

19A 

Map 20: 

Electrification Map 

96 

Map 40: 

Combined Focus Areas 

195 



List of Abbreviations 



AG 

AF5 

B2B 

BBBEE 

BP 

COGTA 

CLLR 

CWP 

DPLG 

DMP 

DM 

DH5 

DOT 

DOH 

DWA 

EE 

ECD 

EPWP 

EEP 

EMP 

E5H 

EXCO 

FMG 

GAAP 

GVA 

HH 

IDP 

ITP 

ITB 


: Key Performance Indicator 
: KwaZulu-Natal 
: Local Economic Development 
: Land Use Management System 
: Local Municipality 
: Municipal Infrastructure Grant 
: Municipal Finance Management Act 
: Municipal Public Accounts Committee 
: Mtunzini (Town) 

: Management Committee 
: National Environmental Management Act 
: Non-Governmental Organisation 
: National Prosecuting Authority 
: Occupational Health and Safety 
: Operation Sukuma Sakhe 
(Flagship Programme) 

: Planning and Development Act 
: Performance Management System 
: Provincial Growth and 
Development Strategy 
: Reconstruction and Development Plan 
: Service Delivery and Budget 
Implementation Plan 
: Spatial Development Framework 
: Small Medium and Micro Enterprises 
: Supply Chain Management 
: South African Local Government Association 
: Spatial Planning and Land Use 
Management Act 
: uThungulu District Municipality 
: Water Services Development Plan 


Auditor-General 

Annual Financial Statements 

Back to Basics 

Broad Based Black Economic Empowerment 
Business Plan 

KZN Dept, of Co-Operative Governance 

and Traditional Affairs 

Councilor 

Community Works Programme 
Department of Provincial and 
Local Government 
Disaster Management Plan 
District Municipality 

KZN Department of Human Settlements 
Department of Transport 
Department of Health 
Department of Water Affairs 
Employment Equity 
Early Childhood Development 
Expanded Public Works Programme 
Employment Equity Plan 
Environmental Management Plan 
Eshowe (Town) 

Executive Committee 

Finance Management Grant 

General Acceptable Accounting Practice 

Gross Value Added 

Households 

Integrated Development Plan 
Integrated Transport Plan 
Ingonyama Trust Board 


KPI 

KZN 

LED 

LUMS 

LM 

MIG 

MFMA 

MPAC 

MTZ 

MANCO 

NEMA 

NGO 

NPA 

OHS 

OSS 

PDA 

PMS 

PGDS 

RDP 

SDBIP 

SDF 

SMMEs 

SCM 

SALGA 

SPLUMA 

UDM 

WSDP 


Section A: 








1.1. WHO WE ARE 

1.1.1. SPATIAL LOCATION 
WITHIN KZN 

The uMlalazi Local Municipality (KZN284) is situated along the 
north eastern coast of KwaZulu-Natal, 1 AOkm north east of 
Durban. The eastern portion of uMlalazi Local Municipality 
lies on the N2 National and Provincial Development Corridor 
linking two major economic hubs of Richards Bay and Durban. 
uMlalazi municipality is located within uThungulu District, which 
comprises of six local municipalities namely; 


Mfolozi LM 

(KZ 281) 

uMhIathuze LM 

(KZ 282) 

Ntambanana LM 

(KZ 283) 

uMlalazi LM 

(KZ 28A) 

Mthonjaneni LM 

(KZ 285) 

Nkandia LM 

(KZ 286) 


It is bordered by iLembe District Municipality (Mandeni 
Municipality to the south and Maphumulo Municipality to the 
southwest). Towards the western regions, the municipality 
boarders Nkandia Municipality and Mthonjaneni Municipality, 
and is bordered northwesterly by Ntambanana Municipality and 
to the north, uMhIathuze municipality. The municipality borders 
on the Indian Ocean on the eastern coastline which stretches 
approximately 1 7km, from the borders of Mandeni municipality 
to uMhIathuze Municipality. Geographically, the municipal area 
covers 2 217km", one of the largest local authority areas in 
South Africa. There are 26 electoral wards and 14 tribal authority 
areas of which amaKhosi are custodians thereof on behalf of 
the Ingonyama Trust Board. 

The uMlalazi Municipality is crossed by a number of important 
transportation routes, such as the N2 Motorway between 
Durban and Richards Bay, the R34 between Richards Bay/ 
Empangeni and Nkwaleni valley to the north of Eshowe, and the 
R66 from the N2 Motorway to Gingindlovu, Eshowe, Melmoth, 
Ulundi and Vryheid. The famous King Shaka (Zulu) Heritage 
Route R66 has a lot of historical and cultural significance and 
is promoted a tourism route. 



Map 1: Regional Context 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 


Section A: Executive Summary 


The population distribution in the municipal area is characterized by relatively high population densities within urban nodes, and low 
densities in rural areas. The municipal area is dominated by tribal areas and 1 A Tribal Authorities exist within the municipal area. 

Eshowe, Mtunzini and Gingindlovu form the three main towns of uMlalazi Municipality. The town of Eshowe is of great historical 
significance in that it is the birthplace of King Cetshwayo, who was King of the Zulu's during the Anglo-Zulu War of 1879. There are 
several traditional Zulu villages open to tourists within an easy drive of the town. The Dlinza Forest is a beautiful forest which is 
an ideal tourist destination. Eshowe Town is also considered as the administrative and service center of the uMlalazi Municipality. 

The coastal town of Mtunzini is a greenbelt situated on the North Coast of Natal, on the banks of the uMlalazi River and bordering on 
the uMlalazi Nature Reserve. Mtunzini is mainly a residential town, offering superb homes in a quiet and relaxed atmosphere, within 
comfortable driving distance of the N2 highway and the industrial and commercial growth areas of Richards Bay and Empangeni. 
Mtunzini has all the basic shopping facilities, doctors and churches. Mtunzini is a quality residential and eco-tourist destination in 
South Africa. 


1.1.2 DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE 


UMLALAZI MUNICIPAL AREA 

Area 2 214 km^ 

INDICATOR 

2001 

2011 

Population 

221 078 

213 601 

Population Growth Rate 

-0.8 

-0.3 

Households 

38446 

45 062 

People per Household 

5.4 

4.6 

Gender breakdown 

Males 

45.3% 

44.7 % 


Females 

54.7% 

55.3 % 

Age breakdown 

0-14 

39.6% 

37.2% 


15-64 

55.1% 

54.1 % 


65+ 

5.2% 

5.6% 


Table 1: Demographic Profile (Census 2001 & 2011) 


The demographic profile table above indicates that the population within the municipality has gradually declined between 2001 and 
2011, according to the census statistics. The approximated population decrease is 7400 people. Further to this, it is also revealed 
in the statistics that the population growth rate has also declined during the same period. The possible causes for this decline in 
population may be attributed to the prevalence of HIV/AIDS as well as the outward migration of people due to urbanization. The 
unemployed people who are economically active migrate to urban areas or cities wherein job opportunities are rife. These areas are 
unfortunately found outside the municipal area, such as Richards Bay and/or eThekwini. It is anticipated that should the municipality 
expand in terms of developments that create jobs, the decline in the growth rate will cease. 

1.1.3. LAND ADMINISTRATION 

The uMlalazi Municipality is made up of 27 electoral wards, with wards 2 to 6 being the largest. The map below depicts the 
Administrative Entities. The municipality is predominantly rural in character and the Ingonyama Trust Board is the majority land owner 
within uMlalazi municipality with a total of 1 4 Traditional Authority Areas of which the traditional AmaKhosi are custodians thereof. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 







Ti rkiAii nnoHVAViMm 



Map 2: Administrative Entities: Electoral Wards and Traditional Authority Areas 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 12 

<XXX>00<XXXXXXX>00000000000 



Section A: Executive Summary 


1.2. ECONOMIC PROFILE 

1.2.1. EMPLOYMENT STATUS (15yrs - 65yrs) (2011) 

There has been a significant increase in the nunnber of economically active persons that were formally employed between 2001 
to 201 1 within the Municipal Area. The unemployment rate also seemed to have decreased from 53% in 2001 to 35.2% in 201 1 . 
However, the effect of the accumulation in the number of discouraged work-seekers, make up 23%, was not brought into account. 


EMPLOYMENT STATUS 

1996 

2001 

2011 

Employed 

51 

47 

65 

Unemployed 

49 

53 

35 

Unemployed Rate 

48.8 

53.3 

35.2 


Table 2: Demographic Profile (Census 2001 & 2011) 


1.2.2. ECONOMIC SECTOR CONTRIBUTOR 

The figure below displays the sectoral contribution to total Gross Value Added (GVA) within the municipality, which is a measure of 
the regional gross domestic product contribution. Tourism is regarded as a cross-sectoral industry in that it has linkages with other 
sectors such as retail, manufacturing, transport, catering, hospitality, etc. As a result, it is difficult to measure the contribution of 
tourism to the local economy as GVA from the tourism industry is spread across a number of other sectors. However, catering and 
accommodation within uMlalazi contributed 1 .3% to total GVA in 201 1 , which is only 8.6% of total catering and accommodation 
output within the District. 


CommgnUVj 5«l*l 

Finance^ rinsidraM#^ rail und tHJiineis itrvicH 

Trznspwt, storj^e and CDirtmunlutlon 
and trade, and, 

C^mlnicIlDn 

Eltctriciir, gas and waier 
M A A Mif C t nl 
Mrinlfig and quarrydtkg 
AgrlcullLjre. fdiv^tirv and id-sninf 


W.0% 


7 . 1 % 


' 1 

■ U.7K 




14 0% 


1 . 1 % 


10.2%^ 


Source: Quantec, 2012 




1 ! j 

S.0% 10.0% 1S0% 




17.4^ 






Figure 1: uMlalazi LM - Gross Value Added - (Source: LED Strategy; 2013) 


1.2.3. HOUSEHOLD INCOME 

The chart below indicates that 12 050 households receive an annual household income of less than R19 601; this is followed 
closely by 10725 households whom receive an annual income scale of below R38 201. These statistics may provide a possibility 
that the majority of the households depend on informal or unskilled labour and the informal economy such as informal traders. 
Indigent households are those households earning less than R1, 600 per month. In terms of this criterion alone, some A5% of the 
Households who resided in the uMlalazi Municipal Area were indigent. In terms of this definition, some A6.A% of households (or 
18,280 households), in 201 1, fell in this category. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 











Source: Census 2011, StatsSA 

Figure 2: Household Income (Statistics 5A, Census 2011) 




1.3. DEVELOPING THE UMLALAZI 
INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

Essentially, the development of the Integrated Development Plan entails a co-ordinated and integrated approach to development 
in an inclusive manner that integrates developments in all spheres of government, and put forward the most critical developments 
and internal transformation needs. The IDP is an overarching strategic tool that guides and informs all planning and development, 
and decisions taken regarding planning, management and development within the municipality. Further to this, the IDP provides for 
effective performance monitoring, evaluation and measureable development frameworks with key performance areas, indicators 
and performance targets. The following table summarizes the IDP process per review. 



Figure 3: IDP Process 

The uMlalazi Municipality developed the 2012/13 - 2016/17 Integrated Development Plan for a five-year cycle, which was 
ultimately tabled to Council and adopted in 2012, in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 5 of the Municipal Systems Act No 
32 of 2000. Although IDPs generally have a 5-year life span, they consist of medium to long term development perspective and 
are reviewed annually. The IDP must locally implement National and Provincial development initiatives which are outlined in the 
National Development Plan 2030 as well as the Provincial Growth and Development Strategy. This 5-year annual review process 
is aligned to the term of office for Council. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 



Section A: Executive Summary 




The adoption of the Integrated Development Plans Is contemplated in terms of Chapter 5 (Section 25 (1)) of the Municipal 
Systems Act 32 of 2000 which provides that; 

Each municipal council must within a prescribed period after the start of Its elected term, adopt a single, all Inclusive and 
strategic plan for the development of the municipality which - 

a) links, integrates and coordinates plans and takes into account proposals for the development of the municipality; 

b) Aligns the resources and capacity of the municipality with the implementation of the plan; 

c) Complies with the provisions of this Chapter; and 

d) Is compatible with national and provincial development plans and planning requirements binding on the municipality in terms 
of relevant legislations 




1.3.1. THE IDR BUDGET 
AND PMS PROCESS PLAN 

The Process Plan was prepared and adopted by Council as per 
the requirements of the Municipal Systems Act (32 of 2000) 
which mandates municipalities to review IDP. This process 
plan aligns the four processes of the IDP, the Budget, SDBIP 
and the Performance Management System. The purpose is to 
ensure that Local Communities participated in the Development, 
implementation and review of the municipal Performance. 
The 2016/2017 Process Plan was adopted by Council on August 
2015. The preparation of IDP process plan is in essence the 


formulation of the IDP and Budget processes, set out in writing 
and requires the adoption by Council. The IDP and Budget 
Process Plan have to include the following: 

■ A programme specifying the timeframes for the different 
planning steps; 

■ The structures that will manage the process; 

■ Appropriate mechanisms, processes and procedures for 
consultation and participation of local communities, organs 
of state, traditional authorities and other role players in the 
IDP review and budget formulation processes; and 

■ Cost estimates for the review process. 



2016/17 IDP/BUDGET AND PMS PROCESS PLAN 


PHASE 1 - PREPARATORY PHASE: (INFORMATION GATHERING AND SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS) 


MONTH 


ACTIVITIES 



IDP 

PMS 

BUDGET 




MAYOR AND 

ADMINISTRATION - 

BUDGET REVIEW 




COUNCIL 

MUNICIPALITY 

AND ENTITY 

ACTIVITIES 

JULY 

■ Preparation of 

■ Signing of new 

■ Mayor begins 

■ Accounting 

■ Approve and 


the Draft IDP / 

performance 

planning for next 

officers and 

announce new 


Budget and PMS 

contracts for 

three-year budget 

senior officials 

budget schedule 


Process Plan. 

Section 57 

in accordance with 

of municipality 

and set up 


■ Tabling of the 

Managers and 

co-ordination role 

and entities begin 

committees 


Draft Process Plan 

submission to 

of budget process. 

planning for next 

and forums. 


to MANGO. 

EXCO on July 201 5 

MFMA s 53 

three-year budget. 

■ Consultation on 


■ Engagement with 

(Section 69 of the 

■ Planning 

MFMA s 68, 77. 

performance and 


Budget Office 

MFMAand Section 

includes review of 

■ Accounting 

changing needs. 


and PMS for 

57 of the MSA). 

the previous year's 

officers and 



alignment purposes. 

■ Roll out of 

budget process and 

senior officials 



■ Prepare Depart- 

theSDBIP 

completion of the 

of Municipality 



mental Business/ 

for 2015/16. 

Budget Evaluation 

and entities 



Sectorial Plans for 

■ 201A/2015 Final 

Checklist. 

review options 



the 2016/2017 

557 Managers' 


and contracts for 



financial year. 

Performance 


service delivery. 




Assessments. 

■ Preparation of 


MSA s 76-81 




sA6 Reports by 
various HDD's. 




AUG 

■ Advertisement of 

■ Submission of 

■ Mayor tables 

■ Accounting Officer 

■ Consultation on 


the IDP Process 

QA 5DBIP Reports 

in Council a time 

to submit AF5 to 

performance and 


Plan in compliance 

(for last quarter of 

schedule outlining 

Auditor-General 

changing needs. 


with MSA 2000. 

MPPR Reg. 14. 

key deadlines for: 

[Due by 31 August, 

■ Review 


■ IDP preparation 

■ Submission 

preparing, tabling 

MFMA Sec 

performance and 


process initiated. 

of the Annual 

and approving the 

126(1)(a)]. 

financial position. 


■ Review of 

Performance 

-budget; reviewing 


■ Review external 


comments 

Reports prepared 

the IDP (as per s 34 


mechanisms. 


received on the 

in terms of s46 

of MSA) and budget 


■ Start Planning 


2015/16 IDP 

of MSA 2000 

related policies 


for next three years. 


Review document. 

to Council. 

and consultation 



■ Self-assessment to 

■ Submission of 

processes at least 




identify gaps in the 

s46 Report to AG. 

10 months before 




IDP process. 

■ Quarterly Audit 

the start of the 




■ Integration of 

Committee meeting 

budget year. 




information from 

on August (for the 

MFMA s 21,22, 23; 




adopted Sector 

last quarter) MFMA 

MSA s 34, Chapter 




Plans into the IDP 

Sect 166 & MPPR 

4 as amended. 




Review document. 

Reg. 14(3)(a). 

■ Mayor establishes 




■ Initiation of new 

■ Evaluation Panel 

committees and 




sector plans into 

Audit Committee 

consultation 




the IDP, if any. 

meeting (for 

forums for the 




■ Updating and 

evaluation of Sect 

budget process. 




review of the 

57 Manager's final 





strategic elements 

assessments) 





of the IDP in light 

MPPR Reg. 14(3)(b). 





of the new focus 
of Council. 

' IDP Steering 
Comnnittee Meeting. 

I Submission of 
Draft Process Plan 
to COGTA 
for Comments 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 16 

<>oo<xxxxxxx>oooooooooooo 













Section A: Executive Summary 


2016/17 IDP/BUDGET AND PMS PROCESS PLAN 
PHASE 2 - STRATEGY FORMULATION 

MONTH ACTIVITIES 


IDP 

PMS 

BUDGET 



MAYOR AND 

ADMINISTRATION - 

BUDGET REVIEW 



COUNCIL 

MUNICIPALITY 

AND ENTITY 

ACTIVITIES 


SEPT 


OCT 


■ Integration of 
information from 
adopted Sector 

Plans into the IDP 
Review document 
if possible. 

■ Council Adopts 

Final Process Plan 

■ IDP Indaba. 

■ Phase 5: Scheme 
Preparation - 
Preparing the 
Scheme Map and 
Draft Document. 

■ Auditor General 
audit of 
performance 
measures. 

■ Reminder to be 
sent to HDD's to 
submit their Q1 
SDBIP Reports in 
terms of 541 MSA. 

■ Council through the 
IDP review process 
determines 
strategic objectives 
for service delivery 
and development 
for next three-year 
budgets including 
review of provincial 
and national 
government sector 
and strategic plans. 

■ Budget offices of 
municipality and 
entities determine 
revenue projections 
and proposed 

rate and service 
charges and drafts 
initial allocations 
to functions and 
departments for 
the next financial 
year after taking 
into account 
strategic objectives. 

■ Engages with 
Provincial and 
National sector 
departments on 
sector specific 
programmes for 
alignment with 
municipalities 
plans (schools, 
libraries, clinics, 
water, electricity, 
roads, etc.) 

■ Update 
policies, priorities 
and objectives. 

■ Determine 
revenue projections 
and policies. 

■ Strategic Planning 
Session: Review 
and updating of the 
IDP Vision, Mission 
and Objectives. 

■ Integration of 
information from 
adopted Sector 

Plans into 

the Draft IDP 

Review document. 

■ Updating and 
review of the 
strategic elements 
of the IDP in light of 
the new focus 

of Council. 

■ IDP Road Shows 
(Identification of IDP 
Priority Projects) 

■ IDP Steering 
Committee Meeting. 

■ Submit Process 

Plan to COGTA. 

■ SDF- Table 
intention to amend 
SDF to Council 

■ Phase 6: Wall to 

Wall Scheme 

- Public 

Consultations on 
the Draft Scheme. 

■ Submission of 

Q1 Reports by HDD's 

■ Q1 Reports 
tabled to Council 
(for first quarter) 
MPPR Reg. 14 

■ Sect 57 Managers' 
quarterly informal 
assessments. 


■ Accounting officer 
does initial review 
of national policies 
and budget plans 
and potential 
price increases 
of bulk resources 
with function 
and department 
officials 

MFMAS35, 36, 

42; MTBPS. 

■ Determine 
revenue projections 
and policies. 

■ Engagement 
with sector 
departments, 
share and evaluate 
plans, national 
policies, MTBPS. 

■ Draft initial 
allocations 
to functions. 

■ Draft initial 
changes to IDP. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 













2016/17 IDP/BUDGET AND PMS PROCESS PLAN 
PHASE 3 - FEEDBACK AND ANALYSIS 

MONTH ACTIVITIES 


IDP 

PMS 

BUDGET 



MAYOR AND 

ADMINISTRATION - 

BUDGET REVIEW 



COUNCIL 

MUNICIPALITY 

AND ENTITY 

ACTIVITIES 


NOV 


DEC 


■ Municipal Strategies, 
Objectives, KPA's, 
KPI's and targets. 

■ Identification 
of priority 
IDP projects. 

■ Project alignment 
between the 

DM and LM's and 
Sector Departments. 

■ IDP Feedback 
Sessions 

■ Convene IDP 
Representative 
Forum. 

■ IDP Road Shows 
(Identification of IDP 
Priority Projects). 

■ Phase 7: Wall 
to Wall Scheme 
- Adoption 
and Application 
Procedures. 

■ Department of 
COGTA to comment 
on the reviewed 
Municipal Strategies, 
Objectives, and KPA's, 
KPI's and targets. 

■ Project alignment 
between the DM 
and LM's. 

■ Identification of 
priority IDP 
projects. (Continue) 


■ Quarterly Audit 
Committee meeting 
(for the first quarter 
of 15/16).MFMA 
Sect 166 &MPPR 
Reg. 14(3)(a). 


■ Compile annual 
report for 14/15 
(MFMA Sect 121). 

■ Reminder to be 
sent to HOD'S to 
submit their Q2 
SDBIP Reports in 
terms of s41 MSA. 


■ Council finalises 
tariff (rates and 
service charges) 
policies for next 
financial year 
MSA s 74, 75. 


■ Accounting officer 
reviews and drafts 
initial changes to IDP. 
MSA s 34 

■ Auditor-General 
to return audit 
report [Due by 
30 November, 
MFMA 126(4)]. 


■ Accounting officer 
and senior officials 
consolidate and 
prepare proposed 
budget and plans for 
next financial year 
taking into account 
previous year's 
performance as 
per audited 
financial statements 


■ Draft initial 
changes to IDP. 

■ Consolidation of 
budgets and plans. 

■ EXCO determines 
strategic choices 
for next three years. 


■ Executive 
determines 
strategic choices 
for next three years. 

■ Finalise 
tariff policies. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 18 

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Section A: Executive Summary 


2016/17 IDP/BUDGET AND PMS PROCESS PLAN 


PHASE A- DRAFT IDP 



ACTIVITIES 


IDP 

PMS 

BUDGET 



MAYOR AND 

ADMINISTRATION - 

BUDGET REVIEW 



COUNCIL 

MUNICIPALITY 

AND ENTITY 

ACTIVITIES 


I Municipal Strategies, 
Objectives, KPA's, 
KPI's and targets. 

I Identification of 
priority I DP projects. 

I IDP Steering 
Committee Meeting 
I Phase 8: Wall to 
Wall Scheme - 
Close Out Report. 


I Submission 
of Q2 Reports 
by HOD'S. 

I Q2 Reports 
tabled to Council. 
MPPR Reg. 14 

I Mayor tables 
draft annual report 
for 14/15 MFMA 
Sect 127(2). 

I Make public annual 
report and invite 
community inputs 
into report (MFMA 
Sect 127 & MSA 
Sect 21a). 

I Municipal Manager 
submits Midterm/ 
Midyear Report to 
the Mayor (in terms 
572 MFMA). 

I Midterm/Midyear 
Report is 
published in the 
Local Newspaper. 


I Entity board of 
directors must 
approve and 
submit proposed 
budget and plans 
for next three-year 
budgets to parent 
municipality at 
least 150 days 
before the start of 
the budget year 
MFMA s 87(1). 


i Accounting officer 
reviews proposed 
national and 
provincial 
allocations to 
municipality for 
incorporation 
into the draft 
budget for tabling. 
(Proposed national 
and provincial 
allocations for 
three years must 
be available by 20 
January) 

MFMA s 36. 


i Prepare detailed 
budgets and 
plans for the next 
three years. 


FEB 1 Continuous 
Review of 
Municipal Strategies, 
Objectives, KPA's, 
KPI's and targets. 

■ Identification of 
priority IDP projects. 

■ IDP Steering 
Committee Meeting. 


I Quarterly 
Project 

Implementation 
Report (MPPR 
Reg. 15). 

I Quarterly Audit 
Committee meeting 
(MFMA Sect 166 & 
MPPR Reg. 

14(3)(a)). 

I Submit Annual 
Report to AG, 
Provincial &DLGTA 
(MFMA Sect 127). 

I Sect 57 Managers' 
formal quarterly 
assessments. 


I Council considers 
municipal entity 
proposed budget 
and service 
delivery plan and 
accepts or makes 
recommendations 
to the entity. 
MFMA s 87(2) 


i Accounting officer 
finalises and 
submits to Mayor 
proposed budgets 
and plans for 
next three-year 
budgets taking into 
account the recent 
mid-year review 
and any corrective 
measures proposed 
as part of the 
oversight report for 
the previous years 
audited financial 
statements and 
annual report. 


i Prepare detailed 
budgets and plans 
for the next 
three years. 

I EXCO adopts 
budget and plans 
and changes to IDP. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 













2016/17 IDP/BUDGET AND PMS PROCESS PLAN 


PHASE 5: ASSESSMENT FEEDBACK ON THE DRAFT IDP AND BUDGET 


MONTH 


ACTIVITIES 



IDP 

PMS 

BUDGET 




MAYOR AND 

ADMINISTRATION - 

BUDGET REVIEW 




COUNCIL 

MUNICIPALITY 

AND ENTITY 

ACTIVITIES 

MARCH 

■ Finalization of 

■ Council to consider 

■ Entity board of 

■ Accounting officer 

■ Mayor tables 


Municipal Strategies, 

and adopt an 

directors considers 

publishes tabled 

budget, resolutions. 


Objectives, KPAs, 

oversight report 

recommendations 

budget, plans, and 

plans and changes 


and KPI's and targets. 

[Due by 30 March 

of parent 

proposed revisions 

to IDP at least 


■ IDP Steering 

MFMA Sec 129(1)]. 

municipality and 

to IDP, invites 

90 days before 


Committee Meeting. 

■ Council Adopts 

submit revised 

local community 

the start of the 


■ Convene IDP 

Annual Report for 

budget by 

comment and 

financial year. 


Representative Forum. 

the year ending 

22nd of month. 

submits to NT, PT 



■ Publicise Draft IDP 

June 2015. 

MFMA s 87(2) 

and others 



and Budget (Invite 

■ Publicise Annual 

■ Mayor tables 

as prescribed. 



Local Community 

Report and 

municipality 

MFMA s 22 & 



to make written 

MPAC Report. 

budget, budgets 

37; MSA Ch U as 



comments in 

■ Draft SDBIP's for 

of entities. 

amended 



respect of the IDP 

2016/17 developed 

resolutions, plans. 

■ Accounting officer 



and Budget) (21 

and for incorporation 

and proposed 

reviews any changes 



days for advertising). 

into draft IDP 

revisions to IDP 

in prices for bulk 



■ Conclusion of 

2016/17 FY. 

at least 90 days 

resources as 



Sector Plans (if 

■ Reminder to be 

before start of 

communicated by 



any) initiated for 

sent to HDD's to 

budget year. 

15 March. 



the 2015/16 

submit their Q3 

MFMA s 16, 22, 23, 

MFMAs A2 



financial year and 

SDBIP Reports in 

87; MSA s 3U 




integration into the 

terms of sAI MSA. 





IDP Review report. 

■ Set performance 





■ Adoption of 

objectives for 





draft IDP and 

revenue for each 





Budget 201 5/201 6. 

budget vote 

(MFMA Sect 17). 




APR 

■ Review written 

■ Q3 Reports tabled 

■ MFMA s 21 

■ Accounting officer 

■ Public hearings on 


comments in 

to Council MPPR 


assists the Mayor 

the Budget, Council 


respect of the 

Reg. 1A 


in revising budget 

Debate on Budget 


Budget and IDP. 

■ Refinement of 


documentation 

and Plans. 


■ Conclusion of 

Municipal Strategies, 


in accordance 



Sector Plans 

Objectives, KPA's, 


with consultative 



initiated for 

KPI's and targets 


processes and 



the 2015/16 

and inclusion into 


taking into account 



financial year and 

2016/17 IDP 


the results from 



integration into the 

Review report. 


the third quarterly 



IDP Review report. 

■ Sect 57 Managers' 


review of the 



■ IDP Steering 

informal quarterly 


current year. 



Committee Meeting. 

assessments. 





■ Public participation 

■ Publicise Annual 





process launched 

Report [Due by April 





through series of 

MFMA Sec 129(3)]. 





public hearings on 

■ Submit Annual 





the IDP and Budget. 

Report to Provincial 





Legislature/MEC 
Local Government 
[Due by April 
MFMA Sec 132(2)]. 

I Review annual 
organisational 
performance targets 
(MPPR Reg 11). 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 20 

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Section A: Executive Summary 


2016/17 IDP/BUDGET AND PMS PROCESS PLAN 


PHASE 5: ASSESSMENT FEEDBACK ON THE DRAFT IDP AND BUDGET 



ACTIVITIES 


IDP 

PMS 

BUDGET 



MAYOR AND COUNCIL 

ADMINISTRATION 

BUDGET 




- MUNICIPALITY 

REVIEW 




AND ENTITY 

ACTIVITIES 


MAY 


I Adoption of the 
IDP by Council. 

I Publicise IDP and 
Budget in the 
Local Newspaper. 


I Community input 
into organisation 
KPIs and targets, 
i Budget for 
expenses of 
audit committee. 


i Council to consider 
approval of budget and 
plans at least 30 days 
before start of budget year. 
MFMAS23, 24; MSA 
Chapter 4 as amended 
i Entity board of 
directors to approve 
the budget of the entity 
not later than 30 days 
before the start of the 
financial year, taking into 
account any hearings 
or recommendations of 
the council of the parent 
municipality. 

. MFMAsB? 


I Accounting officer 
assists the Mayor 
in preparing the 
final budget 
documentation 
for consideration 
for approval at 
least 30 days 
before the start of 
the budget year 
taking into account 
consultative 
processes and 
any other new 
information of a 
material nature. 


JUNE 


I Submission of 
the Final IDP 
to DCOGTA. 


I Reminder to be 
sent to HDD's 
to submit their 
Q3 5DBIP 
Reports in terms 
ofs41 MSA. 


I Council must approve 
annual budget by 
resolution, setting taxes 
and tariffs, approving 
changes to IDP and budget 
related policies, approving 
measurable performance 
objectives for revenue by 
source and expenditure 
by vote before start of 
budget year. 

MFMAS16, 24, 26, 53 
Mayor must approve 
SDBIP within 28 days 
after approval of the 
budget and ensure that 
annual performance 
contracts are concluded 
in accordance with sect 
57(2) of the MSA. Mayor 
to ensure that the annual 
performance agreements 
are linked to the 
measurable performance 
objectives approved with 
the budget and SDBIP. 

The mayor submits the 
approved SDBIP and 
performance agreements 
to council, MFC for local 
government and makes 
public within 14 days 
after approval. 

. MFMAS53; MSAs 
38-45, 57(2) 

I Council must finalise a 
system of delegations. 

. MFMAS59, 79, 82; 

MSA s 59-65 


I Accounting officer 
submits to the 
mayor no later 
than 14 days 
after approval 
of the budget 
a draft of the 
SDBIP and annual 
performance 
agreements 
required by s 57(1) 
(b) of the MSA. 
MFMAS69; MSA 
s57 

I Accounting officers 
of municipality and 
entities publishes 
adopted budget 
and plans. 
MFMAS75, 87 


I Publish budget 
and -plans. 

I Finalise 
performance 
contracts 
and delegation. 

I Council adopts 
budget, 
resolutions, 
capital 

implementation 
plans, objectives 
and changes 
in IDP. 


Table 3: Process Plan for the 2016/1 7 IDP review 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 













1.3.2. PUBLIC PARTICIPATION 

In order to ensure the uMlalazi Municipality achieves effective inclusion within the process of developing the IDP and Budget, 
the municipality utilizes the following mechanisms as required in terms of Chapter 4 of the Municipal Systems Act 32 of 2000; 

■ Public Notices and/or Loud Hailing 

■ Roadshows 

■ Advertisements 

■ Newsletters 

In terms of roadshows, the municipality resorted to clustered ward consultations (for cost cutting purposes) to ensure full participation 
of community members in each ward. This is in order for the municipality to be able to capture the progress made per each ward 
and the challenges faced by each, to have a better understanding of the realities associated with each ward; socio-economically 
and geographically. The following program was developed; 


WARD CLUSTERS 

PROPOSED VENUE 

PROPOSED DATES 

TIME I 

1,2,&8 

Ward 1: Biyela Tribal Court 

7 November 201 5 

10H00 

3&4 

Ward 3: Mzungezi Peace Center 

8 November 2015 

10H00 

5&6 

Ward 6: Biyela Tribal Court 

15 November 2015 

10H00 

7,11,12,13& 14 

Ward 12: EshoweTown Hall 

22 November 2015 

17H00 

9& 10 

Ward 10: Mpungose Tribal Court 

14 November 2015 

10H00 

15,16,17& 18 

Ward 18: Gingindlovu Town Hall 

1 1 November 2015 

10H00 

19, 20&21 

Ward 19: MtunziniTown Hall 

18 November 2015 

17H00 

22,23,24,25 & 26 

Ward 15: Kwabulawayo Hall 

28 November 2015 

10H00 


Table 4: Clustered Ward Community Based Planning Program 


1.3.3. THE UTHUNGULU DISTRICTS FRAMEWORK PLAN 

The Framework for integrated development planning is the mechanism to ensure the alignment and integration of activities, projects 
and programmes between the IDPs of uThungulu District Municipality and its Local Municipalities which are uMlalazi, uMhIathuze, 
Mfolozi, Ntambanana, Nkandlaand Mbonambi Local Municipalities. 


1.4. BROAD KEY CHALLENGES 

1.4.1. KPA 1: MUNICIPAL TRANSFORMATION AND 
ORGANISATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

■ Insufficient Human Resource Capacity ■ Insufficient Skills Development 

■ Outdated and Inadequate Policies ■ Poor Performance of Service Providers 

■ Outdated ICT Systems ■ Ineffective Internal and external Communication 

■ Non achievement of Employment equity Targets ■ Inadequate office space 


1.4.2. KPA 2: SERVICE DELIVERY 


■ Service Delivery Backlogs 

■ Poor quality workmanship on Capital Projects 

■ Ineffective Sukuma Sakhe programme 

■ Lack of Sports development and planning 

■ Poor facilitation of early childhood development 


■ Lack of formalised trading areas 

■ Ineffective Disaster Management 

■ Lack of Planning for Cemetery needs 

■ Crime 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 







Section A: Executive Summary 


1 A3. KPA 3: LOCAL ECONOMIC AND 
SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT 

■ Slow progress on LED and Tourism Development in uMlalazi Municipality area 

■ Unemployment 

1AA. KPA A: MUNICIPAL FINANCIAL VIABILITY 
AND MANAGEMENT 

■ Insufficient measures in place to ensure financial sustainability is maintained 

■ Inadequate financial performance 

■ Noncompliance with SDBIP 

1.A.5. KPA 5: GOOD GOVERNANCE AND 
PUBLIC PARTICIPATION 

■ Unqualified Audit Opinion 

■ Poor participation in HIV/Aids Programmes 

■ Inadequate Risk Reduction measures in place 

■ Poor Public participation initiatives 

■ Lack of outcome on International and National Relations 

■ Ineffective oversight 

1.A.6. KPA 6: CROSS CUTTING ISSUES 

■ Fragmented or adhoc Planning 

1.5. LONGTERM VISION 

The long-term vision for the uMlalazi is as follows: 


VISION 

To provide sustainable services and development to all communities 
by 2030 with emphasis on infrastructure, social and 
economic development in a safe and healthy environment 
managed by visionary and ethical leadership" 


1.5.1. LONG TERM STRATEGIC GOALS AND 
DESIRED OUTPUTS 

The UMlalazi Municipality has developed the following strategic goals to mitigate the key challenges. These strategic goals are 
directly linked to the municipal developmental vision for 2030, which is linked to National and Provincial goals. 


23 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

o<xxxxxx>o<>oo<>c>o<x><x><><xxy) 


1.5.2. OUTPUTS, OUTCOMES AND DELIVERABLES 


RESPONSIBLE 

NATIONALKPA 

[R] 

NDPOBJEaiUE 

[R] 

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 
[R] 

MUNICIPAL KPA 
[R] 

KPI 

Office of 
the MM 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

To improve Service 
Delivery and the image 
of uMlalazi Municipality. 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development. 

Fill all funded prioritized 
vacant posts in the 
organogram by 

30 June 2017. 

Corporate 

Services 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

To improve Service 
Delivery and the image 
of uMlalazi Municipality. 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development. 

Review the 

Organizational structure 
and submit report to 
council by 

30 June 2017. 

Office of 
the MM 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

To improve Service 
Delivery and the image 
of uMlalazi Municipality. 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Sign performance 
agreements with 
all section 56/57 
managers by 

31 July 2016. 

Corporate 

Services 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Organisational skills 
development and 
capacity building. 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development. 

Submit quarterly 
reports to the LLF on 
internship, learnership 
and in-service 
trainings/programs 
implemented. 

Corporate 

Services 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Organizational skills 
development and 
capacity building. 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development. 

Training to be 
provided to 50 staff by 

30 June 2017. 

Office of 
the MM 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Strengthen and improve 
employment equity in 
the municipality. 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development. 

2 people from 
employment equity 
target groups to 
be employed in the 
three highest levels 
of management in 
compliance with 
approved equity plan by 
30 June 2016. 

Corporate 

Services 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Strengthen and improve 
employment equity in 
the municipality. 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development. 

Establish an 

Employment Equity 
Committee by 

31 December 2016. 

Office of 
the MM 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Effective and 
efficient Municipal 
Administration and 
Communication. 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development. 

Compile at least 2 
Municipal newsletters 
by 30 June 201 7. 

Corporate 

Services 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Policy Development. 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development. 

Review 3 Budget 
related policies that 
were previously 
approved and 
submit to Council by 

31 March 2017. 

ALL 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

To improve 

Contract management. 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development. 

Conduct needs 
assessments for use of 
Service Providers and 
submit to exco by 

31 December 2016. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 









Section A: Executive Summary 


1.5.2. OUTPUTS, OUTCOMES AND DELIVERABLES ...continue, 


RESPONSIBLE 

NATIONALKPA 

[R] 

NDPOBJEaiUE 

[R] 

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 
[R] 

MUNICIPAL KPA 
[R] 

KPI 

Corporate 

Services 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

To improve Service 
Delivery and the image 
of uMlalazi Municipality. 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development. 

Conduct community 
satisfaction survey and 
submit report to EXCO 
by 31 March 2017. 

Corporate 

Services 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

To improve Service 
Delivery and the image 
of uMlalazi Municipality. 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development. 

Conduct staff 
satisfaction survey and 
submit report to EXCO 
by 31 March 2017. 

community 

Services 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Social Protection 

To provide Fee 

Basic Services to all 
indigent households 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development. 

Provide free basic 
refuse services to 

12 000 indigent 
households in 
rural areas with 
available resources 
by 30 June 201 7. 

Engineering 

Services 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Social Protection 

To provide Fee 

Basic Services to all 
indigent households. 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development. 

Provide free basic 
electricity services 
to 2300 indigent 
households by 

30 June 2017 with 
available resources. 

Engineering 

Services 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Economy and 
Development 

To facilitate with 
uThungulu to ensure 
alignment of water and 
sanitation provisioning 
to all Municipal Capital 
and other large 
scale Projects. 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development. 

Attend meetings with 
uThungulu to ensure 
alignment of water and 
sanitation provisioning 
to all Municipal Capital 
and other large scale 
Projects and submit 
quarterly reports to 
Portfolio Committee on 
meetings attended. 

Engineering 

Services 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Economy and 
Development 

To facilitate with Eskom 
to ensure alignment of 
electricity provisioning 
to all Municipal Wards. 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development. 

Attend meetings 
with Eskom to ensure 
electricity provisioning 
in Municipal wards 
and submit quarterly 
reports to the Portfolio 
Committee on 
meetings attended. 

Engineering 

Services 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Economy and 
Development 

To facilitate with Eskom 
to ensure alignment of 
electricity provisioning 
to all Municipal Wards. 

Local Economic 
Development. 

Investigate and 
implement green 
energy programs in 
relation to energy 
saving projects such 
as solar water geysers 
and submit quarterly 
progress reports to 
Portfolio Committee. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 









RESPONSIBLE 

NATIONALKPA 

[R] 

NDPOBJEaiUE 

[R] 

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 
[R] 

MUNICIPAL KPA 
[R] 

KPI 

community 

services 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Healthcare 
for all 

Ensure the 
effectiveness of 
waste management 
services in all areas 
and the provision of 
recycling facilities at 
appropriate locations). 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development. 

Raise awareness on 
recycling through A 
sessions with the 
community by 

30 June 2017. 

community 

services 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Healthcare 
for all 

Ensure the 
effectiveness of 
waste management 
services in all areas 
and the provision of 
recycling facilities at 
appropriate locations). 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Review the Integrated 
Waste Management 

Plan (to include 
recycling and buy-back 
centers) and submit to 
council by 30 June 2017 

Engineering 

Services 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Economy and 
Development 

To ensure the provision 
and maintenance 
of municipal 
roads, sidewalks 
and causeways. 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Construct 18.7kms 
of new roads as per 
planned projects by 

30 June 2017 

Engineering 

Services 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Economy and 
Development 

To ensure the provision 
and maintenance 
of municipal 
roads, sidewalks 
and causeways. 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Reseal 2km of 
surfaced roads by 

30 June 2017 

Engineering 

Services 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Economy and 
Development 

To ensure the provision 
and maintenance of 
municipal 
roads, sidewalks 
and causeways. 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Grade 3A00km of 
rural access roads by 

30 June 2017. 

Planning & 
Development 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Transforming 

Human 

Settlements 

To plan and 

support the acceleration 
of sustainable 
human settlements. 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Review Housing 

Sector Plan and 
submit to Council by 

30 June 2017. 

ALL 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Healthcare 
for all 

Facilitate the 
Implementation 
of Operation 

Sukuma Sakhe 
(Flagship Programme. 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Submit quarterly 
consolidated reports 
to EXCO on 

mentorship assistance 
provided to all War 

Rooms in uMlalazi 
Municipality in terms 
of Operation Sukuma 
Sakhe programme. 

community 

services 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Economy and 
Development 

To facilitate adequate 
provisioning and 
management of 
community facilities 
under the ownership of 
uMlalazi Municipality at 
appropriate locations . 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Appoint caretakers 

26 caretakers by 

31 March 201 6 for the 
maintenance of rural 
community facilities. 

Planning & 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Building Safer 
Communities 

Formalize trading areas 
in the Municipality area 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Provide 15 

commuter and trading 
shelters in KDS by 

31 March 2017. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 26 

>^<>0<XXXXXXX>000000000000 









Section A: Executive Summary 


1.5.2. OUTPUTS, OUTCOMES AND DELIVERABLES ...continue, 


RESPONSIBLE 

NATIONALKPA 

[R] 

NDPOBJEaiUE 

[R] 

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 
[R] 

MUNICIPAL KPA 
[R] 

KPI 

Planning & 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Building Safer 
Communities 

Formalize trading 
areas in the 

Municipality area. 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Provide A food safety 
training sessions to 
informal food traders by 
30 June 2016. 

Engineering 

Services 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Building Safer 
Communities 

Ensure quality 
control of 

infrastructure projects. 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Undertake at least 100 
site visits to Capital 
projects by 

30 June 2017. 

Protection 

Services 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Building Safer 
Communities 

Mitigate the 
effectiveness 
of disasters. 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Flold quarterly meetings 
with applicable 
stakeholders to 
discuss disaster 
management issues. 

Protection 

Services 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Building Safer 
Communities 

Mitigate the 
effectiveness 
of disasters. 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Execute 2 emergency 
exercises by 

30 June 2017. 

Community 

Services 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Inclusive Rural 
Economy 

Provide for the 
cemetery needs in the 
Municipal area. 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Develop a cemetery 
plan for the next five 
years to accommodate 
future cemetery needs 
and submit to EXCO by 

31 March 2017. 

Community 

Services 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Economy and 
Development 

Contribute towards the 
development of Sports 
in the Municipal area. 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Develop a plan for 
sports development for 
the next five years and 
submit to EXCO by 

31 March 2017. 

Protection 

Services 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Building Safer 
Communities 

Contribute towards the 
prevention of Crime. 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Report quarterly to the 
Portfolio Committee 
on crime prevention 
strategies implemented 
in partnership with the 
relevant stakeholders. 

Community 

Services 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Improving 
Education, 
training and 
innovation 

Facilitate early 
childhood development. 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Visit all creches 
in 26 Wards by 

30 June 2017 to 
monitor the healthiness 
of the environment for 
childhood development 

Planning & 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Economy and 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Assist 5 Tourism BEE 
entrepreneurs with 
starting growing 
businesses e.g. 

Research, business 
plans and skills 
development by 
30/6/2017. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 









RESPONSIBLE 

NATIONALKPA 

[R] 

NDPOBJEaiUE 

[R] 

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 
[R] 

MUNICIPAL KPA 
[R] 

KPI 

Planning & 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Economy and 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Carry out 5 workshops 
to promote skills 
development and 
support the 

Tourism SMME 
business sector by 

30 June 2017. 

Planning & 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Economy and 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Carry out A tourism 
promotional activities in 
the print and 
other media by 

30 June 2017. 

Planning & 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Economy and 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Assist 10 youth BEE 
entrepreneurs with 
starting growing 
businesses e.g. 

Research, business 
plans and skills 
development by 

30 June 2017. 

Planning & 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Economy and 
Development 

To ensure that 
businesses within 
uMlalazi Municipality 
are licensed through the 
LED department. 

Local Economic 
Development 

Develop a database 
of businesses 
licensed in uMlalazi 
Municipality and submit 
quarterly reports to 
Portfolio Committee. 

Community 

Services 

Local Economic 
Development 

Economy and 
Development 

To contribute towards 
the reduction of 
unemployment. 

Local Economic 
Development 

Number of temporary 
job opportunities 
created through EPWP 
projects and other 
operational projects by 

30 June 2017. 

Finance 

Municipal 

Financial 

Viability and 
Management 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Advance and maintain 
the financial viability of 
the Municipality 

Municipal 

Financial Viability 
and Management 

Achieve a debtors 
payment percentage 
of 95% at 30 June 

2017 (Gross Debtors 
Opening Balance + 

Billed Revenue - Gross 
Debtors Closing Balance 
- Bad Debts Written Off 
/ Billed Revenue x 100). 

Finance 

Municipal 

Financial 

Viability and 
Management 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Advance and maintain 
the financial viability of 
the Municipality 

Municipal 

Financial Viability 
and Management 

Financial viability 
measured in terms 
of the available 
cash to cover fixed 
operating expenditure 
as at 30 June 2017 
((Available cash+ 
investments)/ 

Monthly fixed 
operating expenditure). 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 28 

>^<>0<XXXXXXX>000000000000 









Section A: Executive Summary 


1.5.2. OUTPUTS, OUTCOMES AND DELIVERABLES ...continue, 


RESPONSIBLE 

NATIONALKPA 

[R] 

NDPOBJEaiUE 

[R] 

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 
[R] 

MUNICIPAL KPA 
[R] 

KPI 

Engineering 

Services 

Municipal 

Financial 

Viability and 
Management 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Improve the 
financial performance 
of the municipality 

Municipal 

Financial Viability 
and Management 

Limit unaccounted for 
electricity to less than 

8% by 30 June 201 7 
{(Number of Electricity 
Units Purchased and/ 
or Generated - Number 
of Electricity Units Sold) 

/ Number of Electricity 
Units Purchased and/or 
Generated) x 100}. 

All 

Municipal 

Financial 

Viability and 
Management 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Optimize budget 
implementation in the 
municipality 

Municipal Financial 
Viability and 
Management 

Spend at least 

90% of the Capital 
budget amount by 

30 June 201 7 (Actual 
expenditure/Approved 
capital budget). 

Office of 
the MM 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Effective 

Municipal Oversight 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Review Top Layer 

SDBIP and submit 
to Council by 

24 February 2017. 

Office of 
the MM 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Effective 

Municipal Oversight 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Submit Quarterly 
reports on the 
actual performance 
achieved against the 

Top layer SDBIP targets 
to Council. 

Office of 
the MM 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Effective 

Municipal Oversight 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Submit the 
annual performance 
report to AG by 

31 August 2016. 

Office of 
the MM 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Effective 

Municipal Oversight 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Submit the annual 
financial statements 
by 31 August 2016 
to the Office of the 
Auditor-General. 

Office of 
the MM 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Effective 

Municipal Oversight 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Submit Oversight 

Report of annual report 
to council by 

31 March 2017. 

Office of 
the MM 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

To effectively 

Implement the Back to 
Basics programme 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Submit quarterly 
reports to exco on the 
implementation of Back 
to Basics programme. 

Office of 
the MM 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

To Obtain Clean Audit 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Submit reports to 

EXCO on the measures 
taken to ensure that 
matters raised in the 
2015/16 Audit have 
been resolved in order 
to ensure that the 
Municipality, receives / 
maintains a Clean Audit 
in 2016/2017. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 









RESPONSIBLE 

NATIONALKPA 

[R] 

NDPOBJEaiUE 

[R] 

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 
[R] 

MUNICIPAL KPA 
[R] 

KPI 

Office of 
the MM 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Mitigate the Impact 
of HIV/Aids in the 
Municipality area 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Coordinate quarterly 
meetings of the 
uMlalazi Aids Council. 

Office of 
the MM 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Mitigate the Impact 
of HIV/Aids in the 
Municipality area 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Review HIV/Aids Plan 
and submit to exco by 

30 June 2017. 

Office of 
the MM 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

To reduce Risk to 
the Organisation 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Review Enterprise 

Risk Plan and 
submit to exco by 

30 June 2017. 

Office of 
the MM 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

To reduce Risk to 
the Organization 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Review Fraud Risk Plan 
and submit to exco by 

30 June 2017. 

Office of 
the MM 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Ensure that public 
participation 
structures are 
established, capacitated 
and functional 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Hold meetings with 
stakeholders and 
ward committee to 
communicate the IDP 
process plan. 

Office of 
the MM 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Ensure that public 
participation 
structures are 
established, capacitated 
and functional 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Submit quarterly 
reports to EXCO on 
the functionality of all 
Ward Committees 
(include training 
and development). 

Office of 
the MM 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

To promote 

International and 

National Relations 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Submit a report 
to MCOR by 

30 June 2017 on the 
progress made with the 
Twinning partnership 
with Songdal 

Municipality (Norway). 

Planning & 
Development 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

To promote sustainable 
development 

Cross 

Cutting Issues 

Compile a Town 

Planning Register 
for the 2016/2017 
financial year on 
all Town Planning 
applications being 
processed and their 
status and submit 
quarterly reports to the 
Portfolio Committee. 

Planning & 
Development 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

To promote integrated 
development planning 

Cross 

Cutting Issues 

Review uMlalazi 
Municipality IDP for 
2017/2018 and 
submit to Council by 

30 June 2017. 


Table 5: Outputs, Outcomes and Deliverables 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 30 

>^<>0<XXXXXXXX>00000000000 









Section A: Executive Summary 


1.5.3. STRATEGIC SPATIAL INTERVENTION AREAS 



Map 3 


3 1 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

<xxxxxxx>ooooooooo<x>ooo<x>oc 



1.6. PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT 

The progress will be measured through the Organisational Performance Management Scorecard (OPM5) and the Service 
Delivery, Budget, Implementation Plan (SDBIP). The targets that will be set for the OPMS will be more strategic and linked to 
the Municipal Managers Performance and the operational targets will be set for the SDBIP and will be linked to the Performance 
of the Managers directly accountable to the Municipal Manager. These will be provided in the final IDP Review Document. The flow 
chart below illustrates the performance management system. 



SERVICE DELIVERY & BUDGET IMPLEMENTATION PLAN 



s 

S 

S 

\ 

\ 

> 

KPA'S 

OBJECTIVES 

ACTIVITIES 

KPI'S > 

TARGETS ^ 

RESPONSIBILITY 

/ 

/ 

/ 

/ 

/ 

, 



REPORT ON 
PERFORMANCE 
AGAINST KPI"S 




Figure 4 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 32 

-^<>000<XXXXX>000000000000 















\v 

^ 

1 

1 



1. Planning and 
Development Principles 


2.1. Planning and 
Development Principles 

Planning and development at local level functions in terms of, 

and in alignment with National and Provincial policy frameworks. 

The functions in terms of planning and development at municipal 

level should be implied by the following principles; 

■ Development / investment must only happen in locations 
that are sustainable (NSDRSPLUMA). 

■ Balance between urban and rural land development in support 
of each other (DFA Principles). 

■ The discouragement of urban sprawl by encouraging 
settlement at existing and proposed nodes and settlement 
corridors, whilst also promoting densification. Future 
settlement and economic development opportunities 
should be channeled into activity corridors and nodes 
that are adjacent to or that link the main growth centers 
(DFA Principles). 

■ The direction of new development towards logical infill areas 
(DFA Principles). 

■ Compact urban form is desirable (DFA Principles). 

■ Development should be within limited resources (financial, 
institutional and physical). Development must optimise the 
use of existing resources and infrastructure in a sustainable 
manner (DFA Principles, 5PLUMA, CRDP, National Strategy 
on Sustainable Development). 

■ Stimulate and reinforce cross boundary linkages. 

■ Basic services (water, sanitation, access and energy) must be 
provided to all households (NSDP) 

■ Development / investment should be focused on localities of 
economic growth and/or economic potential (NSDP). 

■ In localities with low demonstrated economic potential, 
development / investment must concentrate primarily on 
human capital development by providing education and 
training, social transfers such as grants and poverty-relief 
programmes (NSDP). 


■ Land development procedures must include provisions that 
accommodate access to secure tenure (SPLUMA). 

■ Prime and unique agricultural land, the environment and other 
protected lands must be protected and land must be safely 
utilized (SPLUMA). 

■ Engagement with stakeholder representatives on policy, 
planning and implementation at national, sectorial and local 
levels is central to achieving coherent and effective planning 
and development (SPLUMA). 

■ If there is a need to low-income housing, it must be provided 
in close proximity to areas of opportunity (Breaking New 
Ground: from Flousingto Sustainable Fluman Settlements). 

■ During planning processes and subsequent development, the 
reduction of resource use, as well as the carbon intensity 
of the economy, must be promoted (National Strategy on 
Sustainable Development). 

■ Environmentally responsible behavior must be promoted 
through incentives and disincentives (National Strategy on 
Sustainable Development, KZN PGDS). 

■ The principle of self-sufficiency must be promoted. 
Development must be located in a way that reduces the 
need to travel, especially by car and enables people as far 
as possible to meet their needs locally. Furthermore, the 
principle is underpinned by an assessment of each areas 
unique competency towards its own self-reliance and need 
to consider the environment, human skills, infrastructure and 
capital available to a specific area and how it could contribute 
to increase its self-sufficiency (KZN PGDS). 

■ Planning and subsequent development must strive to provide 
the highest level of accessibility to resources, services and 
opportunities (KZN PGDS). 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 


2. Government 
Priorities 


2.2. GOVERNMENT PRIORITIES 

2.2.1. NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN PRIORITIES 

The National Planning Commission formulated the National Development Plan of which its priorities are aimed at achieving the 
vision 2030 wherein extreme poverty is eliminated and inequality reduced and opportunities are abundant. Hence the municipality 
has developed strategies so as to align to the objectives and priorities of the ND which are summarized as follows: 


NO. 

(in no 

specific order) 

MILLENNIUM 
DEVELOPMENT GOALS 

MUNICIPAL STRATEGY 

1 

Create jobs 

■ To contribute towards the development of the Agricultural Sector. 

■ To contribute towards the development of the Tourism Sector. 

■ To promote industrial development. 

■ To promote Small Medium and Micro Enterprises ("SMME") Development. 

■ To facilitate the implementation of the Operation Sukuma Sakhe Program 
(flagship programme). 

■ To ensure the roll-out of waste management services in rural areas, and the provision 
of recycling facilities at appropriate locations. 

2 

Expand infrastructure 

■ To facilitate the provision of potable water and sanitation. 

■ To provide electricity / energy within the uMlalazi Municipal Area. 

■ To ensure the roll-out of waste management services in rural areas, and the provision 
of recycling facilities at appropriate locations. 

■ To ensure the provision of commuter and trading shelters 

■ To provide Fire Services for uMlalazi Municipal area. 

3 

Use resources 
properly 

■ To ensure the provision and maintenance of municipal roads, sidewalks and causeways. 

■ To attract and retain scarce skilled staff 

■ Fill critical and essential posts in-line with revised Organizational Structure to increase 
staff capacity in all Departments. 

■ To provide adequate training and development to staff and councilors. 

■ To introduce an Employee Assistance Programme. 

4 

Inclusive planning 

■ To improve inter-departmental and external (including IGR) communication. 

■ Ensure that public participation structures are established, capacitated and functional. 

5 

Quality education 

Dept, of Education 

6 

Quality healthcare 

Dept, of Health 

7 

Build a capable state 

To improve inter-departmental and external (including IGR) communication. 

8 

Fight corruption 

To ensure a corruption-free organization 

9 

Unite the nation 

■ Ensure that public participation structures are established, capacitated and functional. 

■ To facilitate the development of the youth and early childhood development, with 
particular focus on Education and Training. 


Table 6: National Development Plan Priorities 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 







A 




m 

: RESOURCE 
PROPERLY 

ES 




A 


Figure 5: National Developnnent Plan Priorities 


2.2.2. NATIONAL OUTCOMES 

The 1 2 National Outcomes that all provincial governments must align to are: 


NO. 

NATIONALOUTCOME 

MUNICIPAL STRATEGIC GOALS 

1 

Quality 

basic education 

■ Facilitate early childhood development. 

2 

A long and healthy life 
for all South Africans 

Dept, of Health 

3 

All people in South 

Africa are and feel safe 

SAPSTo provide Fire Services for uMlalazi Municipal area. 

A 

Decent employment 
through inclusive 
economic growth 

■ Contribute towards the reduction of unemployment. 

■ Local Economic Development. 

■ To ensure sustainable planning and development of the municipal area. 

■ Mitigate the Impact of HIV/Aids in the Municipality area 

■ Formalise trading areas in the Municipality area. 

■ To improve Service Delivery and the image of uMlalazi Municipality. 

■ Formalise trading areas in the Municipality area. 

■ To Promote International and National Relations. 

5 

Skilled and 
capable workforce 
to support an inclusive 
growth path 

■ Strengthen and Improve Employment Equity in the Municipality. 

■ Ensure effective and efficient Municipal Administration & Communication. 

■ Organizational Skills Development and Capacity Building 

■ Strengthen and Improve Employment Equity in the Municipality. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 






Section B: 2. Government Priorities 


2.2.2. NATIONAL OUTCOMES co« 


The 1 2 National Outconnes that all provincial governments must align to are: 


NO. 

NATIONALOUTCOME 

MUNICIPAL STRATEGIC GOALS 

6 

An efficient, 
competitive 
and responsive 
infrastructure network 

■ Ensure the provision and maintenance of municipal roads, access roads and causeways. 

■ To Improve Contract Management. 

■ Plan and support the acceleration of sustainable human settlement. 

■ Ensure quality control of infrastructure projects. 

■ To ensure sustainable planning and development of the municipal area. 

■ To facilitate adequate provisioning and management of community facilities at 
appropriate locations. 

7 

Vibrant, equitable, 
sustainable rural 
communities 
contributing towards 
food security for all 

■ Local Economic Development. 

■ Contribute towards the reduction of unemployment. 

■ To ensure sustainable planning and development of the municipal area. 

■ Plan and support the acceleration of sustainable human settlement. 

■ To facilitate adequate provisioning and management of community facilities at 
appropriate locations. 

8 

Sustainable human 
settlements and 
improved quality of 
household life 

■ To plan and support the acceleration of sustainable human settlements. 

■ To ensure sustainable planning and development of the municipal area. 

■ To improve Service Delivery and the image of uMlalazi Municipality. 

■ Ensure the provision and maintenance of municipal roads, access roads and causeways 

■ To facilitate adequate provisioning and management of community facilities at 
appropriate locations. 

9 

Responsive, 
accountable, effective 
and efficient local 
government system 

■ To ensure sustainable planning and development of the municipal area. 

■ To ensure effective oversight by the Municipality. 

■ Clean Audit. 

■ Mitigate the Impact of HIV/Aids in the Municipality area 

■ To reduce Risk to the Organisation. 

■ Ensure that public participation structures are established, capacitated and functional. 

■ Contribute towards the prevention of Crime. 

■ Contribute towards the reduction of unemployment. 

■ Improve ICT Systems within the Municipality (Computer Audits, Document 

Management Systems, Communication Plan, Switchboard, Website). 

10 

Protect and enhance 
our environmental 
assets and natural 

resources 

■ To ensure sustainable planning and development of the municipal area. 

11 

Create a better South 
Africa, a better Africa, 
and a better world 

All 

12 

An efficient, effective 
and development 
oriented public service 
and an empowered, fair 
and inclusive citizenship 

All 

13 

An inclusive and 
responsive social 
protection system 

■ Facilitate the Implementation of Operation Sukuma Sakhe (Flagship Program) 

■ Contribute towards the prevention of Crime 

■ Contribute towards the reduction of unemployment 

14 

Nation Building and 
Social Cohesion 

■ Facilitate the Implementation of Operation Sukuma Sakhe (Flagship Program) 

■ Contribute towards the prevention of Crime 

■ Contribute towards the reduction of unemployment 

■ Contribute towards the development of Sports in the Municipal area 


Table 7: 12 National Outcomes 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 






2.2.3. 5 NATIONAL PRIORITIES 
(INCLUDING THE 6™ KZN PRIORITY) 

The Five National anid Six Provincial Priorities include the following: 


NO. 

FIVE NATIONAL 
(INCLUDING 6TH 
PROUINCIAU PRIORITIES 

MUNICIPAL STRATEGIC GOALS 

1 

Job creation 
(Decent work and 
Economic growth) 

■ Contribute towards the prevention of Crime. 

■ Contribute towards the reduction of unemployment. 

■ Contribute towards the reduction of unemployment. 

■ Local Economic Development. 

■ To ensure sustainable planning and development of the municipal area. 

■ Mitigate the Impact of HIV/Aids in the Municipality area. 

■ Formalise trading areas in the Municipality area. 

■ To improve Service Delivery and the image of uMlalazi Municipality. 

■ Formalise trading areas in the Municipality area. 

■ To Promote International and National Relations. 

2 

Education 

Dept, of Education 

3 

Health 

Dept, of Health 

A 

Rural development, 
food security and 
land reform 

■ To facilitate the development of the youth and early childhood development. 

■ To facilitate adequate provisioning and management of community facilities at 
appropriate locations. 

■ To facilitate the implementation of the Operation Sukuma Sakhe Program 
(flagship programme). 

■ Local Economic Development. 

■ To ensure sustainable planning and development of the municipal area. 

5 

Fighting crime 
and corruption 

■ To ensure effective oversight by the Municipality. 

■ Contribute towards the prevention of Crime. 

■ Clean Audit. 

■ To reduce Risk to the Organisation. 

■ Organisational Skills Development and Capacity Building. 

■ Policy Development. 

■ Improve ICT Systems within the Municipality (Computer Audits, Document 

Management Systems, Communication Plan, Switchboard, Website). 

6 

Nation-building and 
good governance 

■ Facilitate the Implementation of Operation Sukuma Sakhe (Flagship Programme). 

■ Contribute towards the prevention of Crime. 

■ Contribute towards the reduction of unemployment. 

■ Contribute towards the development of Sports in the Municipal area. 


Tables: 5 National Priorities (including the 6^^ KZN Priority) 


2.2A STATE OF THE 
NATION ADDRESS 

The State of the Nation Address was delivered by His Excellency, 
Jacob G Zuma, the President of the Republic of South Africa on 
the occasion of the joint sitting of Parliament in Cape Town on 
11 February 2016. 

"A resilient and fast growing economy is at the heart of our 
radical economic transformation agenda and our National 
Development Plan (NDP)." 


When the economy grows fast it delivers jobs. Workers earn 
wages and businesses make profits. 

The President reported on progress made with the 
implementation of the National Plan and reiterated that the 
priorities as expressed in the National Plan need to be addressed. 
As part of this, the President revisited and provided progress on 
the nine point plan to ignite growth and create jobs. 

These are: 

1 . Resolving the energy challenge. 

2. Revitalizing agriculture and the agro-processing value chain. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 






Section B: 2. Government Priorities 


3. Advancing beneficiation or adding value to our mineral wealth. 
A. More effective implementation of a higher impact Industrial 
Policy Action Plan. 

5. Encouraging private sector investment. 

6. Moderating workplace conflict. 

7. Unlocking the potential of SMMEs, cooperatives, township 
and rural enterprises. 

8. State reform and boosting the role of state owned companies, 
ICT infrastructure or broadband roll out, water, sanitation 
and transport infrastructure as well as 

9. Operation Phakisa aimed growing the ocean economy and 
other sectors. 

It goes without saying that the entire country's economy 
has been facing difficulties since the financial crisis in 2008. 
Government has thus embarked on an aggressive infrastructure 
development programme to stimulate growth. The President 
made emphasis on turning around the economy, not only of 
the country, but also strategic focus on the development of 
our local economies. 

The President further elaborated on the undertaking to spend 
public funds wisely and to cut wasteful expenditure, but without 
compromising on the core business of government and the 
provision of services communities. Cost cutting measures are 
to be introduced across all spheres of Government. 

2.2.5. STATE OF THE 
PROVINCE ADDRESS 

The Premier of Kwa Zulu Natal, Honourable Senzo Mchunu 
presented the State of the Province Address on the 25th 


of February 2016. Herein, the theme of this address was: - 

"KwaZuluNatal (KwaZulu-Natal)- A Growing, Developing 
and Caring Province Firmly Focused on 2030" - in which 
the Premier said it "captures the spirit of our people and their 
determination for a better life." 

The Honourable Premier also reconfirmed the provincial 
government's commitment to the Key National Priorities namely: 

■ Creation of more jobs, decent work and sustainable livelihoods 
for inclusive growth; 

■ Rural development, land reform and food security; 

■ Improved quality basic education; long and healthy life for 
all South Africans and 

■ Fighting crime and corruption; and in particular 

■ The implementation of the 9 Point plan to grow our economy. 

Specific key priority areas were identified focussing on the issue 
of radical economic transformation; 

■ Priority Intervention 1: Revitalisation of the agriculture and agro- 
processing value chain (APAP). 

■ Priority Intervention 2: More effective implementation of a higher 
impact Industrial Policy Action Plan. 

■ Priority Intervention 3: Advancing beneficiation (adding value 
to our mineral wealth). 

■ Priority Intervention A: Unlocking the potential of SMMEs, 
cooperatives, township and rural enterprises 

■ Priority Intervention 5: Growing the oceans economy. 

■ Priority Intervention 6: Resolving the energy challenge. 

■ Priority Intervention 7: Managing work place conflict. 

■ Priority Intervention 8: Scaling up private sector participation. 

■ Priority Intervention 9: Cross-cutters related to ICT, Transport 
infrastructure. Science and Technology and Water. 


2.2.6. PROVINCIAL GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 
STRATEGY (PGDS) GOALS 


NO. 

PGDS STRATEGIC GOAL 

MUNICIPAL STRATEGIC GOALS 

1 

Job Creation 

■ Contribute towards the prevention of Crime. 

■ Contribute towards the reduction of unemployment. 

■ Contribute towards the reduction of unemployment. 

■ Local Economic Development. 

■ To ensure sustainable planning and development of the municipal area. 

■ Mitigate the Impact of HIV/Aids in the Municipality area. 

■ Formalise trading areas in the Municipality area. 

■ To improve Service Delivery and the image of uMlalazi Municipality. 

■ Formalize trading areas in the Municipality area. 

■ To Promote International and National Relations. 

2 

Human Resource 
Development 

■ Strengthen and Improve Employment Equity in the Municipality. 

■ Ensure effective and efficient Municipal Administration and Communication. 

■ Organisational Skills Development and Capacity Building 

■ Policy Development. 

■ To Improve Contract Management. 

■ Improve ICT Systems within the Municipality (Computer Audits, Document 

Management Systems, Communication Plan, Switchboard, Website). 

■ Strengthen and Improve Employment Equity in the Municipality. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 






NO. 


PGDS STRATEGIC GOAL MUNICIPAL STRATEGIC GOALS 


3 

Human and 

Community 

Development 

■ Contribute towards the reduction of unemployment 

■ Local Economic Development. 

■ To ensure sustainable planning and development of the municipal area. 

■ Mitigate the Impact of HIV/Aids in the Municipality area 

■ Formalise trading areas in the Municipality area. 

■ To improve Service Delivery and the image of uMlalazi Municipality. 

■ Formalise trading areas in the Municipality area. 

■ To Promote International and National Relations. 

■ Facilitate the Implementation of Operation Sukuma Sakhe (Flagship Programme). 

■ Contribute towards the prevention of Crime. 

■ Contribute towards the reduction of unemployment. 

■ Contribute towards the development of Sports in the Municipal area. 

■ Facilitate early childhood development. 

A 

Strategic Infrastructure 

■ Provide for the cemetery needs in the Municipal area. 

■ To facilitate adequate provisioning and management of community facilities at 
appropriate locations. 

■ Plan and support the acceleration of sustainable human settlement. 

■ Formalize trading areas in the Municipality area. 

■ Mitigate the effectiveness of disasters. 

■ To provide Basic Services to all households and address Service Delivery Backlogs. 

■ Facilitate with uThungulu to ensure alignment of water and sanitation provisioning to all 
Municipal Capital and other large scale Projects. 

■ Facilitate with Eskom to ensure alignment of Electricity provisioning to all Municipal areas. 

■ Ensure the provision and maintenance of municipal roads, access roads and causeways. 

■ To ensure sustainable planning and development of the municipal area. 

■ Ensure quality control of infrastructure projects. 

5 

Responses to 

Climate Change 

■ Mitigate the effectiveness of disasters. 

6 

Governance and Policy 

■ To ensure effective oversight by the Municipality. 

■ Contribute towards the prevention of Crime. 

■ Clean Audit. 

■ To reduce Risk to the Organisation. 

■ Organizational Skills Development and Capacity Building. 

■ Policy Development. 

■ Improve ICT Systems within the Municipality (Computer Audits, Document 

Management Systems, Communication Plan, Switchboard, Website). 

■ To Promote International and National Relations. 

7 

Spatial Equity 

■ To ensure sustainable planning and development of the municipal area. 


Tables: PGDS Goals 

2.2.7. LOCAL GOVERNMENT 
BACK TO BASICS STRATEGY 

The main objective of this strategy is to drive local government 
to focus on serving the people and not extractive elites. 
The Constitution and other legislation spell out municipality's 
responsibilities and tasks. An acceptable level of performance 
in terms of the Back to Basics Strategy means that 
municipalities must: 

■ Put people and their concerns first and ensure constant 
contact with communities through effective public participation 
platforms. This is the essence of the 'back to basics' approach. 

■ Create conditions for decent living by consistently delivering 
municipal services to the right quality and standard. 


This includes planning for and delivery of infrastructure 
and amenities, 

■ Maintenance and upkeep, including the budgeting to do this. 
Ensuring that no failures in services and where there are, 
restore services with urgency. 

■ Be well governed and demonstrate good governance and 
administration - cut wastage, spend public funds prudently, 
hire competent staff, ensure transparency and accountability. 

■ Ensure sound financial management and accounting, and 
prudently manage resources so as to sustainably deliver 
services and bring development to communities. 

■ Build and maintain sound institutional and administrative 
capabilities, administered and managed by dedicated and 
skilled personnel at all levels. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 






Section B: 2. Government Priorities 


UMIalazi Municipality will integrate this approach into the municipal systems and have nominated champions in which to drive the Back 
to Basics Strategy. The municipality reports to KZN COGTA in the form of reporting templates monthly and quarterly. The template 
consists of indicators which the municipality uses as a yardstick to measure progress that the municipality is making in terms of 
implementing the Back to Basics approach. This template has been consolidated to include the Section 47 report and will be used to 
assess the municipalities in terms of the Municipal Excellence Awards. The Back to Basics program will be included in 5 phases of the 
IDP process (Analysis, Strategies, Projects, Alignment and Adoption). The Implementation Plan and SDBIP will include Key Performance 
Indicators to support the Back to Basics program. It will further be cascaded into the Performance Agreements through activity plans. 


2.2.7.1. IMPLEMENTATION OFTHE CAMPAIGNS IN THE MUNICIPALITY 


QUARTER 1 

DEPARTMENT 

CAMPAIGN HELD 

DATE 

AREA/STREET 

Engineering Services 

Pothole Patching and 
re-gravelling. 

15- 19June2015 

Brockwell Street & Hullet Drive (Ward 11), Manono 
Road (Ward 1 5 (q) Engogo) and Ward 2 1 . 

Protection Services 

Fire awareness campaign. 

19June2016 

Mpumazi Primary School (Ward 14). 

Community Services 

Cleaning up campaign. 

19 August 2015 

Ezingwenya Sports Field (Salvesh) in Ward 15. 


QUARTER 2 


Corporate Services 

Corporate image improvement 
(flowering of gardens). 

28 October 2015 

Mayoral and Administration Offices in Hutchinson 
road (Ward 11). 

Planning and 
Development Services 

Operational compliance of 
businesses within CBD. 

05 November 2015 

Eshowe CBD (Ward 11). 


Table 10 


2.2.7.2. DETAILED B2B ACTIVITY HELD ON 28 OCTOBER 2015 

The Back to Basics programme for Corporate Services was held on 28 October 2015. The focus of the programme was on 'Corporate 
Image Improvement' which involved the clearing of refuse, planting of plants, trimming of trees and shrubs, road marking and 
general improvement to the surroundings. 

The programme commenced at 8:30am with participation from all departments. His Worship the Mayor Councillor T B Zulu participated 
in the programme and assistance was provided through the EPWP and Siza Bonke programme by Community Services and the Road 
Marking Team by Engineering Services. The focus areas included the Mayoral Office, Council Chamber, Publicity, and Development and 
Planning Offices. It is planned to extend the programme to other municipal offices in no distant future. 

The overall improvement of the area was evident and certainly spoke to image improvement. 



UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 











His worship, the Mayor Cllr TB Zulu. 



The Corporate Services Director, Mr KC Zulu (left) and Snr. Manager- Mrs Suzie Van der Westhuizen (Right) at work painting the demarcating pavement. 




The Municipal Manager Mr T5 Mashabane (right) and Mrs Noxolo Ntombela (left) busy planting and levelling the flower garden. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 A2 

>00<x>00<XxXxXX>00<X>00000000 



Section B: 2. Government Priorities 


2.2.73. DETAILED B2B 
ACTIVITY HELD ON 28 
OCTOBER 2015 

The back to basic programme for planning and development 
department took place on 5 November 2015. The briefing was 
held at Council Chamber (9am) to guide all departments involved 
on the strategy proposed for the conducting of inspections for 
business license compliance along Osborn Road. This was not 
aiming at ensuring compliance but also to assist businesses to 
register their entities as per the requirement of Business License 
Actno71 of 1991 and for the municipality to have the database 
of businesses within its area of jurisdiction. During the briefing 
various issues and challenges that maybe encounter during the 
inspection were discussed which includes the clarification on the 
following tools used to gather all data required: 

a) Checklists (for the owner and the inspector to fill) 

The checklist was designed to assist in obtaining the statistics 
to substantiate the outcomes/findings. 

b) Maps (Cadastral attached to Aerial photograph overlaid) 

This assists in representing graphic presentation of boundaries, 
precise location and physical features denoting the properties. 

c) Business License application forms 


The Application form helps Business owners/managers to 
understand the process that needs to be followed and to comply 
with Business License Act no 71 of 1991. 

d) Compliance notices 

This is a requirement as per section 2 (3) of Business license act 
no 71 of 1991 and that owners/managers are required to be 
in possession of a valid business license for their businesses. 
Further informed that failure to have the license will constitutes 
a contravention and in terms of Section 5 (1):- 
Any person who contravenes a provision of Section 2 (3) shall 
be guilty of an offence and liable on conviction - 

(a) To a fine not exceeding R1 000.00 or Imprisonment for 
a period not Exceeding three months, or to both such fine 
and imprisonment; and 

(b) To an additional fine not exceeding R 10.00 for every day on 
which on which the offence continues. 

Twenty staff who attended the briefing were then divided into 
five groups and all tools were distributed including the maps 
showing the aerial photograph overlaid with cadastral or site 
boundaries and roads. To show the participants the exact area/ 
boundaries where they are tasked. 








1 1 ' 



W\ I 


Above is the Planning and Development and Municipal Manager's Office staff after briefing session before 
dispersing to their respective tasks on B2B programme for businesses along Osborn Road, Eshowe. 


2.2.7.A. PROPOSED UMLALAZI LM B2B CAMPAIGN SCHEDULE 

In view of the fact that COGTA has not specify dates on which its programme implementation will be held. This is pending the 
approval by MEC and PEC as well as the completion of the evaluation process of the past two campaigns already held. I therefore 
propose that as municipality we should continue with our programme pending COGTA's dates for implementation of its campaigns 
which we will subsequently align ours to it as soon as it is communicated to us. The following is the proposed programme: 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 


DATE 

CAMPAIGN 

MUNICIPAL DEPT. 

PILLAR 

WARD 

26 - 30 January 2016 

Disaster 

Management campaign. 

Protection Services 

2 

To be confirmed 

2-6 February 2016 

Clean up campaign. 

Community Services 

2 

To be confirmed 

16-20 February 2016 

Pothole campaign and 
or Illegal connections 
(electricity, cable theft, 
manhole covers, etc. 

Engineering Services 

2 

To be confirmed 

2-6 March 2016 

Stimulating LED and 
Revenue enhancement. 

Planning and 
Development Services/ 
Finance Dept. 

A 

To be confirmed 

16 -20 March 2016 

Building capable 
administration/Role of 
Traditional Leaders in 
Municipal Governance/ 
Animal Pounds (Getting 
animals off the streets. 

Corporate Services 

3&5 

To be confirmed 

13 - 17 April 2016 

Ward Level 

Improvement Planning. 

Public Participation and 
IDP offices 

1 

To be confirmed 


Table 11: Back to Basics Activity Plan Template 




UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 AA 

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Spatial Analysis 


3.1.1. REGIONAL CONTEXT 

The uMlalazi Local Municipality (KZN284) is situated along the 
north eastern coast of Kwa Zulu Natal (KwaZulu-Natal), 1 40km 
north east of Durban. The eastern portion of uMlalazi Local 
Municipality lies on the N2 Nation and Provincial Development 
Corridor linking two major economic hubs of Richards Bay and 
Durban. uMlalazi municipality is located within u uThungulu 
District, which comprises of five local municipalities namely; 


Mfolozi LM 

(KZ 281) 

uMhIathuze LM 

(KZ 282) 

uMlalazi LM 

(KZ 284) 

Mthonjaneni LM 

(KZ 285) 

Nkandia LM 

(KZ 286) 


It is bordered by ILembe District Municipality (Mandeni 
Municipality to the south and Maphumulo Municipality to the 


southwest). Towards the western regions, the municipality 
boarders Nkandia Municipality and Mthonjaneni Municipality, 
and is bordered northwesterly by Ntambanana Municipality and 
to the north, uMhIathuze municipality. The municipality borders 
on the Indian Ocean on the eastern coastline which stretches 
approximately 1 7km, from Mandeni municipality to uMhIathuze 
Municipality. In addition, the municipal area covers 2 217km", 
one of the largest local authority areas in South Africa. There 
are 27 wards and 14 tribal authority areas. 

The uMlalazi Municipality is crossed by a number of important 
transportation routes, such as the N2 Motorway between 
Durban and Richards Bay, the R34 between Richards Bay/ 
Empangeni and Nkwaleni valley to the north of Eshowe, and the 
R66 from the N2 Motorway to Gingindlovu, Eshowe, Melmoth, 
Ulundi and Vryheid. The famous Zulu Heritage Route R66 has 
a lot of historical and cultural significance and is promoted a 
tourism route. 



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Map 4: Regional Context 


The population distribution in the municipal area is characterized by relatively high population densities within urban nodes, and low 
densities in rural areas. The municipal area is dominated by tribal areas and 14 Tribal Authorities exist within the area. 

Eshowe, Mtunzini and Gingindlovu form the three main towns of uMlalazi Municipality. The town of Eshowe is of great historical 
significance in that it is the birthplace of King Cetshwayo, who was king of the Zulu's during the Anglo-Zulu War of 1879. There are 
several traditional Zulu villages open to tourists within an easy drive of the town. The Dlinza Forest is a beautiful forest which is 
an ideal tourist destination. Eshowe Town is also considered as the administrative and service center of the uMlalazi Municipality. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 


Section C: Spatial Analysis 


The coastal town of Mtunzini is a greenbelt situated on the North 
Coast of Natal, on the banks of the UMIalazi River and bordering 
on the uMlalazi Nature Reserve. Mtunzini is mainly a residential 
town, offering superb homes in a quiet and relaxed atmosphere, 
within comfortable driving distance of the N2 highway and the 
industrial and commercial growth areas of Richards Bay and 
Empangeni. Mtunzini has all the basic shopping facilities, doctors 
and churches. Mtunzini is a quality residential and eco-tourist 
destination in South Africa. Mining rights have been granted to 
an area south of Mtunzini to Tronox. 

3.1.2. ADMINISTRATIVE 
ENTITIES 

The administrative and service center of the uMlalazi Municipality 
is Eshowe, where a number of government departments 
have established offices. It is also a service centre for its 
agricultural hinterland. 

Mtunzini functions as a dormitory town for the University of 
Zululand and some of the workforce in Richards Bay/Empangeni 
resides in town. The popularity of the town as a place of residence 
has manifested in the fact that it is a coastal town. There is a 
strong emphasis on conservation among the residents of the 
town and a number of organizations are promoting this theme. 

Gingindlovu is a much smaller urban node rendering basic 
services to the immediate population of the area. Eshowe attract 
the most of the economic activity in the uMlalazi Municipality. 


3.1.3. STRUCTURING 
ELEMENTS 

■ Coastline of approximately 1 Tkms forms the south-eastern 
boundary of the Municipal Area. 

■ Scattered, low density settlement pattern evident on 
Ingonyama Trust land in the south-western third and the 
north-eastern third of the Municipal Area. 

■ Siyaya Coastal Reserve (the uMlalazi Reserve and the Amatikulu 
Reserve) along the coast and potential for Blue Flag Status. 

■ N2 National Road traverses through the Municipal Area along its 
south-eastern boundary on the lower lying coastal plains. 
Heritage Route R66 traverses from west (Gingindlovu) 
east towards Melmoth thereby connecting the N2 with the 
highlands. 

■ The central and northern parts, as well as the north-western 
and north-eastern parts, of the Municipal Area are 
characterized by undulating topography. 

■ Tourism potential exist with pristine beaches, natural rain forest, 
Zulu heritage. 

■ The R66 Main Road traverses through the centre of the 
municipal area from south to north, providing a road link 
between Durban, Ulundi and Vryheid. 

■ Mining activity proposed for Fairbreeze will enhance local GDP, 
thereby improving standard of living. 

■ Abundant developable and Agricultural Land. 



Map 5: Administrative Entities: Traditional Authorities 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 



Map 6: uMlalazi LM Locality Map 

3.1 A EXISTING NODES AND SETTLEMENT PATTERNS 

Nodes and settlements are located along main transport routes. Accessibility to nodes in the pockets in the rural pockets between 
main roads is generally poor. The municipality is in the process of developing nodal development plans for rural areas to enhance 
the character of rural areas and developing a framework that will attract potential investment in rural areas. 



Map 7: Existing Nodes and Settlements 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 A8 

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Section C: Spatial Analysis 


3.1.5. INTERVENTION AREAS: CORRIDORS 



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Map 8: Intervention Areas: Corridors 


3.1.6. BROAD LAND USES 

The uMlalazi Area is dominated by a band of commercial farms 
covering an area from the west of Eshowe and along the R68 to 
Gingindlovu and northwards along the N2 Motorway to north 
of Mtunzini. One isolated area of commercial farming is located 
in the north of the municipal area and straddles the R3A, and 
includes the Nkwaleni Valley. These areas are characterised by 
intensive agricultural practices, where land management is of 
the highest order. 

Agricultural production is focused on sugar cane, some timber 
production and citrus farming occurs in the Nkwaleni Valley. 
The largest portion of the municipal area is covered by land in 
the ownership of the Ngonyama Trust and farming activities 
are extensive. This area is also characterized by poor land 
management practices and presents a challenge in respect of 
the unlocking of the agricultural potential that exists. This area 
also accommodates scattered residential settlements posing 
considerable pressures in respect of the provision of basic 
services. The provision of water and sanitation is addressed in 
the uMlalazi IDP and the improvement of roads and accessibility 
also features prominently in the identified capital projects. 


The uMlalazi Area features some important conservation areas that 
require careful management in the unfolding development pattern: 

■ The Ongoye Forest is located in the east of the municipal 
area and is a nature reserve, attracting local and foreign visitors. 

■ The Entumeni Nature Reserve, which is located to the west 
of Eshowe and will also require protection. 

■ The Mbongolwane Wetland, which is at present not 
demarcated, but will be protected. It will be identified as 
a Management Area in terms of the uMlalazi Land Use 
Management System. 

■ The Dhlinza Forest, which is located within the town of 
Eshowe and is a nature reserve. 

One of the outstanding features in the uMlalazi Area is the 
coastal zone from north of Mtunzini to the Amatikulu River 
mouth. It covers an area of approximately 1 7km in length. This 
coastline presents outstanding opportunities in respect of 
tourism and recreational facilities. The so-called Siyaya Coastal 
Park will be included as a Management Area in terms of the 
uMlalazi Land Use Management System. 

It must also be noted that there are mining rights allocated to 
areas south of Mtunzini, which are not clearly reflected on the 
map on the next page. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 





Map 9: Broad Land Uses 

3.1.7. LAND OWNERSHIP 

There are isolated pockets of state land evident in the central parts and the northern parts of the Municipal Area. Further, as indicated 
previously, there are private commercial farms in the south-east, the central parts and the northern parts of the Municipal Area. 
The balance of the Municipal Area is Ingonyama Trusts Areas. 



Map 10: Land Ownership 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 50 

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Section C: Spatial Analysis 


3.1.8. LAND REFORM 


LAND CLAIMS 


1 LAND CLAIM STATUS 

KM" 

% OF TOTAL GAZETTED LAND CLAIM AREA 

% OF TOTAL MUNICIPAL AREA I 

Settled 

38.7A 

39.61% 

1.75% 

Not Yet Settled 

59.07 

60.39% 

2.66% 

Total Gazetted 

97.81 

100.00% 

A.A1% 

Total Municipal Area 

2217.00 




Table 12: Status of Land Claims 


Settled land claims constitute some 1 .75% of the Municipal Area (or some 38.7Akm2). Land claims which have been gazetted but 
not yet settled affects some 2.66% (or 59.07km2) of the Municipal Area. 



Map 11: Status of Land Claims 


5 1 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

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3.1.9. PRIVATE 
SECTOR DEVELOPMENTS 

The following projects have been identified by the uMlalazi 
Municipality as "special projects" within its area of jurisdiction: 

3.1.9.1. MINING OF AN AREA 
SOUTH OF MTUNZINI 

Tronox currently has since 1998 had a large business investment 
in the UThungulu District Municipality with mining of the 
mineralized sand dunes in an area just north of Mtunzini, 
KwaZulu-Natal, known as the Hillendale Mine, its central 
processing complex ("CPC") at Empangeni for refinement and 
the Fairbreeze and planned Port Durnford mines. 

Regarding the Fairbeeze mine, Tronox has had valid mining rights 
in the uMlalazi Municipality since 1998 and has been legally 
undertaking mining activities on land within this municipal area 
since 2002. Tronox has since 1998 made significant progress 
towards obtaining additional authorisations for furthering the 
Fairbreeze project which will in turn feed the CPC at Empangeni. 

3.1.9.2. ERF 167, MTUNZINI: 
MIXED RESIDENTIAL 
DEVELOPMENT 

The projects is to be known as Ongoye Views which is 
expected to encompass approximately 1,000 residential units 
and approximately 16 commercial and office sites. The total 
construction cost estimated at R1 bn for residential component, 
and R 1 .5bn for the total development (including residential). 
Typically for urban development, an average of 18 direct and 
indirect jobs is created during construction per R1m spend - 
leading to in this instance the creation of 27,000 construction- 
related jobs. Since construction is estimated at 10 years, this 
averages to 2,700 new construction-related jobs per year over 
the 1 0 year period. Once constructed, the development will give 
rise to permanent operational jobs. Assuming a gross leasable 
area of 100,000m2 of office and commercial, this is expected 
to lead to approximately 1,400 permanent jobs (assuming one 
employee per 70m2), most of which would be sourced from the 
local municipal area. The positive spinoff for uMlalazi LM is the 
significant rates income would be generated for the Municipality. 


The project is still on Planning stage, the site is currently not 
serviced and the Environmental Authorization has not yet been 
obtained therefore it is estimated that the project will commence 
in 2017. 

3.1.9.3. KINGDINUZULU: 
SHOPPING CENTRE 
DEVELOPMENT 

The proposed shopping Centre will be located at the intersection 
of R66 and Mthiyani Road joining Kangela Street (P50- 1 ) in Ward 
1 2, King DinuZulu Suburb. The site is surrounded by Residential 
areas. Petrol Station and the Educational Institution across the 
Road; and covers an area of approximately 5 Hectares. The Petrol 
Station will be form part of the Development. The shopping 
centre, measuring approximately 14 200 m" will comprise of 
a supermarket measuring 2 700 m" together with a range of 
smaller shops, line shops, fast food outlet as well as a separate 
motor retail component. The proposed development will lessen 
the distance people travel from their areas of residence to Town 
more especially the King Dinuzulu Residents, Nyanini and 
Sunnydale Residents and the students from UMfolozi College. 

3.1.9.4. E5H0WE 
PRIVATE HOSPITAL 

The proposed hospital will meet the general demands of multi 
discipline medical services. Three operating theatres will be 
equipped with the latest theatre technology and at least one 
will have a laminar flow unit. The hospital will also meet the 
needs of casualty patient through the establishment of a trauma 
unit and other supporting infrastructure. Supporting medical 
services will include a comprehensive radiology unit, pathology 
laboratory services, physiotherapist and other like health care 
related professions. An in-house pharmacy service will service 
in-patients, patients visiting doctors consulting rooms and 
members of the public. A specialized Burns Wound Unit will 
facilitate for serve burns incidents. Fifteen doctors consulting 
suites tailored to individual needs will be available for permanent 
and session doctors. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 


Section C: Spatial Analysis 


3.1.10. LAND CAPABILITY FOR AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION 



Map 12: Land Capability 

LAND CLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTIONS 


1. Very High Potential 

2. High Potential 

3. Good Potential 

No limitation 

Minor limitation 

Moderate limitation 

HIGH POTENTIAL AGRICULTURAL LAND 

A. Moderate Potential 

Permission required to plough land 


5. Restricted Potential 

Severe limitations due to soils and slopes 

NON-ARABLE LAND 

6. Very Restricted Potential 

Non-Arable 


7. Low Potential 

Severe limitations - non-arable 


8. Very Low Potential 

Non-arable 



Table 13: Land Classification Descriptions 

Most of the high potential agricultural land is in private ownership. This land is located along the coastal strip between Mtunzini 
and Gingindlovu - on the lower lying areas. It is also located in the area surrounding the town of Eshowe and extending to the west 
thereof. There is also some very high potential agricultural land situated in the north-eastern part of the Municipal Area. 

3.2. ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS 

3.2.1. HABITATS 

The following critical habitat types exist within the municipality 

■ Coastal Dune forest 

■ Secondary grassland 

■ Estuaries (uMlalazi and Siyaya) 

■ Open space within the towns 

■ Open woodland and forests 


■ Riverine / riparian and swamp forest 

■ Wetland 

■ Mangrove swamp and salt flats 

■ Natural vegetation 


53 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

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3 2 2 KEY 

HYDROLOGICAL FEATURES 

The municipality has two key hydrological features including 
the following: 

3.2.2.1. THE UMLALAZI ESTUARY 

The estuary is easily accessible by road and lies below the 
Mtunzini Village. The river is approximately 5A km long with 
a catchment area of A92 sq. km. approximately 46% of the 
catchment land-cover of the UMIalazi system is agriculture and 
consists mainly subsistence farming, sugar cane and commercial 
forestry. About 1 % of the catchment is urban comprising mainly 
the residential and industrial developments associated with of 
the coastal village of Mtunzini and the town of Eshowe further 
inland. The catchment does not appear to be degraded and 
about 53% of the catchment is natural. This natural vegetation 
is comprised of grassland, bush land and forest. There have 
however been reports of bank erosion as a result of ploughing 
close to the river's edge. About 72 % of the catchment falls within 
traditional Ingonyama trust area. The surrounds of the estuary 
however are owned by the state and managed by Ezemvelo 
KZN Wildlife. 

3.2.2.2. THE MBONGOLWANE 
WETLANDS 

The Mbongolwane Wetlands has survived despite the fact that 
most wetlands within the municipal area have been drained to 
make land available for commercial agriculture and this wetland 
system is therefore particularly critical. Mbongolwane wetland 
is about 400 hectares and is a prime example of a read marsh 
and remains wet even through the dry season. The wetland is a 
source of reds used in the weaving of traditional mats. While a 
large majority of the wetland remains under natural vegetation 
certain parts of the wetland have been drained for cultivation 
of root vegetables. 

3.2.3. PROTECTED AREAS 

The Municipality has 4 proclaimed protected areas. These include 
the following: 

3.2.3.1. DLINZA FOREST 

Established in 1947, this 250 ha forest is uniquely situated 
within the urban environment of Eshowe. The Dlinza Forest 
historically provided a burial site for the Zulu dead during the 
Anglo-Zulu War in Eshowe. The forest is best known for its birds, 
two species in particular, the Spotted Thrush and Delagorgues 
Pigeon are sought after by birdwatchers in the forest. Numerous 
other beautiful species such as Green Coucal, Grey Cuckoo Shrike, 


NarinaTrogon, Trumpeter Hornbill, Red backed Mannikin, Green 
Twinspot and Crowned Eagle are found in the forest. Numerous 
tree plaques provide information of biological interest and 
describe Zulu medicinal use of the various trees. 

3.2.3.2. ENTUMENI FOREST 

Established in 1970, this little-known 750 ha reserve 
consists largely of a gorge covered by forest. It can be found 
approximately 20 km from Eshowe on the Nkandla/Ntumeni 
Road. The Ntumeni Forest is located on a beautiful but strenuous 
terrain, and consists of a spectacular waterfall on the Ngoje 
stream. At this point the rare Longtailed Wagtails are often 
observed along the stream. Birding can be very rewarding with 
species such as Delagorgues Pigeon, Brown Robin, Yellow 
streaked Bulbul, Olive Woodpecker, Grey Cuckoo shrike and 
Black Cuckoo. As with the Dlinza Forest, both blue duiker and 
bushbuck occur in the forest. The grasslands in the reserve are 
home to a herd of zebra, and numerous grassland bird species 
such as the Lazy and Croaking Cisticola. 

3.2.3.3. ONGOYE FOREST 

Ongoye Forest is an exceptionally rare and diverse habitat. It 
is probably the most famous example of the extremely rare 
scarp forests. The Ongoye mountain range is well-drained by 
numerous fast-flowing streams such as the uMlalazi and its 
tributaries the Thondo and the Intuze arising from valley-head 
springs and is of great importance as a water catchment area. It 
has large array of rare and endemic tree and plant species which 
include magnificent giant umzimbeet, Millettia sutherlundii, forest 
mangosteen Garcinia gerrardii, forest water berry, Syzygium 
gerrardii and pondoland fig Ficus bizanae amongst others. The 
cycads Encephalartos ngoyanus and Encephalartos villosus 
are also found here. Birding and hiking are also very popular 
all year round. There are about 1 30 bird species found on the 
reserve. The green barbet is endemic to the forest. Bushbuck, red 
duiker and red squirrel are also found. The giant Wood's cycad, 
Encephalartos woodii, now extinct in the wild, but surviving at the 
botanic gardens in Durban only occurred here. In the past, Ongoye 
forest was protected by the Zulu Royal household because of 
the medicinal value of the plants found there. 

3.2.3.4. UMLALAZI COASTAL 
NATURE RESERVE 

This coastal reserve is situated one km from Mtunzini on the 
KwaZulu-Natal North Coast. UMlalazi was established as a 
protected area in 1948 and is 1 028 hectares in extent. Home 
of the palmnut vulture, which is one of the rarest birds of prey 
in South Africa. There is an easy walk through one of the best 
examples of mangrove swamps in South Africa, where several 
species of. Wildflowers and a great variety of bird life can be seen. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 


Section C: Spatial Analysis 


3.2A BIODIVERSITY 

The biodiversity resources of the country are considered to 
rank amongst the top ten nations with exceptionally high 
levels of biodiversity resources, and as such, the country is of 
global importance for biodiversity conservation, for a number 
of reasons, including the high levels of species-richness and the 
high levels of endemism present (Department of Environmental 
Affairs and Tourism, 2002). 

The uMlalazi Municipality lies within the Maputaland Coastal 
Plain, and its biodiversity is of particular importance in a 
biodiversity-rich country, from a nature conservation perspective, 
for intrinsic reasons, and for the ecosystem services (as below) it 
provides, as it occurs within one of the two biodiversity hotspots. 

Human-kind (and all other creatures) is dependent on 
biodiversity and the ecosystem services, or ecological goods 
and services, these provide. These biodiversity resources not 
only provide all food, fiber, and a range of natural products 
(including medicines derived from plants, but are also responsible 
for climate regulation, water production, and a range of social 
and spiritual benefits, such as tourism. 

3.2.A.1. SUMMARY STATUS 
OF UMLALAZI WEED 
ERADICATION PROGRAM 

The following provides a brief summary of the uMlalazi Weed 
Eradication Program: 

■ The uMlalazi Municipality improved its weed eradication 
program and provided R1 AO 000.00 on its budget. 

■ Special programmes are in place to draw weedicide. 

■ The weed eradication program for Mtunzini is conducted by the 
Mtunzini Conservancy and finances are provided by the 
uMlalazi Municipality. 

■ The Gingindlovu weed eradication program is undertaken by the 
uMlalazi Municipality and temporary workers are employed 
as a job creation project and trained. 

■ The Eshowe weed eradication program was outsourced and 
consequently the contractor has been employed by the 
Municipality as the skill member who now co-ordinates 
temporary workers as a job creation project and supervises 
the weed eradication programme. 

■ The urban areas of Mtunzini, Gingindlovu and Eshowe have 
respective teams with one permanent employee and the rest 
made up of temporary staff and have collectively eradicated 
+ ADO ha of noxious weeds. 

■ The municipality supplies KZN Wildlife with herbicide which 
is then, in turn, through an approved programme distributed 
to the residents free of charge. 

■ The uMlalazi Municipality through its statutory Community 
Services Committee advises all aspects of the environment. 
This Committee was instrumental in the compilation of a 


letter of agreement between the uMlalazi Municipality, the 
Department of Environmental and Agricultural Affairs which is 
a guideline pertaining to environmental impacts and relevant 
legislation all of which streamlines development in rural and 
urban areas. 

3.2.A.2. THREATS 
TO BIODIVERSITY 

Amongst the threats to biodiversity in the municipal area are 
the following: 

■ Landscape transformation, deforestation modification of 
environmental quality through agriculture, commercial 
afforestation and various forms of resource depletion and 
habitat destruction. 

■ Over-harvesting by hunters and anglers (including small wild 
birds and eggs by villagers) (Pringle 1982, Krook, 2005). 

■ The spread of alien invasive plants, and sometimes animals, 
especially plants such as Lantana and Chromalaena. 

■ Wildfire. 

■ Unsympathetic physical development and infrastructure, 
including poorly designed buildings, roads and tracks. 

3.2.5. CLIMATE CHANGE 

As a result of the 2010 Kwanaloga Summit on Rural 
Development and Climate Change and in anticipation of the 
1 7th Conference of Parties (COP 1 7) to the United Nations 
Framework Convention on Climate Change to be held end of 
201 1, the uThungulu District Municipality is addressing climate 
change with the following adaptation and mitigation measures: 

3.2.5.I. ADAPTATION MEASURES 

■ An uThungulu District Round Table discussion was held 
between Kwanaloga and the uThungulu Family of 
Municipalities on 16 February 201 1 at the uThungulu 
Municipal Offices to discuss the recommendations and 
implementation measures as a result of the Kwanaloga 
Summit on Rural Development and Climate Change. 

■ Climate Change issues will be addressed by during the Review 
of the following Sector Plans of the uThungulu IDP: 

■ Current Review of the uThungulu Agricultural Development Plan; 

■ Current Review of the uThungulu Coastal Management 
Programme; 

■ Proposed Refinement of the uThungulu Spatial Development 
Framework; 

■ Proposed Preparation of the State of the Environment 
Report (SOR) as part of the envisaged uThungulu Strategic 
Environmental Assessment (SEA); 

■ Proposed Review of the uThungulu Disaster Management Plan; 

■ Climate Change is a standing item on the agenda of the 
uThungulu Coastal Working Group and the same will apply 
with the proposed uThungulu IDP Sector and Services 
Alignment Forum. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 


3.2.5.2. MITIGATION MEASURES 

With the assistance of the KZN Department of Transport, an 
Integrated Rapid Public Transport Network (IRPTN) Plan is 
currently being prepared to ensure the effective and efficient 
functioning of public transport within the uThungulu district. By 
promoting public transport the carbon footprint of the uThungulu 
district will be reduced. 

When the UDM Energy Sector Plan will be reviewed, climate 
change mitigation measures will be considered. 

The uMlalazi Municipality will be a stakeholder whom the UDM 
will consult in any plan or strategy preparation of reviews. 

3.2.6. STRATEGIC 
ENVIRONMENTAL 
ASSESSMENT 

The uThungulu District Municipality is reviewing the 
Environmental Management Framework, the purpose of which is 
to secure environmental protection and to promote sustainability 
and environmental co-operative governance. The overall 
objective of the EMF is to guide environmental decisions making 
within the district. In view of the development of this framework, 
the uMlalazi municipality will subsequently review its Strategic 
Environmental Assessment in order to align with the provisions 
and strategic imperatives of the EMF. The development of the 
SEA will form part of the full review of the 5-year IDP and SDF. 

3.2.7. SPATIAL: 

SWOT ANALYSIS 

3.2.7.1. STRENGTHS/ 
OPPORTUNITIES 

■ The feasibility of initiating tourism development opportunities 
along the Tugela River needs to be investigated. 

■ The municipality borders on the Indian Ocean and has a 
coastline of approximately 1 7km. This coastline presents 
outstanding opportunities in respect of tourism and 
recreational facilities. 

■ The Goedertrouw/Phobane Dam offers the opportunity for a 
range of water sports, together with camping and picnic spots. It 
is supplementary to the areas of eco-tourism in the uMlalazi area. 

■ The beauty and ambiance with particular reference to the coast, 
the lagoon, indigenous forests and the activities of the 
conservancies active in the area is an asset which has a 
considerable impact on the tourism potential of the municipality. 

■ The uMlalazi Municipality is crossed by a number of important 
transportation routes, such as the N2 Motorway between 
Durban and Richards Bay, the R3A between Richards Bay/ 


Empangeni and Nkwaleni valley to the north of Eshowe, and 
the R66 from the N2 Motorway to Gingindlovu, Eshowe, 
Melmoth, Ulundi and Vryheid. 

3.2.7.2. WEAKNESSES/THREATS 

■ In many instances, the Traditional Authority areas are 
characterized by poor land management practices that 
presents a challenge in respect of the unlocking of the 
agricultural potential that exists. This is exacerbated by poor 
"allocation of land" practices. The roll-out of wall-to-wall rural 
Planning Schemes will assist greatly in this regard. 

■ Traditional Authority areas also accommodate scattered 
settlement on undulating land, posing considerable pressures 
in respect of the provision of basic services. 

■ The urbanisation rate is increasing in the municipal area and 
appropriate responses are required to adequately 
accommodate this tendency. 

■ Rural access roads are in a poor state of repair. This is acerbated 
by the fact that no sphere of government is clear on who is 
responsible for these roads. 

■ Communities tend to settle in proximity to rivers and streams, 
mostly without due consideration of flood lines along these 
water courses. 

3.2.8. ENVIRONMENTAL: 
SWOT ANALYSIS 

The "key environmental issues" are reflected hereunder in the 

form of a "SWOT" analysis: 

3.2.8.1. STRENGTHS 

■ The beauty and ambiance with particular reference to the coast, 
the lagoon, indigenous forests and the activities of the 
conservancies active in the area is an asset which has 
a considerable impact on the tourism potential of the 
municipality. The strong ties that have been forged between 
the uMlalazi Local Municipality and the uThungulu District 
Municipality support the development and promotion of 
tourism. The act that Mtunzini was the first town to be 
declared as a conservancy makes a large contribution to the 
ambiance of the municipality and greatly contributes to the 
tourism potential in the area. 

■ The municipality has a strong focus on social and community 
based project, which is demonstrated in the vision with 
particular reference to a single integrated community and 
service delivery. 

■ The area has good agricultural potential. 

■ The indigenous ecosystems provide habitat for medicinal 
plants, a rich resource for homeopathic and traditional 
medicines and these areas include the Ongoye, Dhlinza and 
Ntumeni Forests. 

■ A coastal and lagoon experience is provided with attractive 
urban nodes. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 


Section C: Spatial Analysis 


■ The municipality presents a large unskilled labour force serving 
as an attraction for any form of industry that could invest in the area. 

■ Access to trade routes is available via the N2 Motorway but 
some access difficulties are experienced from the inland areas 
of the municipality. 

■ The municipality demonstrates a substantial conservation "feel" 
demonstrated by the protected areas in existence. 

■ The municipality has a high value ecosystem good and 
services as a result of the indigenous forest and grasslands. 

■ The region's scenic public open space provides many goods and 
services which contribute to the regional tourism potential. 

■ Two conservancies and four protected areas are in existence 
within the municipal area and there is further potential for 
increasing the conservation areas with a commensurate 
improvement in tourism potential and biodiversity service delivery. 

3.2.8.2. WEAKNESSES 

■ The alignment between municipalities at the local level, the 
district municipality and the provincial government 
departments requires strengthening, particularly between 
the local and district municipality level on the one hand and 
the provincial government departments on the other. 

■ The implementation of the ward committee system shows 
improve communication within the uMlalazi Local Municipality, 
an area which showed earlier weaknesses. 

■ Service delivery within the municipality is problematical due 
to the large area of the municipality and the sparsely 
populated character thereof. This has resulted in community 
dissatisfaction with the integrated development planning 
process in which external service providers regularly fail 
to deliver. 

■ Poverty and unemployment is rife within the rural areas of 
the municipality. A large proportion of the population within the 
municipality is not within the employable age group and this 
further complicates measures for the alleviation of poverty levels. 

■ The lack of a tourism skills base and capital investment in 
respect of tourism development and promotion has limited 
the ability of the municipality to realize its tourism potential. 

■ Access to markets from the rural areas is limited and problematical 
and places limitations on agricultural and tourism potential. 

■ The absence of an environmental chapter as well as from the 
vision of the municipality is to be corrected by the completion 
of the Strategic Environmental Assessment and the 
Environmental Management Plan. 

■ Littering is a serious problem in the urban areas of the 
municipality and has ecological, animal and human health 
and aesthetic impacts with negative consequences for the 
tourism potential and general health in the area. 


■ The degradation of wetlands is occurring as a result of 
cultivation and artificial drainage, river nitrification, dams, 
urbanisation, soil erosion and alien plant invasion and has 
serious consequences for ecological function and water quality. 

■ Informal housing along the banks of rivers and streams and near 
major transportation routes is a weakness requiring attention. 
Informal housing has substantial impacts in respect of water 
pollution due to a lack of sanitation, aesthetics, poor land 
management and health and safety. 

3.2.8.3. OPPORTUNITIES 

■ Social upliftment as a result of economic growth is expected. 

■ Economic growth is expected in areas of tourism in areas such 
as the coastline, near protected areas and indigenous forests. 

■ Agri-industry opportunities exist inland and are related to 
agricultural produce such as sugarcane. 

■ Nodes or the various forms of development should be carefully 
selected or identified. 

■ The provision of housing together with basic services particularly 
in the rural areas and the formalization of current informal and 
overcrowded settlements present an opportunity. 

■ Informing the communities at "grass-root" level will serve to 
integrate development and inform communities of 
development opportunities in its area. 

■ The broadening of the municipality's rates base through the 
valuation of the rural areas and commercial farming areas will 
increase internal funds available for the funding of capital projects. 

■ The N2 Motorway offers a corridor of opportunities in respect of 
tourism and agriculture. 

■ Development in an integrated manner will discourage 
piecemeal development. 

■ Optimization of tourism potential in the area in tandem with 
environmental sustainability can aid poverty alleviation. 

■ Improved tourism signage will also enhance tourism opportunities. 

■ Non-industrial labour intensive recycling of waste presets 
opportunities for employment throughout the municipality. 

■ The creation of an interlinked open space system using the 
protected areas and rivers and streams to enhance the 
aesthetical appeal of the area. 

■ The introduction of a Land Use Management System (LUM5) for 
the entire municipal area. 

■ Some important species of fauna and flora exist within the 
municipality and is of educational and tourism value. 

■ The area is linked to the "Valley of the Kings" by the R66 
transportation route and presents a tourism opportunity. 

■ The area offers a pleasant climate that will also encourage tourism. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 


3.2.8A THREATS 

■ The categorisation of the uMlalazi Local Municipality as a "low- 
impact municipality" is a negative influence on the overall 
image of the municipality, particularly in respect of its ability 
to render essential services. 

■ There is a high prevalence of waterborne diseases as a result of 
the lack of formal engineering services. 

■ The prevalence of HIV/Aids in the Kwa Zulu Natal Province is 
alarmingly high and represents a serious threat to economic 
development in general. 

■ Development pressures will be experienced along the coastline 
and particularly in Mtunzini as an urban area on the coastline. 

■ Much of the population is involved in migrant labour as a result 
of the lack of employment opportunities within the municipal 
area and this has severe social impacts. 

■ High illiteracy rates prevail within the municipality and are a 
limitation for the population restricting it to unskilled jobs 
with a commensurate threat in respect of economic and 
earnings potential. 

■ Poor farming practices in the rural areas in particular are a threat 
to agricultural production. 


■ There is a lack of infrastructure maintenance impacting 
negatively on the aesthetics of the municipality. 

■ Monoculture is resulting in a loss of both genetic and biodiversity 
goods and services produced in the area. 

■ Alien vegetation has a negative impact on water resources in 
the area. 

■ There is a limited understanding of the downstream impacts of 
environmental degradation with apathy towards offenders. 

■ The subdivision of agricultural land into small entities often 
results in non-viable agricultural production units. 

■ The use of pit latrines in low-cost housing development will lead 
to environmental problems. 

■ The migration of biodiversity up and down altitudinal gradients 
is critical to the survival of species during global climatic 
events. Monoculture has created islands of biodiversity in 
the municipality which inhibits the ability of ecosystems to 
adapt and migrate. 

■ The lack of rehabilitation in some areas is an identified problem. 

The Map below depicts the environmental features evident in 

the uMlalazi Municipal Area: 












Map 13: Environmental Features 


A large tract of the Municipal Area, in the south-central part, is classified as a Biodiversity Priority 1 area. There is also a large area 
in the western half of the Municipal Area that is classified as a Biodiversity Priority 1 area. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 


Section C: Spatial Analysis 


3.3. DISASTER 
MANAGEMENT 

3.3.1. UMLALAZI DISASTER 
RISK MANAGEMENT 
POLICY FRAMEWORK 

uMlalazi Local Municipality faces increasing levels of disaster risk. 
It is exposed to a wide range of natural hazards, including severe 
storms that can trigger widespread hardship and devastation. 
The Municipality's extensive agriculture industry, coupled to 
the major transportation routes, inside the municipality as well 
as those leading to other major centres, present numerous 
catastrophic and hazardous materials threats. In addition to 
these natural and human-induced threats and despite ongoing 
progress to extend essential services to poor urban and rural 
communities, large numbers of people live in conditions of 


chronic disaster vulnerability - in underdeveloped, ecologically 
fragile or marginal areas - where they face recurrent natural and 
other threats that range from flooding to informal settlement 
fires. The uMlalazi disaster management Policy Framework 
is the legal instrument specified by the Act to address such 
needs for consistency across multiple interest groups, by 
providing a coherent, transparent and inclusive policy on disaster 
management appropriate for the Municipality of uMlalazi as a 
whole. In this context, the disaster risk management framework 
of uMlalazi Local Municipality recognizes a diversity of risks 
and disasters that occur or may occur in its Municipal area of 
responsibility, and gives priority to developmental measures that 
reduce the vulnerability of disaster-prone areas, communities 
and households. 

Also, in keeping with international and national best practice, the 
uMlalazi disaster risk management framework places explicit 
emphasis on the risk reduction concepts of disaster prevention 
and mitigation, as the core principles to guide disaster risk 
management in the area. 



3.3.2. RISK PROFILING 


RISK 

DROUGHT 

FIRE 

FLOOD 

TORNADO 

EPIDEMIC 

STORM 

TIDAL 

SURGE 

HAZMAT 

AVIATION 

MARITIME 

RAILWAY 

Ward 1 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 






Ward 2 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 






Ward 3 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 






Ward A 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 






Ward 5 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 






Ward 6 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 






Ward 7 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 






Ward 8 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 






Ward 9 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 






Ward 10 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 






Ward 1 1 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 


X 




Ward 1 2 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 






Ward 1 3 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 






Ward 1A 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 






Ward 1 5 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 






Ward 1 6 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 






Ward 17 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 






Ward 18 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 






Ward 19 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 

X 





Ward 20 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 






Ward 21 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 






Ward 22 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 






Ward 23 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 






Ward 2A 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 






Ward 25 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 






Ward 26 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 







Table 14: Ward Risk Profiling 


In terms of Section 53 of the Disaster Managements Act of 
2002 (Act 57 of 2002), each municipality (Metropolitan, District 
and Local) must prepare a Disaster Risk Management Plan for 
its area of responsibility. In order to develop a Disaster Risk 
Management Plan, it is necessary to conduct a Risk Analysis 
which will identify and priorities potential hazards and threats 
that are likely to occur within the area of responsibility of the 
Municipality. For this process to be effective, detailed indigenous 
knowledge is to be sought from the local people in each ward. 
Physical inspections of each ward is also required in order to 
be acquainted with the physical characteristics of each ward. 


the terrain, the altitude, environmental features and any other 
aspects that could have (positive or negative) implications 
on disasters. The table below indicates the common risks 
associated with each ward; 

From the above table, it is apparent that the most common 
risks identified by members in each community are; drought, 
fire, flooding, storm/tornadoes and epidemics. Through this 
process of risk profiling, the municipality can now give priority 
to developmental measures that reduce the vulnerability of 
disaster-prone areas, communities and households. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 















Section C: Spatial Analysis 


3.3.3. INSTITUTIONAL 
ARRANGEMENTS FOR 
DISASTER MANAGEMENT 

Disaster Management is within the Directorate of the Protection 
Services Department. Although there is a need to capacitate the 
unit, the municipality has made progress in terms of filling the 
DM0 vacancy with a suitably qualified officer to efficiently carry 
out disaster management functions. The Disaster Management 
unit (DMU) is also capacitated with 10 qualified fire fighter as 
well as 1 2 cadet fire fighters. The municipality also enjoys the 
serves of volunteers whom which form part of the Fire Wise 
Program. In terms of EPWP, there are contracted beneficiaries 
from the program who participate in Working for Fire and Weed 
Eradication Program. The post for Manager Environmental 
Health has also been filled and this unit also assist the DMU in 
terms of environmental considerations taken when managing 
and preventing disasters. 

The uMlalazi Municipality has two fire stations situated in 
Gingindlovu and Eshowe. There are appeals for the municipality 
to establish a third fire station in Mtunzini and two satellite fire 
stations in Mbongolwane and KwaBulawayo. For the 2015/16 
financial year, the municipality has advertised for proposals 


the sourcing of funds and project management services on 
a turnkey basis in respect of projects for which funds have 
been sourced for firefighting infrastructure. The municipality is 
currently enjoying the services of ten fire fighters within the two 
fire stations. The table below indicates the status on disaster 
management within the municipality. 

3.3.A. INFRASTRUCTURAL 
ARRANGEMENTS 

The uMlalazi Municipality has two fire stations situated in 
Gingindlovu and Eshowe. There are appeals for the municipality 
to establish a two satellite fire stations in Mbongolwane and 
KwaBulawayo. The main objective of the municipality is to 
construct new fully equipped fire and emergency service centres 
in Eshowe and Mtunzini which will benefit residents, businesses 
and the agricultural sector around these areas and the community 
at large. The second objective in terms disaster management 
is to refurbish the Gingindlovu Fire Station. These centers will 
ensure optimal provision of fire and rescue serves in towns and 
surrounding areas. The municipality has hence undertaken the 
process of the reconstruction of the existing fire stations and 
the establishment of a new fire station in Mtunzini. The business 
plan for funding of these projects outlines the costs as follows; 


ITEM 

DESCRIPTION OF THE PROJECT 

ESTIMATED COST 

1. 

Construction of Eshowe Fire and Emergency Services 

R 1A773 187 

2. 

Construction of Mtunzini Fire and Emergency Services 

R 14 773 187 

3. 

Refurbishment of Gingindlovu Fire and Emergency Services 

R 7 077 387 


INSTITUTIONAL INDICATORS 

STATUS 

1. Disaster Management Plan 

Approved 3/2013 

2. Disaster Management Policy Framework 

Approved 06/2012 

3. Disaster Management Interdepartmental Committee 

In place 

4. Disaster Management Portfolio Committee 

In place 

5. Disaster Management Advisory Forum 

Operational 

6. Disaster Management Personnel 

1 xDMO 

10 X Qualified Firefighters 

12 X Cadet Firefighters 

7. Disaster Management Volunteers 

Only firefighting (Fire wise Program) 


Table 15: Status of Disaster Management 


3.3.5. OPERATIONAL PLAN 
FOR DISASTER MANAGEMENT 

In terms of the provisions of the uMlalazi Disaster Risk 
Management Policy Framework, the Municipality has developed 
Operational Plans which are aimed at:- 

■ Defining Response Protocols; 

■ Contingency Planning 


■ Access to Resources for: 

i. Immediate relief; 

ii. Equipment; and 

iii. Recovery and rehabilitation. 

■ Guidelines for: 

i. Funding; and 

ii. Declaration of a Municipal State of Disaster. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 








3.3.6. IDENTIFIED 
ROLE PLAYERS 

The key role players in the uMlalazi Disaster Management Plan 
have been identified and are actively involved therein. These 
role players are: 

■ the Municipal Manager and the five departmental managers; 

■ the Manager of Protection Services obviously is key to the 
overall structure; 

■ no-governmental organisations (NGO's); 

■ community based organisation (NGO's); 

■ the South African Police Service (SAPS); 

■ the South African National Defense Force (SANDF); 

■ private companies and enterprises; and 

■ The local commercial sector. 

3.3.7. MANAGEMENT 
STRUCTURE 

The management structure for the uMlalazi Disaster Management 
Plan is the following: 


■ The Municipal Manager and a Management Committee 
consisting of senior officials of the municipality execute the 
core management function. 

■ A Health and Medical Committee which is headed by the 
Manager of Community Services and includes as members 
thereof the Senior Medical Superintendent of the Eshowe 
Provincial Hospital, the District Surgeon, Senior Health Nurse 
and others. 

■ A Welfare and Relief Committee which is headed by the 
Manager Corporate Services of the municipality with other 
officials of the municipality. 

■ A Response and Rescue Committee headed by the Manager 
Protection Services of the municipality with representation 
thereon by the Provincial Area Manager of the Kwa Zulu 
Natal (KwaZulu-Natal) Department of Transport, the Station 
Commissioner of the South African Police Service. 

■ A Reconstruction Committee headed by the Manager 
Engineering Services of the municipality, officials of the 
municipality and the General Manager of the Kwa Zulu Natal 
(KwaZulu-Natal) Department of Transport. 

■ A Development Committee headed by the Manager Financial 
Services of the municipality and other officials of that department. 


STRENGTHS 


WEAKNESSES 


Disaster Risk Management Policy Framework is effectively 
in place. 

Risk Assessment has been conducted to identify all Disaster 
Risks and have formulated a Disaster Reduction model to 
mitigate casual disaster risks. 

Operational Plan effectively in place. 

10 Fire Fighters employed to combat disasters. 

12 Fire Cadets. 

Training provided to fire fighters 
2 active Fire stations and 3 Fire Trucks and 2 Fire Bakkies 
and 1 Disaster management vehicle. 

Fire Hydrants to be install on street curbs. 

Catchment Management Forum is operational. 

Budget for Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief. 
Land Use Management Scheme in place. 


OPPORTUNITES 


■ Funding arrangements for Disaster Management insufficient. 

■ Shortage of Staff. 

■ Poor Road Infrastructure in rural areas and overall 
topography makes rural areas inaccessible. 

■ Slow Water and Sanitation projects. 

■ Unplanned allocation of TA land. 


THREATS 


Rural Fire prevention programs 
Upgrading of Fire fighting/ Disaster infrastructure. 
EPWP Programs (Working on Fire, Food for waste,) 
OSS flagship programme. 

Awareness Campaigns in Communities and schools. 
Rural Housing Developments 
Fast track electrification projects 
Satellite fire station. 

Sidewalks to prevent road accidents. 

Installation of lightning conductors. 


■ Water Shortage/Drought. 

■ Alien weeds in rivers. 

■ (Sugar Cane) Fires. 

■ Slums/Informal Settlements - unsafe practices. 

■ Crime. 

■ Road Accidents. 

■ Some rural households rely on candles for lighting and fire 
for cooking. 

■ Climate Change. 


Table 16 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 






Section C: Spatial Analysis 


3.4. DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS 


3.4.1. DEMOGRAPHIC INDICATORS 


AREA 2001 2011 


3.A.1.1. POPULATION SIZE 

Total Populaticin of Uthungylu 


400000 

jum 

3DD0D0 
200000 

Figure 6: uThungulu DM - Total Population Size per LM (2011) 


UThungulu DM 

885,965 

907,519 

Mfolozi 

106,942 

122,889 

Mthonjaneni 

50,382 

47,818 

Nkandia 

133,602 

114,416 

Ntambanana 

84,771 

74,336 

uMhIathuze 

289,190 

334,459 

UMIalazi 

221,078 

213,601 


Table 17: UDM Total Population 



The total population size of the uThungulu District Municipality has increased from 885 965 in 2001 to 907,519 in 2011. UMIalazi has 
a decrease of 3% over the same time period. A possible reason for this is that people - particularly males - move out of the latter two 
areas to seek for employment opportunities elsewhere - most notable uMhIathuze LM. This links directly to the increase in urbanisation. 

3.4.1. 2. POPULATION DENSITY (2011) 

The area surrounding the town of Eshowe has the highest population Density, i.e. More than 300 persons per km2. The Eshowe, 
Gingindlovu and Mtunzini triangle also has relatively high population density, i.e. between 201 and 300 persons per km^ 



Map 14: Population Density 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 







3.4.13. POPULATION GROWTH 

In the period 1996 to 2011, uMlalazi LM was the only LM with a negative population growth rate, i.e. -0.8%. In the same period, 
uMhIathuze LM had a growth rate of 7.7%. 

In the period 2001 to 201 1, the LMs of Ntambanana, uMlalazi, Mthonjaneni and Nkandia, experienced negative population growth. 
As indicated previously, this is indicative of urbanization to larger urban centers with the perception that employment opportunities 
are available. 


MUNICIPALITY 

POPULATION 
GROWTH RATE 

POPULATION 
GROWTH RATE 


(1996-2001) 

(2001-2011) 

UThungulu 

3.0 

0.2 

Mfolozi 

2.1 

1.4 

uMhIathuze 

7.7 

1.5 

Ntambanana 

3.1 

-1.3 

uMlalazi 

-0.8 

-0.3 

Mthonjaneni 

6.3 

-0.5 

Nkandia 

0.6 

-1.6 


Table 18: Population Growth - uThungulu DM and LMs within 
the District (1996 - 2001, 2001 - 201 1) 


PcpuldtlDn Growth Rates of Uthuruulu 
DM and uMlalail LM from lS 96 to 2011 

lA 

iSt 

r^uliltoii Growth Rile (i^g&iaoi! 

Growth Rale ( 2001 - 2011 } 

Figure 7: Population Growth of UDM 1996-2001 


3.4.I.4. HOUSEHOLDS 

3.4.I.4.I. NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS, HOUSEHOLD DISTRIBUTION AND 
AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD SIZE 



Number of Households 


250 000 
ZOO WO 
150 wo 
IWOOO 
50000 
0 



Tgrt^l hymtwr flf HcwvehcWS 


Figure 8: Number of Households 


■19» ^2mi ■2C11 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 64 

XX>0<XXXXXXX>000000000000 







Section C: Spatial Analysis 


UMLALAZI 

1996 

2001 

2011 

Total Population 

230 205 

209 111 

206 961 

Number of Households 

3A775 

38 AA6 

A5 062 

Average Household Size 

6.6 

5.A 

A.6 


Table 19: Number of Households 


The above indicates that, whilst there has been a decrease in the total population size between 1 996 to 2001 and again between 
2001 and 2011, there has been an increase in the number of households over the same time periods. The reason for this, as is 
evident also in the next table and figure, is that household sizes have decreased. 

3.4.1.4.2. HOUSEHOLD DISTRIBUTION 

Households are more densely settled in the area surrounding Eshowe town and to the east thereof. The settlement pattern in the 
remainder of the Municipal area is low density scattered settlement. The Settlement pattern also shows that there are denser 
settlements along corridors and major routes, which may indicate that people are settling closer to access to transportation. 



Map 15: Settlement Patterns 


3.4.1.4.3. AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD SIZE 

There has been a significant decrease in Average Household Sizes between 1996 and 2001, i.e. from an average of 6.6 persons 
per household to 5. A persons. This trend continued and average household sizes decreased to A. 6 persons per household in 201 1 . 
The largest households (more than 6 members per household) are located in Wards 22 and 2A, in the north-eastern part of the 
Municipal Area. Whilst the population density in Eshowe town and surrounds is the highest in the Municipal Area, Household Sizes 
are also the smallest, i.e. less or equal to A members per household. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 






3A1A4. FEMALE HEADED HOUSEHOLDS 


UMLALAZI 

1996 

2001 

2011 

No. of household 
headed by women 

17 317 

22 157 

24913 

% of female headed 
households 

49,8 

57,6 

55,3 


Table 20: % of Female Headed Households 


u 
u 

L1H- UHL ami 

Figure 9: % of Female Headed Households 



Between 1996 and 2001, there has been a significant increase in the % of households headed by women, i.e. from 49.8% to 57.9%. 
Between 2001 and 201 1 this decreased slightly to 55.3%. A possible reason for this is that males seek employment outside of the 
Municipal area, such as at Vryheid, Richards Bay, Durban and Gauteng. The slight reduction in the % of female headed households 
between 2001 and 201 1 could possibly be as a result of returning migrant labourers (males) from the declining mining sector in 
Gauteng and surrounds. 


3.4.1.4.5. CHILD HEADED HOUSEHOLDS 

There has a significant reduction between 1 996 and 2001 in the % of households headed by children, i.e. from 1 .8% to 0.6%. There has, 
however, between 2001 and 2011, been an increase from 0.6% to 1 .2%. The 1 .2% represents some 541 households headed by children. 


% of Households Headed by Children 

1996 

2001 

2011 

1.8 

0.6 

1.2 


Table 21: % of Households Headed by Children 


S Li 



Hfi HGL HtL 


H i i liP^r P U i ■ 

Figure 10: % of Households Headed by Children 


3.4.I.5. GENDER RATIO 

In 201 1 the male to female ratio within the uMlalazi Municipal Area was 45 males: 55 females. A possible reason for this is that 
males seek employment outside of the Municipal area, such as at Vryheid, Richards Bay, Durban and Gauteng. 


GENDER 

TOTAL 

% 

Male 

20 149 

45 

Female 

24913 

55 

Total 

45 062 

100 


Table 22: Gender Ratio (2011) 


at HDUs&hald by Gender (20 11) 

■M^le 

Figure 11: Gender Ratio (201 1) Gender Ratio (2011) 



UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 














Section C: Spatial Analysis 


3.A.1.6. AGE DISTRIBUTION 


AGE 

1996 

2001 

2011 

COHORT 

MALE 

FEMALE 

TOTAL 

MALE 

FEMALE 

TOTAL 

MALE 

FEMALE 

TOTAL 

0-A 

14,880 

15,144 

30,025 

12,892 

13,157 

26,048 

14,297 

14,217 

28,515 

5-9 

16,009 

16,005 

32,014 

15,214 

15,306 

30,519 

12,799 

12,532 

25,331 

10-1A 

15,919 

16,524 

32,444 

15,579 

15,572 

31,151 

13,145 

12,543 

25,688 

15-19 

12,936 

13,885 

26,821 

14,194 

14,773 

28,967 

13,351 

13,235 

26,586 

20-24 

9,213 

11,507 

20,720 

9,022 

10,497 

19,519 

9,742 

11,168 

20,910 

25-29 

6,456 

8,755 

15,211 

6,472 

8,642 

15,114 

7,068 

9,006 

16,074 

30-34 

5,255 

8,044 

13,298 

4,931 

6,806 

11,737 

5,057 

6,480 

11,537 

35-39 

4,511 

6,370 

10,881 

4,482 

6,804 

11,285 

4,434 

5,578 

10,012 

40-44 

3,781 

5,128 

8,909 

3,779 

5,701 

9,480 

3,555 

5,000 

8,554 

45-49 

3,421 

5,108 

8,530 

3,148 

4,448 

7,595 

3,336 

5,250 

8,586 

50-54 

2,419 

3,238 

5,657 

2,902 

4,744 

7,645 

2,791 

4,351 

7,142 

55-59 

2,388 

3,766 

6,154 

2,043 

2,907 

4,950 

2,552 

3,689 

6,241 

60-64 

1,684 

3,406 

5,090 

1,868 

3,640 

5,509 

2,379 

4,083 

6,461 

65-69 

1,641 

3,210 

4,852 

1,313 

2,667 

3,979 

1,469 

2,127 

3,596 

70-74 

951 

1,697 

2,648 

1,043 

2,482 

3,525 

1,121 

2,281 

3,402 

75-79 

651 

1,327 

1,978 

604 

1,213 

1,817 

538 

1,581 

2,119 

80-84 

302 

605 

907 

364 

1,013 

1,377 

419 

1,211 

1,631 

85+ 

191 

575 

766 

234 

625 

860 

355 

863 

1,218 

Total 

102,610 

124,294 

226,903 

100,082 

120,995 

221,078 

98,407 

115,194 

213,601 


Table 23: Age Distribution - 1996, 2001 and 201 1 


2011 Male 


uMlalazi 


2011 Female 



40^1 

M-14 

Id- 14 
0-4 



0 SOW ifl«o n<m 


Figure 12: Age Distribution (2011) 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 
















In comparing the age distribution of the population within the 
uMlalazi Municipal Area between 1996, 2001 and 2011, the 
following is noted: 

There is a steady increase in the number of people per age 
category from 20 years and older. This means that the pyramid 
structure, as presented in the graph is indicating a broadening 
trend from people aged 20 years and older. The population is 
becoming older. It is typical of developing countries. Further, 
the age distribution also indicates a reduction in the age 
categories of 5 yrs to 19yrs. What is however interesting 
to note is the number of persons in the age category 0 to A 
yrs (or from 2007 to 2011) has increased significantly the 
expectation would have been that this category should also 
have shrunk. The reason for a "baby boom" from 2007 to 
201 1 is not fully known, however, this period coincides with 
the global economic recession. Could it be that due to jobs lost 
males have returned to the area and hence the baby boom? 
This, however, is not supported by changes in the Gender 
Ration within the Municipal area over the same period. 

3.A.I.7. HEALTH: 

HIV/AIDS PREVALENCE 

HIV/AIDS has had a major impact on both the quality of life 
of communities and families and on the economy. A number 
of initiatives have been implemented through the National 
Department of Health to combat the current epidemic however 
major challenges still remain. Within uMlalazi, the number of 


HIV positive persons has decreased at an average annual 
growth rate of -1.0% between 2001 and 2011, bringing the 
percentage of the population with HIV to 1 5.5% of the total 
population. The number of AIDS related deaths has increased 
at an average annual growth rate of 1.2% between 2001 and 
2011, with AIDS deaths accounting for about 60.A% of total 
deaths in the municipality. This highlights the severity of the 
current situation and the need for interventions that target and 
attempt to address these HIV/AIDS challenges. 

The impact of HIV/Aids is very serious issue and should be 
incorporated into whatever strategies or developments are 
undertaken in an area. Typical impacts of AIDS include decreased 
productivity of workers, increased absenteeism and additional 
costs of training of new workers. It also represents a greater 
demand and pressure on health facilities and as the statistics 
gathered from antenatal clinics indicate a very real problem 
of AIDS orphans and child (minor) headed households. These 
factors must be taken cognizance of when devising local 
economic development strategies. The concerns about the 
impact of HIV on uThungulu need to be reiterated as KwaZulu- 
Natal has the highest HIV prevalence rate of all the provinces. 

3.A.I.8. EDUCATION 

The figure below displays the distribution of the highest level 
of education received by the population: 


■ No ichooNng 

■ Some primary 

■ primary 

■ Somt j«prnHry 

■ IQ /Form $ 

■ KiBhar 

■ Othtr 

■ Un? p«cili?d 

- Nol ippticiblt (childrtn youngtr thin fhr* 

years, irrsiitutional populatkHi and transients) 



Figure 1 3: Distribution of the Highest Level of Education (Census 2011) 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 


Section C: Spatial Analysis 


3A2. KEY FINDINGS 
(INCLUDINGTRENDS) 


■ There has been a steady decline in population figures within the 
uMlalazi Municipal Area from 1996 to 2011, i.e. from 230,205 
people in 1996 to 213,601 (StatsSA). This can be as a result of 
out-migration of people - particularly men - to Empangeni/ 
Richards Bay, Durban and mining areas in Gauteng and 
elsewhere. 

■ There has been a significant decrease in Average Household 
Sizes between 1996 and 2001, i.e. from an average of 6.6 
persons per household to 5. A persons. This trend continued 
and average household sizes decreased to A.6 persons per 
household in 2011. 

■ Denser settlement has been identified: 

■ Along main transport routes 

■ In the north-eastern third of the Municipal Area - between 
Eshowe, Empangeni and Gingindlovu 

■ There are more females than males (55: A5) within the 
Municipal area. This is likely the result of males seeking 
work elsewhere. 

■ The Municipality has a very young population, i.e. some 59.47% 
of the population is less than 20 years of age. 

■ There are very high dependency ratios in the south-western 
third of the Municipal Area, along the Tugela River. Whilst 
settlement densities appear to be relatively low, and the 
settlement pattern is scattered, this area also e (seems to 
be some text missing) 

■ Experience severe poverty and high illiteracy levels. 

■ There is a steady increase in the number of people per age 
category from 20 years and older. This means that the 
pyramid structure is indicating a broadening trend from people 
aged 20 years and older. The population is becoming older. It 
is typical of developing countries. Further, the age distribution 
also indicates a reduction in the age categories of 5 yrs to 


1 9yrs. What is however interesting to note is the number of 
persons in the age category 0 to A yrs (or from 2007 to 201 1 ) 
has increased significantly. The expectation would have been 
that this category should also have shrunk. The reason for a 
"baby boom" from 2007 to 201 1 is not fully known - however 
this period coincides with the global economic recession. 

3.5. MUNICIPAL 
TRANSFORMATION 
AND ORGANISATIONAL 
DEVELOPMENT 
ANALYSIS 

3.5.1. MUNICIPAL 
TRANSFORMATION 

Municipal Transformation plays an integral role in the maximizing 
of sustainable service delivery. UMlalazi Municipality operates 
within a sphere of continuous progressive transformation. 
This is made possible through the implementation of 
transformative strategies which will ultimately feed into building 
a strong municipal administrative system and processes. The 
Municipality has an Employment Equity Plan in place and it is 
being implementing. It is reviewed annually. Further to this, the 
municipality has developed progressive strategies to overcome 
the following challenges in which the municipality is faced with; 

■ Human resource capacity constraints. 

■ Shortage of skilled staff within the organization 

■ Improve the management of service providers 

■ Improve and continuously upgrade ICT within the organisation 



3.5.2. ORGANISATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 


3.5.2.1 . INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS 

The structure established to manage all aspects of the Municipality is summarized as follows: 

The Council Executive/Committee served by the Municipal Manager. 

Six departments, namely: 

■ Engineering Services; 

■ Protection Services; 

■ Community Services; 

■ Financial Services; and 

■ Corporate Services. 

■ Planning and Development 

The Section 56 positions are filled for the above posts. There are currently only twelve vacancies (see organograms overleaf), which 
translates to a vacancy rate of 2.8%. 90% of these vacancies are non-managerial posts. It shall be noted that there is no Human 
Resource Strategy in place; however, it will be included in the Final IDP Document which will be adopted in June 2015. 

3.5.2.2. POWERS AND FUNCTIONS 


The following table indicates the Powers and Functions for uMlalazi Municipality: 


LOCAL FUNCTION 

DISTRICT FUNCTION 

SHARED FUNCTION I 

■ Air Pollution Control 

■ Electricity Reticulation 

■ Fire Fighting Services 

■ Building Regulations Enforcement 

■ Municipal Health Services 

■ Local Tourism 

■ Planning and Development control 

■ Potable Water 

■ Municipal Airport 

■ Child-Care Facilities 

■ Sanitation 

■ Municipal Planning 

■ Pontoons, Jetties, Ferries, Piers, Harbors 


■ Municipal Public Transport 

■ Storm Water Management 


■ Cemeteries, Funeral Parlors 

(Built-Up Areas). 


and Crematoria 

■ Trading Regulations. 


■ Markets 

■ Beaches and Amusement Facilities. 


■ Municipal Abattoirs. 

■ Billboards and Display of 


■ Municipal Roads. 

Advertisements in Public Places 


■ Refuse Removal, Refuse Dumps and 

■ Cleansing. 

■ Control of Public Nuisances. 

■ Control of Sale of Liquor to the Public. 

■ Facilities for the Accommodation, 

Care and Burial of Animals. 

■ Fencing and Fences. 

■ Licensing of Dogs. 

■ Local Amenities. 

■ Local Sports Facilities. 

■ Municipal Parks and Recreation. 

■ Noise Pollution. 

■ Pounds. 

■ Public Places. 

■ Street Trading. 

■ Street Lighting. 

■ Traffic and Parking. 


Solid Waste. 


Table 24: Municipal Powers and Functions 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 






Section C: Spatial Analysis 


3.5.23. STAFF COMPOSITION AND EQUITY 

The following table depicts the staff composition of the uMlalazi Municipality. The information only reflects the staff that is permanently 
employed by the municipality. Councilors, Temporary staff and EPWP employees are not accounted for in this table. The Staff 
composition of a total of 305 fixed employees, categorizes staff into race and gender. 


1 

OCCUPATIONAL 

TASK 

STRENGHT 

WHITES 

INDIANS 

COLOUREDS 

AFRICANS 

TOTA FEMALES I 

1 

LEVELS 

GRADES 


B 

1 

1 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

fl 

1 

Top 

Management 

sec57 

5 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

5 

100 

5 

0 

100 

0 

0 

2 

Dep CFO 

19 

1 

1 

20 

1 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 


0 

3 

Senior 

Management 

15-16 

15 

3 

20 

2 

1 

1 

7 

0 

1 

0 

0 

0 

0 

11 

73 

10 

1 

80 

3 

20 

4 

Professionally 
qualified & 
experienced 
specialists 
& mid- 
management 

11-14 

39 

12 

31 

5 

7 

3 

8 

1 

2 

0 

0 

0 

0 

24 

62 

15 

9 

69 

18 

46 

5 

Skilled technical 
& academically 
qualified 
workers, junior 
mgt, supervisor, 
foreman & 
superintendents 

9-10 

33 

3 

9 

2 

1 

3 

9 

2 

1 

2 

6 

1 

1 

25 

76 

16 

9 

91 

12 

36 

6 

General 
skilled & 
descretionery 
decision 
making 

6-8 

84 

6 

7 

3 

3 

6 

7 

2 

4 

1 

1 

1 

0 

71 

85 

53 

18 

93 

26 

31 

7 

Basic skilled 
and defined 
decision 

2-5 

185 

2 

1 

2 

0 

1 

1 

1 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

158 

85 

127 

59 

86 

59 

32 


TOTAL PERMANENT 

362 

27 

7 

15 

12 

14 

4 

6 

8 

3 

1 

2 

1 

276 

76 

191 

87 

81 

97 

27 


Non-Permanent 

Employees 

24 

0 

0 

0 

0 

1 

4 

0 

1 

0 

0 

0 

0 

18 

75 

9 

8 

79 

9 

38 


TOTAL 

386 

27 

7 

15 

12 

15 

4 

6 

9 

3 

1 

2 

1 

294 

76 

200 

95 

81 

106 

27 


Table 25: Staff Composite and Equity 

3.5.2.4. ORGANISATIONAL 
STRUCTURE / ORGANOGRAM 

The municipality adopted the new organogram in June 201 5. Within the 
new organogram, the municipality had budgeted for an additional 51 new 
positions which were advertised in the 201 5/1 6 financial year. This was 
in order to mitigate the challenge that the municipality was facing with 
respect to human capacity. Through this process, there were 61 vital 
positions that the municipality filled adding to job creation and poverty 


alleviation within the municipal area. Further to this, the municipality has 
employed capable and experienced staff within various sections of the 
organization so as to align itself with the requirements SPLUMA which 
have taken effect in this financial year. Central to this, the municipality will 
also capacitate the Office of the Mayor which will result in the employment 
of a Youth Manager as well as the Communications Manager. The adopted 
organogram below outlines clearly the new organizational structure 
of the political and macro structure of the municipality. The broader 
organisational structure is annexed to this document. 



PAGE 1.1 PAGE 1.2 PAGE 1.3 PAGE 1.4 

Figure 14: Office Bearers Structure 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 




















OFFICE OF THE MAYOR 


NOTE: ALL POSITIONS REPORTING TO 
POLITICAL OFFICE BEARERS WILL BE 
SUBJECT TO A FIXED TERM CONTRACT IN 
ACCORDANCE WITH THE TERM OF THE 
POLITICAL OFFICE 




EXECUTIVE 

SECRETARY 


Figure 15: Office of the Mayor 


PAGE 1.1 


NOTE: ALL POSITIONS REPORTING TO 
POLITICAL OFFICE BEARERS WILL BE 
SUBJECT TO A FIXED TERM CONTRACT IN 
ACCORDANCE WITH THE TERM OF THE 
POLITICAL OFFICE 



Figure 16: Office of the Deputy Mayor 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 72 

^<XX>00<XXXXXXX>00000000000 





























Section C: Spatial Analysis 



Figure 17: Office of the Speaker 


NOTE: ALL POSITIONS REPORTING TO 
POLITICAL OFFICE BEARERS WILL BE 
SUBJECT TO A FIXED TERM CONTRACT IN 
ACCORDANCE WITH THE TERM OF THE 
POLITICAL OFFICE 



Figure 18: Office of the Chief Whip 


MUNICIPAL 

MANAGER 


DIRECTOR 

CORPORATE 

SERVICES 

PAGES 

CHIEF 

FINANCIAL 

OFFICER 

PAGE A 

DIRECTOR 

COMMUNITY 

SERVICES 

PAGES 

DIRECTOR 

ENGINEERING 

SERVICES 

PAGE 6 

DIRECTOR 

PROTECTION 

SERVICES 

PAGE? 

DIRECTOR 
PLANNING AND 
DEVELOPMENT 
PAGES 


Figure 19: Macro Structure 


73 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

o<xxxxxx>ooooooooo<x>o<xxx>< 



























3.5.2.5. MUNICIPAL INSTITUTIONAL CAPACITY AND CRITICAL POSTS 
3.5.2.5.1. CRITICAL POSTS 

The posts of Municipal Manager, as well as all Section 56 posts, are considered as critical posts. All these posts, with the exception 
of the Director: Planning and Development post are filled within uMlalazi Municipal Organization. This position has been budgeted for 
and the municipality is in pursuit of a suitably qualified candidate in which to fill this critical post. Within the 2015/1 6 Financial year, 
the municipality made available a large number of posts and the following table outlines the various posts which the municipality 
has filled in the 2015/16 financial year; 


NO 

EMPLOYEE NAME 

GENDER 

DATE APPOINTED 

OCCUPATION 

DEPARTMENT 

1. 

5 M Mabaso 

F 

01 August 201 5 

Fluman Resources Clerk 

Corporate Services 

2. 

CZulu 

F 

01 August 2015 

Fluman Resources Clerk 

Corporate Services 

3. 

H N Mbeje 

M 

01 August 2015 

General Assistant 

Protection Services 

A. 

1 5 Buthelezi 

F 

01 August 2015 

Library Assistant 

Corporate Services 

5. 

5 N Mchunu 

F 

01 August 2015 

Library Assistant 

Corporate Services 

6. 

5 Z Hlongwa 

F 

01 August 201 5 

Library Assistant 

Corporate Services 

7. 

5 C Ngema 

M 

01 August 2015 

Library Assistant 

Corporate Services 

8. 

R Ganas 

F 

01 August 2015 

Library Assistant 

Corporate Services 

9. 

N P Mkhwanazi 

F 

01 August 2015 

General assistant 

Protection Services 

10. 

N Z Mwandia 

F 

01 August 201 5 

General Assistant 

Protection Services 

11. 

H H Magwaza 

F 

01 August 2015 

General Assistant 

Protection Services 

12. 

TGSZulu 

M 

01 August 2015 

Technical Officer 

Engineering Services 

13. 

B N Mthethwa 

M 

20 August 2015 

Fire Fighter 

Protection Services 

14. 

B C Crawford 

F 

01 September 2015 

Assistant Librarian 

Corporate Services 

15. 

M L Buthelezi 

M 

01 October 2015 

Manager Communications 

Office of the Mayor 

16. 

N P Mohlomi 

F 

01 November 2015 

Executive Secretary 

Office of the Speaker 

17. 

P P Sibiya 

M 

01 November 2015 

Senior Manager 

Supply Chain 

Financial 

Services Department 

18. 

P K Mthiyane 

F 

12 November 2015 

Manager LED 

Planning and 

Development Department 

19. 

B Mthethwa 

F 

18 January 2016 

Administration Officer (IGR) 

Municipal 

Manager's Office 

20. 

D N Mhlongo 

M 

10 February 2016 

Training and 

Development Officer 

Corporate Services 

21. 

5 5 Ngcobo 

M 

10 February 2016 

Committee Officer 

Corporate 

Services Department 

22. 

P B Sibisi 

F 

15 February 2016 

Flealth and Safety Officer 

Corporate 

Services Department 

23. 

N P DIamini 

F 

01 March 2016 

Employee Assistant 
Programme Officer 

Corporate Services 
Department 

24. 

R N Z Fakude 

F 

01 March 2016 

IT Manager 

Corporate Services 
Department 

25. 

YZMkhize 

F 

15 February 2016 

Control Room Operator 

Protection Services 
department 

26. 

M 5 Gamede 

M 

10 March 2016 

Supervisor Control Room 

Protection Services 

27. 

B B Ntombela 

M 

07 March 2016 

Relief Clerk 

Protection Services 









Section C: Spatial Analysis 


NO 

EMPLOYEE NAME 

GENDER 

DATE APPOINTED 

OCCUPATION 

DEPARTMENT 

28. 

LHZulu 

M 

10 February 2016 

Disaster 

Management Officer 

Protection Services 

29. 

M E Sangweni 

M 

10 April 2016 

Station Officer 

Protection Services 

30. 

R Chetty 

F 

10 March 2016 

Licensing Clerk 

Protection Services 

31. 

5 G Nhlengethwa 

M 

01 January 2016 

Clerk 

Financial Services 

32. 

5 Z 5 Mzimela 

M 

01 January 2016 

Fleet Management Officer 

Financial Services 

33. 

L 1 Mdlalose 

F 

16 March 2016 

Cashier 

Financial Services 

3A. 

Al Phiri 

M 

01 January 2016 

Manager 

Environmental Services 

Community Services 

35. 

W N Zungu 

M 

01 January 2016 

Programme Facilitator 

Community Services 

36. 

H M Thulare 

M 

02 December 2015 

Programme Facilitator 

Community Services 

37. 

5 B Mgwaba 

M 

01 February 2016 

General Assistant 

Community Services 

38. 

5 N Buthelezi 

F 

01 February 2016 

General Assistant 

Community Services 

39. 

5 G Mahlatshana 

F 

01 February 2016 

General Assistant 

Community Services 

AO. 

M F Myeza 

M 

01 February 2016 

General Assistant 

Community Services 

A1. 

5 Buthelezi 

M 

01 February 2016 

General Assistant 

Community Services 

A2. 

M D Mhlongo 

M 

01 February 2016 

General Assistant 

Community Services 

A3. 

B Buthelezi 

M 

01 February 2016 

General Assistant 

Community Services 

AA. 

M D Msane 

M 

01 February 2016 

General Assistant 

Community Services 

A5. 

N Thembani 

F 

01 February 2016 

General Assistant 

Engineering Services 

A6. 

A 5 Zulu 

M 

01 February 2016 

General Assistant 

Engineering Services 

A7. 

B P Maphumulo 

F 

01 February 2016 

General Assistant 

Engineering Services 

A8. 

5 Nzuza 

F 

01 February 2016 

General Assistant 

Engineering Services 

A9. 

5 R Cele 

M 

01 February 2016 

General Assistant 

Engineering Services 

50. 

T Mpungose 

M 

01 February 2016 

General Assistant 

Engineering Services 

51. 

T P Khoza 

F 

01 February 2016 

General Assistant 

Engineering Services 

52. 

5 5 Thabethe 

M 

01 February 2016 

General Assistant 

Engineering Services 

53. 

RZNtuli 

F 

01 February 2016 

General Assistant 

Engineering Services 

5A. 

B B Yimba 

M 

01 February 2016 

General Assistant 

Engineering Services 

55. 

M E Khoza 

M 

01 February 2016 

General Assistant 

Engineering Services 

56. 

N Mbambo 

M 

01 February 2016 

General Assistant 

Engineering Services 

57. 

N 5 Nzuza 

F 

01 April 2016 

Handyman Assistant 

Engineering Services 

58. 

M 5 Mhlongo 

M 

01 April 2016 

Handyman Assistant 

Engineering Services 

59. 

STZuma 

M 

01 April 2016 

Handyman Assistant 

Engineering Services 

60. 

N T Mthimkhulu 

M 

01 February 2016 

General Assistant 

Engineering Services 

61. 

B Manqele 

M 

11 April 2016 

Driver Operator 

Engineering Services 


Table 26: 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 









3.5.2.5.2. IN5TITUTI0NALCAPACITY 

As indicated previously, the Municipality has the following 
six Departments: 

■ Engineering Services; 

■ Protection Services; 

■ Community Services; 

■ Financial Services; and 

■ Corporate Services. 

■ Planning and Development. 

THE FOLLOWING PROVIDES AN OVERVIEW 
OF THE ABOVE DEPARTMENTS: 

3.5.2.5.2.I. ENGINEERING SERVICES 

CORE FUNCTION 

To ensure the provision and maintenance of municipal 
infrastructure to implement capital, rehabilitative and 
maintenance projects for the community of uMlalazi Municipality 
as in terms of Civil Engineering, Town planning service and to 
assume responsibility for the duties as laid down by the OSH 
Act, 1993 (Act No. 85 of 1993) and the Engineering Profession 
of South Africa Act, 1 990 (Act No. A6 of 2000). To ensure the 
provision and maintenance of a comprehensive electrical service 
and to assume responsibility for the duties as laid down by 
Regulation No 2(1) of the General Machinery regulations of the 
OSH Act. Offer technical input into the Integrated Development 
Plan (IDP). Provide administrative leadership for the Department. 
Set Engineering standards and monitor compliance. Perform 
all functions and duties of the Municipal Infrastructure 
Development as required by current legislation and regulations. 

KEY PERFORMANCE AREAS 

■ Operational and maintenance of electricity distribution 

■ Render an internal fleet management service 

■ Build and maintain civil engineering services related to roads, 
storm water and municipal buildings and structures 

■ Develop and manage civil engineering support services 

■ Ensure appropriate building control and town planning services 

■ Effective and efficient function of the GIS for data capturing 
techniques 

■ Waste Management Services and Job Creation 

FUNCTIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES: DIRECTOR 
ENGINEERING SERVICES 

Civil Engineering Services:- 

Manage (ensure the acquiring/ construction, operating and 
maintenance of) the following units: 

■ Streets, roads and storm water drainage. 

■ Building and maintenance of community halls and creches. 

■ Municipal Buildings. 

■ Waste removal and recycling programs for the implementation 
Integrated Waste Management Plan. 

■ Existing Infrastructure and develop maintenance plans. 


Waste Management Services: - 

Manage and provide waste management services: 

■ Ensure efficient and effective waste management services. 

■ Ensure Compliance with Waste Management Act and other 
related legislations. 

■ Implementation mechanism for Integrated Waste Management 
Plan (IWMP) for establishment of Buy-Back Centers; Recycling 
and Re-use programmes. 

■ Comply with waste management standards including Waste 
Transfer Station permits. 

■ Plan waste services extension to under-serviced areas. 

■ Conduct a full cost Account for waste management services. 

■ Ensure compliance with outputs and measures in the 
Local Government Turn Around Strategies and National, 
Provincial Targets. 

■ Ensure implementation of Free Basic Services. 

■ Review By-laws to comply with Waste Act and IWMP and 
associated tariffs. 

■ Render skip for garden refuse and mass container services to 
the community and businesses. 

Electrical Engineering Services: - 

Manage (ensure the acquiring / construction, operating and 

maintenance of) the following: 

■ Ensure efficient and affordable supply of electricity to customers. 

■ Ensure efficient fleet management within the Council. 

■ Provide technical support services, be in non- core business, to 
other departments. 

■ Set technical specifications/ requirements and associated tariffs 
for private and industrial development. 

■ Ensure alignment and participation with Eskom projects for 
rural electrification. 

Project Management Unit: - 

Manage Municipal Capital Infrastructure Projects: 

■ Co-ordinate and manage infrastructure grants . 

■ Ensure project registration process with MIG. 

■ Develop project implementation plans. 

■ Ensure Compliance with DORA; CIDB and other current legislation. 

■ Monitoring and Evaluation: Manage Consultants and Contractors 
for value for money for quality projects. 

■ Provide technical support services in the planning process to 
align with strategies and goals. 

■ Formulate service delivery plans for the Municipal Infrastructure 
Development. 

■ Take corrective action where service delivery standards are not 
met and terminate contracts in terms of General Conditions 
of Contract (GCC). 

■ Monitor and control all processes are carried out and legal 
requirements are met such as ElAs; Public Participation 
Processes; RODs and any other authorization may required. 

■ Ensure all contract documents are signed before 
commencement of any projects and in compliance with the 
Supply Chain Management Policy and MFMA. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 


Section C: Spatial Analysis 


SERVICES 

PERFORMANCE 

CHALLENGES 

Administration 

Average 

■ Communication - telephones and e-mails are always on and off. Current system not 
working properly. 

■ File numbers to match records at the Corporate Services. 

■ Printing of tender documents - be outsourced if project is done internally 

■ Office space - no office space for additional staff. 

■ Capacity to administer fleet management (relief clerk is currently shared with 
other Departments). 

Electricity 

Distribution 

Good 

■ Capacity - to service rural areas and engage on Eskom projects. 

■ Eskom - taking too long for Council's building electrification. 

■ Eskom and Department of Energy are reluctant to attend alignment meetings 
sometimes (IGR to be improved and enforced). 

■ Overtime is too high - shift system to be introduced. 

■ Funding to address backlogs and implementation of free basic service. 

■ Succession planning and skills development. 

■ High cable and transformer theft. 

■ Tampering/ illegal connections. 

Roads and 
Stormwater 

Average 

■ Funding to improve infrastructure (storm water management system). 

■ Road classification (responsibility for road maintenance in rural areas). 

■ Road Asset Management System (Pavement Management System) to incorporate 
rural areas. 

■ Capacity and skills for rural road maintenance (grader operation) - satellite offices. 

■ Equipment for road construction and maintenance of road infrastructure. 

■ Integrated transportation plan. 

■ Adequate vehicle to access rural areas. 

Project 

Management 

Unit(PMU) 

Average 

■ Capacity and skills on project implementation and construction supervision 

■ Monitoring and Evaluation of service providers (Contractors and consultants). 

■ Adherence to the MFMA and SCM regulations (variation orders). 

■ Inexperienced consultants and contractors. 

■ EPWP and CIDP reporting. 


Table 27: Engineering Services - Functions and Analysis 

3.5.2.5.2.2. PLANNING AND 
DEVELOPMENT 

BUILDING AND GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM 

This component provides building plans approval processes and 

GI5 services as follows: 

■ Building control in terms of the National Building Regulations Act 
103 (Act No. 103 of 1977). 

■ Compliance with the Town Planning Scheme to develop and 
assess planning applications. 

■ Undertake assessments, site inspections and investigation 
for the developments within the area. 

■ Ensure quality control in the building construction environment. 

SPATIAL AND STRATEGIC PLANNING 

■ Properties - Ensure proper control exercised over all properties 
registered in Council's name and all properties under Council's 
jurisdiction (acquisitions, alienation's, street closures, 
subdivisions, consolidations). 

■ Town Planning. 

■ Improve town planning to be proactive in the development of 
uMlalazi not only application responsive. 


■ Undertake IDP Review internally. 

■ Guide development in accordance with the IDP and 5DF. 

■ Ensure the execution of integrated development planning. 

■ Manage effective town planning. 

■ Establish an effective Landuse Management systems that is 
in line with the 5PLUMA. 

LED 

■ Trade Licenses - Formal and informal trade regulation. 

■ Render services related to trade licensing. 

■ Coordinate corporate business planning. 

■ Support feasible tourism development. 

■ Register Co-operatives and Private companies. 

■ Facilitate acceleration of the development of Agriculture. 

■ Create investment opportunities to expand and support 
economic growth. 

■ Tourism. 

■ Agriculture. 

HUMAN SETTLEMENTS 

■ Manage sustainable housing projects. 

■ Housing administration. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 






Housing 

Good 

Capacity 

Bulk Services 

■ Capacity to monitor and manage rural projects is a concern. 

■ Bulk Services for urban housing projects a challenge with the District Municipality. 

■ UDM cannot confirm provision of services in urban areas and housing projects are delayed. 

■ Opportunity to provide housing to all rural wards and improve life of community members. 

■ Housing opportunities for Mtunzini, Ging and Eshowe. 

GIS 

Average 

■ Shortage of skills - high staff turnover. 

■ Outdated information - aerial photos; revised map boundaries 

■ Local IT specialist. 

■ Vehicle to access rural areas for ITB applications. 

■ Majority of Tourism is achieved through the Tourism Associations. 

■ More effort to be made on internal marketing. 

Buildings 

Good 

■ Capacity for building construction supervision. 

■ Bylaws and building regulations enforcement (property inspections). 

■ Building control officers. 

■ Lack of resources reliant on external services - draughting services or drawing of plans. 

■ Electronic / draft building plans filing. 

■ Council building maintenance and security in rural areas. 

■ Greenhouse policy. 

Spatial and 
Strategic 

Planning 

incapacitated 

■ Short of staff. 

■ Implementation of the KwaZuluNatal Planning Development Act and 5PLUMA. 

■ Town Planning Services for the building plans scrutinisation 

■ Land Use Management rolling out to rural areas. 

■ Industrial Revitalization in Ging and Eshowe. 

■ Amendment of Land Use Management Scheme. 

■ Future growth of Eshowe Town, Gingindlovu and Mtunzini. 

■ Land leases and sales. 


Table 28: Performance and Challenges 

3.5.2.5.2.3. PROTECTION SERVICES 

CORE FUNCTION 

■ ’^To ensure the rendering of effective and efficient 
protection service. 

■ To ensure the provision and maintenance of a comprehensive 
service to the community of Eshowe, Mtunzini and Gingindlovu 
in terms of public safety. 

■ Ensure that all municipal bylaws are adhered to. 

KEY PERFORMANCE AREAS 

■ Render traffic and licensing services. 

■ Render fire and emergency services. 

■ Render security and community policing services. 


FUNCTIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES 

■ Fire services (Fire Prevention, Fire Fighting, Disaster Management, 
Special Services, Rescue Services). 

■ Traffic Services (Traffic Law Enforcement, Traffic Education, 
Traffic Engineering, Motor Vehicle Licensing, Learner Driver's 
Licensing, Road Marking and Signage. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 


Section C: Spatial Analysis 


3.5.2.5.2.A. COMMUNITY SERVICES 

CORE FUNCTION 

To ensure the rendering of effective and efficient community and 
health services, horticultural and recreational services. 

FUNCTIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES 

■ Secretarial and administrative services 

■ Managed Environmental Health Services 

■ Waste Management Services 

■ Clinic and Primary Health Care Services 

■ Manage and maintain vegetation, parks, and recreational facilities 

■ Manage and control cemeteries and burials 

■ Structure and implementation of Youth Desk 

■ Structure and implementation of HIV/AIDS desk 

■ Structure and implementation of Culture Desk 

■ Structure and implementation of Sports desk 

■ Key Performance Areas 

■ Manage administration to facilitate flow of work. 

■ Render Health and cleansing Services 

■ Inspection of food premises, informal traders; overgrown 
properties; bylaw infringements 


■ Render Primary Health Care Services 

■ Health education programmes; HIV Counseling; 
immunisation; STD's; 

■ Render Parks; Gardens and Recreational Services 

■ Grass cutting; tree felling; Siza Bonke work creation program; 
pools; caravan park; weed eradication; monitor contractors 

■ Render Cemetery Services 

■ Plan, maintain cemetery; dig graves 

■ Render Youth Assistance 

■ Form and maintain Youth Desk; promote and facilitate 
youth programs 

■ Render HIV/AIDS assistance 

■ Form and maintain Aids Desk; supply food parcels; 
Participate in War Room organization; assist NGO's 

■ Render Cultural assistance 

■ Organise cultural activities; 

■ Render Sports assistance 

■ Manage; co-ordinate; fund major sports events; supply 
financial assistance, sports kits, equipment 


SERVICES 

PERFORMANCE 

CHALLENGES 

Administration 

Good 

Pressure when one clerk absent 

Environmental Health 

Average 

One person cannot control all three entities 

Primary Health Care 
Services 

Good 

Transfer imminent 

Parks And Gardens 

Good 

Delays in appointing superintendents parks and gardens 

Cemetery 

Good 

No dedicated Cemetery Official 

Youth Desk 

Good 

Functional 

HIV/Aids Desk 

Good 

Capacity, no dedicated employee 

Culture Desk 

Good 

Capacity, no dedicated employee 

Sports Desk 

Good 

Dedicated Sports Development Officer 


Table 29: Performance and Challenges 






3.5.2.5.2.5. FINANCIALSERVICES 

CORE FUNCTION 

To ensure the effective and efficient management of financial matters 

KEY PERFORMANCE AREAS 

■ Manage the revenue collection process 

■ Manage Municipal Expenditure 

■ Ensure effective financial planning 

FUNCTIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES 

■ Revenue 

■ Meter reading 

■ Data capturing on all debtor accounts 

■ Billing 

■ Collection of all monies paid 

■ Credit control and debt collection administration 

■ Public enquiries and correspondence 

■ Expenditure 

■ Control all payments of the Council 

■ Administer petty cash system 

■ Manage salaries and allowances payments of staff 
and councillors 

■ Control investment system 

■ Control grants system 

■ Manage IT system for all departments 

■ Financial Compliance 

■ Compile and control the Council's budget 

■ Keep the assets register 

■ Compile the Financial Statements of the council 

■ Compile all reports in terms of legislation 

■ Supply Chain Management 

■ Control all purchasing systems 

■ Manage the Council's Stores 

ACHIEVEMENTS 

■ Revenue 

■ Accurate monthly billing on the ABAKUS system takes place 

■ Reconciliations of debtor accounts are done monthly 

■ Credit control is done monthly 

■ Expenditure 

■ Creditors are paid within 30 days from the date of receiving 
the invoice 

PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT AND CHALLENGES 


■ Salaries and allowances are paid on or before the 20th of 
each month 

■ Investment balances are obtained daily and reconciled 

■ Grants received and spent are reconciled monthly 

■ Bank reconciliation is done monthly 

■ Financial Compliance 

■ Budget reports are submitted on time 

■ Financial Statements submitted before the due date 

■ Monthly reports submitted on time 

■ Supply Chain Management 

■ Regulations and the policy are adhered to 

■ Stock count at the stores depicted no shortage 

3.5.2.5.2.6. CORPORATE SERVICES 

CORE FUNCTION 

To ensure the rendering of effective and efficient administrative 
support services, management advisory services integrated 
development planning and community facilitation 

KEY PERFORMANCE AREAS 

■ Administer matters related to estates 

■ Render diverse administrative services 

■ Render legal support services 

■ Render human resource management services 

■ Render management information systems 

■ Render corporate database systems. 

■ Ensure and maintain regular strategic planning 

■ Ensure public participation 

FUNCTIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES 

■ Management data systems 

■ Business Analysis & Efficiency 

■ Corporate database 

■ Human Resource Management Practices 

■ Legal Services 

■ Secretarial Services to Council and Council Committee activities 

■ Diverse Administrative Management Services with regard to - 

■ Archive 

■ Library (Main Library with 3 satellites) 

■ Museum Administration 


SERVICES 

PERFORMANCE 

CHALLENGES 

Administration 

Good 

Capacity - Committee Clerks. 

Registry 

Average 

Capacity - Archive Manager Required. 

Human Resources 

Good 

Capacity - Training and development officer required. 

Libraries 

Good 

Challenge in providing services to Rural Areas. 

Museum 

Good 


Halls and Offices 

Good 

Maintenance of halls is of concern. 

Ownership of halls in rural areas still under dispute. 

Legal Services 

Good 

Reliant on external professional Attorneys for legal assistance when 
required. Capacity - internal legal advisor required. 


Table 30: Performance Assessment and Challenges 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 






Section C: Spatial Analysis 


ACHIEVEMENTS 


SERVICES 

ACHIEVEMENTS 

Administration 

Compliant, no qualifications from AG in terms of administration. 

Registry 

Introduced a new electronic filing system to improve control. 

Human Resources 

Compliant with the submission of top management on minimum qualifications 
requirement. 

Publicity And Tourism 

Upgraded website. 

See separate report from Publicity Officer. 

Libraries 

New Library in KDS in excess of AOOO members. 

New library in Eshowe operating well. 

Both libraries in Eshowe and KDS have cyber cadets and access to computers for members. 

Museum 

Upgraded and revamped museum. 

Halls And Offices 

Upgraded and maintained urban halls 

Legal Services 

Successfully won litigation case for housing. 


Table 31: Achievements 


SERVICES 

CHALLENGES 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Administration 

Capacity 

Improve service delivery and customer satisfaction if improved capacity. 

Registry 

Capacity 

Improve control measures to reduce loss of information. 

Introduce electronic Management System like DIMS to centrally control 
communication and information. 

Human Resources 

Capacity 

Improve training and development 

Reduce Audit Queries (leave etc.). 

Libraries 

Rural Areas 

Improve services to rural areas through mobile library units. 

Halls And Offices 

Maintenance 

Ownership 

Structures require new roofs, etc. major costs to revamp and maintain. 
Ownership of buildings built by Council in the rural areas and control thereof. 

Legal Services 

Capacity 

Contract management would improve if legal services were internal and 
full time. 

Compliance would improve. 


Table 32: Opportunities for Improvement in Service Delivery 


3.5.2.6. HUMAN 
RESOURCE STRATEGY 

Central to the effectiveness and efficiency of the municipality to 
deliver services, is its human capacity. Special emphasis must 
be placed on skills within a growth enabling environment. The 
objective of the municipality from a HR perspective is to have 
a transformed municipality that supports competent, results 
driven employees who contribute significantly through value 
adding performance towards delivery of quality service to the 
public. Thus, all internal stakeholders of the institution i.e. all 
departments and Councillors should align their priorities to a 
municipal strategic direction. The uMlalazi Municipality has 
therefore developed a Human Resource Strategic Plan which 
reflective of this objective and the municipality's vision and it is 


aligned to the National Development Plan, the PGD5 as well as 
the DGDP The uMlalazi HR Strategy has been further developed 
for the following objectives; 

1) To ensure that the management team is aligned in its views 
on what is the organizations' cultural fit. 

2) To attract and retain critical skills by using world-class 
recruitment and selection strategies and talent management. 

3) To maintain a credible performance management system 
across the entire organization to maximize employees 
contribution to the achievement of business objectives 

A) To implement and drive Employment Equity in order to give 
effect to the agreed plan 

5) To develop Competency Based Training and Development to 
ensure that the municipality has the right skills and leadership 
in alignment with national and provincial view 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 









6) To regularly develop and review an updated HR policies 
and procedures - to ensure common understanding - 
by all stakeholders 

7) To focus on skills audits by assessing the people capabilities- 
in order to identify opportunities for further growth and 
development (career development and succession planning 
including focus on Integrated Development Planning) 

8) To ensure through initial induction that new employees enter 
the organisation effectively and are introduced to the 
organisational culture and behaviors. 

3.5.2.7. WORKPLACE 
SKILLS PLAN 

UMIalazi Municipality has a skills development plan which 
is updated and reviewed every financial year in line with the 
prescripts of the Skills Development Act 1 998. The act aims to 
improve the quality of life of the labour force, to encourage the 
labour force to be self-employed and to encourage workers to 
participate in leadership and other programs. The Municipality 
promotes and implements skills development strategies to 
capacitate its employees to implementation the objectives of 
the IDP. The work place skills plan is prepared annually and each 
municipal department is required to implement the plan with the 
support of the Corporate Services Department. The budget is 
made available for skills development and is reviewed quarterly 
to ensure implementation of the plan. The Skills Development 
Plan of the municipality supports the achievement of the 
municipalities' goals and operational requirements. The plan 
specifically expressed annual targets such as: 

■ Priority training needs 

■ Beneficiaries based on employment equity 

■ Budgetary allocations 

Training needs assessments are based on current staff functions 
and cognizance taken of the municipalities' strategic priorities 
and pledges. The following are the skills priority areas: 

■ Finance 

■ Management / Supervisory /Leadership 

■ Policy and Legislation 

■ Community Development and Partnership 


■ Safety and Security 

■ Information Technology 

■ Organizational Change, Transformation and 
Project Management 

■ Administrative 

■ Quality Management 

■ Job/ function specific 

■ Human Relations 

■ Formal Education 

3.5.2.8. THE SPATIAL 
PLANNINGANDLANDUSE 
MANAGEMENT ACT AND ITS 
IMPLEMENTATION 

The Spatial Planning and Land Use Management Act 1 3 of 201 3 
(SPLUMA) came into effect on the 1 st July 201 5 as per gazette 
notice number 38828 published on 27 May 2015. The Minister 
of Rural Development and Land Reform has also gazetted and 
published the final SPLUMA Regulations in terms of section 5A 
(1) of the SPLUMA on the 23 March 2015. 

With regard to development application processes, the 
municipality is still continuing to use the existing planning 
legislation to the extent that it is not inconsistent with the 
SPLUMA (Section 2(2) of SPLUMA) until such time that the by- 
laws and systems are adopted by Council. 

The uThungulu District municipality resolved to establish a 
uThungulu South Joint Municipal Planning Tribunal (JMPT), a 
committee which consists of members from uThungulu District 
Municipality, uMlalazi, Nkandlaand Mthonjaneni Local Municipality 
and a uThungulu North Joint Municipal Planning Tribunal which 
consists of the remaining municipalities in the district. 

The advert calling for nominations for membership of uThungulu 
South (JMPT) was placed on the Zululand Observer and llanga 
and the closing date for nominations was 30 October 201 5. 
The Evaluation committee met on 21 January 2016 to evaluate 
nominations received. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 


Section C: Spatial Analysis 


After thorough assessment of the applications received, the following nominees were appointed as internal members of the 
uThungulu South Joint Municipal Planning Tribunal Committee: 


MUNICIPALITY AND NOMINATED FIELD 


1. Thembinkosi Jele 

uThungulu District Municipality 

Engineering 

2. Gcina DIamini 

uThungulu District Municipality 

Land Legal 

3. Wisdom Mpofu 

uThungulu District Municipality 

Planning 

A. Gift Mathalise 

uThungulu District Municipality 

Planning 

Vise chairperson 

5. Khethokule Zondi 

Nkandia Local Municipality 

Engineering 

6. Mthobisi Shezi 

Nkandia Local Municipality 

Engineering 

7. Ntuthuho Mhlongo 

Nkandia Local Municipality 

Planning 

8. Mthokozisi Ngubane 

uMlalazi local Municipality 

Planning 

Chairperson 

9. Wenzile Sibiya 

uMlalazi local Municipality 

Planning 

10. Helman DIamini 

uMlalazi local Municipality 

Engineering 

1 1 . Suzie Van Der Westhuizen 

uMlalazi local Municipality 

Land Legal 

Administrative Officer 

12. Jaap Le Granje 

uMlalazi local Municipality 

Engineering-Electrical 

13. N Mathonsi 

Mthonjaneni Local Municipality 

Planning 

1A. P Vilakazi 

Mthonjaneni Local Municipality 

Local Economic Development 

15. D Horne 

Mthonjaneni Local Municipality 

Traffic 

16. N Zikhali 

Mthonjaneni Local Municipality 

Engineering 


Table 33 


83 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

o<xxxxxx>ooooooooo<x>o<xxx 





The following nominees were appointed as external private members of the uThungulu South Joint Municipal Planning 
Tribunal Committee: 


EXTERNALMEMBERS 

NOMINATED FIELD I 

Thulani Nkosi 

Land Legal 

Sibongiseni Maseko 

Planning 

Thamsanga Majola 

Land Legal 

Aubrey Ngcobo 

Land Legal 

Nomfuneko Mkhize 

Land Legal 

Lulama Miya 

Land Legal 

CPCele 

Planning 

Robert Wilson 

Planning 


It shall be noted that the external members will be paid by 
uThungulu District Municipality an amount of R750.00 per 
hour with maximum of R3000 per meeting and the internal 
members will not be paid since there are the employees of the 
state. Travelling costs to external members will also be paid as 
per Department of Transport rates. 

The three Local Municipalities (Nkandia, Mthonjanneni and 
uMlalazi) will share the cost of advertising the appointed 
members of uThungulu South MPT and divide amongst the 
each other. 

3.5.2.9. MUNICIPAL 
TRANSFORMATION & 
ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: 
SWOT ANALYSIS 

3.5.2.9.1. STRENGTHS 

■ Sound financial management system 

■ Sound Financial Policies and the Implementation thereof 

■ Competent and capacitated staff 

3.5.2.9.2. WEAKNESSES 

■ Retention of technical Staff is problematic 

■ Contract Management can be improved 

■ Lack in staff capacity in all Departments 

■ Lack of capacity to deal with legal issues 

■ Lack of funds 

■ Inappropriate allocation of functions 


■ Employment equity can still be improved upon 

■ No employee assistance program in place 

■ Lack of office space in general 

■ Two Civic Centres, instead of only one 

■ Lack of Fire Fighting Tenders 

■ Non-compliance with the Fire Services Protection Act 
(not sufficient staff, not sufficient fire tenders) 

■ Lack of adequate office space at the Eshowe Testing Station 

■ Insufficient security at municipal buildings 

■ Some Departments lack up-to-date computer equipment 
and software 

3.6. SERVICE DELIVERY 
AND INFRASTRUCTURE 
ANALYSIS 

3.6.1. WATER AND 
SANITATION 

3.6.1. 1. WATER 

UThungulu District Municipality (UDM), in terms of the Water 
Services Act, is the Water and Sanitation Services Authority 
in respect of its area of jurisdiction, apart from the City of 
uMhIathuze. The latest UDM WSDP was completed in 2009. 
However, it is currently under review. The district has planned 
to roll out (in the medium term) various reticulation projects 
throughout most of the ward. There are also tanker reduction 
and distribution programme. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 





Section C: Spatial Analysis 


The table below sets out a comparison of community's access to piped water in 1 996, 2001 and 2011: 


ACCESS TO PIPED fTAP) WATER 

1996 

2001 

2011 

Inside dwelling /yard 

4 965 

7 364 

18 787 

On a communal stand 

1 193 

6 029 

14 741 

-No access 

28 077 

25 053 

11 534 


Table 34: Comparison of Access to Piped Water - 1 996, 2001 and 201 1 


Access to piped (tap) water (2011) 

MOOO 
20 000 
10 OW 
0 

In&i^Q dwcllinj /yard On a cE^rnFminal ttand No acccu 

"iWl ■2011 

Figure 20: Access to Piped Water - 1996, 2001, 201 1 



There has been a dramatic increase from 2001 to 201 1 in the number of households who have been provided with piped access to 
water inside the dwelling or yard. There has also been, as can be expected, a dramatic reduction of households who have no access 
to piped water over the same period. This reduction is even more dramatic, since, over the same time periods, there has also been 
an increase in the number of households residing in the Municipal Area, i.e. 6,600 additional households or a 12% increase in the 
number of households. The table below sets out community access to piped water, as derived from the Census 201 1 data: 


ACCESS TO PIPED WATER (2011) 

TOTAL 

% 

Inside dwelling / institution 

8,844 

19.63 

Inside yard 

9,943 

22.07 

On community stand: distance less than 200m from dwelling/institution 

8,892 

19.73 

On community stand: distance between 200m and 500m from 
dwelling/institution 

2,484 

5.51 

On community stand: distance between 500m and 1 000m (1 km) from 
dwelling /institution 

1,338 

2.97 

On community stand: distance greater than 1 000m (1km) from 
dwelling/institution 

2,027 

4.50 

No access 

11,534 

25.60 

Total 

45,062 

100.00 


Table 35: Access to Piped Water (2011) 


According to the 201 1 census results, a total of 61 .43% of households within the Municipal Area had access to piped water in the 
dwelling (1 9.63%) or in the yard (22.07%) or within 200m from their dwellings (1 9.73%), (the minimum RDP standard level of service). 
However, there are still some 25.6% of households who indicated that they had no access to piped water. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 











Map 16: Percentage of Households, per Ward, with No Access to Piped Water (2011) 


As can be noted from the Map above, it is particularly the north-eastern and south-western parts of the Municipality where 
households, in 2011, indicated that they had no access to piped water. The most affected wards in this regard are Wards 21, 22 
and 24 in the north-east and Wards 3, 5 and 6 in the south-west. Below is the 2015/1 6 Water Backlog Study that was conducted 
by uThungulu DM:; 



2001/2002 

HOUSEHOLDS 

2001/2002 
% BACKLOG 

2011 

HOUSEHOLDS 

HOUSEHOLDS 

WITH 

SANITATION 

HOUSEHOLDS 

WITHOUT 

SANITATION 

2015/2016 
% BACKLOG 

uMfolozi (KZ281) 

12664 

99.00% 

25584 

20328 

5256 

21% 

Ntambanana (KZ283) 

9528 

76% 

12826 

13187 

0 

INFILLS 

uMlalazi (KZ284) 

34484 

85% 

45062 

35891 

9171 

22% 

Mthonjaneni (KZ285) 

6056 

95% 

10433 

11069 

0 

INFILLS 

Nkandia (KZ286) 

21085 

94% 

22463 

21415 

7582 

5% 

Total 

82817 

89% 

116368 

102433 

13935 

12% 


Table 36: Water Supply Backlog in uThungulu District (201 5/16) 
Source: uThungulu DM 

It is clear from the table above that (seems to be some text missing) 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 86 

Xx>000<xXxXX>000000000000 








Section C: Spatial Analysis 


3.6.1.2. SANITATION 


The table below sets out a comparison of community's access to sanitation facilities in 1 996, 2001 and 2011: 


UMLALAZI 

1996 

2001 

2011 1 

Flush or chemical toilet 

3919 

7 305 

12 643 

Pit latrine 

1A502 

12 420 

17611 

Bucket latrine 

178 

981 

1 010 

None 

15 843 

17 741 

10 177 


Table 37: Community Access to Sanitation Facilities 


There has been a dramatic increase from 1996 to 2001 to 201 1 in the number of households who have been provided with flush 
or chemical toilet facilities. There has also been a significant decrease between 2001 and 201 1 in the number of households who 
had no access to toilet facilities. However, some 10,177 households still had, in 2011, no access to toilet facilities. This represents 
22.5% of all households. It must be noted that over the same period, the number of households within the Municipal Area have 
increased by some 6,600 households (or by 1 2%). 


Type of toilet facility (ZDll) 

2000C 

=.il1il==lk 

Flutii or chemkil Loilci put iJiiriM Bucket latrine None 


■1996 "2001 "2011 

Figure 21: Community Access to Sanitation Facilities 









Map 17: Percentage of Households with No Toilets (2011) 


It is particularly the south-western (wards 5, 6 and 15) and south-eastern parts (wards 14 and 15), as well as north-western parts 
(wards 5 and 6), of the Municipal Area where more than 35.1% of households indicated, in 201 1, that they had no toilet facilities. 



2001/2002 

HOUSEHOLDS 

2001/2002 
% BACKLOG 

2008/2009 

HOUSEHOLDS 

HOUSEHOLDS 
WITH WATER 

HOUSEHOLD 

WITHOUT 

WATER 

2015/2016 
% BACKLOG 

Mbonambi (KZ281) 

12 664 

97.% 

20615 

13 590 

7 025 

34% 

Ntambanana (KZ283) 

9 528 

81% 

16 339 

9 822 

6517 

40% 

uMlalazi (KZ28A) 

34 484 

82% 

42 623 

22 595 

20 028 

47% 

Mthonjaneni (KZ285) 

6 056 

78% 

9712 

6 993 

2719 

28% 

Nkandia (KZ286) 

21 085 

72% 

25757 

17 781 

7 976 

31% 

Total 

83 817 

81% 

115 046 

86 034 

29 012 

26.1% 


Table 38: Sanitation Backlogs by uThungulu District (2015/16) 


The sanitation situation in uMlalazi LM rural wards looks bleak in the 
light that the majority of the population relies on raw surface water 
(for those that get their water from the river) and groundwater for 
the boreholes. The rural wards either have VIP's or the normal self- 
built pit latrines. 

The proximity of these structures can impact on the quality of 
raw water. VIP's when maintained properly are a very appropriate 
sanitation technology for rural wards, however in uMlalazi, some 
VIP's were poorly constructed and the structures are destroyed with 
each passing storm. The VIP's are also overflowing as they have a 
limited use; they are only as good as the volume of human waste they 
can take. This situation therefore results in some of the households 
receiving this basic sanitation level of service also forming the backlog 
because they go back to using the self-built pit latrines. 


The most disturbing trend as observed in Wards 1 , 8 and 2 1 , whereby 
the residents don't even build themselves pit latrines but use the 
nearby forest and fields. This human excrement makes it to the water 
sources that are used for human consumption!' 

All of the above is the result of expenditure in water and related 
infrastructure. Such expenditure is guided by the Water Services 
Development Plan (WSDP). The focus of the WSDP is as follows: 

■ Reflection of current levels of services experienced by communities. 

■ Revised need for water services by all communities in the district. 

■ Prioritized projects for development of water services, coupled with 
budgets and time frames. 

■ Strategies regarding technical, social and financial principles of 
water sources. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 88 

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Section C: Spatial Analysis 


The W5DP also deals with issues pertaining to the provision of 
sanitation services. The eradication of water backlogs have been 
addressed since the 2001/2002 financial years. The backlogs 
for water and sanitation (as the main expenditure items on the 
municipal budget) relate to the following RDP standards: 

■ The minimum RDP level of water supply is 25 liters per capita 
per day within a walking distance of 200m. 

■ The minimum RDP level of sanitation supply is 1 VIP 
per household, detached from the household, inclusive 
of superstructure. 

The following is the UDM Strategies relating to water and 
sanitation provision: 

■ Low cost housing projects 

■ The UDM will install basic water infrastructure (reticulation 
and bulk) 

■ Rural: Metered connection within 200 m from dwelling 
(funded from housing subsidy) 

■ Urban: Metered connection on plot boundary 

■ Households have a choice of minimum free basic or metered 
above 6 kl/month stepped tariffs 

■ Developer to construct basic on-site sanitation (VIP's) 

■ Upper income housing developments 

■ The developer constructs all water and sanitation 
infrastructure, including bulk where there is not sufficient 
capacity, at own cost 

■ UDM to approve design standards 

■ Households billed on metered stepped tariffs 


■ Industrial developments 

■ The developer constructs all water and wastewater 
infrastructure, including bulk where there is not sufficient 
capacity, at own cost 

■ UDM to approve design standards 

■ Water consumption billed on metered fixed tariff 

■ New policy to be developed regarding wastewater disposal 
of large wet industries - incentives to do pre-treatment 

■ Metering System 

■ Proposed metering of inlets/outlets of all bulk water 
infrastructure, WTW, pump stations, reservoirs, for water 
balancing purposes 

■ All connections, including communal stand pipes to 
be metered 

■ New design created for metered yard connections 

■ Implementation of 5MME programs including EPWP 

■ Strategy document to Implement Small contractor 
development on water reticulation projects 

■ Involves Level 1 contractors registered with the CIDB 

■ Various disciplines to train, support and develop the 
contractors 

■ Assistance from Department of Public Works required 
regarding the EPWP 

The following table depicts the funds required in order to 
eradicate backlogs for water and sanitation in rural areas. 
The total amount of money required for both water and 
sanitation is just under R Abn: 


LOCAL MUNICIPALITY 

2009 / 2010 HOUSEHOLDS 

POPULATION WITH GROWTH 

CAPITAL COST 
R,INCLVAT 

Mfolozi KZ281) 

20615 

123 693 

33A,A57,3A7 

Ntambanana (KZ283) 

16 339 

98 037 

493,958,444 

uMlalazi (KZ284) 

42 623 

255 735 

1,210,563,792 

Mthonjaneni (KZ285) 

9712 

58 272 

270,379,491 

Nkandia (KZ286) 

25 757 

15A539 

1,174,289,839 

Total 

115 046 

1,063,977 

3,483,648,915 


Table 39: Funds required for rural water scheme: 


LOCAL MUNICIPALITY 

2008/2009 

HOUSEHOLDS 

HOUSEHOLDS 
WITHOUT SANITATION 

CAPITAL COST 
RJNCLVAT 

COST PER CAPITA 
RJNCLVAT 

Mfolozi (KZ281) 

20615 

7018 

52,635,000 

7,500 

Ntambanana (KZ283) 

16 339 

500 

3, 750, 000 

7,500 

uMlalazi (KZ284) 

42 623 

21624 

162,180,000 

7,500 

Mthonjaneni (KZ285) 

9712 

384 

2,880,000 

7,500 

Nkandia (KZ286) 

25 757 

5422 

40,665,000 

7,500 

Total 

115 046 

34948 

288,321,000 



Table 40: Funds required for rural sanitation/VIP: 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 













UThungulu District Municipality as WSA has a number of 
initiatives underway, notably: 

■ Water loss management strategy 

■ Water meter installation 

■ Water quality improvement interventions 


The UThungulu District Municipality has rolled out a drought 
intervention program wherein water tanker truck conducts 
frequent deliveries of water to all wards/sub-wards to reduce 
the effects of drought especially in rural areas. The water 
tanker trucks deliver water and stores them in tanks that 
are strategically located within the wards, the following table 
indicates this process plan: 


SCHEME 

NUMBER OF 
LOADS (15 KU 

STORAGE UOJOS/ RES/ CONTAINERS) 

FREQUENCY/ 

WEEK 

WARDCLLR 

Oyemeni 2 

0 

On hold 

1 

Ward 22 Cllr Nkwanyana 

Ohhaheni : Tshidi Line 

3 

Reservoirs 

1 

Ward 23 Cllr Mzimela 

Nqamuzana 

1 

Containers are filled. Mbokazi Bus Stop 
and Mthembu's Store no longer used due 
to contamination of Chili Tuck Shop tank. 

2 

Ward 23 Cllr Mzimela 

Khehlehle 

1 

2 TANKS: Between the Church and 
Creche as well as Nduna Khubisa 

1 

Ward 2A Cllr Biyela 

Kwelomoya 

1 

1 TANK: Between Lutheran Church and 
Mchunu Household 

2 

Ward 25 Cllr Nsele 

Khangelani 

1 

3 TANKS: Mngadi House from 

Samungu direction, Makhoba 

Household and Zondo Household 

2 

Ward3CllrNtuli 

Edakeni 

1 

2 TANKS: Next to Edakeni School and 
Next to Stegern Agricultural Gardens 

1 

Ward3CllrNtuli 

Ntuli/Ngedlesi 

0 

On hold 

2 

Ward A Cllr Khumalo 

Oyaya 

1 

Reservoirs 

2 

Ward A Cllr Khumalo 

Norris 

2 

Containers 

3 

Ward 7 Cllr Cebekhulu 

Saroni Sibazane 

3 

Containers 

1 

Ward 7 Cllr Cebekhulu 

Zamimpilo 

2 

Reservoirs 

1 

Ward 1 Cllr Biyela 

Bongela 

0 

On hold 

1 

Ward 1 Cllr Biyela 

KwaMfana 

2 

Reservoirs 

2 

Ward 13 Cllr Ngema 

Ezindophi 

1 

Containers 

1 

Ward 13 Cllr Ngema 

Mawudiu 

1 

Containers 

1 

Ward 13 Cllr Ngema 

Nyanini 

0 

On hold 

1 

Ward 13 Cllr Ngema 

Endlovini/ Mbangayiya 

2 

1 TANK: At Ngongonini: Nxumalo 
Household 

1 

Ward 1 A Cllr Magwaza 

Edengweni 

1 

2 TANK: Mrs. Nxumalo's House and 
MamaThandi's Njingili House 

1 

Ward 1 A Cllr Magwaza 

Mpumazi 

1 

Reservoirs/ Containers 

1 

Ward 1 A Cllr Magwaza 

Hologo Oluncane 

1 

Reservoirs/ Containers 

1 

Ward 1 A Cllr Magwaza 

Hologo Olukhulu 

2 

Reservoirs/ Containers 

1 

Ward 1 A Cllr Magwaza 

Mfenyane 

2 

Reservoirs 

1 

Ward 1 A Cllr Magwaza 

Khoza 

2 

Containers 

2 

Ward 15 Cllr Qwabe 

Ematsheni 

1 

Containers 

2 

Ward 15 Cllr Qwabe 

Engogo 

1 

Containers 

2 

Ward 15 Cllr Qwabe 

Ezimpongo 

0 

On hold 

1 

Ward 16 Cllr Ndwandwe 

Makhunduva 

0 

On hold 

1 

Ward 16 Cllr Ndwandwe 

Wombane 

0 

On hold 

1 

Ward 16 Cllr Ndwandwe 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 








Section C: Spatial Analysis 


SCHEME 

NUMBER OF 
LOADS (15 KL) 

STORAGE UOJOS/ RES/ CONTAINERS) 

FREQUENCY/ 

WEEK 

WARDCLLR 

Amahubu 

2 

Containers 

1 

Ward 16 Cllr Ndwandwe 

Eziphambanweni 

2 

Containers 

1 

Ward 16 Cllr Ndwandwe 

Makhilimba 

0 

On hold 

1 

Ward 16 Cllr Ndwandwe 

Nguqu 

2 

3 TANKS: Emasundwini, Mthethwa 
Household & Mhlongo Household 

2 

Ward 20 Cllr Zondi 

Eyetheni 

2 

Containers 

2 

Ward 21 Cllr Mnqayi 

Ohhaheni : Vundia Line 

1 

Reservoirs 

2 

Ward 22 Cllr Nkwanyana 

Oyemeni 1 

0 

On hold 

1 

Ward 22 Cllr Nkwanyana 


Table 41: Water Tanker Deliveries 



Map 18: Water Reticulation 


3.6.2. SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT 


The table below reflects a comparison of the 1 996, 2001 and 201 1 Census data in respect of solid waste disposal: 


SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL 

1996 

2001 

2011 

Removed by local municipality 

3 806 

4718 

7 969 

Communal / Own refuse dump 

21 346 

24 136 

25 230 

No rubbish disposal 

9 025 

9 592 

10227 


Table 42: Solid Waste Disposal - 1996, 2001 and 201 1 


9 1 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

o<xxxxxx>ooooooooo<x>o<xxx 













Type of refuse removal 


wum — 



■ BlWl 

Figure 22: Solid Waste Disposal - 1996, 2001 and 201 1 


Between 1996 and 2001 and between 2001 and 201 1 there 
has been an increase in the number of households who had 
their refuse removed by the local Municipality. However, there 
are still some 10,227 households who had no refuse disposal. 

3.6.2.I. INTEGRATED WASTE 
MANAGEMENT PLAN (2010) 

As a requirement of the National Waste Act 59 of 2008, 
the uMlalazi Municipality developed the Integrated Waste 
Management Plan in November 2010. The purpose of this plan 
is to set out priorities and objectives for waste management; 
establish mechanisms for collection, minimisation; re-use and 
recycling and also provides for the management of landfill 
and transfer sites and the decommissioning thereof. It further 
indicates the financial resources required for effective waste 
management. As part of the IWMP, the municipality further 


developed Refuse Bylaws, which were promulgated in 2010. 
The Refuse Bylaw outlines guidelines on the disposal of various 
forms of waste, control of littering and illegal dumping. Medical 
waste is generated within the municipality, but the responsibility 
of storage, collection and disposal or treatment does not lie with 
the uMlalazi Municipality. 

3.6.2.2. AREAS PRIORITISED 
FOR WASTE COLLECTION 

Refuse waste is collected in all suburban areas of all three towns 
namely; Eshowe, Gingindlovu and Mtunzini. Waste is collected 
once a week in suburban areas and collected daily within the CBDs. 

The table below indicates the frequency of collection within the 
identified priority areas within the uMlalazi Municipality: 


WASTE TYPE 

AREA COVERED 

FREQUENCY 

SERVICE PROVIDED BY 

Domestic Waste 

Sunnydale 

Once a week 

Municipal Staff 

Mpushini Park 

Norwood Park 

Eshowe Town 

KDS 

Once a week 

Contractor 

Gingindlovu 

Municipal staff and Contractor 

Mtunzini 

Twice a week 

Contactor 

Commercial 

Eshowe 

Seven times per week (as and when required) 

Contractor 

Gingindlovu 

Municipal Staff and Contractor 

Mtunzini 

Contractor 


Table 43: Frequency of Collecting and Responsible Persons for Refuse Removal (uMlalazi IWMP) 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 







Section C: Spatial Analysis 


The municipality enjoys the services of contractors who assist 
with the following functions; 

■ All general waste, street sweeping and household 
waste collection 

■ Commercial street sweeping (CBD, Taxi Ranks) 

■ Transportation to landfill/transfer sites and recycling 

3.6.23. ROLEOFEPWP 

The municipality has rolled out, through the EPWP, a programme 
known as the Food for Waste program in 1 A of the 26 municipal 
wards. Through this programme, 100 beneficiaries have been 
identified who assist in the waste collection and cleaning in 
mostly the rural wards. The cleanup operation focuses mainly 
on the rural main roads within the municipality. The municipality 
also makes use of service providers who assist in the collection 
of waste within these rural areas. Further to the aforementioned 
programme, the municipality is also running a War against 
Poverty programme of a similar nature than that of the food 
for waste programme. The War against Poverty programme 
also deals with the collection of waste on main roads such as 
the R66 as well as the P230. There are 95 beneficiaries within 
this programme and 5 service providers that assist with the 
collection of waste in strategic locations. 

3.6.2.A. LANDFILL/ 

TRANSFER SITES 

There two disposal facilities in uMlalazi, viz.: 

■ Eshowe Transfer Station (29 OOOsqm) - servicing Eshowe 
Suburbs and surroundings. 

■ Mtunzini Transfer Station (22 OOOsqm) - used for temporary 
storage of waste from Mtunzini, Gingindlovu and the 
surrounding farmers. 

Illegal dumping near Transfer Stations does occur, especially near 
low cost housing. Hazardous and medical waste is not permitted 
to enter the waste transfer station. The site is controlled for 
entry and exit, and is open to the public 7 days a week. Currently 


Garden Refuse and Building Rubble are transported to the 
uThungulu Regional Landfill for disposal. Illegal dumping near 
Transfer Stations does occur, especially near low cost housing. 
Hazardous and medical waste is not permitted to enter the 
waste transfer station. The site is controlled for entry and exit, 
and is open to the public 7 days a week. 

3.6.3. TRANSPORTATION 
INFRASTRUCTURE 

The Municipality has a well-developed road network on a 
national, district, and local scale, but the condition of the majority 
of the local roads are poor, and access is problematic in wet 
conditions. The UDM has prepared an Integrated Transportation 
Plan which will designate roads in need of upgrade thus 
hopefully improving local movement. 

The following primary and secondary transportation routes are 
aligned through the uMlalazi Municipal Area: 

■ The N2 Motorway which is aligned through the eastern 
sector of the municipal area in proximity to both Gingindlovu 
and Mtunzini. This implies that the majority of the municipal 
area is well removed from this primary transportation corridor. 
There are two tollgates in respect of this route the one being 
the Mtunzini Plaza and the other being the Dokodweni 
Ramp Plaza. 

■ The R102 is aligned almost parallel to the N2 Motorway 
and represents the previous only North Coast Road. It is still 
a popular route particularly for operators wishing to avoid 
he payment of toll. 

■ The R66 which links the N2 Motorway with Eshowe, 
Melmoth and Vryheid. Some surface improvements were 
recently completed but substantially more could be done as 
it is an important transportation route or Eshowe from both 
transportation and an economic development perspective. 

■ The R3A linking the Nkwaleni Valley midway between Eshowe 
and Melmoth with Empangeni. It links with the John Ross 
Highway in Richards Bay and the latter is in the process of a 
substantial upgrade. 


Map 19: Transport Routes 



■ The P230 which is an important alternative route to the 
R3A and is in the process of being upgraded to full tarmac 
standard. This will elevate this route to an important 
secondary transportation route offering alternative access 
to Empangeni. 

■ The P710 links the south-western sector of the municipal 
area with Mandeni and is a gravel surfaced transportation 
route which is in need of a similar upgrade as is being 
implemented for the P230. 

■ The P50-2 to Nkandia is also an important link through 
Mbongolwane and some improvement to the surface has 
been done. 

■ The P15-2 links with the P15-2 which is aligned across the 
Tugela River linking Kranskop in the south-west. Upgrading 
of it is taking place. 

■ Other than the above the municipal area is crisscrossed by a 
number of district traffic routes, often in a poor condition and 
making effective transportation problematical. Map 

■ Lowest in the ranking of transportation routes are the so- 
called agricultural roads which provide access to agricultural 
crops and link with the district roads. 


3.6A ENERGY 

Eskom, the national electricity supplier, supplies electricity in bulk. 
Richards Bay, Melmoth, Eshowe and Empangeni are the only 
towns that buy electricity in bulk and distribute to their consumers. 
Areas within the uMlalazi Municipal Area which are provided with 
electricity, obtain such electricity directly from Eskom. 

Eskom's supplies grid electrification while the Department 
of Mineral and Energy Affairs is responsible for non-grid 
electrification. A combined strategy/partnership between 
uThungulu DM and Eskom is urgently required to form an 
integrated and sustainable electrical service delivery within 
the district. In conjunction with the Department of Minerals and 
Energy and Eskom a plan should be devised to implement the 
uThungulu Energy Master Plan as compiled. 

The national energy crises has far reaching implications on the 
supply and maintenance of infrastructure services to the district, 
notably the cost for stand by generators at pump stations as 
well as the running cost of such generators. Apart from such 
operational expenses, the environmental costs of increased 
combustion into the atmosphere as a result of generator 
operations also need to be considered. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 9 A 

>ooo<xxxxxxx>oooooooooooo 



Section C: Spatial Analysis 


The following table reflects a comparison of electricity usage for lighting, cooking and heating for the 1 996, 2001 and 201 1 Census years: 


USAGE OF ELECTRICITY 

1996 

2001 

2011 

Lighting 

10 432 

14 993 

26 238 

Heating 

6 381 

9217 

16016 

Cooking 

7 283 

9 406 

20 505 


Table UU: Electricity Usage - 1996, 2001 and 201 1 





LisHtlPfifi MciaHnc Cor^inB 
Figure 23: Electricity Usage 


3.6.A.I. NEW ELECTRIFICATION PROJECTS 


The uMlalazi LM has since 201 1 made huge strides in terms of supplying electricity to communities within the municipal area. Eskom 
has further confirmed the funding for the following areas to be prioritised for electrification projects: 


PROJECT NAME 

WARD 

CONNECTIONS 

BUDGET 1 

Bonisani - Makhehle Electrification 

24 

140 

R 4.1m 

Emahusheni Electrification 

7 

120 

R 2.96m 

Emasundwini Electrification 

4 

325 

R8.7m 

Emvini Electrification 

26 

74 

R 1.48m 

Ngudwini Electrification 

5 

786 

R22m 

Izinyosi Electrification 

1 

260 

R7.02m 

Ward 15 Subwards Electrification 

15 

350 

R7m 


Table 45 


The following table presents electrification projects that have been considered as complete as of January 2016. 


AREAS 

WARD 

CONNECTIONS 

BUDGET 

WAY FORWARD 

Mpehlele 

25 

410 


Busy close out report 

Sibhakuza 2013/2014 

22 

401 

R 4.2 mil 

Project complete 

Manzamnyama 

22 

203 

R 6.1 mil 

Project complete 

Mabudle 

15 

114 


Project complete 

Umhiatuzana / Izikoshi 
Schedule six UMlalazi Project 

14 

660 

R 15mil 

Close out report submitted to Dept, of Energy 
and handed over to Eskom. 

Ngeza 

14 

867 

R 14.9 mil 

Project complete 

KDS -Mtakwende & Tintown 

12 

Busy Mtakwende 
and Tintown 

Municipal 

Funds 

Project complete 

Ntumeni 

8 

795 - phase 1 


Project complete 

Saroni 

7 

539 

R6.3 mil 

Project complete 

Samungu #2 

6 

1382 

R 20.730 mil 
(ward 5 & 6) 

Busy close out report 

Dibhasi/Mankumbu 

2 

936 

R 14 mil 

Outage to be done and energise customers 

Makhilimba 

16 

298 

R6.5mil 

A1 completed project - busy hand over and PCS files 

Gingindlovu housing project 

18 

143 

R 1.5 mil 

completed 133 house connections (10 
connections outstanding) 


Table 46: Completed Electrification Projects (Jan 2016) 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 


















Map 20: Electrification Map 

3.6.5. ACCESS TO 
COMMUNITY FACILITIES 

In this sub-section, accessibility to social facilities and services, 
i.e. tribal courts, community halls, pension payout points and 
sport facilities are provided. The rationale behind this analysis is 
that (1 ) areas that have poor access to community facilities are 
shown in order to guide future development of such facilities. 
A further critical criterion is to consider the need for such 
facilities and services in relation to population densities because 
any such provision in community/social facility related needs 
has the potential to address the need of a relatively large 
beneficiary community. 


3.6.5.1 . ACCESS TO CEMETERIES 

Community Cemeteries are located in the north-eastern part 
of the Municipal Area, as well as in the area between Mtunzini 
and Gingindlovu and from Gingindlovu to Eshowe (including the 
area surrounding Eshowe). 

It must however be realised the community cemeteries are 
more prone to exist in some areas, whilst not in other areas, 
due to cultural preferences. Communities are however being 
encouraged to make use of municipal cemeteries due to the 
threats to the environment associated with backyard burials. 

The municipality is also looking into the expansion of various 
cemeteries to increase capacity in order to meet the demands 
of burial sites within the municipality. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 96 

xx>ooo<xxxxx>oooooooooooo 


Section C: Spatial Analysis 



I r n ^ A 

Dion 






Map 21: Access to Cemeteries 


97 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

o<xxxxxx>oooooooo<xx>oooooo< 




3.6.5.2. COURTS 




Map 22: Access to Courts 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 98 

><><Xx><X><XX>0<>00<XxX><>0<>0<>0<^ 





Section C: Spatial Analysis 


3.6.53. COMMUNITY CENTRES / HALLS 




Map 23: Access to Community Centres / Halls 


99 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

0<XXXXXX>OOOOOC>0<XXX>000000<; 




3.6.5A PENSION PAY POINTS 



HDD 


Map 24: Access to Pension Pay Points 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 1 00 

><>0<x>0<><X><XxX><><>0<X><>0<>0<>0^ 



Section C: Spatial Analysis 


3.6.5.5. SPORT FIELDS / FACILITIES 



Map 25: Access to Sport Fields / Facilities 


101 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

o<xxxxxx>ooooooooo<x>ooo<x>o<^ 








Section C: Spatial Analysis 


3.6.6. HUMAN SETTLEMENTS 

3.6.6.1. HOUSING STATISTICS 


DWELLING TYPE 

1996 

2001 

2011 

Formal Dwelling 

10437 

16 171 

27 359 

Traditional Dwelling 

23 493 

21 296 

16 370 

Informal Dwelling 

437 

791 

828 


Table 47: Formal, Traditional and Informal Dwellings 
(1996, 2001 and 2011) 


There has been a more than significant increase between 
1996 and 2001 and between 2001 and 201 1 in the number of 
households residing in formal dwellings. As can be expected, there 
has also been a significant decrease, over the same time periods, 
in the number of households residing in traditional dwellings. 

3.6.6.2. UMLALAZI 
MUNICIPALITY HOUSING 
SECTOR PLAN 

The formulation of the uMlalazi Housing Sector Plan (HSP) 
Review is in accordance with statutory requirement of section 
9(1) of the National Housing Act (No. 107 of 1997) which 
informs the compilation of Housing Sector Plans. Part 4 of the 
Act specifically requires municipalities to compile strategies 
and targets, as part of their Integrated Development Plans. As 
such the UMlalazi Municipality has developed a comprehensive 
strategic plan of which the main objective is to create sustainable 
human settlement within the municipal area. Sustainable human 
settlements in this instance, refers to the creation of human 
settlements that cater for the infrastructural and socio economic 
needs of the people. The objective is to sustain livelihoods rather 
than catering only for housing (BNG). 

This Housing Sector Plan Review is intended to be a guiding 
document that will help the municipality achieve the 
following objectives: 

3.6.6.2.1. ALIGNMENT 

■ Consolidating, confirming and instilling a shared housing 
vision between uMlalazi Municipality and all role players by 
emphasizing all national focus areas in terms of Housing 
Delivery within the municipality; 

■ Ensure alignment with provincial and national housing policies 
as well as planning directives; 

■ Ensure sustainable and spatially integrated housing delivery. 


IHwMhDidii bv Milfi 





m\wm Bim mmv 


Figure 24: Formal, Traditional and Informal Dwellings (1996, 
2001 and 2011) 

3.6.6.2.2. INTERVENTIONS 

■ Establish a common understanding of housing for housing 
delivery challenges and constraints; 

■ Ensure relevance and effectiveness of the various housing 
delivery programs and products; 

■ Explore and recommend tools to monitor and evaluate 
housing delivery. 

3.6.6.2.3. INTEGRATION AND 
SUSTAINABLE IMPLEMENTATION 

■ Ensure integration with uMlalazi IDP, Spatial Development 
Framework and other local planning policies and guidelines; 

■ Ensure integration of Housing Delivery Implementation plan 
with National and Provincial spheres. 

3.6.6.3. CURRENT ANALYSIS OF 
HOUSING DEMAND 

The primary housing backlog in uMlalazi municipality remains 
in the tribal / rural areas, where housing projects will have to 
be implemented. The provision of housing in the rural areas is 
a high demand which will be in the form of Insitu (Institute? 
Meaning here unclear) Upgrades. 

Based on the current housing demand database for uMlalazi 
area the demand is estimated to be 5 500 in the urban areas, 
whereas a quantified figure in the rural areas is estimated to be 
an average demand of 8 1 98 households not residing in a formal 
dwelling within the rural areas therefore averaging the housing 
demand to 8000 in the first phase and an additional 8000 in 
phase 2. It is therefore imperative that this housing shortage 
be addressed as soon as possible in order to avoid pressures 
building up to an uncontrollable level. According to the uMlalazi 
Integrated Development Plan there is an emergence of Rural 
Housing Projects in the area, which is based on the formalization 
of existing informal settlements. The formalisation of squatter 


1 03 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

o<xxxxxx>oooooc>ooo<x>o<xxx 






shacks in the King Dinuzulu has been identified as a high-rank priority in the area. The estimated database and priority areas identified 
as part of the Housing Plan is sourced from the adopted Integrated Development Plan of the uMlalazi Council. The demand is estimated 
and will only be finalised or confirmed after the completion of the planning phase of the housing investigation as funded by the 
Department of Human Settlement. 

There is an emergence of Rural Housing Projects in the area, which is based on the formalisation of existing informal settlements. 
The formalisation of squatter shacks in the King Dinuzulu and Gingindlovu has been identified as high rank priorities in the area. 


HOUSING DEMAND URBAN AREAS 

NO 

AREA 

ESTIMATED DATABASE OF HOUSING DEMAND 

1 

Eshowe (Mpushini Park) 

3500 

2 

King Dinuzulu 

500 

3 

Mtunzini 

500 

4 

Gingindlovu 

1000 


TOTAL 

5500 


Table 48: Housing Demand in Urban Areas 


HOUSING DEMAND RURAL AREAS - NEW PROJECTS 

NO 

AREA 

ESTIMATED DATABASE OF HOUSING DEMAND 

1 

Inkosi Shange - Shange TA 



■ Nkanini Settlement 

■ 1 000 


■ Vuma Settlement 

. 1 000 


■ Mamba Settlement 

. 1 000 

2 

Nkosi Mzimela - MzimelaT.A 

1 000 

3 

Nkosi Khoza -Kwa Khoza TA 

1 000 

4 

Nkosi Dube - Kolweni TA, 

1 000 

5 

Nkosi Zulu AV - Ogagweni TA. 

1 000 

6 

Nkosi Zulu - Kwamondi TA 

1 000 


TOTAL 

8000 


HOUSING DEMAND RURAL AREA* 

S- SECOND PHASE 

1 

Nkosi N.T Nzuza - Nzuza TA 

1000 

2 

Nkosi Biyela - Ndlangubo TA 

1000 

3 

Nkosi B.L Mpungose - Mpungose TA 

1000 

4 

Nkosi Biyela - Mombeni TA 

1000 

5 

Nkosi G. Zulu - BangindodaTA 

1000 

6 

Nkosi Zulu - Bhekishowe TA 

1000 

7 

Nkosi Biyela - Mvuzane TA 

1000 

8 

Nkosi SD. Ntuli - OyayaTA 

1 000 


TOTAL 

8000 


Table 49: Housing Demand in Rural Areas 


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Section C: Spatial Analysis 


3.6.6A CURRENT HOUSING PROJECTS 


The following have been approved by the Department of Human Settlements' Housing Evaluation and Advisory Committee (HEAC), 
are being implemented currently: 



CURRENT RURAL PROJECTS 

NO 

HOUSING PROJECT 

WARD 

URBAN / 
RURAL 

NO OF 
UNITS 

IMPLEMENTATION AGENT 

STATUS 

1 

Mpungose Phase 1 

9, 10, 1A 

Rural 

1 000 

Bahlomile Development 

Tranche 2 - 
Detailed Planning 

2 

Ndlangubo Phase 1 

2A, 26 

Rural 

1 000 

Stedone Developments 

Tranche 2 - 
Detailed Planning 

3 

Mombeni Phase 1 

6 

Rural 

1 000 

Linda Masinga and 

Associates 

Tranche 3 - 
Construction 

A 

Ngudwini Phase 1 

5 

Rural 

1 000 

Qhawe Lamaqhawe 

Business Enterprise 

Tranche 3 - 
Construction 

5 

Bhekeshowe Phase 1 

25, 26 

Rural 

1 000 

Improdev 

Tranche A - Close out 

6 

Mvuzane Phase 1 

1, A 

Rural 

1 000 

Ntokozweni developers 

Tranche 2 - 
Detailed Planning 

7 

Uyaya Phase 1 

2,3, A,5 

Rural 

1 000 

Siqu group 

Tranche 3 - Construction 

8 

Kwa Khoza Phase 1 

15,18 

Rural 

1 000 

Siqu group 

Tranche 1 - 
DeskTop Planning 

9 

Kholweni Phase 1 

8 

Rural 

1 000 

Mabune consulting 

Tranche 1 - 
DeskTop Planning 

10 

Kwamondi Phase 1 

13 

Rural 

1 000 

Kantey and Templer 

Tranche 1 - 
Desk Top Planning 

11 

Nzuza Phase 1 

17,19,20 

Rural 

1 000 

Department of Human 
Settlement 

Tranche 1 - 
DeskTop Planning 


CURRENT URBAN PROJECTS 

15 

Sunnydale Phase 2 

11 

Urban 

A02 

Kantey and Templer 

Tranche A - Close out 

16 

Sunnydale Phase 2 
Extension 

11 

Urban 

117 

Kantey and Templer 

Tranche 2 - 
Detailed Planning 

17 

Gingindlovu Extension 5 
& 6 - Phase 1 

18 

Urban 

1A3 

PD Naidoo and Associates 

Tranche A - Close out 


Table 50: Current Housing Projects 


3.6.6.5. PRIORITY STATUS OF CURRENT HOUSING PROJECTS 


PRIORITY PROJECTS 

NO 

HOUSING PROJECT 

WARD 

URBAN / 
RURAL 

NO OF 
UNITS 

IMPLEMENTATION AGENT 

STATUS 

1 

Mpungose Phase 1 

9, 10, 1A 

Rural 

1 000 

Bahlomile Development 

Tranche 2 - 
Detailed Planning 

2 

Ndlangubo Phase 1 

2A, 26 

Rural 

1 000 

Stedone Developments 

Tranche 2 - 
Detailed Planning 

3 

Mvuzane Phase 1 

1, A 

Rural 

1 000 

Ntokozweni developers 

Tranche 2 - 
Detailed Planning 

A 

Sunnydale Phase 2 
Extension 

11 

Urban 

117 

Kantey and Templer 

Tranche 1 - 
DeskTop Planning 


Table 51: Priority Status of Current Housing Projects 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 




















NO 


HOUSING PROJECT 


WARD 


URBAN /RURAL 


1 

Ogagweni Rural Housing Project - Phase 2 

20,21 

Rural 

2 

Mamba Rural Housing Project - Phase 2 

2 

Rural 

3 

Mzimela Rural Housing Project - Phase 2 

21,23 

Rural 

A 

Mpushini Housing Project - Phase 2 

7 

Urban 

5 

Nkanini Rural Housing - Phase 2 

7 

Rural 

6 

Vuma Rural Housing - Phase 2 

8 

Rural 

7 

Nzuza Rural Housing - Phase 2 

16, 17,19,20 

Rural 

8 

Ndlangubo Rural Housing - Phase 2 

24,26 

Rural 

9 

Mpungose Rural Housing - Phase 2 

9, 10, 14 

Rural 

10 

Mombeni Rural Housing - Phase 2 

6 

Rural 

11 

Ngudwini Rural Housing - Phase 2 

5 

Rural 

12 

Bhekishowe Rural Housing - Phase 2 

25, 26 

Rural 

13 

Mvuzane Rural Housing - Phase 2 

1,4 

Rural 

1A 

Oyaya Rural Housing - Phase 2 

2,3, 4,5 

Rural 

15 

Kwa Khoza Rural Housing - Phase 2 

15,18 

Rural 

16 

Kolweni Rural Housing, - Phase 2 

8 

Rural 

17 

Kwamondi Rural Housing - Phase 2 

13 

Rural 

18 

King Dinuzulu (Densification & link road project) 

12 

Urban 


of jurisdiction, apart from the City of uMhIathuze. The latest 
UDM WSDP was completed in 2009. However, it is currently 
under review. 

The uMlalazi Municipality (UM) is the Water Services Authority 
and the uThungulu District Municipality (UDM) is the Water 
Services Provider. 

The following is the new UDM Strategies relating to water and 
sanitation provision: 

Low cost housing projects 

■ The UDM will install basic water infrastructure (reticulation 
and bulk) 

■ Rural: Metered connection within 200 m from dwelling (funded 
from housing subsidy) 

■ Urban: Metered connection on plot boundary 

■ Households have a choice of minimum free basic or metered 
above 6 kl/month stepped tariffs 

■ Developer to construct basic on-site sanitation (VIP's) 

Upper income housing developments 

■ The developer constructs all water and sanitation 
infrastructure, including bulk where there is not sufficient 
capacity, at own cost 

■ UDM to approve design standards 

■ Households billed on metered stepped tariffs 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 1 06 

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Table 45: Planned Housing Projects in within the Municipal Area. 

3.6.6.6. TYPES OF 
HOUSING PROGRAMS 

3.6.6.6.1. PROJECT LINKED SUBSIDY 

This housing subsidy mechanism enables a qualifying household 
to access a complete residential unit, which is developed within 
an approved project linked housing subsidy project for ownership 
by the beneficiary. 

3.6.6.6.2. RURAL SUBSIDIES 

This housing subsidy is available to beneficiaries who only 
enjoy functional tenure rights to the land they occupy. This land 
belongs to the State and is governed by traditional authorities. 
The subsidies are only available on a project basis and 
beneficiaries are supported by implementing agents. 
Beneficiaries also have the right to decide on how to use their 
subsidies either for service provision, on building of houses or 
a combination thereof. 

3.6.6.7. BULK SERVICES 
INFRASTRUCTURE ANALYSIS: 
WATER AND SANITATION 

UThungulu District Municipality (UDM), in terms of the Water 
Services Act, is the Water Services Authority in respect of its area 







Section C: Spatial Analysis 


All of the above is the result of expenditure in water and related 
infrastructure. Such expenditure is guided by the Water Services 
Development Plan (WSDP). The focus of the WSDP being as 
follow: 

■ Reflection of current levels of services experienced 
by communities. 

■ Revised need for water services by all communities in the district. 

■ Prioritized projects for development of water services, coupled 
with budgets and time frames. 

■ Strategies regarding technical, social and financial principles 
of water sources. 

The WSDP also deals with issues pertaining to the provision of 
sanitation services. The eradication of water backlogs have been 
addressed since the 2001/2002 financial years. The backlogs 
for water and sanitation (as the main expenditure items on the 
municipal budget) relate to the following RDP standards: 

■ The minimum RDP level of water supply is 25 liters per capita 
per day within a walking distance of 200m. 

■ The minimum RDP level of sanitation supply is 1 VIP 
per household, detached from the household, inclusive 
of superstructure. 

The majority of the households in the 23 rural wards get their 
water through standpipes, boreholes water tankers (water 
carts) and the river. While only a few sub-wards have yard taps. 
The sub-wards with standpipes and boreholes usually have 
households that still need to walk more than 200 metres and 
are therefore outside the basic level of service. Compounding the 
problem further is that there are a number of standpipes that 
are either broken or they periodically run out of water. 

The households receiving their water from the water carts also 
suffer because these tankers typically come to refill the water 
tanks twice a week. This result in the long queues for water on 
the days the tankers come and fights have been known to break 
out in these instances. This water is usually depleted within an 
hour of the tankers refilling. This group of households therefore 
also fall outside the basic level of service. 

The households that get water from the river, and this makes 
up those households serviced by the water carts and broken/ 
out of service standpipes, usually have to also share this water 
with livestock and upstream, some might be using the water for 
washing. Some even get their water from stagnant ponds. This 
situation can lead to a number of diseases including cholera. 
There is also a danger of crocodiles and drowning. 

It is clear that uThungulu DM has made some inroads in 
providing the residents of uMlalazi, with at least the basic level 
of service but without operations and maintenance (O&M) of 
the infrastructure, those households that had been afforded 


the basic level of service are back to having to walk very long 
distances for water or use unsafe raw water. 

It is imperative that the W5A use some of its budget on O&M 
as well as do a comprehensive plan to service the households 
that are not currently served. 

UThungulu District Municipality as WSA has a number of 
initiatives underway, notably: 

■ Water loss management strategy 

■ Water meter installation 

■ Water quality improvement interventions 

3 . 6 . 6 . 8 . IDENTIFICATION 
OF POTENTIAL LAND FOR 
HOUSING DEVELOPMENT 

One of the biggest challenges facing the uMlalazi area is to 
provide a formal dwelling for each household in the municipal 
area. Establish security of tenure for communities in the tribal / 
rural areas by co-ordinating housing projects with the provision of 
physical services such as water, sanitation, roads, electricity, etc. 

It may appear that there is a shortage of land available for 
housing in the uMlalazi area, but this is not the case. 

UMlalazi Municipality has approximately 320ha of land at its 
disposal, land under municipal ownership. Therefore one of the 
options that the municipality can take is to allocate available land 
for affordable housing development. This will accommodate the 
rapid growth of the uMlalazi area. 

The Eshowe area has vast sugar cane leases surrounding the 
urban node which can be utilised for housing development. 
Portion of these areas have been developed as Light Industrial 
in an attempt to attract and encourage investment. 

The Mtunzini area and surrounds is known to have been 
experiencing increasing development pressures due to its 
residential, tourism and leisure potential. In an attempt to pro- 
actively establish a strategy for facilitating appropriate and 
sustainable development in the Mtunzini area and its surrounds, 
a Development Framework was undertaken. Portion of the 
reminder of Erf 167 Mtunzini which is currently under sugar 
cane production is due for development and will accommodate 
a multiple of development options which include commercial, 
social infrastructure, housing and education. A sustainable 
development plan is required to be undertaken as a first 
phase for this development to ensure responsible and 
sustainable development. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 


In the Gingindlovu urban node, land for housing development 
is to be made available by the development of Gingindlovu 
Extensions 5 & 6. The two townships are located to the north 
of the railway reserve and south of R66 between Gingindlovu 
and Eshowe. The area adjacent to this can accommodate 500 
housing units. 

The IDP also contains Sector Plans although they are (fully or 
partially) developed. These Sector Plans are: 

■ Water Services Development Plan 

■ HIV/AIDS Sector Plan 

■ Integrated Transportation Plan 

■ Disaster Management Plan 

■ Electricity Sector Plan 

Tribal areas dominate the municipal area and 14 Tribal 
Authorities exist within the area. The Tribal Authority makes land 
available for housing to individuals by means of a "permission 
to occupy" (PTO). 

■ Performance Management System and Institutional Plan 

■ Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) Plan 

■ Local Economic Development Plan 

■ Housing Strategy 

3 . 6 . 6 . 9 . INTEGRATION WITH 
OTHER PROJECTS 

The main aim of developing municipal IDPs is to ensure 
coordinated and integrated development. IDPs seek to ensure 
that municipal projects are coordinated and support each other. 
UMIalazi IDP identifies five main development sectors, namely, 

■ Infrastructure 

■ Local Economic Development 

■ Social needs 

■ Environmental Management 

■ Institutional Development and Finance 

The above-mentioned plans are part of the IDP document. This 

Housing Sector Plan will be developed as a separate document, 
although it will still form part of the IDP. Therefore it is important 
that the development projects emanating from the IDP 
development sectors and the sector plans should be able to link 
and support each other. Coordination structures should be set up 
to coordinate and integrate the implementation of these projects 
from implementation to execution. The Municipality (Housing 

Division) should use the Housing Sector Plan to influence the 
development activities of the following institutions: 


INSTITUTION 


SERVICES 


Department of Health 

Clinics, Hospitals 

Department of Education 

Schools 

Department of Social Welfare 

Welfare Institutions, Creches 

Department of Sports, Arts and Culture 

Sport fields and Recreational Facilities 

Department of Transport 

Roads, Public transport 

Department of Environmental Affairs 

Protection of the Environment 

Department of Water Affairs and Forestry (UThungulu DC) 

Water, Sanitation and environmental protection 

Department of Safety and Security 

Police stations or Satellite police stations 

Eskom 

Electricity 

Telkom 

Telephones 

Financial Institutions 

Home Loans 

Local and Foreign Donors 

Funding 

Department of Local Government and Traditional Affairs 

Facilitation of Housing Projects with other Dept, and 

Traditional Leadership. 


Table 52: Government Departments affected by Housing Developments 

It is most important that in the process of planning and implementing housing projects, the Municipality should make broad contacts 
with the above institutions in order to encourage them to render the much needed services mentioned above. 

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Section C: Spatial Analysis 


3.6.7. TELECOMMUNICATIONS 


TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

2001 

2011 

Radio 

27 248 

27 212 

Television 

12 469 

21 347 

Computer 

829 

3 336 

Landline/ telephone 

4 037 

2 848 

Cell-phone 

7 006 

38 066 

Internet 

0 

12 318 


Table 53: Household Access to Telecommunications (2011) 


Between 2001 and 2011, there has been a dramatic increase 
in the number of households who had access to televisions, 
cell phones and the internet. This is important to note, since it 
could, in the future, become a means to directly communicate 
with households. 

3.6.7.I. UMLALAZI MUNICIPAL 
IT GOVERNANCE FRAMEWORK 

In developing the ICT Governance Framework, the Municipality 
appointed Sigma IT to facilitate the development of the 
framework. This also included using the ICT steering committee 
as the driver of the process and its role being ultimately 
responsibility for devising and managing a comprehensive 
IT governance framework to meet the unique needs of the 
municipality and its recently consolidated technology. 

The ICT Governance Framework of UMIalazi Local Municipality 
provides guidelines for both the Political and Administrative 
leadership on how the Municipality should plan and operate its 
ICT in a stable and controlled environment. ICT governance can 
be seen as a structure of relationships and processes to direct 
and control the enterprise use of ICT to achieve the enterprise's 
goals by adding value while balancing risk vs. return over ICT and 
its processes. ICT Governance: 

■ Provides the structure that links ICT processes, ICT resources 
and information to enterprise strategies and objectives; 

■ Enables the integration and institutionalisation of best 
practices of planning and organizing, acquiring and 
implementing, delivering and supporting, and monitoring 
and evaluating ICT performance to ensure that the 
enterprise's information and related technology support its 
business objectives; 


mun icaticin^ 



y 


Figure 25: Household Access to Telecommunications (2011) 

■ Allows the municipality to take full advantage of its 
information; and 

■ Identifies control weaknesses and assures the efficient and 
effective implementation of measurable improvements. 

3.6.7.2. UMLALAZI 
MUNICIPALITY MASTER 
SYSTEMS PLAN 

Having realised that ICT has become an integral part of the day 
to day operations, the uMlalazi Municipality has realized the 
need to develop its ICT strategy (here with called the ICT Master 
Systems Plan) which is aimed at aligning ICT to the business 
and ensuring that the Municipality gets best value for money 
out of its ICT investment. The MSP is a 5 year ICT strategy for 
the Municipality and the department of finance ensures that a 
budget is available each year to implement its projects in order 
to achieve is key objectives. The MSP is also developed a part of 
the Auditor Generals requirements as well as the international 
best practices for ICT to have a strategy. It outlines the ICT Vision, 
Mission and Objectives and informs of Strategic Actions that are 
required to be undertaken in order to achieve the objectives of 
the municipal IT Governance framework. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 







STRENGTHS 

WEAKNESSES 

1 . High levels of staff commitment 

2. Good relations with stakeholders 

3. All core ICT systems to support the business are 
currently in place 

A. Strong commitment from the business to support 

ICT initiatives 

5. Dedicated server room 

6. Full Management support of ICT 

7. ICT Steering committee 

8. Shared service agreement with the district 

1. Slow machines and networks 

2. Poor environmental controls 

3. Lack of ICT policies, standards and strategy 

A. Poor Network Management 

5. Insufficient ICT budget to meet ICT requirements 

6.No ICT budget 

OPPORTUNITES 

THREATS 

1 .New technology can enhance business operations 

2. Using ICT to enhance revenue base 

3. Speeding up ICT services 

1 . Increasingly sophisticated security risks and threats 

2. More stringent audits focusing on controls 

3. Focus on ICT by Auditor General 

A. Business Units make decisions which may impact 

ICT without consulting ICT 

5. Constantly changing ICT technologies 


■ Infrastructure associated the mining will improve the 
infrastructure available to a municipal area. 

3.6.8.2. WEAKNESSES/THREATS 

■ High backlogs in water and sanitation provision in the rural 
areas, which is exacerbated by the poor maintenance of 
existing infrastructure. 

■ High backlogs in electricity / alternative energy provision 
in the rural areas, exacerbated by scattered rural 
settlement patterns. 

■ Illegal connections (electricity) pose safety risks to people. 

■ Rural access roads are in a poor state of repair. This is 
exacerbated by the fact that no sphere of government is clear 
on who is responsible for these roads. 

■ Due to the absence of potable water in many of the rural 
areas, communities tend to settle in close proximity to rivers 
and streams, mostly without due consideration of flood lines 
along these water courses. 

■ Fires occur during protracted periods of drought and are aided 
by the generally dense vegetation such as cane fields, forests 
and invasive alien vegetation throughout the municipal area. 

■ The occurrence of cholera and related diseases is as a result 
of the absence of potable water as well as the lack of 
sanitation in rural areas. 

■ The uMlalazi Local Municipality does not have the capacity 
in terms of manpower nor the technical support equipment to 
deal with a major disaster. Poor access increases the potential 
impact of a disaster. 

■ The impact of climate change - more periods of heavy 
flooding and longer periods of drought - poses a very real 
threat to the sustainable livelihood of rural communities. 

■ Lack of sufficient storm water management in urban areas. 


Table 54: ICT SWOT Analysis 

3.6.8. SERVICE DELIVERY & 
INFRASTRUCTURE: SWOT 
ANALYSIS 

3.6.8.1. STRENGTHS/ 
OPPORTUNITIES 

■ Full range of engineering services provided to all urban areas. 

■ The reticulation of water is complicated by the 
undulating topography. 

■ Free Basic services for electricity are being provided by 
the uMlalazi Municipality, for those people on the indigent 
register and residing in Eshowe and King DinuZulu (where the 
Municipality is the electricity service provider). Monies are also 
being paid over to ESKOM on a monthly basis for free basic 
electricity for the indigents on ESKOM's Indigent Register. 

■ Free Basic Services for solid waste removal are provided by 
the Municipality for households on the Municipal Indigent 
Register for those residing in Eshowe, King DinuZulu 
and Gingindlovu. 

■ Recycling and buyback centres are being investigated and the 
Municipality has already commenced with the roll-out of pilot 
projects in the rural areas. 

■ The uMlalazi Municipality is crossed by a number of important 
transportation routes, such as the N2 Motorway between 
Durban and Richards Bay, the R3A between Richards Bay/ 
Empangeni and Nkwaleni valley to the north of Eshowe, and 
the R66 from the N2 Motorway to Gingindlovu, Eshowe, 
Melmoth, Ulundi and Vryheid. 

■ The uMlalazi Local Municipality has a 2A hour Alpha 
Emergency Control Centre located at the offices of the 
Manager Protection Services in Butcher Street, Eshowe. 


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Section C: Spatial Analysis 


3.7. LOCAL ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL 
DEVELOPMENT ANALYSIS 

3.7.1. LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ANALYSIS 

3.7.1. 1. MUNICIPAL COMPARATIVE AND COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGES 

■ Pristine coastline of approximately 1 7kms 

■ Excellent biodiversity, natural rain forest (fewest in the country) 

■ Goedertrouw/Phobane Dam offering adventure tourism/water sports 

■ Potential for Mining in specific areas. 

■ Siyaya Coastal Reserve (the uMlalazi Reserve and the Amatikulu Reserve) - potential blue flag status. 

■ Four Conservation Areas (Ntumeni Nature Reserve, Mbongolwane Wetland, Ongoye and Dhlinza Forests). 

■ N2 National Road traverses through the Municipal Area along its south-eastern boundary connecting two of KZN biggest 
commercial hubs/ports. 

■ The R66 Main Road traverses through the center of the municipal area from south to north, providing a road link between Durban, 
Ulundi and Vryheid. 

■ The municipality is located adjacent and to the south of one of the fastest growing urban centers in South Africa, namely 
Richards Bay - Empangeni. 

■ The municipal area is rich in historical and cultural assets. 

■ Abundant development space in strategic areas within the municipality. 


3.7.1.2. ECONOMIC PROFILE OF THE POPULATION 
3.7.1.2.1. ECONOMIC POPULATION 


AGE 

COHORT 

GENDER 

1996 

2001 

2011 

0-1A 

Male 

A6 809 

A3 685 

AO 2A1 


Female 

A7 67A 

AA 03A 

39 292 

15-6A 

Male 

52 065 

52 8A0 

5A265 


Female 

69 206 

68 960 

67 839 

65+ 

Male 

3 736 

3 558 

3 901 


Female 

741A 

8 000 

8 063 


Source: Census 20 1 1, Stats SA 

Table 55: Distribution by Functional Group (StatsSA) 


iniiiiillll. ... 

■Mi ripMP iMf I— fip iWk| 

^Ji iM 

■W4» ‘■JiH Blhl 

Figure 26: Distribution by Functional Group 


There has been a significant reduction of the number of people, from 1 996 to 2011 , that are aged between 0 and 1 A years. There 
has been no significant increase in the economic population, i.e. 15 to 6A years, as well as in the elderly (65 years and older). This 
possibly reconfirms the opinion that the reduction in population size is possibly due to an out-migration of economically active 
people to larger centers where there is a perception of more employment opportunities. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 








3.7.1.2.2. EMPLOYMENT STATUS (PERSON AGED BETWEEN 15 AND 65) 


EMPLOYMENT STATUS 

1996 

2001 

2011 

Employed 

51 

47 

65 

Unemployed 

49 

53 

35 

Unemployed Rate 

48.8 

53.3 

35.2 


Source: Census 201 1, StatsSA 

Table 56: Employment Status (ISyrs-GSyrs) (2011) 


¥«hn| 


U 



■ m "jni BKII 


Figure 27: Employment Status (15 yrs to 65yrs) 


There seemed to have been a significant increase in the number of economically active persons that were formally employed 
between 2001 to 201 1 within the Municipal Area. The unemployment rate also seemed to have shrunk from 53% in 2001 to 
35.2% in 201 1 . However, the effect of growth in the number of discouraged work-seekers was not brought into account. 


NO OF PERSONS 

NO OF 
PERSONS 

% OF TOTAL 

Employed 

24792 

49.79 

Unemployed 

13480 

27.07 

Discouraged work-seeker 

11520 

23.14 

Total 

49792 

100.00 


Source: Census 201 1, StatsSA 

Table 57: Employment Status (15yrs-65yrs) (2011) 


Emplayment Status (in 

zimoo 

PjW 

w4rk-&ec4ter 

Figure 28: Employment Status (15yrs - 65yrs) (2011) 



The adjacent figure indicates the effect of discourages work-seekers on the employment status of persons aged between 1 5 and 
65 years within the Municipal Area in 201 1. Some 23% of persons who are potentially employable have indicated, in 201 1, that they 
are not encouraged in seeking work anymore. 


1 SECTOR 

KZN 

UTHUNGULU 

UMLALAZI 1 

1 Agriculture 

3.9% 

4.7% 

14.8% 

2 Mining 

1.1% 

9.7% 

1.5% 

3 Manufacturing 

19.7% 

32.1% 

23.9% 

4 Electricity 

1.7% 

0.7% 

0.4% 

5 Construction 

2.7% 

2.2% 

2.8% 

6 Trade 

13.2% 

6.7% 

5.3% 

7 Transport 

12% 

9.2% 

2.1% 

8 Finance 

18.1% 

10.8% 

6.1% 

9 Community services 

17% 

11.9% 

32.8% 

Households 

11.6% 

12% 

10.3% 

Total 

100% 

100% 

100.0% 


Source: Census 2011 

Table 58: uMlalazi LM - Sector Share of the Region 


From 1 996 to 2010, the economy of the uThungulu District grew at a slightly slower pace than the national economy at an average 
annual growth rate of 3.2% per annum compared to 3.29% for the national economy. This resulted in the uThungulu economy 
decreasing its share in national output from 1.45 % in 1996 to 1.44% in 2010. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 1 12 

o<xx>o<xxxxxxx>oooooooooooo 














Section C: Spatial Analysis 


3.7.1.2.3. HOUSEHOLD INCOME 


MUNICIPALITY 

AVERAGE ANNUAL HOUSEHOLD INCOME 
(IN RANDS) IN THE UTHUNGULU DISTRO 

UThungulu DM 

80,05A 

Mfolozi 

A6,130 

uMhIathuze 

121,177 

Nkandia 

39,679 

Ntambanana 

56,483 

uMlalazi 

49,096 

Mthonjaneni 

44,783 





Figure 29: Average Annual Household Inconne in the 
uThungulu District (2011) 


Source: Census 201 1, StatsSA 

Table 59: Average Annual Household Inconne In The 

Uthungulu District (2011) 

Households within the uMhIathuze LM Area had, in 201 1, the highest average annual household inconne, i.e. R121, 177 per annum. 
Households in all the other LMs in the uThungulu DM Area earned significantly less, in 201 1, than those residing within the uMhIathuze 
LM Area. This reinforces the opinion that people might well seek work in the latter Municipal Area. 


ANNUAL HOUSEHOLD INCOME 

POPULATION 1 

RO - R4800 

2 282 

R4801 - R 9600 

3 948 

R9601 - R 19 600 

12 050 

R 19 601 - R38 200 

10 725 

R 38 201 -R 76 400 

4 728 

R 76 401 - R 153 800 

2515 

R 153 801 -R307 600 

1 683 

R 307 601 -R 614 400 

1 020 

R 614 001 - R 1 228 800 

274 

R 1 228 801 -R 2457 600 

95 

R 2 457 601 or more 

64 

Unspecified 

0 

Total 

39 385 


Annual Household Income 

( 2011 ) 





Figure 30: Household Income (2011) 


Source: Census 20 1 1, StatsSA 
Table 60: Household Income (2011) 

Indigent households are those households earning less than R1, 600 per month. In terms of this criterion alone, some A5% of the 
Households who resided in the uMlalazi Municipal Area were indigent. 

In terms of this definition, some A6.A% of households (or 18,280 households), in 201 1, fell in this category. It is noted that the majority 
of households that earned less than R1, 633 per month in 2011, resided in the western quarter of the Municipal Area, as well as 
the northern portion and the eastern part of the Municipal Area. The poorest of the poor are settled in Wards 1 , 2, A, 5, 6, and 27. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 










Map 26: Low Income Households (2011) 


3.7.1. 2 A DEPENDENCYRATIO 


CATEGORY 

1996 

2001 

2011 1 

< 14 years 

94 483 

87 719 

79 534 

> 65 years 

11 150 

11 558 

11 964 

Dependent Population 

121 271 

121 800 

122 103 

Dependency Ratio 

87.1 

81.5 

74.9 


Source: Census 20 1 1, StatsSA 

Table 61: Dependency Ration (1996, 2001, 2011) 


Dependency Ratio (2011} 





l■^™l 3m 1 


Figure 31: Dependency Ratio (1996, 2001, 2011) 


It is encouraging to note that dependency ratios - whilst still extremely high - have decreased from 1 996 to 2001 and from 2001 
to 201 1 . Dependency ratio means the number of persons that is supported by 1 earner, i.e. in 201 1 the Dependency Ratio was 
74.9. This means that some 75 persons were dependent on every income earner. 

Dependency ratios are the highest in the western parts of the Municipal Area. However, these areas are relatively sparsely settled in 
comparison to the Eshowe, Gingindlovu and Mtunzini triangle. 



Map 27: Dependency Ratio per Ward (2011) 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 1 14 

o<xx>o<xxxxxxx>oooooooooooo 








Section C: Spatial Analysis 


3.7.13. LED STRATEGY AND ITS 
IMPLEMENTATION (TRACKING 
PROGRESS) 

The uMlalazi LM reviewed the LED Strategy in 2003, the aim 
of which was to maximize the economic potential of uMlalazi 
LM by encouraging the public sector, the business sector and 
communities to work together in creating conditions favorable to 
economic growth and employment generation. Specific targets 
of LED include: 


■ Create employment; 

■ Develop local markets; 

■ Promote and support SMMEs; 

■ Decrease poverty and hardship; and 

■ Ensure community empowerment. 

In view of these targets and in compliance with National and 
Provincial Legislation and Policies, the LED Strategy was 
developed in keeping with the following strategic thrusts; 



1. Expansion and diversification 
of the agricultural sector 


1.1. Improvement of coordination between all parties critical to agricultural development 


1 .2. Emerging and smallOscale farmer development and assistance 

1 .3. Commondity development and agro-proessing 


2. Development of a clear vision 2.1 . Manufacturing sector policy and planning 

for the manufacturing sector 2.2. SMME participation within the manufacturing sector 


3. Development and support for 
the tourism sector 


3.1 . Expansion of the tourism attractions and activities 

3.2. Information, marketing and promotion 


3.3. Tourism specific infrastructure upgrades 


4. Improveing the institutional 
and policy environment 
towards effective LED 


4.1. Coordination and communication of LED stakeholders 


4.2. Funding of LED implemenation 


4.3. Business Retention and Expansion 


5. Ensuring effective education, 
skills and capacity development 


5.1 . Skills training and development 


5.2. Development of relationships between industry and tertiary and training instutions 


5.3. Retention of skilled residents 


6. Expansion and 
development of strategic 
economic infrastructure 


6.1. Transportation infrastructure capacity and maintenance (road and rail) 

6.2. Development of bulk services 


7.1. Assistance and support 

7.2. Value-chain development and local pocurement 

7.3. Development of innovation 


/. btrective support to t 
and 


informal economy 
^ development of 
small enterprises 


STRATEGIC GOAL STRATEGIC PROGRAMMES 





3.7.1 A 5MME DEVELOPMENT 

As with the tourism sector, the 5MME sector is also regarded 
as a cross-sectorial industry in that it has linkages with other 
sectors such as retail, manufacturing, etc. As a result, it is difficult 
to measure the contribution of SMIVIEs to the local economy. 
The informal business sector is a part of the economy that is not 


taxed, regulated, or included in any gross national product (GNP). 
It is a form of livelihood which is characterised by low levels of 
education and high rates of unemployment. 

In terms of the informal sector, the figure below gives an 
indication of the number of informal employees within each 
sector of the economy. 

■i Mining #nd quirr^inp 

■ M*nufMtyfpng; 

■ W#ttr 

B Con^tf uctien 

B trtd r#l*il lK4Ei4, C^l+r'ing 4 nd 

BTT*ih5p^>r1, *ncj <Otnn1vnit*ti^hi 

B Pininsip inf LFnnei, r»1 «nd 

B C^muriMnily, Wr+I fnd |i*rji5n*il Wivic-tJ 

B jg^vtf nmvnt 


OCPt 





Figure 32: 5MME Sector Share 


3.7.1.4.1.NARYSEC 

The Department of Rural Development and Land Reform has 
rolled out a program called National Rural Youth Services Corps 
(NARYSEC) which is aimed at creating vibrant, equitable, and 
sustainable rural communities by providing certain skills and 
to perform community service in their own communities. The 
objectives of NARYSEC are as follows: 

■ Train youth through specifically developed programs linked 
to community needs in rural areas. 

■ Develop youth with multi-disciplinary skills through 
civic education. 

■ Capacitate youth in retaining knowledge and technical skills 
acquired during training. 

■ Increase the number of rural communities receiving support 
in their self-development through the CRDP. 

■ Character development and patriotism. 

The department has, through this program, selected 30 
unemployed beneficiaries (from uMlalazi LM) to be trained 
in various skills ranging from mechanical, civil, electrical and 
agricultural skills. The program runs for 2A months and it is 
based in Bloemfontein. The selected individuals will receive 
monthly stipends to cater for their immediate needs. The 


recruitment of unemployed youth was done in ward 9, 10 and 
25 which included youth with disabilities and with a majority 
of them being women. 

3.7.I.4.2. YOUTH BUSINESS 
ADVISORY CENTRE 

The uMlalazi Youth Business Advisory Centre "Home for 
Entrepreneurs" (YABC) was established and officially opened 
by His Worship the Mayor Cllr TB Zulu on the 9th of April 201 A. 
YABC assists youth to develop and harness their business ideas 
into fully grown sustainable business entities by; 

■ Registering entities -inter-alia; Proprietor ownership. Co- 
operatives etc. 

■ Sourcing funding from relevant financial institutions. 

■ Guiding and improving technical and financial management 
targeting skills development, mentoring and coaching. 

■ Any other support required by young entrepreneurs. 

The municipality is of the progressive view that by establishing 
this YABC, sustainability in the development of young 
entrepreneurs is ensured, in such a way that they are not only 
being advised, but they are also being connected to financial and 
mentoring streams to further empower their visions. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 1 16 

>^00<xXxXxXX>000000000000 


Section C: Spatial Analysis 


3.7.1A3. INFORMAL TRADING 

The informal economic makes an important contribution to the economic and social life of the uMlalazi Municipality. Due to the 
decline in formal employment and consequent increase in unemployment rate, many people seek alternative means of earning 
an income. It is generally accepted that the informal sector plays a significant role in the local economy more especially in the 
previously disadvantage areas. One of the main reasons for this is the inability of national economy's formal sector to create 
sufficient employment for the relatively fast- growing labour force. This inability leads to new entrants into the labour market being 
increasingly forced to turn into the informal sector, to earn a living. In view of the aforementioned, the municipality has developed 
an informal trader's policy in which to regulate informal trading within the municipality and to develop the sector and its participants 
into a commercially viable and dynamic economic sector, which contributes to the economic growth of the town and the quality of 
life of its citizens in a sustainable manner. The uMlalazi LM Informal Traders Policy covers the informal trading activities occurring 
within the municipality. This policy is founded in economic, social and spatial principles which provide a strategic thrust in achieving 
the core objectives upon which the policy is derived. 

Central to equitable allocation of trading bays, is the compilation by the municipality of a database of all street traders in a particular 
area, which will include for each trader: ID number or any recognized form of identification, address, goods being sold, trading location 
and any other relevant information. A summary of the municipal informal trader's data base is as follows: 


NO. 

LOCATION 

NUMBER OF TRADERS I 

1 

Outside Adams Spar 

6 

2 

Bus Rank 

17 

3 

Outside Checkout 

1 

A 

Containers 

A2 

5 

Lindela 

9 

6 

Nkanini 

3 

7 

Vuma 

1 

8 

King Dinuzulu Suburbs 

1A 

9 

Kingdom 

A1 

10 

Mpumazi 

5 

11 

Vans Rank 

15 

12 

Sports Shop 

2 

13 

Mhlathuzana Rank 

A 

1A 

Theatre Lane 

1 

TOTAL 

161 


Table 63: Informal Traders Database 


In taking cognizance on the development of this sector, the municipality has identified a need to formalise the facilities for informal 
trading. The municipality has introduces a smart card manufacturing system for the issuing of permits. Formal shelters are to be 
erected in Eshowe, Mtunzini, KD5, Gingindlovu, and Mbongolwane. At the Eshowe Taxi Rank the municipality is constructing A1 Trading 
Units, comprising of A anchor shops and 37 normal size shops which was formally opened by the MEC for the DEDTEA in May 201 5. 

3.7.1.5. AGRICULTURE 

The agricultural sector dominates uMlalazi contributing 33% to the local economy. The uMlalazi area is reliant on the agricultural sector 
for economic growth. The products that dominate the area are sugar cane, timber production and citrus farming. The agricultural 
sector accounts for approximately 6.A% of total GVA in the uThungulu District, while the contribution of this sector to total formal 
employment is 7.9%. UMlalazi contributes 19.8% to total agricultural output in the district, and have experienced a decline in growth 
of -5.5% from 2001 to 201 1 . The table below provides an indication of the quantity and average annual growth rate of employment 
and GVA in agriculture for the Province, District and uMlalazi Local Municipality. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 






EMPLOYMENT IN 
2011 ' 


AVERAGE 
ANNUAL GROWTH 
(2001-2011) 


GVA 

(CURRENT PRICES) 
IN 2011 


REAL AVERAGE 
ANNUAL GROWTH 
RATE (2001-2011) 


KwaZulu-Natal 

105,645 

-10,6% 

R 18,751,990,000 

2,4% 

uThungulu 

12,364 

-11,4% 

R 2,087,997,000 

1,4% 

Umlalazi 

2,544 

-16,9% 

R 413,862,000 

-5,5% 


Source: Census 20 1 1, StotsSA 

Table 64: Economic Contribution for Agriculture 

The agricultural sector is one of the basic economic sectors 
as it impacts significantly on employment, income generation, 
economic linkages, land tenure, land reform and environmental 
considerations in the district. Timber and sugar cane are the 
most important agricultural activities. 

The agricultural sector has grown over the years and there is 
a focus towards more subsistence farming to enhance local 
economic development. The current agricultural products that 
are being exported are sugar cane, vegetables, citrus fruit and 
timber. The main crop that is being exported is sugar cane in 
uMlalazi area. 

There have been community gardens that have been very 
successful in the uMlalazi Municipality. However, the issue 
still remains of transport due to the poor road conditions in 
the area as well as accessibility. The community gardens have 
been introduced as means of providing access to food for the 
residents of uMlalazi however, the excess produce has been 
sold in the markets. 


Most of the high potential agricultural land is in private 
ownership. This land is located along the coastal strip between 
Mtunzini and Gingindlovu - on the lower lying areas. It is also 
located in the area surrounding the town of Eshowe and 
extending to the west thereof. There is also some very high 
potential agricultural land situated in the north-eastern part of 
the Municipal Area. 

The Municipality has, through the LED Department, rolled 
out funding and technical support for the development and 
sustainability of agriculture in various wards within the municipal 
area. There are 15 registered co-operatives that have received 
support. The promotion of these projects is crucial for the 
safeguarding of food security especially within impoverished 
communities and has the potential to create a substantially 
higher number of jobs in a shorter time frame. 



■LutEi HKfurrniti 


Map 28: Agriculture Potential Areas 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 1 18 

XX><>0<>0<XXXXX>0000<>0<>0<>0<^ 






Section C: Spatial Analysis 


3.7.1.5.1.THE FRESH 
PRODUCE MARKET 

The UThungulu District Municipality has successfully establishes 
a Fresh Produce Market that incorporates both commercial and 
communal farmers. The aim of this initiative is also to ensure 
growth and continuity, especially amongst emerging farmers at 
a small scale level. This is a collective initiative which requires 
combined efforts and resources. The aim is to continually 
strive to encourage partnerships to assist and undertake the 
task towards agrarian reform within the uThungulu District. 
The Market operates as an entity within its own to boost 
economic growth through agricultural practices. The partnering 
government departments include: 


■ The Department of Agriculture 

■ The Department of Co-Operative Governance and 
Traditional Affairs 

■ The Department of Trade and Industry 

The municipality, in support of local agricultural development, 
rolls out rural agricultural projects that are aimed at ensuring 
food security through agriculture and land care. The Department 
of Agriculture also assists greatly in this regard. The department 
has rolled out major agricultural projects within the UMIalazi 
municipality. The following food security projects have been 
rolled out by the municipality at ward level: 


PROJECT 

DESCRIPTION 

STATUS 

WARD 

1. FOOD SECURITY: 

Inqaba Yesizwe Co-operative. 

Gardens implements, seeds, fertilizers and agro-chemicals 
handed over to Co-operative's beneficiaries. 

100 % complete. 

25 

Amakalishi Co-operative. 

Gardens implements, seeds, fertilizers and agro-chemicals 
handed over to Co-operative's beneficiaries. 

100 % complete. 

21 

Silwanendlala CO-operative. 

Gardens implements, seeds, fertilizers and agro-chemicals 
handed over to Co-operative's beneficiaries. 

100 % complete 

2A 


Gardens implements, seeds, fertilizers and agro-chemicals 
handed over to Co-operative's beneficiaries. 

100 % complete 

10 

Mpumalanga Co-operative. 

Gardens implements, seeds, fertilizers and agro-chemicals 
handed over to Co-operative's beneficiaries. 

100 % complete 

01 

Izimbidli Co-operative. 

Gardens implements, seeds, fertilizers and agro-chemicals 
handed over to Co-operative's beneficiaries. 

100 % complete 

06 

Asisebenze Co-operative. 

Gardens implements, seeds, fertilizers and agro-chemicals 
handed over to Co-operative's beneficiaries. 

100 % complete 

04 

Thintumkhaba Co-operative. 

Gardens implements, seeds, fertilizers and agro-chemicals 
handed over to Co-operative's beneficiaries. 

100 % complete 

09 

Siyathuthuka Co-operative. 

Gardens implements, seeds, fertilizers and agro-chemicals 
handed over to Co-operative's beneficiaries. 

100 % complete 

15 

Hlanganani Co-operative. 

Gardens implements, seeds, fertilizers and agro-chemicals 
handed over to Co-operative's beneficiaries. 

100% Complete. 

23 

Siyajabula Co-operative. 

Gardens implements, seeds, fertilizers and agro-chemicals 
handed over to Co-operative's beneficiaries. 

100% Complete 

12 

Luzwano Co-operative. 

Gardens implements, seeds, fertilizers and agro-chemicals 
handed over to Co-operative's beneficiaries. 

100% Complete. 

22 

Phaphamani Co-operative. 

Gardens implements, seeds, fertilizers and agro-chemicals 
handed over to Co-operative's beneficiaries. 

100% Complete. 

07 

Mkhwishimane Co-operative. 

Gardens implements, seeds, fertilizers and agro-chemicals 
handed over to Co-operative's beneficiaries. 

100% Complete. 

03 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 







PROJECT 


DESCRIPTION 


STATUS 


WARD 


2. INFORMAL TRADERS: 

Smart Card 

Manufacturing System. 

For production of UMlalazi Municipality informal 
traders permits. 

100% Completed. 

All 26 
wards. 

Trading Shelters 

10 Osborn Rd 

OA Mtunzini 

OA Mbongolwane Hosp. 

Galvanized, descent trading shelters for street traders. 

100% Completed 

11, 19& 

04. 

3. Eshowe Taxi Rank New 
Trading Facilities. 

41 Trading Units, comprising of 4 anchor shops and 37 normal 
size shops. 

Completed 

11 

Philangemvelo (Pty) Ltd, 
uVaba, uVuka Gogo, ward 

1 Cooperatives and other 
identified partners (CSIR, UJ, etc) 

Poverty Eradication Through Integrated (Holistic) Agricultural 
Practices: Herbs/Spices and Traditional medicinal purposes. 

Planning Stage 

01,02, 
and 06. 


Table 65 

3.7.1.6. TOURISM 

3.7.1.6.1. TOURISM INTHE 
KWAZULU-NATAL PROVINCE 

Tourism is increasingly becoming a major contributor to the 
global economy, currently contributing an estimated 1 0. 1 % to the 
global Gross Domestic Product (GDP). South African tourism's 
contribution to the country's GDP was recorded at about 7, 
3% in 2003, accounting for approximately 800 000 direct and 
indirect jobs. 

The sector is able to generate employment opportunities 
without significant capital investment. About R1 million of 
tourism spend generates and sustains 1 1 annual direct and 
indirect jobs. Tourism outstripped Gold as the leading generator 
of foreign exchange earnings in South Africa in 2003, generating 
R53 billion and driving foreign direct spend into the country. 

In KwaZulu-Natal, tourism total contribution to GGP is standing 
about R18 billion - about 10% of the provincial economy. 
The province currently attracts about 1 .3 million foreign visitors 
and 13.9 million domestic tourism trips on an annual basis. 

Tourism KwaZulu-Natal has demonstrated just how significant 
the tourism sector is to the growth of the provincial economy. 
The Province has wonderful natural tourism attractions and is 
thus well positioned to take advantage of the continued growth 
in world and domestic tourism. 

It is hoped that the plans set out in the Strategic Plan receive 
the support and investment to realize the vision of making 
KZN Africa's leading tourism destination. Kwa Zulu Natal 
(KwaZulu-Natal) tourism industry is fundamental tourist 


attraction for South Africa. It has been estimated that there 
are approximately 8A million domestic tourists from outside and 
within the province. The primary factor that attracts tourists in 
the province is its beaches, family and friends, the wild life and 
Zulu culture. Kwa Zulu Natal's core tourism market is derived 
from within its borders. Gauteng is Kwa Zulu Natal's (KwaZulu- 
Natal's) most important market. The key destinations are Durban 
Central, the South Coast, the Midlands and the North Coast. It has 
been estimated that domestic revenue equates to approximately 
R8 billion per annum in terms of consumer expenditure. 

3.7.1.6.2. TOURISM INTHE 
UMLALAZI MUNICIPAL AREA 

The tourism sector has enormous potential in the uMlalazi area 
and the uMlalazi municipality has identified the need to improve 
and enhance the tourism sector. The uMlalazi LM is developing 
a Tourism Plan in-house, which will package accordingly all 
the tourist attractions within the municipal area and develop 
strategies in which will enhance the potential of these 
attractions and also to attract investment within the municipal 
area through tourism. Tourism is regarded as a cross-sectoral 
industry in that it has linkages with other sectors such as retail, 
manufacturing, transport, catering, hospitality, etc. As a result, 
it is difficult to measure the contribution of tourism to the local 
economy as GVA from the tourism industry is spread across a 
number of other sectors. However, catering and accommodation 
within uMlalazi contributed 1.3% to total GVA in 2011, which is 
only 8.6% of total catering and accommodation output within the 
District. This indicates that uMlalazi plays a relatively small role 
within the tourism sector within the wider uThungulu District. 
It should also be noted that although this contribution is small, 
it is expected that this is only a small portion of the total GVA 
generated from the industry, with spin-offs of tourism largely 
cutting across the wholesale and retail sector. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 1 20 

>^<>0<XXXXXXX>000000000000 







Section C: Spatial Analysis 



KwaZulu-Natal 

uThungulu 


EMPLOYMENT IN 
2011’ 

AVERAGE 

ANNUALGROWTH 

(2001-2011) 

GVA 

(CURRENT PRICES) 
IN 2011 

REAL AVERAGE 
ANNUALGROWTH 
RATE (2001-2011) 

41,964 

-1,9% 

R 6,760,432,985 

5,7% 

2,283 

-0,5% 

R 377,799,734 

8,0% 

255 

0,3% 

R 32,551,465 

7,9% 


Umlalazi 


Source: (Quantec, 2012) 

Table 66: uMlalazi LM - Catering and Accommodation Sector Employment and GVA 


Eshowe, Mtunzini and Gingindlovu are the three main towns in 
uMlalazi and offer an array of choices for domestic as well as 
international tourists. Eshowe, a City Set on a Hill, is situated 
around a 250 hectare indigenous coastal scrub forest. The Dlinza 
Forest Aerial Boardwalk, the first in Southern Africa and exclusive 
to Eshowe and the second in the world (the first was built in 
Mali), is a 1 60 meter long walkway built above the forest floor, 
which allows visitors to view flora, fauna and avifauna - it has 
a platform of 20 meters above the forest floor. The Boardwalk 
employs two trained birding guides. Some of the flora and fauna 
that exist in the forest are the Green Coucal, Crowned Eagles and 
Spotted Thrush. The Ironwoods, Wild Plums and other giants 
give shelter to Orchids, Clivias, Bushbuck, Duiker, NarinaTrogons, 
Delegorgues's Pigeon and Wood Eshowe. 

Eshowe offers a window on history as it is the oldest town in 
Zululand. King Cetshwayo was born and died here and it was 
King Mpande who first invited the Norwegian missionary, the 


Reverend Ommund Oftebro to settle his mission station here 
in 1861, thereby forever changing the face of Eshowe. 

Mtunzini is characterised by natural beauty and is a popular 
coastal town. UMIalazi Nature Reserve, controlled by Ezemvelo 
KwaZulu-Natal Wildlife, covers 1 028 hectares. The zebra is 
often found grazing in the nature reserve. The uMlalazi Reserve 
and the Amatikulu Reserve together form the Siyaya Coastal 
Reserve, which stretches from the uMlalazi River in the north, 
in a narrow band along the coast southwards almost to the 
Thukela (Tugela) River. Amatikulu Reserve and access is via the 
N2 approximately 30 km south of Mtunzini. There are 5 different 
ecosystems, namely estuarine, dune scrub, dune forest, coastal 
riverine and coastal forest which characterize the Mtunzini 
area providing diverse natural environment. There is a thriving 
population of giraffe as well as waterbuck and a number of 
smaller antelope. 



UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 






The uMlalazi Municipality has vast potential for enhancing 
tourism in the area but the access by road is problematic as 
the areas are mountainous with forest. The Goedertrouw/ 
Phobane Dam offers the opportunity for a range of water sports, 
together with camping and picnic spots, however this need to be 
developed still and once completed will assist local communities 
with jobs and upliftment. It is supplementary to the areas of 
eco-tourism in the uMlalazi area. Thukela Valley is an area of 
outstanding scenic beauty and represents rugged countryside. 

The Eshowe Butterfly Dome is located adjacent to Nongqyai 
Museum Village, in Eshowe. It is an eco-tourism venture 
with the purpose of bringing future job opportunities to the 
community of the uMlalazi Municipality and educates school 
children and tourists on the value of indigenous vegetation and 
its connection with the associated insect species. The ultimate 
goal is biodiversity conservation awareness. The dome is a 20m 
X 10m geodesic structure covered with insect netting. Inside 
it is landscaped with indigenous butterfly host plants in order 
for the butterflies to undergo several life cycles and keeping a 
steady population of different species. All the butterflies inside 
the dome are indigenous in South Africa. The person in charge 
of breeding butterflies, collect few females from the wild and 
releases them into a breeding cage. There, the butterflies lay 
eggs which then are collected by the staff member. When the 
eggs hatch, the caterpillars are raised till they reach the pupa 
stage. Then they will move the chrysalides to the butterfly dome 
where they eventually will hatch. Therefore, all the butterflies 


inside the dome are raised in captivity. The Eshowe Butterfly 
Dome is part of the Butterfly Route, which is an initiative of 
African Conservation Trust out of a request by Dr. America 
Bonkewitzz to establish a community-based Indigenous 
Butterfly education project specifically for the children of 
uMlalazi. The Eshowe Butterfly Dome is committed to the 
enlightment of the local people about the pristine environment, 
the importance of the forest and the role of the insect fauna in 
the ecosystem and the advantage over other towns, to have a 
pristine natural indigenous forest within the town of Eshowe. 

Currently there are many attractive tourist sites with many bed 
and breakfasts in the uMlalazi area which draw large number 
tourists to the area. 

3 . 7 . 1 . 7 . MANUFACTURING 
(INDUSTRIAL SECTOR) 

The manufacturing sector in uMlalazi is largely influenced by 
the agricultural sector. This is because of the sugar mill located 
at Amatikulu. The manufacturing sector is currently the second 
biggest contributor to GVA in the uMlalazi Municipality with a 
contribution of 18.5%, while the sector is the biggest contributor 
at a district level with a contribution of 26.8% to the uThungulu 
District GVA. The following table provides an indication of the 
quantity and average annual growth rate of employment and 
GVA in manufacturing for the Province, District and uMlalazi 
Local Municipality. 



KwaZulu-Natal 


EMPLOYMENT IN 
2011’ 

AVERAGE 

ANNUALGROWTH 

(2001-2011) 

GVA 

(CURRENT PRICES) 
IN 2011 

REAL AVERAGE 
ANNUALGROWTH 
RATE (2001 -2011) 

286,842 

-2,0% 

R 76,246,200,000 

2,4% 

18,039 

0,4% 

R 7,375,676,000 

2,6% 

2,241 

1,9% 

R 638,690,600 

7,2% 


uThungulu 


Umlalazi 


Source: (Quantec, 2012) 

Table 67: Economic Contribution for Manufacturing 


The provincial manufacturing sector employed close to 287,000 people, and generated a GVA of more than R76 billion in 201 1 . 
The sector experienced 2.4% real average annual GVA growth since 2001 , while employment within the sector declined at 2.0% per 
annum. Within both the district and uMlalazi, the number of people employed in the sector increased since 2001 . UMIalazi contributes 
1 2.4% to total employment within the district manufacturing sector, with employment increasing at a rate of 1 .9% per annum since 
2001 . Additionally, GVA growth has increased at 7.2% per annum since 2001 . This indicates that while the sector is growing, the 
employment in the sector is not growing at the same pace as the output and there is a need to boost employment in the sector. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 1 22 

>^<>o<xxxxxxx>oooooooooooo 






Section C: Spatial Analysis 


The figure below displays the breakdown of the manufacturing sector in terms of contribution to total manufacturing GVA within uMlalazi. 


Furnrfurt *nd fninufpciturin^ -391'... 
trjfrhip^rr [SiC' 

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rnfitiil pr^L»cl$p niKhinirv frid... 
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clethinf ind Itithiar foodi [SIC: 311>317l! 
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1^% 


12.SI4 


1Q.9* 










55 


0 % 


25.0% W-0% 4010^ SO.5% W.0% 

Figure 33: GVA contribution within manufacturing sector in uMlalazi, 201 1 (Quantec 2012) 


3.7.I.8. SERVICES 

The business services sector is a big contributor to the total GVA in the uMlalazi Municipality with a contribution of 1 6. 7%. The table 
below provides an indication of the quantity and average annual growth rate of employment and GVA in business services for the 
Province, District and uMlalazi Local Municipality. 



KwaZulu-Natal 

uThungulu 


EMPLOYMENT IN 
2011’ 

AVERAGE 

ANNUALGROWTH 

(2001-2011) 

GVA 

(CURRENT PRICES) 
IN 2011 

REAL AVERAGE 
ANNUALGROWTH 
RATE (2001 -2011) 

286,780 

2,0% 

R 54,570,953,664 

5,6% 

17,578 

3,5% 

R 3,127,030,726 

7,1% 

2,18A 

A,0% 

R 433,065,798 

7,6% 


Umlalazi 


Source: (Quantec, 2012) 

Table 68: Business services sector employment and GVA (Quantec 2012) 


The business services sector has increased its GVA contribution to the economy of uMlalazi significantly within the last 10 years. 
In 2001, the sector contributed 8.3% to the GVA of uMlalazi, while in 201 1 the sector contributed 16.7% to the GVA of uMlalazi. 
Together with the finance, insurance and real estate industry it is the biggest contributor to GVA within the uMlalazi economy. This 
is an indication of the importance of the sector within the uMlalazi Municipality. 

3.7.I.9. MINING 

Tronox currently has since 1 998 had a large business investment in the UThungulu District Municipality with mining of the mineralized 
sand dunes in an area just north of Mtunzini, Kwa Zulu Natal, (KwaZulu-Natal) known as the Hillendale Mine, its central processing 
complex ("CPC") at Empangeni for refinement and the Fairbreeze and planned Port Durnford mines. 


In regards the Fairbeeze mine, Tronox has had valid mining rights in the uMlalazi Municipality since 1998 and has been legally undertaking 
mining activities on land within this municipal area since 2002. Tronox has since 1 998 made significant progress towards obtaining additional 
authorizations for furthering the Fairbreeze project which will in turn feed the CPC at Empangeni. Tronox as of May 201 3 has the following 


123 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

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authorization from government to pursue mining activities on the 
awarded mining areas: 

■ Mining rights from Department of Mineral Resources 
(see Table 55 below); 

■ Water use rights from the Department of Water Affairs(DWA), 

■ Environmental approvals from the Department of 
Environmental Affairs(DEA), 

■ Permits from the Department of Fisheries, Agriculture and 
Forestry (DAFF), 

■ A positive decision by the Durban Fligh Court on the Land Use 
Change approval on a large portion of mining area which 
allows Tronox to continue early works construction. 

Tronox is currently awaiting a water use license for additional 
water uses associated with mining. 

A Land Use Planning application for Sub 3 of Lot 91 uMlalazi 
10011 and Rem of Lot 91 uMlalazi 10011 has been submitted to 
the municipality, in terms of the KZN Planning and Development 
Act, Act No. 6 of 2008 for surface mining. The application has 
been approved by the Municipal Council. Two appeals were 
lodged against the decision taken by the Municipality. At the 
time of finalizing this IDP Review, the appeal process has not 
been concluded. 


3.7.1.10. LOCAL ECONOMIC 
DEVELOPMENT: SWOT ANALYSIS 

STRENGTHS 

■ A diverse and rich cultural heritage and has broad 
international appeal; 

■ Quality of natural endowments, beaches, climate; 

■ Prominent sugar cane mill run in its own entity; 

■ High concentration of areas of sugar can that has 
been untapped; 

■ Good existing agricultural base; 

■ Satisfactory business service industry; 

■ A good transport network for the N2; 

■ Close proximity to industrial centre in Richards Bay. 

WEAKNESSES 

■ The backlog of basic services such as water, sanitation, 
electricity; 

■ Poor access to rural areas; 

■ Lack of value-adding; 

■ Ineffective linking of graduates to private sector; 

■ Insufficient funding for the implementation of LED projects; 

■ Lack of coordination between the private and public sector 
(especially provincial and national departments relevant to 
the project); 

■ Ineffective financial and project management; 

■ Lack of new foreign and domestic investment (leading to a 
reduction in new technology and therefore competitiveness); 


■ Insufficient support for SMMEs and small-scale farmers; 

■ Poor institutional support and assistance in the region from 
public sector (incl. relationships with national and provincial 
government and 50Es); 

■ The proposers of projects (often private sector initiators) 
are often omitted from motivating the proposals and 
funding processes; 

■ Constrained capacity in local government officials to act as 
facilitators of LED initiatives; 

■ Operational structuring (including clearly defined 
land ownership); 

■ Low level of school completion and skills development 
and training; 

■ Lack of business retention and expansion; 

■ High levels of unemployment; 

■ Inadequate infrastructure (road and rail network, and 
bulk services); 

■ Limited access to credit. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

■ Community development through agri-processing and 
community agricultural projects; 

■ Development of new value-chains in the agricultural sector 
(incl. bio-diesel and crushing of own sugar juices); 

■ Linkages between agriculture and business sector; 

■ Diversification of the manufacturing sector and development 
of new value-chains (incl. renewable energy products); 

■ Development of a clear vision for uMlalazi; 

■ Infrastructure development; 

■ Investment promotion and facilitation (including development 
of incentives); 

■ Development of under-utilised or un-utilised agricultural and 
industrial land (vacant farms and industrial lots); 

■ Promotion of business retention and expansion programmes; 

■ Establishment of industry driven training and skills 
development through internships and apprenticeships. 

THREATS 

■ Impact of HIV/AID5; 

■ Access to machinery and equipment; 

■ Degradation of road infrastructure; 

■ Obstacles between banks and local people; 

■ Crime; 

■ Lack of knowledge in rural areas; 

■ Threat of mechanisation in both industrial and agricultural 
development; 

■ Decline in formal employment within agriculture; 

■ Increasing input costs (electricity, transport, capital and 
equipment); 

■ Stakeholder and community conflicts of interest; 

■ Lack of investment into development of bulk infrastructure; 

■ Corruption and a lack of accountability (financial and 
management); 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 1 2 A 

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Section C: Spatial Analysis 


■ Out-migration of skilled employees to other urban-centres; 

■ Increasing demand of electricity against limited supply; 

■ Worsening climatic conditions which have translated into water scarcity and therefore negatively impacting on farming around 
Northern KwaZulu-Natal; 

■ Land reform and associated challenges (poor skills transfer to new farmers, slow process, etc.). 

3.8. SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT ANALYSIS 

3.8.1. BROAD BASED COMMUNITY NEEDS 

At the end of January 201 2, a Community-Based Needs Analysis was conducted in each of the Municipal Wards. As a result of the 
above exercise, the top 5 priority infrastructure needs by all wards could be determined and is reflected in the table below: 



INFRASTRUCTURE /FACILITIES 

NUMBER OF WARDS OUT OF 26 WARDS CITING 

INFRASTRUCTURE AS TOP PRIORITY 

Roads, Access Roads, Bridges and Causeways 

21 

Water 

19 

Electricity 

17 

Rural Housing 

1A 

Sanitation 

12 


Table 60: Top 5 Priority Infrastructure Needs by Wards 


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3.8.2. SAFETY AND 
SECURITY PLAN 

UMIalazi Municipality do not have its own safety and 
security plan for the whole area, however the Municipality is 
working together with South African Police Services to ensure 
thorough sector policing. 

Community Police Forum is part of sector policing. The 
Community Police Forum is regulated by section 1 8 of the South 
African Police Act, 1995 (Act No 68 of 1995). 

3.8.2.I. COMMUNITY POLICE 
FORUM OBJECTIVES ACCORDING 
TO SEC 18 OF SAPS ACT, 1995 
(ACT NO 68 OF 1995) 

■ Establishing and maintaining a partnership between the 
community and the service. 

■ Promoting communication between the Service and 
the community. 

■ Promoting co-operation between the Service and community 
in fulfilling the needs of the community regarding policing. 

■ Improving the rendering of police services to the community 
at National, Provincial and local levels. 

■ Improving transparency in the Service and accountability of 
the service to the community. 

■ Promotingjoint problem identification and problem-solving 
by the Service and the community. 



3.8.2.2. OPERATIONAL 
FUNCTIONS OF THE COMMUNITY 
SAFETY STRUCTURES 

■ Eyes and ears of the SAPS. 

■ If the need arises, carry out a citizen's arrest in terms of the 
Criminal Procedure Act, 1977 (Act No 51 of 1977), section A2. 

■ Performing patrol duties that will serve as a crime deterrent. 

■ Preserving crime scenes when first on the scene. 

■ Facilitating good relations in the neighbourhood. 

■ Rendering a voluntary service. 

■ Reporting crime and crime in progress to the SAPS. 

■ Creating crime prevention awareness amongst the community. 

Community Police Forums report all their activities to uMlalazi 
Municipality council through Protection Services Portfolio 
Committee by attending committee meetings and providing 
reports for discussion. 

Protection Services Department, Traffic department provide 
traffic control, nuisance by-laws and road safety and scholar 
patrols working together with KZN Road Traffic Inspectorate. 
Fire and Emergency Services provide fire safety and awareness 
to the community. 

3.8.23. CRIME 

Crime affects all people not only within the municipal boundaries, 
but the entire Republic. It promotes a decaying society of 
which its morals are degenerative. UMIalazi Municipality is 
not exempt from the scourge of crime. The following table 
presents disturbing figures on the levels of crime affecting the 
municipality. The most perpetrated crimes are: 

■ Assault with the intent to inflict grievous bodily harm; 

■ Robbery with aggravating circumstances; 

■ Burglary at residential premises and; 

■ Drug-related crime. 



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Section C: Spatial Analysis 


CRIME CATEGORY: ESHOWE PRECINT 

2011/2012 

2012/2013 

2013/2014 

2014/2015 

CONTACT CRIMES 

(CRIMES AGAINST THE PERSON) 





Murder 

3A 

40 

43 

36 

Total Sexual Offences 

107 

117 

112 

99 

Attempted murder 

48 

55 

37 

38 

Assault with the intent to inflict grievous 
bodily harm 

233 

233 

247 

280 

Common assault 

303 

270 

293 

191 

Common robbery 

60 

59 

49 

57 

Robbery with aggravating circumstances 

178 

164 

158 

118 

Total Contact Crimes (Crimes Against the Person) 

963 

938 

939 

819 

CONTACT-RELATED CRIMES 





Arson 

12 

16 

14 

10 

Malicious damage to property 

150 

115 

107 

118 

Total Contact-Related Crimes 

162 

131 

121 

128 

PROPERTY-RELATED CRIMES 





Burglary at non-residential premises 

131 

106 

91 

96 

Burglary at residential premises 

459 

449 

363 

432 

Theft of motor vehicle and motorcycle 

29 

25 

18 

20 

Theft out of or from motor vehicle 

94 

105 

58 

79 

Stock-theft 

52 

61 

66 

36 

Total Property-Related Crimes 

765 

746 

596 

663 

CRIME DETECTED AS A RESULT OF POLICE ACTION 





Illegal possession of firearms and ammunition 

62 

63 

59 

57 

Drug-related crime 

309 

360 

454 

512 

Driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs 

89 

94 

137 

165 

Sexual offences detected as result of police action 

0 

0 

1 

1 

Total Crime Detected As A Result Of Police Action 

460 

517 

651 

735 

OTHER SERIOUS CRIMES 





All theft not mentioned elsewhere 

390 

369 

319 

373 

Commercial crime 

162 

169 

157 

104 

Shoplifting 

75 

124 

138 

145 

Total Other Serious Crimes 

627 

662 

614 

622 

SUBCATEGORIES OF AGGRAVATED ROBBERY 





Carjacking 

11 

7 

4 

12 

Truck hijacking 

0 

0 

0 

1 

Robbery at residential premises 

66 

54 

43 

34 

Robbery at non-residential premises 

26 

40 

52 

18 


127 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

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CRIME CATEGORY: MTUIMZIIMI PRECINCT 


2011/2012 


2012/2013 


2013/2014 


2014/2015 


CONTACT CRIMES 

(CRIMES AGAINST THE PERSON) 





Murder 

32 

34 

26 

26 

Total Sexual Offences 

88 

106 

91 

105 

Attempted murder 

31 

33 

26 

28 

Assault with the intent to inflict grievous 
bodily harm 

330 

363 

330 

286 

Common assault 

195 

152 

148 

143 

Common robbery 

58 

57 

67 

47 

Robbery with aggravating circumstances 

19A 

193 

283 

236 

Total Contact Crimes (Crimes Against the Person) 

928 

938 

971 

871 

CONTACT-RELATED CRIMES 





Arson 

9 

15 

18 

9 

Malicious damage to property 

99 

73 

89 

87 

Total Contact-Related Crimes 

108 

88 

107 

96 

PROPERTY-RELATED CRIMES 





Burglary at non-residential premises 

56 

78 

96 

55 

Burglary at residential premises 

373 

407 

430 

410 

Theft of motor vehicle and motorcycle 

13 

6 

10 

7 

Theft out of or from motor vehicle 

20 

38 

40 

37 

Stock-theft 

31 

20 

25 

30 

Total Property-Related Crimes 

A93 

549 

601 

539 

CRIME DETECTED AS A RESULT OF POLICE ACTION 





Illegal possession of firearms and ammunition 

32 

28 

39 

19 

Drug-related crime 

21 

29 

28 

60 

Driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs 

18 

25 

15 

19 

Sexual offences detected as result of police action 

1 

0 

0 

0 

Total Crime Detected As A Result Of Police Action 

72 

82 

82 

98 

OTHER SERIOUS CRIMES 





All theft not mentioned elsewhere 

2AA 

229 

241 

219 

Commercial crime 

22 

21 

39 

20 

Shoplifting 

3 

1 

5 

3 

Total Other Serious Crimes 

269 

251 

285 

242 

SUBCATEGORIES OF AGGRAVATED ROBBERY 





Carjacking 

6 

5 

10 

7 

Truck hijacking 

0 

1 

0 

0 

Robbery at residential premises 

90 

80 

162 

120 

Robbery at non-residential premises 

14 

17 

33 

27 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 1 28 

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Section C: Spatial Analysis 


CRIME CATEGORY: MBONGOLWANE PRECINT 

2011/2012 

2012/2013 

2013/2014 

2014/2015 

CONTACT CRIMES 

(CRIMES AGAINST THE PERSON) 





Murder 

11 

5 

22 

12 

Total Sexual Offences 

28 

29 

33 

29 

Attempted murder 

14 

9 

18 

8 

Assault with the intent to inflict grievous 
bodily harm 

60 

56 

48 

42 

Common assault 

40 

29 

32 

20 

Common robbery 

8 

10 

7 

3 

Robbery with aggravating circumstances 

23 

17 

28 

23 

Total Contact Crimes (Crimes Against the Person) 

184 

155 

188 

137 

CONTACT-RELATED CRIMES 





Arson 

3 

4 

2 

2 

Malicious damage to property 

13 

17 

18 

17 

Total Contact-Related Crimes 

16 

21 

20 

19 

PROPERTY-RELATED CRIMES 





Burglary at non-residential premises 

16 

16 

21 

9 

Burglary at residential premises 

37 

33 

29 

35 

Theft of motor vehicle and motorcycle 

1 

3 

0 

0 

Theft out of or from motor vehicle 

8 

2 

7 

2 

Stock-theft 

32 

10 

15 

9 

Total Property-Related Crimes 

94 

64 

72 

55 

CRIME DETECTED AS A RESULT OF POLICE ACTION 





Illegal possession of firearms and ammunition 

24 

19 

29 

26 

Drug-related crime 

28 

96 

131 

84 

Driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs 

0 

3 

3 

4 

Sexual offences detected as result of police action 

0 

0 

0 

0 

Total Crime Detected As A Result Of Police Action 

52 

118 

163 

114 

OTHER SERIOUS CRIMES 





All theft not mentioned elsewhere 

40 

25 

21 

35 

Commercial crime 

0 

0 

1 

2 

Shoplifting 

0 

0 

0 

0 

Total Other Serious Crimes 

40 

25 

22 

37 

SUBCATEGORIES OF AGGRAVATED ROBBERY 





Carjacking 

0 

2 

0 

2 

Truck hijacking 

0 

0 

0 

0 

Robbery at residential premises 

16 

13 

21 

13 

Robbery at non-residential premises 

5 

0 

2 

4 


1 29 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

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CRIME CATEGORY: GINGIIMDLOVU PRECINQ 


2011/2012 


2012/2013 


2013/2014 


2014/2015 


CONTACT CRIMES 

(CRIMES AGAINST THE PERSON) 





Murder 

17 

7 

13 

11 

Total Sexual Offences 

32 

41 

40 

42 

Attempted murder 

13 

10 

5 

13 

Assault with the intent to inflict grievous 
bodily harm 

104 

126 

111 

95 

Common assault 

51 

55 

44 

58 

Common robbery 

13 

24 

10 

12 

Robbery with aggravating circumstances 

62 

50 

62 

47 

Total Contact Crimes (Crimes Against the Person) 

292 

313 

285 

278 

CONTACT-RELATED CRIMES 





Arson 

8 

1 

3 

2 

Malicious damage to property 

35 

45 

37 

40 

Total Contact-Related Crimes 

43 

46 

40 

42 

PROPERTY-RELATED CRIMES 





Burglary at non-residential premises 

61 

72 

67 

38 

Burglary at residential premises 

108 

147 

121 

67 

Theft of motor vehicle and motorcycle 

13 

9 

5 

2 

Theft out of or from motor vehicle 

13 

18 

14 

22 

Stock-theft 

12 

21 

23 

31 

Total Property-Related Crimes 

207 

267 

230 

160 

CRIME DETECTED AS A RESULT OF POLICE ACTION 





Illegal possession of firearms and ammunition 

8 

13 

15 

7 

Drug-related crime 

59 

127 

104 

117 

Driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs 

31 

50 

17 

27 

Sexual offences detected as result of police action 

0 

0 

0 

0 

Total Crime Detected As A Result Of Police Action 

98 

190 

136 

151 

OTHER SERIOUS CRIMES 





All theft not mentioned elsewhere 

126 

111 

93 

102 

Commercial crime 

8 

10 

16 

17 

Shoplifting 

4 

8 

10 

13 

Total Other Serious Crimes 

138 

129 

119 

132 

SUBCATEGORIES OF AGGRAVATED ROBBERY 





Carjacking 

2 

1 

4 

5 

Truck hijacking 

0 

0 

0 

0 

Robbery at residential premises 

25 

25 

17 

13 

Robbery at non-residential premises 

13 

7 

15 

8 


Table 69: Crime Statistics in uMlalazi Municipality (Source: SAPS Website) 


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Section C: Spatial Analysis 


The above table creates awareness that considerably more 
efforts are required to mitigate crime and criminal activities 
within the municipality. Greater cognizance must be given to the 
establishment and strengthening of community policing forums 
who will assist the SAPS to eradicate crime within communities. 
Communities must be empowered to stand up against crime 
by reporting on it. Mechanisms of reporting crimes must be 
made easily available to communities, especially those in rural 
areas. Areas where most crimes are recorded are Mtunzini and 
Eshowe. These are small police stations that service a much 
more extensive radius, and policing vehicles are not abundant. 
It is also apparent that drug related crimes are on the rise. 
The establishment of satellite stations within the known rural 
pressure areas will reduce the occurrences of crime. The issue 
of drugs can be addressed by establishing rehabilitation centers 
within the municipality and enhancing the effectiveness of anti- 
drug campaigns. Un-aiding to the rising crime levels is also the 
inaccessibility in terms of transport, to most rural communities 
due to topography of the municipal area. Road infrastructure 
also makes it difficult for SAPS to access rural households and 
as a result, criminals having an advantage over the police. 

3.8.3. NATION BUILDING 
AND SOCIAL COHESION 

The municipality has established a number of programs that 
promote social cohesion and nation building. A Senior Citizens 
Forum has been established to not only deal with the issues 
affecting the elderly, but also to improve their social wellbeing. 
Through this forum the municipality further encourages the 
elderly to partake in recreational activities in order for them to be 
healthy. Platforms such as the Golden Games allow the elderly 
to compete recreationally with other municipalities through 
sports and indigenous games which promote healthy living. 

The uMlalazi Municipality established a Sports Desk, of 
which the aim is to promote sport development in terms of all 
applicable sports codes and finance Kwanaloga Games at local, 
district and provincial level. Private and public sport federations 
are sponsored based on them meeting specific criteria. 

As part of promoting Arts and Culture within uMlalazi 
Municipality and ensuring that youth of uMlalazi is kept from 
criminal activities and reviving the culture and pride within youth. 
Community Services is organizing a Cultural dance competitions 
between all wards in the following traditional dances: 

a. Isizingili dance - for male and female groups 

b. Isishayameni dance - for male and female groups 

c. Indlamu - for male and female groups 

d. Isicathamiya - for male and female groups 

e. uMaskandi music - for male and female groups/ individuals 


3.8. A. COMMUNITY 
DEVELOPMENT WITH 
PARTICULAR FOCUS ON 
VULNERABLE GROUPS 
(SPECIAL PROGRAMMES) 

In order to ensure compliance and inclusion of all citizens, 
uMlalazi Municipality is required to establish Forums for all the 
sectors within the municipality such as disability, women's, 
men's and senior citizens as well as children sectors. These 
sectors and forums are responsible for the following, amongst 
other things:- 

3.8. A.1. THE DISABILITY 
SECTOR FORUM 

To promote awareness of disabilities within the uMlalazi 
MunicipalityandencourageGovernmentDepartments to integrate 
disability issues into their line function activities. Furthermore, to 
coordinate, facilitates and monitor the implementation of the 
Integrated National Disability Strategy (IND5). 

3.8. A.2. SENIOR CITIZENS 
SECTOR FORUM 

To ensure inclusion of senior citizens and raise awareness in 
the issues concerning older people within uMlalazi Municipality 
and promote healthy lifestyles in order that they live longer and 
enjoy the fruits of democracy. 

3.8. A.3. WOMEN AND MEN'S 
SECTOR FORUM 

To promote issues pertaining to men and women within the 
municipality, ensure that they are heard and recognize their 
contribution in the societies within uMlalazi. 

3.8. A.A. THE CHILDREN'S 
SECTOR FORUM 

To promote the rights of children in every community of uMlalazi 
and ensure that they are protected from all forms of abuse. 
The principles guiding the functioning of these Forums include: 

■ Commitment and willingness to accept all stakeholders as 
equal partners 

■ Self-representation by people with disabilities 

■ Consultation with relevant stakeholders 

■ Adherence to democratic principles 

■ Meaningful participation by people from all sectors. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 


3.8.5. YOUTH DEVELOPMENT 

A Youth Desk has been established. Through the established 
Youth Desk, students are supported at a tertiary institution by 
providing full bursaries. The Youth Desk concentrates on Youth 
Days and promotes youth activities and education and fund 
transport, catering, auxiliary costs such as PVA, tents, ablutions 
and promotional items. Financial assistance is also provided to 
support Youth Days. His Worship the Mayor: Cllr TB Zulu officially 
opened the Youth Business Advisory Center on the 9th of April 
201 A. The purpose of which is to "Assist the youth to develop 
and harness their business ideas into fully grown sustainable 
business entities". This will be achieved through the following: 

■ Registering Entities inter-alia: Proprietor ownership. 
Co-operatives etc., 

■ Creating and managing a database of existing businesses 
within the municipal area, 

■ Sourcing funding from relevant financial institutions to finance 
affordable small businesses finances, 

■ Guiding and providing technical and financial management 
targeting skills training, mentoring and coaching, 

■ Supporting people needing full assistance and guidelines in 
completing SCM tender applications, 

■ Introducing entry point youth assistance to stakeholders such 
as SEDA, EDTEA etc., 

■ Providing technical support for SMME and ISO accreditation and, 

■ Taking part in export readiness assessment and assistance. 

The department has issued application forms to assist students 
again in 2015/1 6 who are studying towards the following fields 
which will also address the shortage of skills: 

■ Finance 

■ Public Administration/Social Sciences 

■ Engineering 

■ Town Planning 

■ Information Technology 

■ Horticulture/ Environmental Studies 

The municipality also plans to host annual Youth Day 
Commemorations wherein there are engagements through 
community dialogue on youth issues i.e. teenage pregnancy, drug 
abuse and high rate of unemployment. There are also annual 
competitions for the youth focusing on arts and culture through 
choral and traditional music festivals. 

3.8.6. VUMA YOUTH 
DEVELOPMENT ACADEMY 

The Youth Development Academy (in ward 8) was conceptualised 
as a result of the persistent challenges of unemployment and 
low skills level faced by the youth in the province. Challenges 
that are further compounded by social ills, unbecoming sexual 
behaviour, and the general ill-discipline and poor ethical values 
displayed by the youth. This state of affairs called for the 


Department of Social Development in partnership with other 
stakeholders to implement a bold, audacious and imaginative 
youth development programme in the province. Hence, the idea 
of a Youth Development Academy that will have a strong focus 
on behavioural change, values and ethics, combined with need- 
directed vocational skills training programmes, was realised. The 
beneficiaries identified for this programme are youth between 
the ages of 17 and 35 who are South African Citizens residing 
within UThungulu District which have no criminal record and 
have some level of education (Grade 9). 

The goals and objectives of the academy are as follows; 

■ To ensure an increased steady flow of contributing and 
productive young people. 

■ Unlock the potential of young people through cognitive, 
emotional, physical and spiritual empowerment; 

■ To implement behaviour change programmes; 

■ To develop self-esteem of the young people to believe in their 
potential and to be responsible citizens; 

■ To provide relevant vocational skills to youth; 

■ To strengthen collaborations and partnerships by different 
stakeholders for youth development; 

■ To Increased prospects of employability and business venture 
creation; and 

■ To develop young men and women so that they can become 
self-reliant and responsible citizens who positively contribute 
to the country. 

In November 201A the Academy officiated a graduation of 
51 young men who were the very first students to enroll in 
the Academy. In just a space of six months, the Academy 
saw a complete transformation in the lives of these young 
participants. Many whom in their own words had lost hope 
and resigned to the fact they will never amount to anything. 
The Academy experience was an injection of new hope and 
an extension of a second chance to these young people. All 
51 young men graduated with a Seta Accredited First Aid level 
1, Basic Computer Training, Entrepreneurship, Electrical basic 
training. Plumbing and Bricklaying. They further received their 
learners licenses, drivers licenses and some their PDPs. An After 
Care strategy is being implemented for those students who 
have graduated with the aim of ensuring continuous impact 
and psycho-social development. 

Besides the direct beneficiation of the participants, the 
establishment of the academy has directly created 19 jobs. 
These are the Academy staff members who all have fixed term 
contracts with the Academy and are responsible for the day to 
day running of the Academy. Further to that A5 more jobs have 
been created indirectly, where the Academy and the Department 
of Social Development has come up with a unique model to 
empower local cooperatives and to give them an opportunity 
to provide daily essential services to the Academy to ensure 
some of its vital functions. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 1 32 

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Section C: Spatial Analysis 


The students receive life skills training provided by social workers 
and other government and non-governmental organisations 
such as Sanca, Lifeline, Department of Social development, Dept, 
of Correctional Services, KRCC and many other sectors. Through 
partnership with KZN Wildlife, students have undergone an 
outdoor self-development exercise and in that process have 
received Nature Conservation training. The Academy through 
Umfolozi TVET College and other Service providers provide skills 
development training to the students. The trades trained are 
as follows: 

■ Basic Electricity 

■ Pluming 

■ Bricklaying 

■ Hospitality 

■ Entrepreneurship Training 

■ Basic Computer Literacy 

■ Learners Licenses/ Drivers Licenses/ PDPs 

3.8.7. THE SIZA BONKE 
WORKS PROGRAMME 

The Municipality recognises the need, as also highlighted in the 
KZN PSEDS, to develop its second economy, in order to reduce 
the gap between it and the first economy, whilst at the same 
time creatingjobs and fighting poverty. 

The Municipality has launched the Siza Bonke Works 
Programme. The Programme is designed to accommodate 
the unemployed within the uMlalazi Municipality. Specific 
requirements for selection are undertaken and only unemployed 
men, women and youth are employed. Skills transfer is built into 
the program as well as numerous life skills. 

3.8.8. HEALTH 

3.8.8.1. ACCESS TO HEALTH 
CARE SERVICES 


Health Posts : 1A 

Mobiles Clinics :6 

CHC(2Ax7) :0 

District Hospitals : 3 


Due to the inadequacy of health facilities in most rural areas, 
the resultant reality of this impacts negatively on the wellbeing 
of the people within these communities. The public often have 
to travel vast distances to access these facilities. This is also 
exacerbated by poor road infrastructure which makes it difficult 
for health services such as ambulances and mobile clinics to 
access these communities. The municipality has fourteen (14) 
Clinics and 3 District Hospitals in its area of jurisdiction and 
enjoys the services of 6 mobile clinics. 


3.8.8.2. MEDECINSSANS 
FRONTIERES(MSF) 

The municipality also enjoys the services of Medecins Sans 
Frontieres (M5F) for health services. M5F is an international, 
independent, medical humanitarian organisation that delivers 
emergency aid to people affected by armed conflict, epidemics, 
natural disasters and exclusion from healthcare. M5F offers 
assistance to people based on need, irrespective of race, religion, 
gender or political affiliation. Our actions are guided by medical 
ethics and the principles of neutrality and impartiality. M5F 
in partnership with the KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) Department of 
Health (DOH) is currently supporting a HIV/TB project in the 
Mbongolowane and Eshowe areas (uThungulu District), "Bending 
the Curves Project". The Bending the Curves (BTC) project that 
was introduced in 201 1 seeks to implement multiple strategies 
to address the high co-incidence of HIV and TB, and reduce 
the number of incidences in line with the South Africa National 
Strategic plan. The overall strategic objective of the project is 
to reduce the incidence of HIV and TB, in addition to reducing 
HIV- and TB-related morbidity and mortality (bend the epidemic 
curves downwards). Specifically, the project will demonstrate 
the feasibility and acceptability of a wide range of innovative 
strategies to achieve the primary objective. 

The Project presently includes the Mbongolwane Health Service 
Area and Eshowe Municipality, uMlalazi Wards 1 to 14 (plus 
Ward 1 5 and some of Ward 1 6). This strategy will provide MSF 
with an opportunity to demonstrate the outcomes of the Project 
in both an urban and rural setting. The project is now established 
in its work across the 'prevent, test, link, treat and retain' cascade 
or the HIV care continuum, also referred to as the HIV treatment 
cascade which is a model that outlines the sequential steps or 
stages of HIV medical care that people living with HIV go through 
from initial diagnosis to achieving the goal of viral suppression. 
The project is expected to run until the year 2018 according to 
the MoU signed with the Department of Health KwaZulu-Natal 
for a period of 5 years (1 April 2013 to 31 March 2018). 

3.8.8.2.1. PROGRAMME/ACTIVITIES 

Working with the Department of Health (DoH), the project 
focuses on both existing methods of prevention (medical male 
circumcision and condoms) and innovative methods, such as 
'Treatment as Prevention', to demonstrate the feasibility of 
decreasing the incidence of new HIV and TB infections. This 
objective will be achieved by: 

■ Community Mobilisation and Advocacy work to encourage 
HIV and TB prevention and stigma reduction amongst the 
community; partnering with NGOs, in particular the Shintsha 
Health Initiative (SHINE) and the Treatment Action Campaign 
(TAC) to support project activities. 


133 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

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■ Providing enhanced HIV testing options including a mobile testing unit (mobile one stop shop, or M155), stand- 
alone HCT sites in urban areas, piloting testing and patient support by community health workers (Community 
Health Agents, or CHAs), and through training and working with Traditional Health Practitioners (THPs). 

■ Strengthening existing HIV, STIs and TB treatment services. 

■ Commencing treatment of HIV earlier - commencing ART according to extended criteria for initiation: at CDA count 
of 500, or regardless of CDA for pregnant women (and continuing lifelong), or regardless of CDA for HIV positive 
individuals in a relationship with an HIV negative person (National guidelines implemented from January 2015). 

■ Promoting a decentralised patient care approach - the community model of care - using clubs based at health facilities and 
groups based in the community. 

3.8.8.3. MORTALITY INDICATORS 


Total Deaths (StatsSA 2011) 

KwaZulu-Natal : 104652 

UThungulu District : 8758 



UThungulu District Major Causes of Death 

No. 

% 

1. 

Tuberculosis 

1270 

14.5 

2. 

Influenza and Pneumonia 

501 

5.7 

3. 

Other Viral Diseases 

462 

5.3 

4. 

Cerebrovascular Diseases 

442 

5.0 

5. 

HIV 

418 

4.8 

6 . 

Other forms of heart diseases 

397 

4.5 

7. 

Diabetes Mellitus 

364 

4.2 

8. 

Intestinal Infectious Disease 

330 

3.8 

9. 

Hypertensive Disease 

237 

2.7 

10. 

Certain Disorders involving the immune mechanisms 

184 

2.1 

11. 

Other Natural Causes 

3287 

37.5 

12. 

Non-Natural Causes 

886 

9.9 


All Causes 

8758 

100 


Table 70: UThungulu Major Causes of Death (StatsSA 2011) 


3.8.8.4. PEOPLE AFFECTED BY HIV/AIDS 

The established HIV/AIDS Desk, as part of the Municipality's HIV/AIDS intervention program, supports HIV/AIDS non-governmental 
institutions by means of grants, subject to specific requirements. Food parcels are issued to target families as an intervention to 
promote nutrition for HIV/AIDS affected people. 

Community Services department issued food parcels, maize meal to all ward Councilors to identify destitute families and OVC 
beneficiaries. Child Care SA was appointed by the Office of the Premier to establish and train 10 ward committees within uMlalazi 
Municipality. The wards that were identified for initial training were wards: 01 , 02, 07, 1 0, 1 2, 1 3, 1 4, 1 5, 1 7and 22. In each ward, the 
committee was established and trained for two days. UMlalazi Municipality organised venues for training as well as refreshments 
for two day training per ward. All ward councilor's assisted by identifying relevant stakeholders within their wards. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 1 34 

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Section C: Spatial Analysis 






JL. 1 



IlMIJU JLfI 

■LOCU 








Map 29: Access to Health Facilities 

3.8.9. EDUCATION 

The following table provides a summary of the levels of educations that currently exist within the municipality. From this table it is 
apparent that the majority of the population has received some form of Primary to High School education. The numbers decrease 
sharply as the levels of education decreases. These implications may portray a scenario where; after matric levels, there may be 
financial constraints to receive further of higher education. This could also mean that the levels at which matric is passed, is not 
conducive to allow a person to further their studies. The municipality, through the office of the Mayor, has initiated a Mayoral Bursary 
Scheme which enables matriculants whom have excelled in their studies, an opportunity to further their studies. This initiative was 
established to minimize the high levels of matriculants who do not have qualifications of tertiary education. It is important also 
too, to assist the youth who have not got the luxury to attain tertiary qualifications to be skilled in the form of training and skills 
development in order to empower them to be able to use their skills to create employment for themselves. The municipality has 
established a Youth Business Advisory Centre in order to assist these people especially the youth with information regarding career 
choices, business advice and other outreach programs to assist the youth in paving their own ways into obtaining a brighter future. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 


WARD 

GRADE 1-12 

FURTHER EDUCATION AND 
TRAINING COLLEGE FET 

HIGHER EDUCATIONAL 
INSTITUTION 

ADULT BASIC EDUCATION 
AND TRAINING 

Ward 1 

2940 

36 

186 

251 

Ward 2 

3345 

55 

199 

171 

Ward 3 

2434 

23 

203 

171 

Ward A 

3233 

85 

241 

290 

Ward 5 

3853 

27 

155 

229 

Ward 6 

2600 

17 

70 

104 

Ward 7 

2091 

123 

201 

358 

Ward 8 

3207 

107 

85 

258 

Ward 9 

3155 

38 

222 

188 

Ward 10 

3445 

77 

165 

113 

Ward 1 1 

2015 

109 

402 

33 

Ward 1 2 

1490 

86 

118 

25 

Ward 1 3 

2497 

324 

188 

140 

Ward 1A 

3528 

43 

99 

188 

Ward 1 5 

3264 

12 

131 

112 

Ward 1 6 

4319 

29 

140 

101 

Ward 17 

2048 

28 

38 

31 

Ward 18 

861 

52 

127 

81 

Ward 19 

975 

5 

138 

85 

Ward 20 

3698 

72 

354 

307 

Ward 21 

2478 

24 

171 

116 

Ward 22 

2916 

23 

202 

261 

Ward 23 

3155 

17 

89 

30 

Ward 24 

2944 

25 

102 

152 

Ward 25 

2673 

15 

110 

116 

Ward 26 

3016 

7 

82 

80 

Grand Total 

72180 

1457 

4220 

3992 


Table 71: Education Levels 


According to the Census that was conducted by StatsSA in 2001 , there are A001 people whom are under the age of 20 (and above 
the age of 7) years who have had no form of education and 1 6 800 people, over the age 20 (and below pension age) who also have 
had no education. These alarming statistics create a reality that much more needs to be done in order to breach this huge gap of 
illiteracy. This means that these people must be re-integrated educationally by facilitating the provision of ABET and similar initiatives. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 1 36 

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Section C: Spatial Analysis 



Map 30: Access to Education Facilities 


3.8.10. EARLY CHILDHOOD 
DEVELOPMENT AND SOCIAL 
DEVELOPMENT SERVICES 

The municipality in partnership with Divine Life have enetered 
into a memorandum of agreement to assist communitites 
(mostly ruaral) in the establishment of socilal facilities, with 
special attention given to early childhood development facilities. 
The Divine Life Society of South Africa is a non-governmental, 
non-profit spiritual institution and has over the past 55 years 
served the needs of the disadvantaged and poor community 
of KwaZulu-Natal and has experience in the field of poverty 
alleviation, building of schools, clinics, training and skills centres, 
literature and educational programmes and other noble service 
related activities. Since 2011/12 the municipality has (through 
this program) built 16 creches in various wards. These projects 
are co-funded buy Divine Life as well as MIG funding. In the 
2015/16 Financial year, Devine Life and the municipality have 
constructed 1 2 more creches in various wards thus fullfilling 
the National and Provincial mandate to fastrack the provision of 


early childhood development centers within our municipalitites. 
The National Department of Social Development and the 
uMlalazi Municipality will construct an ECD Center in Ward 2 
(Near Kwazikwakhe School). The following ECD facilities have 
been established in the 2015/16 financial year : 


1. 

Sibonelo Creche 

Ward 10 

2. 

Sibonokuhle Creche 

Ward 1 

3. 

Nstheluntshelu Creche 

Ward 26 

4. 

Khulanathi Creche 

Ward 12 

5. 

Kholweni Creche 

Ward 8 

6. 

Takalani Creche 

Ward 1 3 

7. 

Maqotha Creche 

Ward 5 

8. 

Mayemeni Creche 

Ward 21 

9. 

Doveyane Creche 

Ward 20 

10. 

Ncekwane Creche 

Ward 22 

11. 

ECD Centre 

Ward 2 

12. Mbalenhie Creche 

Ward 8 


Inkanyezi service Office have 22 funded organisation which 
include ECD centres. Luncheon Clubs, HCBC, Sustainable 
livelihood projects. Children's home. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 


There are 1 A funded early childhood development centre in 18 Wards that are serviced by Inkanyezi service Office. 


ITEM 

NAME OF ORGANISATION 

WARD 1 

1. 

Isibonelo creche 

10 

2. 

Takalani creche 

13 

3. 

Mondi 

13 

A. 

Fundokuhle 

10 

5. 

Khulubone 

OA 

6 . 

Smiling heart 

OA 

7. 

Khombukukhanya 

25 

8. 

Bambanani 

15 

9. 

Enjabulweni 

1A 

10. 

Saron 

07 

11. 

Yamkela 

08 

12. 

Khuthala 

08 

13. 

Zamimpilo 

01 

1A. 

Imbalenhie 

08 


SERVICE LEVEL AGREEMENTS FOR ECD'S SUBMITTED FOR FUNDING AT CLUSTER LEVEL 


ITEM 

NAME OF ORGANISATION 

WARD 1 

1. 

Sphesihle 

25 

2. 

Tholulwazi 

26 

3. 

Antonia Weer 

OA 

A. 

St Thomas 

09 

5. 

Zwelisha 

25 

6 . 

Lethukuthula 

2A 

7. 

Snethemba 

25 

8. 

Philanathi 

26 

9. 

Fundukhuphuke 

13 

10. 

uFasimba 

26 

11. 

Zamile 

OA 


LUNCHEON CLUBS 


ITEM 

NAME OF ORGANISATION 

WARD 1 

1. 

Umqhelewethu 

26 

2. 

Sakhisizwe 

15 

3. 

Nomyaca 

26 

A. 

Sizamimpilo 

2A 


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Section C: Spatial Analysis 


SERVICE LEVEL AGREEMENTS FOR LUNCHEON CLUBS SUBMITTED FOR FUNDING AT CLUSTER LEVEL 


ITEM 

NAME OF ORGANISATION 

WARD I 

1. 

Ntumeni 

08 

2. 

Ubuhlebasedangweni 

9 

3. 

Ibele 

25 

A 

Umnqadayi 

26 


HCBC ARE CURRENTLY FUNDED (1 A HCBC'S ARE REGISTERED BUT UNFUNDED 


ITEM 

NAME OF ORGANISATION 

WARD 

1. 

uNokwenza 

25 

2. 

UMIalazi 5t Thomas 

09 


3 SUSTAINABLE LIVELIHOOD PROJECT 


ITEM 

NAME OF ORGANISATION 

WARD 

1. 

Isibusiso sewing club 

03 

2. 

Ingqalasizinda widows Project 

1A 

3. 

Zamunmotho Women 

OA 


k REGISTERED PROJECTS THAT NEED ASSISTANCE WITH FUNDING 


ITEM 

NAME OF ORGANISATION 

WARD I 

1. 

Sizophumelela Project 

15 

2. 

Kwashange community Governing 

07 

3. 

Inhiansi yethemba Project 

05 

A. 

Zenzeleni Soup kitchen 

07 


4 YOUTH CLUBS 


ITEM 

NAME OF ORGANISATION 

WARD I 

1. 

Zethembe community project 

12&09 

2. 

Masibumbane generation 

03 

3. 

Siyaphambili 

13 

A. 

King Dinuzulu 

13 


Table 72 


1 39 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

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The Map below indicates the location of creches, as well as accessibility thereto: 



Map 31: Access to creches 


3.8.11. ARTS AND CULTURE 

The Department of Atrs and Culture rolls out social cohesion 
programmes focusing mainly on Arts and Culture wherein the 
municipality performs a facilitating role. These joint initiatives 
serve the following purposes; 

■ Improve efficiency of government led job creation programme 

■ Enhance youth skills development and life-long learning 

■ Support skills alignment to economic growth 

■ Poverty alleviation and social welfare 

■ Rolling out of promotional and/or advocacy projects 
to communities 

The Strategic Objectives of the Department of Arts and Culture 
are as follows: 

1 . The implementation of interventions that grow the arts and 
culture industry in KZN, contributing to job creation and 
poverty alleviation 

1.1. Establishment of Arts and Culture Forum - Ward Level 

1 .2. Identification of co-operatives to be supported 


2. The implementation of interventions that advance artistic 
disciplines into viable industries. 

2.1 . Performing arts / visual arts training for inmates 

2.2. Rolling out Main stream Performing and Visual Arts 
Training 

2.3. Performing arts training (theatre/drama, music etc.) 

2. A. Visual arts and craft training (fine arts, beadwork etc.) 

2.5. Performing arts/ Visual arts and craft training for people 
with disabilities. 

2.6. Youth Camp 

2.7. Men's Project - Amahubo rehearsals 

2.8. Women's Project (Operation Siyaya Emhiangeni) 

2.9. Dolosfees 

2.10. Regional Choral Music Competition 

2.11. District Community Festivals 

2.12. District Ingoma 

3. The implementation of interventions that enhance social 
cohesion and inclusion in the Province. 

3.1. Community Dialogues 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 1 AO 

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Section C: Spatial Analysis 


A. The improvement of the Quality of Education in the Arts, 
Culture & Heritage 

4.1. Umkhosi waMaganu 

4.2. Freedom Day Celebration 

4.3. Umkhosi weNonkosazana/ kaNomkhubulwane 

4.4. Reed Dance Ceremony 

4.5. Umkhosi weSivivane/ Izithungo 

4.6. Umkhosi weLembe 

4.7. Umkhosi woSelwa/ UkweShwama 

3.8.12. LOCAL AND 
SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT 
ACHIEVEMENTS 

■ 2012/13-60 students, 2013/14-19 students and 2014/15 
financial year - 42 students registered through Annual 
Mayoral Registration Bursary Fund. 

■ 23 in-service training provided to the youth of 
uMlalazi Municipality. 

■ Early Childhood Development Programme -Constructed 16 
Creches in partnership with Devine Life Society and through 
MIG funding. 

■ Youth Business Advisory Centre established. - (50 
Co-operatives registered and 20 skilled and 80 Private 
Companies registered and 40 skilled). 

■ Commemorative Cultural Days (Heritage day, 
Diwali) Sponsored. 

■ Cultural Competition Dance. 

■ Protection Services Dept, provide road safety campaigns to 
various schools within the municipality. 

■ UMfolozi FET College provides various skills training and 
national qualifications to the youth. 

■ Local AIDS Council launched in November 201 1 at Mpushini 
Park Hall. 

■ Municipality has a 5 year HIV Strategy, which aim to reduce 
new HIV infections. 

■ 20 Ward AIDS committees established. 

■ Operation Sukuma Sakhe programme launched and 25 War 
Rooms established. 

■ Food security for People Living with HIV and AIDS - 30 
monthly food parcels given and encourage one-home-one 
garden through Dept, of Agriculture. 

■ 257 CCGs within uMlalazi Municipality: (199 appointed by 
DOH and 58 appointed by DSD). They support LAC and OSS 
interventions through health education, palliative care, DOT 
support, male medical circumcision and referrals. 

■ Destitute / pauper burial provided (dignity). 

■ Special Programs - Disability Forum, Women's Sector 
and Men's Sector; Child Protection + Senior Citizens 
Forum established. 

■ Annual SALGA games and annual Jacob Zuma soccer 
tournaments held. 

■ 23 community gardens fenced - formalization of informal 
economy around the municipal area - training of informal 
economy role players - review LED strategy annually. 


■ More than 70 temporal jobs created during erection of fencing 
for local people especially youth, women and disabled. 

■ Eshowe Taxi Rank development in partnership with KZN 
EDTEA with 41 Trading Units, comprising of 4 anchor shops 
and 37 normal size shops. 

■ Gingindlovu Shopping Centre - more 90 jobs during 
construction and 70 permanent jobs. 

■ Tronox Mining also provides job opportunities for 
local communities. 

■ 201 1 -86 EPWP beneficiaries increase to 825 in 2015. 
Jobs creation for local people, through infrastructure 
projects contractors. 

■ 201 1 - 120 CWP beneficiaries increased to 1 1 1 5 in 2015. 

3.8.13. SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT: 
SWOT ANALYSIS 

3.8.13.1. STRENGTHS/ 
OPPORTUNITIES 

■ Established and functional Ward Committees. 

■ Free Basic services for electricity are being provided by 
the uMlalazi Municipality, for those people on the indigent 
register and residing in Eshowe and King DinuZulu (where the 
Municipality is the electricity service provider). Monies are also 
being paid over to ESKOM on a monthly basis for free basic 
electricity for the indigents on ESKOM's Indigent Register. 

■ Free Basic Services for solid waste removal are provided by 
the Municipality for households on the Municipal 
Indigent Register for those residing in Eshowe, King DinuZulu 
and Gingindlovu. 

■ The uMlalazi Local Municipality has a 24 hour Alpha 
Emergency Control Centre located at the offices of the 
Manager Protection Services in Butcher Street, Eshowe. 

■ Local Economic Development (LED) obligations as part of 
Social and Labour Plan of the mine will contribute significantly 
to a municipality and its LED objectives. 

3.8.13.2. WEAKNESSES / THREATS 

■ Lack of funds. 

■ Clinics and Traditional Administrative Centres are mainly 
located along main transport routes, making access to these 
facilities relatively difficult to people residing in deep rural 
areas of the municipality. 

■ Creches are poorly distributed in the western parts of the 
Municipal Area. 

■ There is a lack of facilities at pension pay points - facilities 
such as shelters and sanitation facilities. 

■ As resultant from the ward-based needs analysis conducted 
during October and November 2011, there is a need for 
tertiary education facilities or improved access thereto, as 
well as for skills development and transfer. 

■ High unemployment rate, low household income levels and 
poverty-stricken communities, exacerbated by the relatively 
high incidence of HIV/Aids. 


141 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

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3.9. FINANCIAL VIABILITY AND 
MANAGEMENT ANALYSIS 


3.9.1. CAPABILITY OF THE MUNICIPALITY TO EXECUTE 
CAPITAL PROJECTS 

3.9.1. 1. ANALYSIS OF THE CAPITAL BUDGET FROM 
2010/2011 TO 2016/2017 


SUMMARY 

BUDGET YEAR 

BUDGET YEAR 

BUDGET YEAR 

BUDGET YEAR 


2010/2011 

2011/2012 

2015/2016 

2016/2017 

Mayoral Office 

285 000 

79 000 

4 102 200 

100 000 

Corporate Services 

23 A29 618 

2 595 000 

3 640 000 

5 962 000 

Protection Services 

1 A29 036 

1 192 000 

1 080 000 

440 000 

Financial Services 

130 000 

609 000 

2 656 900 

1 250910 

Community Services 

7 059 295 

A 461 269 

10 561 870 

12 660 000 

Engineering Services 

20 308 758 

24 381 719 

48 462 130 

53 520 850 

TOTAL 

52 6A1 707 

33 317 988 

72 363 900 

73 933 760 


Table 73: Summary of Actual Capital Budgets from 2010/201 1 to 2016/2017 


DESCRIPTION 

GRANT DESCRIPTION 

2015/2016 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

CAPITAL FOR 
DEPARTMENTS 

EQUITABLE SHARE 

25 933 900 

22 868 020 

13 642 280 

15 376 340 

16 399 500 


MUNICIPAL 

INFRASTRUCTURE 

GRANT 

38 490 000 

39 961 000 

42 166 000 

44 475 360 

46 859 430 


MUNICIPAL SYSTEMS 
IMPROVEMENT GRANT 

40 000 


40 000 


40 000 



38 530 000 

39 961 000 

42 206 000 

44 475 360 

46 899 430 

OWN FUNDS 

CAPITAL REPLACEMENT 
RESERVE 

7 900 000 

4 907 640 

5 400 000 




INVESTMENTS 

- 





TOTAL 


72 363 900 

67 736 660 

61 248 280 

59 851 700 

63 298 930 

CHECK^^^ 


72 363 900 

67 736 660 

61 248 280 

59 851 700 

63 298 930 


Table Ik: Capital Budget: Funding Sources 



2015 

2014 

2013 

2012 

2011 

Capital budget 

72 363 900 

45 958 140 

49 708 931 

39 236 868 

35 434 366 

Actual capital spend 

56 082 022 

37 164 802 

33 670 529 

25 458 042 

23 409 223 

% Spending 

77.5 

80.87 

67.74 

64.88 

66.06 


Table 75: Expenditure of Capital Budget over last 5 years (2011 - 2015) 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 1 A2 

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Section C: Spatial Analysis 


3.9.1.2. CAPITAL FINANCING STRATEGIES 

■ The basic capital projects of the municipality are funded from internal funds in term of the provisions of Section 1 09 of the Local 
Authorities Ordinance, 197A (Ordinance 25 of 197A). 

■ Ad-hoc capital projects are mostly funded from grant funding and implementation of an ad-hoc capital project commences only 
when the grant funding has been received. 

■ Smaller ad-hoc capital projects are funded from the internal funds of the municipality, where possible. 

■ A portion of the equitable share of the municipality is being used to fund ad-hoc capital projects in the rural areas so that basic 
services can be provided to indigent communities. 

3.9.2. INDIGENT SUPPORT (INCLUDING FREE BASIC SERVICES) 

3.9.2.I. THE ROLL-OUT OF FREE BASIC SERVICES 

The UMIalazi Municipality has since 2011/12 enhanced the level of commitment into providing relief of basic services such as electricity 
as refuse waste removal. The refuse removal service has spread into the rural areas where this function is carried out through the 
Food- For- Waste Programme. Refuse removal services have been extended to 12 205 urban and rural communities. The budget 
for free basic electricity has been increased almost twice as much as it was budgeted for in 201 1 /1 2, where free electricity has been 
provided for 23A8 households within the municipality. The tables below depict the provision of free basic services within the municipality. 


ESKOM FREE BASIC ELECTRICITY 

AMOUNTS PAID BY THE MUNICIPALITY ON A MONTHLY BASIS TO ESKOM 

AMOUNT PAID TO ESKOM FOR FBE 

2011/12 

2015/16 


R 545 847.63 

R 1 173 520 


Table 76: Eskom Free Basic Electricity 



FREE BASIC ELECTRICITY 

NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS 

SUPPLIED BY THE MUNICIPALITY 

FEB 2011/2012 

FEB 2015/16 

TOTAL 

806 

2384 


Table 77: Free Basic Electricity (Municipality) 


FREE BASIC REFUSE 

1 NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS | 

Supplied by the Municipality 

2012/13 

2015/16 

TOTAL 

1014 

12 205 (IncI Rural) 


Table 78: Free Basic Electricity (Municipality) 


3.9.3. REVENUE 
ENHANCEMENTAND 
PROTECTION STRATEGIES 

■ The municipality approves once per annum at the annual 
budget meeting the rates tariff for the ensuing financial year in 
terms of the provisions of Section 1 05 of the Local Authorities 
Ordinance, 1974 (Ordinance 25 of 1974). 

■ The municipality approves once per annum at the annual 
budget meeting the increases in the service tariffs for the 
ensuing financial year. 


Electricity tariffs are submitted to the National Electricity 
Regulator (NER) for approval prior to implementation. 
Consumer meters are read on a monthly basis, accounts 
are sent out monthly, with payment dates clearly 
reflected thereon. 

Where payment is not secured by the due date, a termination 
report is prepared and disconnection is effected if non- 
payment prevails. If payment is not secured within one month 
of the specified date, the consumer deposit is used to for 
payment and he account is handed over to the legal advisors 
of the municipality for collection. In some instances a tracing 
agent is employed on the basis of "no trace no pay". 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 















■ Rates are payable by 30 November of the financial year 
and outstanding rates accounts are dealt with in terms of the 
provisions of Section 1 72 of the Local Authorities Ordinance, 
197A (Ordinance 25 of 1974). 

■ Cashiers are available during normal business hours in each 
of the urban nodes of Eshowe, Mtunzini and Gingindlovu. 


■ All monies received are collected by a security company and 
deposited into the current account of the municipality. Monthly 
bank reconciliation is done to balance the cash books of the 
municipality. 

■ The implementation of the Municipality's Credit Control and 
Debt Collection Policy. 

■ The implementation of the Municipality's Indigent Policy. 


3.9.4. MUNICIPAL CONSUMER DEBT POSITION 


TRADE RECEIVABLES 

2015 

2014 

2013 

2012 

2011 1 

Rates and penalties 

12 205413 

11 581 094 

8 001 224 

9 524 727 

11 321 264 

Electricity 

5 039 000 

5 422 869 

6 329 704 

4 262 170 

3 861 981 

Housing 

1 866 967 

1 810 368 

1 738 746 

1 690 211 

1 647 960 

Refuse 

2 099 909 

1 851 769 

1 301 164 

1 292 871 

1 111 511 

Sundries 

3 523 179 

12 099 020 

10 152 593 

6 786 795 

5 661 804 

Traffic Fines 

1 976 486 

1 774 222 

- 

- 

- 

Total 

26 710 954 

32 765 120 

27 523 431 

23 556 774 

23 604 520 


Table 79: Municipal Consumer Debt Position over last 5 years (201 1 to 2015) 


3.9.5. GRANTS AND SUBSIDIES 


ITEM 

2015 

2014 

2013 

2012 

2011 

Total operating revenue budget 

309 871 240 

247 457 250 

201 324 642 

173 981 660 

155 434 227 

Grants and subsidies 

137 720100 

139 626 630 

99 463 902 

69 774 421 

57 515861 

Percentage of revenue 

44.4 

56.42 

49.40 

40.10 

37.00 


Table 80: Grants and Subsidies over the last 5 years (201 1 to 2015) 


3.9.6. MUNICIPAL INFRASTRUCTURE ASSETS AND 
MAINTENANCE (Q&M) 


3.9.6.I. MUNICIPAL INFRASTRUCTURE ASSETS AND 
MAINTENANCE (Q&M) 


ITEM 

2015 

2014 

2013 

2012 

2011 1 

Roads 

267 532 489 

199174 061 

200 450 544 

189 082 709 

190131 955 

Storm Water 

41 351 759 

22 999128 

24 737 980 

23 125315 

2 022 426 

Electrical 

32 861 712 

34 932 153 

38 116 202 

39 797 986 

40 984 215 

Total Infrastructure Assets 

341 745 960 

257105 342 

263 304 726 

252 006010 

233138 596 

Repairs and maintenance 

17 462 762 

15 035 026 

10 539 721 

10013 279 

5 505 350 

Percentage of Infrastructure assets 

5.11 

5.85 

4.00 

3.97 

2.36 


Table 81: Municipal Infrastructure Assets and Maintenance (Q&M) over the last 5 years (201 1 to 2016) 


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Section C: Spatial Analysis 


3.9.6.2. ASSET MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES 

■ All the departmental managers take charge of the assets in his/her department. 

■ Each manager is charged with the responsibility of indicating the maintenance costs within his/her department's operating budget 
in order to ensure cost effectiveness in terms of the use of assets. 

■ The Council has adopted a policy in terms of which the life span of assets is determined and replacement takes place only when 
such a date is reached. 

■ Assets having reached the pre-determined life span are sold in terms of the provisions of Section 189 of the Local Authorities 
Ordinance, 97A (Ordinance 25 of 1974). 

■ The Manager Financial Services is responsible for the insurance cover of all the assets of the municipality. 

■ The development and implementation of a fixed asset register and asset control system as well as the maintenance thereof. 

3.9.7. BORROWINGS (DBSA) 


2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 


Borrowings | 4799418 | 5142234 | 5 485 050 | 5 827 866 | 6170681 

Table 82: Municipal Borrowings over the last 5 years (201 1 to 2015) 

3.9.8. MUNICIPALITY'S CREDIT RATING 

The Municipality does not currently have a Credit Rating. 


3.9.9. EMPLOYEE RELATED COSTS 
(INCLUDING COUNCILOR ALLOWANCES) 



2015 

2014 

2013 

2012 

2011 

Employee related costs 

88 209 470 

59 569 958 

54 200 554 

51875 069 

49 866 542 

Remuneration of councillors 

17 792 480 

13 688172 

12 732 586 

12059172 

10 953 567 

Total 

106 002 310 

73 258130 

66 933140 

63 934 241 

60820109 


Table 83: Employee Related Costs and Councilor Allowances over the last 5 years (201 1 to 2015) 


3.9.10. SUPPLY CHAIN 
MANAGEMENT (SCM) 

The uMlalazi Municipality has a Supply Chain Management Policy 
in place which was reviewed and adopted in February 2012 and 
which is being implemented. 

3.9.11. FINANCIAL VIABILITY 
AND MANAGEMENT: 

SWOT ANALYSIS 

3.9.11.1. STRENGTHS/ 
OPPORTUNITIES 

■ The Municipality has -sound Capital Financing Strategies 
in place; 

■ Up to date, the Municipality has been able to meet its financial 
obligations with regards to payment and provisioning of Free 
Basic Services for Electricity and Refuse Removal; 


■ The Municipality has sound Revenue Enhancement and 
Protection Strategies in place; 

■ The Municipality Consumer Debt Position has remained at 
roughly the same level since 2008; 

■ The Municipality has sound Asset Management Strategies 
in place; 

■ Employee Related Costs and Councilor Allowances have 
increased at an acceptable rate from 2008 to 2012; and 

■ The Municipality has a SCM Policy in place which is being 
implemented. 

3.9.1 1 . 2 . WEAKNESSES/ 
THREATS 

■ From 2009 to 2012 there has been a steady decrease in 
the Municipality's capability to expend it's Capital Budget, i.e. 
84.32% expenditure of the capital budget in 2009 and 64.88% 
expenditure of the capital budget in 2012; 

■ Whilst the Municipality's assets have increased significantly 
between 2008 and 2012, the provisioning for operations and 
maintenance has not increased; and 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 












■ The Municipality's borrowings have increased significantly 
from 2008 to 2012. 

3.10. GOOD 

GOVERNANCE ANALYSIS 

3.10.1. NATIONAL AND 
PROVINCIAL PROGRAMS 
ROLLED-OUT AT 
MUNICIPAL LEVEL 

3.10.1.1. SUKUMASAKHE 

The purpose of Operation Sukuma Sakhe aims to rebuild 
the fabric of society by promoting human values, fighting 
poverty, crime, diseases, deprivation and social ills, ensuring 
moral regeneration, by working together through effective 
partnerships. Partnerships include civil society, development 
partners, communities and government departments, to provide 
a comprehensive integrated service package to communities. 


The objective of Operation Sukuma Sakhe is to create and 
maintain functional task teams at provincial, district, local, 
and ward levels to deliver integrated services to individuals, 
households and communities. 

The functionality of all war rooms is still an issue in the wards 
as most wards are reporting non to somewhat functional. The 
uMlalazi Local Task Team meets at every Friday at uMlalazi 
Council Chamber at 1 0hOO. The Local Task Team reports to the 
UThungulu District Task Team. The functioning of 055 within 
the municipality is yet to be at a satisfactory level however, the 
Office of His Worship the Mayor has since established a plan 
to resuscitate the effectiveness of this program on the ground. 
The operation of 055 within the municipality focuses on, but is 
not limited to the following; 

i. 5ocial Interventions (Obtaining Grants Birth Certificates and 
Identity Documents; Burials; Counselling; Crime prevention; 
school uniforms and educational materials) 

ii. Infrastructural Interventions (Housing/5helter, electricity, road 
infrastructure, water tanks etc.) 

iii. Health Interventions (Care giving; Wheelchairs and other 
disability apparatus; treatment; food parcels etc.) 

iv. LED (Community Gardens) 




UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 1 A6 

xx>ooo<xxxxx>oooooooooooo 




Section C: Spatial Analysis 


The 23 war room that have been established within 23 wards within the municipality are operating in accordance with the 
following schedule: 


WARD 

DAY 

TIME 

VENUE 1 

Ward 01 

Thursday 

09h00 

Thembelani 

Ward 02 

Thursday 

lOhOO 

Mamba one-stop-shop 

Ward 03 

Tuesday 

lOhOO 

Inkosi uMzungezi Peace Centre 

Ward OA 

Thursday 

lOhOO 

Thembalesizwe School 

Ward 05 

Thursday 

lOhOO 

Kwa-Bangindoda Tribal Court 

Ward 06 

Thursday 

12h00 

Tribal court 

Ward 07 

Thursday 

09h00 

Nkanini Health Station 

Ward 08 

Wednesday 

IlhOO 

Sphezi Hall 

Ward 09 

Thursday 

OShOO 

Sphezi hall 

Ward 10 

Tuesday 

lOhOO 

Siphilile Clinic 

Ward 1 1 

Wednesday 

UhOO 

Peace Centre 

Ward 1 2 

Monday 

14h00 

King DinuZulu Hall 

Ward 1 3 

Thursday 

13hOO 

Izindophi Peace Centre 

Ward 1A 

Thursday 

lOhOO 

Mpumazi Tribal Court 

Ward 1 5 

Monday 

IlhOO 

Tribal Court 

Ward 1 6 

Thursday 

09h00 

Mvutshini Hall 

Ward 1 7 

Wednesday 

lOhOO 

Nyezane Creche 

Ward 18 

Not functioning 



Ward 19 

Not functioning 



Ward 20 

Wednesday 

lOhOO 

Obanjeni Community Hall 

Ward 21 

No war room 



Ward 22 

Monday 

lOhOO 

Lubisana Hall 

Ward 23 

Wednesday 

lOhOO 

Ekuphumuleni Church 

Ward 2A 

Monday 

lOhOO 

Tribal Court 

Ward 25 

Tuesday 

14h00 

Maqwakazi Hall 

Ward 26 

Monday 

12h30 

Nomyaca Community Hall 


Table 84: War Room Meeting Days 


T 



1 A7 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

o<xxxxxx>ooooooooo<x>o<xxx 







3.10.1.2. EPWP - 5IZAB0NKE 
PROGRAMME 

3.10.1.2.1. BACKGROUND 

His Worship the Mayor, Councilor T.B Zulu entered into an 
implementation Protocol Agreement with the Premier of the 
KwaZulu-Natal Province in respect of Phase 2 of the Expanded 
Public Work Program (2009 - 201 A). The purpose of the 
agreement is: 

■ To establish an agreed framework for co-operation and 
co-ordination between the parties 

■ To promote the objectives of the EPWP by increasing the 
number of full time equivalent work opportunities through 
mainstreaming the use of Labour-Intensive employment 
in the delivery of public infrastructure, goo and services in 
the municipality 

■ To confirm the municipalities' agreement and commitment 
to achieve the targeted numbered of full time equivalent work 
opportunities in the Municipality by 201 A as specified 

■ To promote EPWP incentive grants and incentivizes eligible 
Public Bodies in the Province to increase Labor-Intensive 
employment through EPWP projects and programs that 
maximize job creation 

■ To specify the institutional structures that will oversee, 
monitor and report on progress in implementation the EPWP 
and achieving the EPWP targets 

■ To provide for mutual assistance and support in respect of 
the programs and initiatives of the EPWP 


3.10.1.2.2. EPWP OVERALL 
CO-ORDINATION WITHIN 
THE MUNICIPALITY 

3.10.1.2.2.1. THE EPWP STEERING 
COMMITTEE AND RESPONSIBILITIES: 

The EPWP steering Committee was established to: 

■ Setting EPWP targets for each department and Sectors. 

■ Creating an enabling climate for the successful implementation 
of EPWP in EMM. 

■ Reporting to EXCO 

■ Program Monitoring and Evaluation 

■ Setting performance Standard 

■ Compiling EPWP Management Plan. 

■ Guide the execution of the EPWP, including project selection; 

■ Define Sector reviews; 

■ Facilitate communication among stakeholders; and 

■ Provide a baseline for progress measurement and 
program control. 

3.10.1.2.2.2. EPWP UMLALAZI MUNICIPALITY 
CO-ORDINATION STRUCTURE 

The Executive Committee resolved that 

■ Councillor Ndwalane be nominated to lead and promote the 
EPWP in the Infrastructure, Social and Environmental Sectors 

■ The Director Engineering Services be nominated to assist 
His Worship the Mayor Councilor T B Zulu with effective co- 
ordination and monitoring the implementation of the EPWP. 


POLITICAL CHAMPION 


ADMINISTRATIVE CHAMPION 


EPWP STEERING COMMITTEE 


EPWP SECTOR COORDINATION AND 
IMPLEMENTATION PLAN 


EPWP CROSS-CUTTING SUPPORT 


Executive Mayor 

Responsible for: Councilor C T Ndwalane 

Political leadership and direction 


Municipal Manager 
Responsible for: 

Strategic direction & monitoring 


Director's Forum 

Responsible for: Direct engineering services 

Strategic Direction; Performance Standards; Budget Approval; 
Reporting to EXCO; Monitoring & Evaluation and Evaluation 

Managers / Project Managers 
Responsible for: 

Program Implementation; project design. Reporting on EPWP 
System; Sectors coordination (Infrastructure - Snr Manager 
Engineering Services & PMU; Environ & Culture and Social 
Sectors- Snr Manager Community Services; Non-State and 
- LED Officer) 

Finance; HR; etc. (Municipal Departments). 

Responsible for: 

Over-all cross-cutting support 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 1 A8 

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Figure 3A: EPWP uMlalazi Municipality Co-ordination Structure 














Section C: Spatial Analysis 


3.10.1.2.3. SECTOR CO-ORDINATION 

Sector Co-ordinators are appointed by the Executive 
Committee through the Municipal Manager for each of the four 
sectors namely: 

■ Infrastructure Sector 

■ Environment and Culture Sector 

■ Social Sector; and 

■ Non State Sector 

The appointed Sector Coordinator is at the Management Level 
and is responsible for: 

■ Liaising with the stakeholders 

■ Keeping abreast with sector specific developments; 

■ Liaising and representing the Municipality on the relevant 
provincial EPWP Committees; 

■ Disseminating sector specific information to the dedicated 
EPWP Champions identified by each of the Departments. 

■ Sector coordinators are also responsible for programs design, 
implementation and reporting on EPWP System; and 

■ Monitor, evaluate and report on sector specific KPIs to the 
Head of Department. 

3.10.1.2.4. EPWP SECTORS 

3.10.1.2.4.1. THE ENVIRONMENT AND 
CULTURE SECTOR PROGRAMMES 

The aim of the Sector is to: 'Build South Africa's natural, social 
and cultural heritage, and in doing so, dynamically uses this 
heritage to create both medium and long term work and social 
benefits.' Examples of projects in the Environment and Culture 
Sector include: 

■ Sustainable land based livelihoods (Greening, Working for 
Water & Wetlands) 

■ Waste management (Working on Waste, Food for Waste etc.) 

■ Tourism and creative industries (Working for Tourism, etc.) 

■ Parks and beautification (People and Parks, Cemetery 
Maintenance, Community Parks, etc.) 

■ Coastal management (Working for the Coast) 

■ Sustainable energy (Working for Energy) 

3.10.1.2.4.2. SOCIAL SECTOR 
PROGRAMMES 

The objectives of the Sector is to contribute to the overall 
Government objectives of improving the delivery of health 
services, early childhood development, community crime 
prevention, school nutrition and other social development 
oriented services through programs such as: 

■ Community safety programs - crime reporting, crowd control, 
school patrol, disaster emergency response, firefighting. 


floods Impact support and community safety officials 

■ Home community based care - home community based care 
Services (TB, HIV/Aids etc.). 

■ Early Childhood Development - early childhood development, 
homework services, literacy programs, peer education, social 
issues awareness and career guidance. 

■ Sports and recreation - life guards, sports academy, seasonal 
employment: holiday resorts and nature reserves. 

■ Social Services - domestic violence, rape counseling and 
support, child labour, suicide counseling, abuse counseling 
and support, substance abuse. 

■ Graduate development programmes - updating indigent 
register and debt collection. 

3.10.1.2.4.3. INFRASTRUCTURE 
SECTOR PROGRAMMES 

The Infrastructure sector is aimed to promote the use of labour- 
intensive methods in the construction and maintenance of public 
infrastructure. Infrastructure Sector Programmes includes: 

■ Road construction and maintenance. 

■ General construction and maintenance - construction of 
buildings, dams, reservoirs etc. and their maintenance. 

■ Storm water programmes: storm water drainage systems. 

■ Water and sanitation projects. 

■ National youth services aimed at developing and training 
youth between the age of 18 and 35 years on artisan trades 
in the building environment. 

■ Learnership aimed at training and developing contractors and 
supervisors in labour-intensive methods of construction. 

■ Large Projects aimed at providing support to public 
bodies in the implementation of projects with a value of high 
labour-intensity. 

3.10.1.2.4.4. NON -STATE SECTOR 

The objectives of the Sector are to create an avenue where 
NPO's; NGOs; and CBOs can assist government in the 
overall Government objectives of Job creation through 
socially constructive activities in their local communities. The 
Municipality will support the delivery of the Non-State Sector 
through measures such as facilitating and mobilising NPOs. 

3.10.1.2.5. EPWP PROJECTS FOR 
2015/16 FINANCIAL YEAR 

His Worship the Mayor, Councilor T.B Zulu entered into an 
implementation Protocol Agreement with the Premier of the 
Kwa-Zulu Natal Province in respect of Phase 2 of the Expanded 
Public Work Program (2011 - 2015). 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 


FINANCIALYEAR 

WORK 

OPPORTUNITIES 
(JOBS CREATED) 

FULLTIME 

EQUIVALENT 

2011/2012 

370 

135 

2012/2013 

481 

175 

2013/2014 

605 

218 

20U/2015 

1010 

825 

2015/16 

1650 

1585 


The uMlalazi Municipality has a created 1 650 jobs in 2015/2016 
financial year. In terms of Job Creation the municipality had a 
budget of R 3 241 800 for Poverty alleviation and towards Work 
Creation Projects the municipality budgeted R2 004 000. 

Below is the list of projects identified for the EPWP with regards 
to job creation within the uMlalazi Municipality in the 2015/ 
2016 Financial Year: 


Table 85: Targets (201 1 - 2015) 


WARD 

DAY 

VENUE 

Environmental & Culture Sector 

Food For Waste 

100 

War Against Poverty 

100 

Sizabonke 

85 

Waste Management Contracts 

129+5 

Weed Eradication 

50 

Infrastructure 

MIG: Projects 

135 

Electrical 

1000 

Community Works Program 
(Road and Street, Verges, 
infrastructural maintainance) 

Local Economic Development (LED) 

Co-operatives and other Poverty 
Alleviation projects 

180 


Table 86: Projects Identified For the FPWP 


These projects are funded from: 

■ Equitable Share Grant: (Poverty Alleviation; Work Creation; 
Local Economic Development); 

■ EPWP Grant 

■ and MIG (Labour-Intensive Construction method) 

3.10.2. IGR FRAMEWORK 

The Intergovernmental Relations Framework Act of 2005 
provides for the establishment of a District Intergovernmental 
Forum for every district, giving effect to the goals and principles 
of intergovernmental relations and cooperative government as 
contained in Chapter 3 of the Constitution. 

The KZN Department of Co-operative Governance and Traditional 
Affairs (KZN COGTA) provided assistance with the preparation 
of a Draft Mayoral Protocol for the uThungulu District Mayor's 
Coordinating Forum. 

The Mayoral Protocol will serve as a Terms of Reference for 
the uThungulu District Mayor's Co-ordinating Forum in order 
to promote Intergovernmental Relations within the District. 


The Mayoral Protocol provides a framework or guidance on 
the following matters of the uThungulu District Mayors 
Coordinating Forum: 

■ Membership; 

■ Object of the Forum; 

■ Functions of the Forum; 

■ Referral of matters; 

■ Meeting of the Forum; 

■ Broad consultative meeting; 

■ Procedure; 

■ Resolutions and their implementation; 

■ Settlement of Disputes; 

■ Technical support structure; 

■ Funding; 

■ Amendment of protocol 

■ Application. 

The Forum consists of: 

■ the mayor of the uThungulu District Municipality; 

■ the mayors of local municipalities in the District; and 

■ Socio-Economic partners and other stakeholders as may be 
invited by the District Mayor. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 1 50 

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Section C: Spatial Analysis 


Other IGR Meetings within the uThungulu District Municipality are scheduled as follows: 


DATE 

FORUM 

TIME I 

20 January 

Technical Support Forum (TFS) MMs 

11H00 

27 January 

District Intergovernmental Forum (DIF) Mayors 

13H00 

19 February 

Communications Forum 

10H00 

20 February 

CFO Forum 

10H00 

2A February 

Community Forum 

9H00 

24 February 

Infrastructure Forum 

14H00 

6 March 

Corporate Forum 

10H00 

13 March 

Planners Forum 

9H30 

19 May 

CFO Forum 

10H00 

19 May 

Infrastructure Forum 

10H00 

21 May 

Communications Forum 

10H00 

12 June 

Planners Forum 

9H00 

13 August 

Infrastructure Forum 

12H00 

20 August 

Communications Forum 

10H00 

10 September 

CFO Forum 

9H00 

1 1 September 

Planners Forum 

9H00 

17 November 

Infrastructure Forum 

12H00 

19 November 

Communications Forum 

10H00 

26 November 

CFO Forum 

10H00 

1 1 December 

Planners Forum 

9H30 


Table 87: IGR Meeting Schedule 


3.10.3. MUNI-MEC MEETINGS 

The MUNI-MEC is a provincial intergovernmental body that meets 
quarterly to analyse the state of local governments and is made 
up of the MEG and Municipal Mayors and Municipal Managers 
within the province. The body also serves and platform where 
programmes and projects by Provincial and National Government 
that will be implemented locally are packaged. Current issues and 
challenges affecting municipalities are identified and strategically 
dealt with. As such the His Worship the Mayor Cllr TB Zulu and 
the Municipal Manager form an integral part of this forum and 
representatives of the municipality. 


3.10.A. THEIDP 
REPRESENTATIVE FORUM 

This is the structure, which institutionalises and ensures a 
participatory IDP review process. It represents the interests of 
the constituents of the municipality in the review process. It is 
envisaged that all government and nogovernment organisations, 
stakeholders or interest groups are represented in the forum. In 
terms of the adopted IDP, Budget and /PM5 Process Plan, the 
municipality is required to conduct one representative forum 
per quarter of the financial year. This ensures an integrated and 
inclusive approach to development and within a vertically and 
horizontally aligned platform. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 






3.10.5. MUNICIPAL STRUCTURES 


3.10.5.1. COMMITTEES APPOINTED BY COUNCIL 

3.10.5.1.1. COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES AT UTHUNGULU DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY 

The following councillors were representatives of uMlalazi Municipality in the uThungulu District Council: 


1 

Councillor TB Zulu (ANC) 

2 

Councillor E N Mtshali (ANC) 

3 

Councillor S G Ngema (ANC) 

A 

Councillor J K Powell (IFP) 

5 

Councillor M DIudIa (IFP) 

6 

Councillor B LThusi (NFP) 


Table 88: Council Representatives at uThungulu District Municipality 

3.10.5.1.2. SECTION 79 COMMITTEES 

In 2012/13 Council recomposed its Section 79 committees and they reflect as follows: 


FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 

Councillor T B Zulu (Chairperson) 

(ANC) 

Councillor N M Mnqayi 

(ANC) 

Councillor S G Ngema 

(ANC) 

Councillor S Naicker 

(ANC) 

Councillor M M Khanyile 

(ANC) 

Councillor S G Mbambo 

(Exco 05 March 14: Exco Min 187/13/14) 

(IFP) 

Alderman S B Larkan 

(IFP) 

Councillor E A Talmage 

(Exco 03 July 13 : Exco Min 10/13/14) 

(IFP) 

Councillor B R L Ngema 

(NFP) 

Councillor Z H Biyela 

(Exco 03 Dec 14: Exco Min 175/14/15) 

(NFP) 


CORPORATE SERVICES COMMITTEE 

Councillor B R L Ngema (Chairperson) (Exco 03 Dec 1A : Exco Min 175/1A/15) 

(NFP) 

Councillor C T Ndwalane 

(ANC) 

Councillor M G Zondi 

(ANC) 

Councillor M M Khanyile 

(ANC) 

Councillor M E DIamini 

(ANC) 

Councillor N L Biyela 

(ANC) 

Councillor J K Powell 

(IFP) 

Councillor S G Mbambo 

(IFP) 

Councillor M DIudIa 

(Exco 16 Oct 14 : Exco Min 97/14/15) 

(IFP) 

Councillor B LThusi 

(NFP) 


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Section C: Spatial Analysis 



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ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE 


Councillor CT Ndwalane (Chairperson) (Exco 01 July 15 : Exco Min 12/15/16) 

(ANC) 

Councillor! E Nsele 

(ANC) 

Councillor M E DIamini 

(ANC) 

Councillor E Z Jaffe 

(ANC) 

Councillor N L Ngidi (Exco 16 Oct 74 :Exco Min 97/1^/15) 

(IFP) 

Councillor K Khumalo 

(IFP) 

Councillor P G DIolane 

(IFP) 

Councillor 5 5 Sithole 

(NFP) 

Councillor M B Biyela 

(NFP) 

Councillor K B Magwaza 

(IFP) 

Councillor B LThusi 

(NFP) 



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Section C: Spatial Analysis 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

MIN NO UMC 45/10/11 

APPROVED BY COUNCIL ON 01 JUNE 201 1 


His Worship the Mayor 

Councillor T B Zulu (Chairperson) 

(ANC) 

The Deputy Mayor Councillor MMM Ntuli 
(Sp Council 16July20U (MIN NO UMC6/U/15) 

(NFP) 

Councillor C Gamede 

(Council 25 March 20 U (MIN NO UMC 96/13/1U -full time) 

Promulgated in Notice 07 of the Provincial Gazette No 1097 dated 17 February 2014 

(ANC) 

Councillor C T Ndwalane 

(ANC) 

Alderman 5 B Larkan 

(IFP) 

Councillor B R L Ngema 

(NFP) 

Councillor S G Ngema (Sp Council on 28 May 2015 MIN NO UMC 106/ 74/ 15 -full time) 

(ANC) 

Councillor j K Powell (Council 24 Feb 2015 (MIN NO UMC 70/1^/15 -full time) 

Promulgated in Notice A2 of the Provincial Gazette, dated 27 March 2015 

(IFP) 

Councillor I Woollatt 

(ANC) 

Councillor Q TXulu 

(IFP) 

The Chief Whip Councillor M B Biyela (Non member) (Sp Council 23 July 201^ (MIN NO UMC 7 7/74/75/ 

(NFP) 

The Speaker Councillor E N Mtshali 

(Non member) 

(ANC) 


Table 89 


3.10.6. THE AUDIT AND PERFORMANCE AUDIT COMMITTEE 

The following were members of the Audit and Performance Audit Committee and Mr D Bosch was appointed as the chairperson 
of the Committee: 


NAME 

DESIGNATION 

Mr D Bosch 

Chairperson 

Mr Z Zulu 

Member 

MsTNdlela 

Member (Resigned) 

Mr M DIamini 

Member 


Table 90: Members of the Audit and Performance Audit Committee 


The Committee members are remunerated for preparation 
and attendance of meetings in line with the National Treasury 
Regulation that regulate the remuneration of commission and 
committee and were reimbursed for expenses incurred for 
attending audit committee meetings. 

3.10.6.1.1. MUNICIPAL PUBLIC 
ACCOUNTS COMMITTEE 

Guidelines for the Establishment of Municipal Public Accounts 
Committees were issued jointly by Cooperative Governance and 
Traditional Affairs and National Treasury Departments during 
August 2011. 

The MPAC may engage directly with the public and consider 
public comments when received and will be entitled to request 


for documents or evidence from the Accounting Officer of a 
municipality or municipal entity. 

The primary functions of the Municipal Public Accounts 
Committees are as follows: 

■ To consider and evaluate the content of the Annual Report 
and to make recommendations to Council when adopting an 
oversight report on the Annual Report; 

■ In order to assist with the conclusion of matters that may 
not be finalised, information relating to past recommendations 
made on the Annual Report, must also be reviewed. This 
relates to current in-year reports, including the quarterly, 
mid-year and Annual Reports; 

■ To examine the financial statements and audit reports 
of the municipality and municipal entities, and in doing so, 
the committee must consider improvements from previous 


1 55 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

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statements and reports and must evaluate the extent to which the Audit Committee's and the Auditor-General's recommendations 
have been implemented; 

■ To promote good governance, transparency and accountability on the use of municipal resources; 

■ To recommend or undertake any investigation in its area of responsibility, after reviewing any investigation report already undertaken 
by the municipality or the Audit Committee; and 

■ To perform any other functions assigned to it through a resolution of Council within its area of responsibility. 

■ The MPAC reports to Council, at least quarterly, on the activities of the Committee which will 

include a report detailing its activities of the preceding and current financial years, the number of meetings held, the membership 
of the committee and key resolutions taken in the annual report. 

■ Municipal Public Accounts Committee (MPAC) is established instead of the Standing Committee on Public Accounts (5COPA). 


The structural composition of the committee is as follows; 


MUNICIPAL PUBLIC ACCOUNT COMMITTEE (MPAC) 

EXCOMINNO 296/10/11 

APPROVED BY EXCO ON 27 JUNE 201 1 


Councillor N S Mzimela (Chairperson) 

(Exco 06 Feb 13 : EXCO MIN NO 2 1 1/12/13) 


(NFP) 

Councillor M E DIamini 


(ANQ 

Councillor M M Khanyile 


(ANC) 

Councillor E ATalmage 


(IFP) 

Alderman S B Larkan 

(Exco 05 March U : EXCO MIN NO 187/1 3/ U) 


(IFP) 

Table 91: Municipal Public Accounts Committee Members 



3.10.6.1.2. BID COMMITTEES 

In terms of Section 1 1 2(1) of the Local Government Municipal Finance Management Act 56 of 2003 the supply chain management 
policy of a municipality must be fair, equitable, transparent, competitive and cost-effective and comply with a prescribed regulatory 
framework for municipal supply chain management. 

In terms of Section 26 (1) (a) (i) to (iii) of the uMlalazi Supply Chain Management Policy the Accounting Officer is required to establish 
a committee system for competitive bids consisting of : - 

(i) A Bid Specification Committee; 

(ii) A Bid Evaluation Committee; and 

(iii) A Bid Adjudication Committee; 

3.10.6.1.2.1. COMPOSITION OF BID COMMITTEES 

REGULATION 27(3) - BSC 

Must be composed of one or more officials of the municipality, preferably the manager responsible for the function involved, and 
may when appropriate, include external specialist advisors. 

REGULATION 28 (2) (A) & (B) BEC 

A bid evaluation committee must as far as possible be comprised from departments requiring the goods and services and at least 
one SCM practitioner of a municipality. 

REGULATION (2) (I) TO (III) -BAG 

A Bid adjudication committee must consist of at least four senior managers of the municipality, which must include: 

■ The Chief Financial Officer or if the Chief Financial Officer is not available another manager in the budget and treasury office 
reporting directly to the Chief Financial Officer and designated by the Chief Financial Officer. 

■ At least one senior supply chain management practitioner who is an official of the municipality, and 

■ A technical expert in the field which is an official of the municipality. 


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Section C: Spatial Analysis 


In view of the above and noting the regulations, the following officials have been appointed to represent the uMlalazi Council on 
the aforementioned Committees: - 


3.10.6.1.2.2. BID SPECIFICATIONS COMMITTEE MEMBERS: - 



DESIGNATION 

DEPARTMENT 

NAME 

CAPACITY I 

1 

Senior Manager Engineering (Electrical) 

Engineering Services 

J Le Grange 

Chairman 

2 

Senior Manager Community Services 

Community Services 

F Mahaye 

Member 

3 

Senior Manager Corporate Services 

Corporate Services 

S V D Westhuizen 

Member 

A 

Senior Manager Finance (Revenue) 

Financial Services 

K Nxumalo 

Member 

5 

SCM Practitioner 

Financial Services 

M Hulley / L Maphumulo 

Advisor 


Table 92: Bid Specifications Committee Members 


Note: Quorum is made by at least 50% +1 . It should be noted that this committee may when appropriate, include external specialist 
advisors for technical matters. 


3.10.6.1.2.3. BID EVALUATION COMMITTEE MEMBERS: - 



DESIGNATION 

DEPARTMENT 

NAME 

CAPACITY I 

1 

Director Corporate Services 

Corporate Services 

KCZulu 

Chairman 

2 

Senior Manager Finance (Expenditure) 

Financial Services 

T Mnguni 

Member 

3 

Senior Manager Engineering (Civil) 

Engineering Services 

M DIamini 

Member 

A 

Senior Manager Protection Services 

Protection Services 

XBIose 

Member 

5 

SCM Officer 

Financial Services 

L Maphumulo 

Advisor 


Table 93: Bid Evaluation Committee Members 


Note: Quorum is made by at least 50% +1 . 

BID ADJUDICATION COMMITTEE MEMBERS: - 



DESIGNATION 

DEPARTMENT 

NAME 

CAPACITY I 

1 

Chief Financial Officer 

Financial Services 

Z Mhlongo 

Chairman 

2 

SCM Practitioner 

Financial Services 

M Hulley 

Member 

3 

Director Engineering Services 

Engineering Services 

N Buthelezi 

Member 

A 

Director Community Services 

Community Services 

S M Nzuza 

Member 

5 

Deputy Chief Financial Officer 

Financial Services 

B Koster 

Member 

6 

Director Protection Services 

Protection Services 

Vacant 

Member 


Table 94: Bid Adjudication Committee Members 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

















Note: Quorum is made by at least 50% +1 . 


An Employee of the Supply Chain Management Unit is required to be present at the meetings of the Specification and Evaluation 
Committees as an Observer. 

The requirements of their respective committee which are detailed in Clause 29 of the uMlalazi Supply Chain Management Policy 
are applied. 


3.10.6.1.3. OTHER SUPPORTING COMMITTEES 

. The HIV/Aids Desk. 

■ The Sports Desk. 

■ Arts and Culture Desk. 

■ Youth Desk. 

■ Ward Committees for 26 wards in the municipality. 


3.10.6.1.4. IDP PUBLIC PARTICIPATION STRUCTURES 

As set out in the IDP Review Process Plan for 201 3/201 A, the following Structures have been established to ensure effective and 
efficient public participation around planning and development that affect people's lives: 


STRUCTURE 

STATUS I 

IDP Representative Forum 

Functional 

Road Shows 

Functional 

Ward Committees 

Established and Functional 

Izimbizos 

Functional 

Ward-based Planning forum 

Still to be established 


Table 95: Public Participation Structures 







Section C: Spatial Analysis 


POLICY 

FILE REF 

SECTION 

EXCO ADOPTION 

REVIEW DATES 

Pool Motor Vehicle Policy 

3/3/1 

General 

07 Feb 2012 


Office Bearers Security Services Policy 

3/3/2 

General 

16 Feb 2012 


Whistle Blowing Policy 

3/3/3 

General 

07 Feb 2012 


Risk Management Policy 

3/3/A 

General 

07 Feb 2012 


1 T Policy 

3/3/6 

General 

07 March 2012 


Communication Plan Policy 

3/3/21 

General 

05 June 2013 


Records Management Policy 

3/3/25 

General 

02 October 2013 


Informal Economy Policy 

3/3/26 

General 

02 October 2013 


Expanded Public Works Policy (LLF 29 Jan 1 A) 

3/3/33 

General 

05 March 2014 


Budget Policy 

3/3/7 

Finance 


Council 30 May 2013 

S & T Allowance Policy 


3/3/8 

Finance 

08 Oct 201 2 

Supply Chain Management 

3/3/9 

Finance 


EXCO 05 June 2013 

Bad Debt Write off and Impairment of 

Debts Policy 

3/3/10 

Finance 

Council 30 May 2013 


Credit Control and Debt Collection Policy 

3/3/11 

Finance 


Council 30 May 2013 

Council 29 May 201 A 





Indigent Policy 

3/3/13 

Finance 


Council 30 May 2013 

Funding and Reserve Policy 

3/3/1 A 

Finance 

Council 30 May 2013 


Borrowing Policy 

3/3/15 

Finance 

Council 30 May 2013 


Investment and Cash Management Policy 

3/3/17 

Finance 


Council 30 May 2013 

Tariff Policy 

3/3/18 

Finance 

01 June 2007 

Council 30 May 2013 

Property Rates Policy 

3/3/20 

Finance 


Council 29 May 201 A 

Leave Policy and Procedures Policy 

3/3/5 

Human Resource 

03 April 201 3 


Rewards, Gifts and Favours Policy 

3/3/12 

Human Resource 

08 May 2013 


Bursary Policy for Council Officials 

3/3/16 

Human Resource 

19 Sept 2012 


Training and Development Policy 

3/3/19 

Human Resource 

06 July 2010 


Scarce Skills Policy (LLF 1 7 July 1 3 & 23 Sept 1 A) 

3/3/23 

Human Resource 

05 November 201 A 


Staff Retention Policy (LLF 1 7 July 1 3) 

3/3/2A 

Human Resource 

21 August 2013 


Voluntarism and Internship Policy (LLF 29 Jan 1 A) 

3/3/28 

Human Resource 

05 March 2014 


Occupational Health and Safety Policy 
(LLF 29 Jan 14) 

3/3/29 

Human Resource 

05 March 2014 


Protective Clothing (LLF 29 Jan 1 A) 

3/3/30 

Human Resource 

05 March 2014 


Dress Code Policy (LLF 29 Jan 1 A) 

3/3/31 

Human Resource 

05 March 2014 


Employee Assistance Policy (LLF 29 Jan 1 A) 

3/3/32 

Human Resource 

05 March 2014 



Table 96: Status of Municipal Policies 


The Municipality annually submits the Workplace Skills Plan and 
Annual Training Report to the Local Government Sector Education 
and Training Authority in terms of Skills Development Act 97 of 
1998 as well as Annual Report as required by the MFMA. 

3.10.7. MUNICIPAL RISK 
MANAGEMENT POLICY 

The uMlalazi Municipality has adopted a Risk Management 
Policy. The following sets out the four identified Risk Categories. 





FlAUCill 

rtik 

ritik 


Figure 35: Four Risk Categories 


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MAIN RISK CATEGORIES EXAMPLES 


MAIN MITIGATION MEASURES 


Strategic risk 1. 


2 . 

3. 


Political changes or change in system of 
government or policies particularly as 
our system in South Africa is base d on 
proportional representation which means 
political parties and political alignments are 
more profound. 

Faction fighting. 

Forceful and grabs. 


Financial risk 

Risk pertaining to 
corruption, solvency, 
profitability and liquidity 


Operational risks 

Failures of operational 
effectiveness or service 
delivery in municipal 
operations due to 
inadequate internal 
processes or ineffective 
response to external 
challenges. 


1. Fraud and corruption 

2. Market risks 

3. Interest rates 
A. Equity prices 

5. Transfer risk 

6. Political risk 

7. Crime 

8. Economic risk 

9. Liquidity risk 

10. Rates or rent boycott 

1 1 . Failure to collect rates and municipal taxes 

1 2. Failure to collect monies from municipal creditors. 

1. Poor performance in critical KPA. 

2. Dissatisfaction of residents with service 
delivery which might lead to protests and even 
violence. 

3. Councilors who are not accountable. 

A. Not adhering to the Batho Pele principles 

5. No clear roles and functions of municipal 
stakeholders. 

6. Political interference in service delivery. 

7. lack of cooperation between the municipality 
and other spheres of government including 
the District Municipality 


Flard to predict or quantify, this can be 

addressed through: 

1. Environmental scanning, scenario 
development and simulation. 

2. Ensuring that service delivery and 
people's needs surpass political affiliation 
and subjectivity. 

3. Maximize public participation in matters of 
local government. 

A. Effective strategic management. 

5. Capacity building for all stakeholders. 

6. Passing appropriate by-laws and ensuring 
there is rule of law. 

7. Development of strategic response to each 
alternative scenario. 

8. Development of conflict resolution skills. 

1 . Application monitoring of policies and plans 
such a fraud and corruption plan. 

2. Proper implementation and monitoring of 
the Acts such as the Municipal Finance 
Management Act 

3. early warning system 

A. An effective and efficient justice system at 
local level. 

5. Collaborative efforts in combating crime such 
as developing the capacity of ward committees, 
financial committees and policing forums. 

6. Transparent procurement system. 

1. Application and monitoring of 
performance managements systems within 
the municipality. 

2. Development of mechanisms and systems 
of involving the community in matters of 
governance and decision making at local level 
such as ward committees, project committees. 

3. Communication internally and 
externally improved. 

A. Capacity building regarding roles, function, and 
responsibility of each municipal stakeholder. 

5. Enforce adherence to the code of conduct by 
both councilors and officials. 

6. Making the IDP development and the 
budgeting processes a community 
driven process. 

7. Improve intergovernmental relations. 

8. Adherence to the Municipal Financial 
management systems and sound 
financial practices. 

9. Good governance principles such as 
accountability and transparency, openness, 
responsiveness and so on. 

10. Informing the public about what quality and 
standard of service to expect. 

1 1 . Ensuring that public meetings to update 
communities about development are 
held regularly. 


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Section C: Spatial Analysis 


MAIN RISK CATEGORIES 


EXAMPLES 


MAIN MITIGATION MEASURES 


Project and program 
risks 

Risk within specific 
projects, involving 
technology, human 
behavior and external 
threats. 


1 . Risk of technology failure. 

2. Strikes 

3. Project personnel that does not have 
appropriate skills to deliver. 

A. Failure to complete the project 

5. Project is of low standard, and it is difficult to 
retrieve municipal monies used. 

6. The procurement process was not open and 
transparent. 

7. There is no buy in or ownership of the project 
by the community. 

8. The project is not based on the real needs of 
the people, and thus does not address the real 
needs of the people. 

9. Lack of co-operation and good working 
relationship between the municipality and 
different government departments. 

10. Budgetary constraints. 

1 1 . The project is not aligned to the IDP. 


1. Effective strategic planning, incorporating 
internal and external stakeholders. 

2. Ensuring alignment of the project to the IDP. 

3. Open and transparent procurement system. 

4. Formation of project committees. 

5. Project steering committees to be well versed 
with their roles functions and responsibilities. 

6. Ensuring that the service provider provides 
quality service. 

7. Proper project budgeting. 

8. Accountability, transparency, monitoring and 
constant reporting regard project progress. 

9. Use of local resources. 


Table 97: Unpacking of the four identified Risk Categories 


Top 10 Organisational Risks: 

Risk 01. KPA2: Service Delivery: Disaster Managements 

Risk 02. KPA4: Good Governance and Public Participation: Public Participation 

Risk 03. Community Services: Community Facilities 

Risk 04. KPA 2: Service Delivery: Waste Management 

Risk 05. Business Support: Fuel Management and Control 

Risk 06. KPA 1 : Municipal Transformation and Organisational Development: Council Support 
Risk 07. KPA 4: Good Governance and Public Participation: Municipal Vision and Goals 
Risk 08. Business Support: Audit Function 

Risk 09. Economic Development: Investment Attraction and Retention 
Risk 10. Financial Management: Contract Management. 



h^n Apfl Apori mm Mp mm i^ii m^^ mi¥ m-u 


Figure 36: Top 10 Organisational Risks 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 






3.10.8. FRAUD AND CORRUPTION 

The uMlalazi Municipality has adopted an Anti-Corruption / Fraud Prevention Plan, with the following aims: 

■ Enhance public confidence in the municipality, 

■ Build and maintain an ethics culture in order to avoid possibilities for conflict of interest well in advance, 

■ Strengthen community participation in exposing and reporting corruption, 

■ Create organizational culture of transparency, 

■ To encourage councilors in particular to engage communities in anti-corruption initiative, 

■ To prevent, detect and investigate fraud and corruption, and take appropriate action in the event of such irregularities, 

■ To build public accountability as well as internal accountability and transparency, 

■ To enhance efficiency, effectiveness and responsiveness of the uMlalazi Municipality, 

■ To promote effective participation of municipal stakeholders in decision making and in corruption prevention, and 

■ Increase municipal credibility and remove public distrust. 

3.10.9. MUNICIPAL BYLAWS 


The table below indicates Bylaws that the Municipality has adopted since 2003 to current: 


NO 

DATE OF ADOPTION 

E = EXCO 

C = COUNCIL 

BYLAWS 

RESOLUTION 

STATUS 

1 

E - 04/02/08 

C - 25/03/08 

Advertising Bylaws 

EXCO 274/07/08 

Promulgate on 09/04/2009 

2 

E - 03/02/03 

C - 24/03/03 

Caravan Park Bylaws 

EXCO 309/02/03 

Promulgated on 10/07/03 

3 

E - 03/02/03 

C - 24/03/03 

Cemetery and Crematorium Bylaws 

EXCO 309/02/03 

Promulgated on10/07/03 

A 

E - 03/02/03 

C - 24/03/03 

Lease of Halls and Conference Facilities 
Bylaws 

EXCO 309/02/03 

Promulgated on 10/07/03 

5 

E - 05/05/03 

C - 29/09/03 

Aerodrome Bylaws 

EXCO 454/02/03 

Promulgated on 04/03/04 

6 

E - 05/05/03 

C - 29/09/03 

Funeral Undertaker Bylaws 

EXCO 454/02/03 

Promulgated on 04/03/04 

7 

E - 05/05/03 

C - 29/09/03 

Public Amenities Bylaws 

EXCO 454/02/03 

Promulgated on 08/04/04 

8 

E - 07/06/04 

C - 28/06/04 

Nuisance Bylaws 

EXCO 475/03/04 

Promulgated on 11/11/04 

9 

E - 04/07/05 

C - 26/09/05 

Fire Prevention Bylaws 

EXCO 10/05/06 

Promulgated on 09/10/08 

10 

E - 04/07/05 

C - 26/09/05 

Encroachment Bylaws 

EXCO 10/05/06 

Promulgated on 11/03/10 

11 

E - 04/07/05 

C - 26/09/05 

Parking Bylaws 

EXCO 10/05/06 

Promulgated on 11/03/10 

12 

E - 04/07/05 

C - 26/09/05 

Street Trading Bylaws 

EXCO 10/05/06 

Promulgated on 11/03/10 

13 

E - 04/07/05 

C - 26/09/05 

Beaches Bylaws 

EXCO 10/05/06 

Promulgated on 11/03/10 

14 

E - 04/07/05 

C - 26/09/05 

Electricity Bylaws 

EXCO 10/05/06 

Promulgated on 11/03/10 

15 

E - 04/07/05 

C - 26/09/05 

Municipal Public Transport Bylaws 

EXCO 10/05/06 

Promulgated on 11/03/10 


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Section C: Spatial Analysis 


NO 

DATE OF ADOPTION 

E = EXCO 

C = COUNCIL 

BYLAWS 

RESOLUTION 

STATUS 

16 

E - 04/07/05 

C - 26/09/05 

Storm Water Management Bylaws 

EXCO 10/05/06 

Promulgated on 11/03/10 

17 

E - OA/07/05 

C - 26/09/05 

Public Roads Bylaws 

EXCO 10/05/06 

Promulgated on 11/03/10 

18 

E- 01/08/05 

C - 26/09/05 

Keeping of Animals Bylaws 

EXCO 49/05/06 

Promulgated on 11/03/10 

19 

E- 01/08/05 

C - 26/09/05 

Environmental Health Bylaws 

EXCO 49/05/06 

Promulgated on 11/03/10 

20 

E- 03/10/05 

C- 12/12/05 

Financial Bylaws 

EXCO 114/05/06 

Promulgated on 11/03/10 

21 

E - 07/08/06 

C - 26/09/06 

Refuse Bylaws 

EXCO 37/06/07 

Promulgated on 11/03/10 

22 

C - 27/02/07 

Finance Rates Bylaws 

UMC35/06/07 

Promulgated on 11/03/10 

23 

E - 05/02/07 

C - 26/03/07 

Pound Bylaws 

EXCO 222/06/07 

Promulgated on 11/03/10 

2A 

C - 26/03/07 

Motor Vehicle and Traffic Bylaws 

EXCO 233/06/07 

Promulgated on 11/03/10 

25 

E - 04/04/08 

C - 07/04/08 

Delegation of Powers Bylaws 

EXCO 321/07/08 

Promulgated on 11/03/10 


Table 98: Bylaws adopted since 2003 to current 

3.11. PUBLIC 

PARTICIPATION 

ANALYSIS 

The uMlalazi Conrimunication Plan was completed in 2007 and 

subsequently revised. 

The Objectives of the Communication Plan are: 

3.11.1. PUBLIC EDUCATION 

■ To educate the community about the roles, functions and 
processes of Council. 

■ To develop and maintain correct public perception on 
government delivery. 

■ To forge links with the media. 

■ To educate the people about their rights and obligations, more 
especially, on the kind and quality of services they are entitled 
to, and understand why they have to pay for these services. 

■ To inform the community about the kind of services provided 
by the municipality vis-a-vis those delivered by the provincial 
and government, and the costs thereof. 

■ To enhance communication between the three spheres of 
government and all the stakeholders. 

3.11.2. PUBLIC 
PARTICIPATION 

■ To inform the community about the resolutions and programs 
of Council. 

■ To foster healthy relations with the communities so that they 
identify with Council. 


■ To encourage public involvement in the ’"activities of 
the municipality. 

■ To produce an informed and responsive citizenry capable of 
making a meaningful contribution to the work of Council. 

■ To ensure that the community is at the center of developmental 
programs of their local government. 

3.11.3. PERFORMANCE 
MANAGEMENT 

■ To improve communication and efficiency within Council. 

■ To show case (exhibit) the achievements of the municipality. 

■ To receive and provide feedback (evaluation) about 
municipal programmes. 

■ To reassure people that Council cares and works hard to solve 
their problems. 

3.1 1.A. MARKETING/ 
BRANDING 

■ To position the uMlalazi Municipal Council as a professional 
organization. 

■ To improve the corporate image of Council. 

■ To brand uMlalazi Municipality as a premier destination for 
leisure, business and residence. 

■ To market the municipal area to current and potential residents, 
tourists and investors. 

As indicated previously, the following Structures have been 

established to ensure effective and efficient public participation 

around planning and development that affect people's lives: 


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STRUCTURE 

STATUS 1 

IDP Representative Forum 

Functional 

Road Shows 

Functional 

Ward Committees 

Established and Functional 

Izimbizos 

Functional 

Ward-based Planning forum 

Still to be established 


Table 99: Public Participation Structures 

In addition to the above structures, the media is also used to 
distribute information to communities and to notify them of 
meetings or workshops. Media includes radio, newspapers, 
posters and leaflets. 

3.12. GOOD 
GOVERNANCEAND 
PUBLIC PARTICIPATION: 
SWOT ANALYSIS 

3.12.1. STRENGTHS/ 
OPPORTUNITIES 

■ Committed staff and Councillors 

■ Established and functional Ward Committees 

■ Twinning Agreement with Geel Local Authority in Belgium offers 
unique opportunities to learn from each other. 

3.12.2. WEAKNESSES/ 
THREATS 

■ Inadequate training and development of staff and councillors 

■ No succession plan in place 

■ Poor risk management 

■ Lack in capacity to enforce all Bylaws 

■ Poor inter-departmental and external communication 

■ Lack of funds 

■ IGR relatively poor 

3.13. COMBINED 
SWOT ANALYSIS 

3.13.1. STRENGTHS 

■ Coastline 

■ Transportation routes (N2, R3A, R66, P230, P2A0, P50) 

■ Conservancies, Protected Areas, Wetlands - 
Mbongolwane, Forests 


■ Medicinal plants 

■ Cultural Heritage 

■ Sound financial management system 

■ Municipal-owned land 

■ Dam 

■ Access to social grants 

■ Stability of Municipal Management 

3.13.2. WEAKNESSES 

■ Problematic access to community facilities (creches and clinics) 

■ No formal rural cemeteries 

■ Lack of Tertiary education facilities 

■ Unskilled labour 

■ Lack of institutional Capacity (internal) - vacant posts; critical 
posts of legal services and Development and Planning, Internal 
Audit, Contract manager; enforcement of bylaws 

■ Backlogs in basic services in rural areas 

■ Rural access roads are in a poor state of repair 

■ Decline in the transport sector 

■ Shelter and toilets lacking at pension payout points 

■ Reliance on sugar cane for agriculture 

■ Limited growth in the manufacturing industry 

■ Retention of technical Staff 

■ Contract Management - needs assessment, policy, reporting 
and monitoring, supervision 

■ Inadequate training and development of staff 

■ No succession plan 

■ Unfunded mandates 

■ Lack of office space in general 

■ Two Civic Centres in Eshowe Town 

■ Non-standardisation of IT equipment and software 

■ Inadequate maintenance of Municipal Roads in urban areas 

■ Poor Intergovernmental Relations 

■ Inadequate infrastructure to attract investment 

■ Non-functionality of Ward Committees 

3.13.3. OPPORTUNITIES 

■ Tourism and recreational facilities 

■ Development along movement corridors 

■ Traditional Medicine 

■ Large labour force 

■ Primary Agriculture and Agri-processing 

■ Recycling of waste 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 1 6A 

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Section C: Spatial Analysis 


■ Biodiversity rich 

■ Cultural Heritage 

■ Mining 

■ Industrial development 

■ Cell Phone Access - 85% 

3.1A. BROAD KEY 
CHALLENGES 

3.1A.1.KPA1: MUNICIPAL 
TRANSFORMATION 
AND ORGANISATIONAL 
DEVELOPMENT 

■ Insufficient Human Resource Capacity 

■ Insufficient Skills Development 

■ Outdated and Inadequate Policies 

■ Poor Performance of Service Providers 

■ Outdated ICT Systems 

■ Ineffective Internal and external Communication 

■ Non achievement of Employment equity Targets 

■ Inadequate office space 

3.14.2. KPA2; 

SERVICE DELIVERY 

■ Service Delivery Backlogs 

■ Lack of formalized trading areas 

■ Poor quality workmanship on Capital Projects 

■ Ineffective Disaster Management 

■ Ineffective Sukuma Sakhe program 

■ Lack of Planning for Cemetery needs 

■ Lack of Sports development and planning 

■ Crime 

■ Poor facilitation of early childhood development 


3.1A.3. KPA3: 

LOCAL ECONOMIC AND 
SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT 

■ Slow progress on LED & Tourism Development in uMlalazi 
Municipality area 

■ Unemployment 

3.1AA KPAA: MUNICIPAL 
FINANCIAL VIABILITY AND 
MANAGEMENT 

■ Insufficient measures in place to ensure financial sustainability 
is maintained 

■ Inadequate financial performance 

■ Noncompliance with SDBIP 

3.1A.5. KPA5: 

GOOD GOVERNANCE AND 
PUBLIC PARTICIPATION 

■ Unqualified Audit Opinion 

■ Poor participation in HIV/Aids Programmes 

■ Inadequate Risk Reduction measures in place 

■ Poor Public participation initiatives 

■ Lack of outcome on International and National Relations 

■ Ineffective oversight 

3.14.6. KPA6;CROSS 
CUTTING ISSUES 

■ Fragmented or adhoc Planning 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 





SOUTH AFRICA 



Section D. 




167 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT 

oc><x>oo<xxx>o<x> 



4. Vision and 
Mission and Goals 
and Objectives 


4.1. STRATEGIC 
DEVELOPMENT 
RATIONALE: 
COMPARATIVE 
ADVANTAGE AREAS 


The Strategic Development Rationale puts forward an 
incremental development approach, where the upgrading of 
existing services and provision of new services is focused in 
specific areas according to settlement and nodal classification 
and according to areas where there is already economic growth 
or the potential for economic growth. 

The Strategic Development Rationale also recognises the need 
for the Municipality to build strong public - public (between 
local, district, provincial and national government) and public 
- private partnerships. This component is essential to ensure 
that obstacles are identified and dealt with - procedural, human 
resource as well as financial. 

4.1.1. IDENTIFIED 
COMPARATIVE ADVANTAGES 

■ Pristine Coastline of approximately 1 7kms 

■ Excellent biodiversity 

■ Goedertrouw/Phobane Dam 

■ Siyaya Coastal Reserve (the uMlalazi Reserve and the 
Amatikulu Reserve) 

■ Four Conservation Areas (Entumeni Nature Reserve, 
Mbongolwane Wetland, Ongoye and Dhlinza Forests) 

■ N2 National Road traverses through the Municipal Area along 
its south-eastern boundary 

■ The R66 Main Road traverses through the center of the 
municipal area from south to north, providing a road link 
between Durban, Ulundi and Vryheid. 

■ The municipality is located adjacent and to the south of one 
of the fastest growing urban centers in South Africa, namely 
Richards Bay - Empangeni. 

■ The municipal area is rich in historical and cultural assets. 


The Strategic Development Rationale provides the overall 
approach to the Development of the uMlalazi Municipal Area. 
This Rationale forms the premise for the Spatial Development 
Framework. The rational has both physical and institutional 
components, i.e. it focuses on the structuring of the urban 
and rural form to overcome developmental problems and 
address key priorities and needs as well as the institutional 
requirements in terms of resourcing (human and financial) to 
attain the aforesaid. 

The key aspect to the Strategic Development Rationale is 
to focus on those components, elements or areas that will 
provide the highest impact in terms of sustainable development 
contributing towards local economic development and in a 
substantial increase in the living standard of people residing 
in the municipal area, as well as the financial viability of the 
municipality itself. This cannot be attained without financial 
inputs while the effective use of such financial inputs cannot 
be done without a Council that is empowered to make efficient 
and effective use of scarce resources. 

The Strategic Development Rationale for UMlalazi is supported 
through the development of a hierarchy of nodes (as proposed 
through the revised 5DF). These nodes will form the focal 
points for development and service provision, to ensure access 
to social and economic opportunities for the entire area. The 
concentration of activities in and around nodes will stimulate 
a higher order of activities and development. Access to social 
and economic opportunities at such nodal areas will have to be 
managed and supported to ensure its efficiency. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 1 68 

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Section D: Vision and Mission And Goals And Objectives 


4.2. MUNICIPAL VISION AND MISSION 

4.2.1 . THE MUNICIPAL VISION 

The Vision is seen as the ultimate destination in terms of the IDP Process, with the Key Performance Areas, Development Strategies 
and Objectives, and projects being the steps required to reach the vision or destination. The vision is the overall developmental aim 
for the municipality for up the year 2030, as this is also the vision period within the KZN PGD5. 

The long-term vision for the uMlalazi is as follows: 


VISION 

Jo provide sustainable services and development to all communities 
by 2030 with emphasis on infrastructure, social and 
economic development in a safe and healthy environment 
managed by visionary and ethical leadership" 


A.2.2. THE MUNICIPAL MISSION 


■ To develop the institution and to facilitate institutional transformation. 

■ To provide infrastructure and services to all, with emphasis on rural communities, in a sustainable manner. 


■ To develop and support sustainable local economic development , through focusing on tourism, agriculture 
development, industrial development which incorporates the youth. 

■ To develop and support social development initiatives, particularly those focused on the youth and 
the vulnerable. 


■ To ensure good governance through leadership excellence and community participation. 

■ To ensure continued sound financial management. 




■ To ensure effective and efficient Land Use Management, taking cognizance of sound environmental practices. 

■ To support job creation through employment programmes. 




Figure 40: Municipal Mission 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 


4.3. CROSS BOARDER ALIGNMENT WITH 
NATIONAL OUTCOMES AND PROVINCIAL GOALS 
AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES 


NATIONALOUTCOMES 


Outcome k\ Decent 
employment through 
inclusive economic growth. 

Outcome 5: A skilled 
and capable workforce 
to support an 
inclusive growth. 


Outcome 8: Sustainable 
Human Settlements 
and improved quality of 
household life. 

Outcome 9: Responsive 
accountability, effective 
and efficient local 
government system. 


KZN GOALS KEY PERFORMANCE MUNICIPAL STRATEGIC GOALS 

AREA VISA VIZ BACK- 
TO-BASICS PROGRAM 


2: Human Resource 
Development. 

1: Job Creation 


A: Strategic 
Infrastructure 

1: Job Creation 


KPA 1: Municipal 
Transformational 
and Institutional 
Development 

B2B: Building capable 
institutions and 
Administrations 


KPA 2: Basic 
Service Delivery 
and Infrastructural 
Development. 

B2B: Creating decent 
living conditions. 


■ To improve Service Delivery and the image of 
uMlalazi Municipality. 

■ Organisational Skills Development and 
Capacity Building. 

■ Policy Development. 

■ To Improve Contract Management. 

■ Improve ICT Systems within the Municipality 
(Computer Audits, Document Management 
Systems, Communication Plan, Switchboard, 
Website). 

■ Ensure effective and efficient Municipal 
Administration and Communication. 

■ Strengthen and Improve Employment Equity 
in the Municipality. 

■ To Expand the existing Municipal 
infrastructure / buildings. 

■ To provide Basic Services to all households 
and address Service Delivery Backlogs. 

■ Facilitate with uThungulu to ensure 
alignment of water and sanitation 
provisioning to all Municipal Capital and 
other large scale Projects. 

■ Facilitate with Eskom to ensure alignment of 
Electricity provisioning to all Municipal areas. 

■ Ensure the effectiveness of waste 
management services in all areas and 
the provision of recycling facilities at 
appropriate locations). 

■ Ensure the provision and maintenance 
of municipal roads, access roads 

and causeways. 

■ To facilitate adequate provisioning and 
management of community facilities at 
appropriate locations. 

■ Plan and support the acceleration of 
sustainable human settlement. 

■ Formalise trading areas in the 
Municipality area. 

■ Ensure quality control of 
infrastructure projects. 

■ Mitigate the effectiveness of disasters 

■ Facilitate the Implementation of Operation 
Sukuma Sakhe (Flagship Programme). 

■ Provide for the cemetery needs in the 
Municipal area. 

■ Contribute towards the development of 
Sports in the Municipal area. 

■ Contribute towards the prevention of Crime 

■ Facilitate early childhood development. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 1 70 

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Section D: Vision and Mission And Goals And Objectives 


NATIONALOUTCOMES 

KZN GOALS 

KEY PERFORMANCE 
AREA VISA VIZ BACK- 
TO-BASICS PROGRAM 

MUNICIPAL STRATEGIC GOALS 

Outcome k\ Decent 

3: Human and 

KPA 3: Local 

■ Local Economic Development. 

employment through 

Community 

Economic 

■ Contribute towards the reduction of 

inclusive economic growth. 

Development. 

Development. 

unemployment. 

Outcome 6: An efficient, 

1: Job Creation 

B2B: Creating decent 


competitive and 
responsive economic 
infrastructure network. 

7: Spatial Equity 

living conditions. 



5: Environmental 



Outcome 7: Vibrant, 
equitable and sustainable 
rural communities and food 
security for all. 

Sustainability 



Outcome 10: 

Environmental assets and 
natural resources that 
are well protected and 
continually enhanced. 




Outcome 13: Inclusive and 
responsive social system. 




Outcome 9: Responsive 

Governance and 

KPA k\ Municipal 

■ Advance and maintain the financial viability of 

accountability, effective and 

Policy 

Financial Viability 

the Municipality. 

efficient local government 


and Financial 

■ Improve the financial performance of the 

system. 


Management 

municipality. 

■ Optimise budget implementation in the 



B2B: Sound Financial 
Management 

municipality. 

Outcome 9: Responsive 

Governance and 

KPA 5: Good 

■ Clean Audit. 

accountability, effective 

Policy 

Governance and 

■ Mitigate the Impact of HIV/Aids in the 

and efficient local 


Public Participation 

Municipality area. 

government system. 


B2B: Putting 

■ To reduce Risk to the Organisation. 

■ Ensure that public participation structures are 

Outcome 12: An efficient. 


people first 

established, capacitated and functional. 

effective and development 



■ To Promote International and National 

orientated public service 



Relations. 

and an empowered, fair and 



■ To ensure effective oversight by the 

inclusive citizenship. 



Municipality. 

Outcome 1A: Nation 




Building and Social 

Cohesion. 





UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 







NATIONALOUTCOMES 

KZN GOALS 

KEY PERFORMANCE 
AREA VISA VIZ BACK- 
TO-BASICS PROGRAM 

MUNICIPAL STRATEGIC GOALS 

Outcome 12: An efficient, 
effective and development 
orientated public service 
and an empowered, fair and 
inclusive citizenship. 

7: Spatial Equity 

KPA6: Cross-Cutting 
Issues 

■ To ensure sustainable Planning and 
development of the municipal area. 

Outcome A: Decent 
employment through 
inclusive economic growth. 




Outcome 6: An efficient, 
competitive and responsive 
economic infrastructure 
network. 




Outcome 7: Vibrant, 
equitable and sustainable 
rural communities and food 
security for all. 




Outcome 10: 

Environmental assets and 
natural resources that 
are well protected and 
continually enhanced. 





Table 100: Cross Boarder Alignment 








Section D: Vision and Mission And Goals And Objectives 


4.4. PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT 
AREAS, DEVELOPMENT GOALS, STRATEGIES 
AND OBJECTIVES 


The Performance Management Areas, Development Strategies and Objectives, and Projects forthcoming from the IDP should support 
the vision and its elements, while the spatial development framework should be a spatial reflection of the vision and should give 
effect to the elements of the vision by guiding spatial development in the area. 


RESPONSIBLE 

NATIONAL 

KPA[R] 

NDPOBJEaiVE 

[R] 

STRATEGIC 

OBJEaiVE[R] 

MUNICIPAL KPA[R] 

KPI 

Office of 
the MM 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

To improve Service 
Delivery and the 
image of uMlalazi 
Municipality 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Fill all funded 
prioritized vacant posts in 
the organogram by 

30 June 2017. 

Corporate 

Services 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

To improve Service 
Delivery and the 
image of uMlalazi 
Municipality 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Review the Organisational 
structure and submit 
report to council by 

30 June 2017. 

Office of 
the MM 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

To improve Service 
Delivery and the 
image of uMlalazi 
Municipality 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Sign performance 
agreements with all 
section 56/57 managers 
by 31 July 2016. 

Corporate 

Services 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Organisational skills 
development and 
capacity building 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Submit quarterly reports 
to the LLF on intership, 
learnership and in-service 
trainings/programmes 
implemented. 

Corporate 

Services 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Organisational skills 
development and 
capacity building 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Training to be provided to 

50 staff by 30 June 2017. 

Office of 
the MM 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Strengthen 
and improve 
employment equity 
in the municipality 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

2 people from employment 
equity target groups 
to be employed in the 
three highest levels of 
management in compliance 
with approved equity plan 
by 30 June 2016. 

Corporate 

Services 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Strengthen 
and improve 
employment equity 
in the municipality 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Establish an Employment 
Equity Committee by 

31 December 2016. 

Office of 
the MM 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Effective and 
efficient Municipal 
Administration & 
Communication 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Compile at least 2 

Municipal newsletters 
by 30 June 2017. 

Corporate 

Services 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Policy Development 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Review 3 Budget related 
policies that were 
previously approved and 
submit to Council by 

31 March 2017. 

ALL 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

To improve Contract 
management 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Conduct needs 
assessments for use of 
Service Providers and 
submit to exco by 

31 December 2016. 


173 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

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RESPONSIBLE 

NATIONAL 

KPA[R] 

NDPOBJEaiVE 

[R] 

STRATEGIC 

OBJEaiVE[R] 

MUNICIPAL KPA[R] 

KPI 

Corporate 

Services 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

To improve Service 
Delivery and the 
image of uMlalazi 
Municipality 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Conduct community 
satisfaction survey and 
submit report to EXCO by 

31 March 2017. 

Corporate 

Services 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

To improve Service 
Delivery and the 
image of uMlalazi 
Municipality 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Conduct staff 
satisfaction survey and 
submit report to EXCO by 

31 March 2017. 

community 

Services 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

Social 

Protection 

To provide Fee 

Basic Services to all 
indigent households 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Provide free basic refuse 
services to 12 000 
indigent households in 
rural areas with available 
resources by 

30 June 2017. 

Engineering 

Services 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

Social 

Protection 

To provide Fee 

Basic Services to all 
indigent households 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Provide free basic 
electricity services to 

2300 indigent households 
by 30 June 2017 with 
available resources. 

Engineering 

Services 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

Economy and 
Development 

To facilitate with 
uThungulu to ensure 
alignment of water 
and sanitation 
provisioning to all 
Municipal Capital 
and other large 
scale Projects 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Attend meetings with 
uThungulu to ensure 
alignment of water and 
sanitation provisioning to 
all Municipal Capital and 
other large scale Projects 
and submit quarterly 
reports to Portfolio 
Committee on 
meetings attended. 

Engineering 

Services 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

Economy and 
Development 

To facilitate 
with Eskom to 
ensure alignment 
of electricity 
provisioning to all 
Municipal Wards 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Attend meetings 
with Eskom to ensure 
electricity provisioning 
in Municipal wards and 
submit quarterly reports 
to the Portfolio Committee 
on meetings attended. 

Engineering 

Services 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

Economy and 
Development 

To facilitate 
with Eskom to 
ensure alignment 
of electricity 
provisioning to all 
Municipal Wards 

Local Economic 
Development 

Investigate and implement 
green energy programmes 
in relation to energy 
saving projects such as 
solar water geysers and 
submit quarterly 
progress reports to 

Portfolio Committee. 

community 

services 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

Healthcare 
for all 

Ensure the 
effectiveness of 
waste management 
services in all areas 
and The provision of 
recycling facilities at 
appropriate locations) 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Raise awareness on 
recycling through 

A sessions with the 
community by 

30 June 2017 

community 

services 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

Healthcare 
for all 

Ensure the 
effectiveness of 
waste management 
services in all areas 
and the provision of 
recycling facilities at 
appropriate locations) 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Review the Integrated 
Waste Management Plan 
(to include recycling and 
buy-back centres) and 
submit to council by 

30 June 2017. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 1 7 A 

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Section D: Vision and Mission And Goals And Objectives 


RESPONSIBLE 

NATIONAL 

KPA[R] 

NDPOBJEaiVE 

[R] 

STRATEGIC 

OBJEaiVE[R] 

MUNICIPAL KPA[R] 

KPI 

Engineering 

Services 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Economy and 
Development 

To ensure the 
provision and 
maintenance of 
municipal roads, 
sidewalks and 
causeways 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Construct ISJkms of 
new roads as per planned 
projects by 30 June 201 7. 

Engineering 

Services 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Economy and 
Development 

To ensure the 
provision and 
maintenance of 
municipal roads, 
sidewalks and 
causeways 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Reseal 2km of surfaced 
roads by 30 June 2017. 

Engineering 

Services 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Economy and 
Development 

To ensure the 
provision and 
maintenance of 
municipal roads, 
sidewalks and 
causeways 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Grade 3400km of 
rural access roads by 

30 June 2017. 

Planning and 
Development 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Transforming 

Human 

Settlements 

To plan and support 
the acceleration of 
sustainable 
human settlements 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Review Housing Sector 

Plan and submit to Council 
by 30 June 2017. 

ALL 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Healthcare 
for all 

Facilitate the 
Implementation 
of Operation 

Sukuma Sakhe 
(Flagship Programme 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Submit quarterly 
consolidated reports to 
EXCO on mentorship 
assistance provided to all 
War Rooms in uMlalazi 
Municipality in terms of 
Operation Sukuma 

Sakhe programme. 

community 

services 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Economy and 
Development 

To facilitate adequate 
provisioning and 
management of 
community facilities 
under the ownership 
of uMlalazi 

Municipality at 
appropriate locations 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Appoint caretakers 26 
caretakers by 31 March 

2016 for the maintenance 
of rural community facilities. 

Planning and 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Building Safer 
Communities 

Formalise trading 
areas in the 
Municipality area 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Provide 1 5 commuter and 
trading shelters in KDS by 

31 March 2017. 

Planning and 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Building Safer 
Communities 

Formalise trading 
areas in the 
Municipality area 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Provide 4 food safety 
training sessions to 
informal food traders by 

30 June 2016. 

Engineering 

Services 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Building Safer 
Communities 

Ensure quality 
control of 

infrastructure projects 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Undertake at least 100 
site visits to Capital 
projects by 30 June 201 7. 

Protection 

Services 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Building Safer 
Communities 

Mitigate the 
effectiveness 
of disasters 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Hold quarterly meetings 
with applicable 
stakeholders to 
discuss disaster 
management issues. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 









RESPONSIBLE 

NATIONAL 

KPA[R] 

NDPOBJEaiVE 

[R] 

STRATEGIC 

OBJEaiVE[R] 

MUNICIPAL KPA[R] 

KPI 

Protection 

Services 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Building Safer 
Communities 

Mitigate the 
effectiveness of 
disasters 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Execute 2 emergency 
exercises by 30 June 201 7. 

Connnnunitv 

Services 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Inclusive 

Rural Economy 

Provide for the 
cemetery needs in 
the Municipal area 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Develop a cemetery plan 
for the next five years 
to accommodate future 
cemetery needs and 
submit to EXCO by 

31 March 2017. 

Community 

Services 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Economy and 
Development 

Contribute towards 
the development 
of Sports in the 
Municipal area 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Develop a plan for sports 
development for the next 
five years and submit to 
EXCO by 31 March 2017. 

Protection 

Services 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Building Safer 
Communities 

Contribute towards 
the prevention of 
Crime 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Report quarterly to the 
Portfolio Committee 
on crime prevention 
strategies implemented 
in partnership with the 
relevant stakeholders. 

Community 

Services 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Improving 
Education, 
training 
and innovation 

Facilitate early 

childhood 

development 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 

Visit all creches in 26 

Wards by 30 June 201 7 to 
monitor the healthiness 
of the environment for 
childhood development. 

Planning and 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Economy and 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Assist 5 Tourism BEE 
entrepreneurs with 
starting growing 
businesses e.g. Research, 
business plans and 
skills development by 
30/6/2017. 

Planning and 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Economy and 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Carry out 5 workshops 
to promote skills 
development and support 
the Tourism 5MME 
business scetor by 

30 June 2017. 

Planning and 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Economy and 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Carry out A tourism 
promotional activities in 
the print and other media 
by 30 June 2017. 

Planning and 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Economy and 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Assist 10 youth BEE 
entrepreneurs with 
starting growing 
businesses e.g. Research, 
business plans and 
skills development by 

30 June 2017. 

Planning and 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Economy and 
Development 

To ensure that 
businesses within 
uMlalazi Municipality 
are licensed through 
the LED department 

Local Economic 
Development 

Develop a database of 
businesses licenced in 
uMlalazi Municipality and 
submit quarterly reports 
to Portfolio Committee. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 176 

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Section D: Vision and Mission And Goals And Objectives 


RESPONSIBLE 

NATIONAL 

KPA[R] 

NDPOBJEaiVE 

[R] 

STRATEGIC 

OBJEaiVE[R] 

MUNICIPAL KPA[R] 

KPI 

Community 

Services 

Local Economic 
Development 

Economy and 
Development 

To contribute 
towards the 
reduction of 
unemployment 

Local Economic 
Development 

Number of temporary 
job opportunities created 
through EPWP projects 
and other operational 
projects by 30 June 201 7. 

Finance 

Municipal 

Financial 

Viability and 
Management 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Advance and 
maintain the 
financial viability of 
the Municipality 

Municipal Financial 
Viability and 
Management 

Achieve a debtors 
payment percentage of 

95% at 30 June 2017 
(Gross Debtors Opening 
Balance + Billed Revenue 
- Gross Debtors Closing 
Balance - Bad Debts 

Written Off / Billed 

Revenue x 100). 

Finance 

Municipal 

Financial 

Viability and 
Management 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Advance and 
maintain the 
financial viability of 
the Municipality 

Municipal Financial 
Viability and 
Management 

Financial viability 
measured in terms of 
the available cash to 
cover fixed operating 
expenditure as at 30 

June 2017 ((Available 
cash+ investments)/ 
Monthly fixed operating 
expenditure). 

Engineering 

Services 

Municipal 

Financial 

Viability and 
Management 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Improve the financial 
performance of the 
municipality 

Municipal Financial 
Viability and 
Management 

Limit unaccounted for 
electricity to less than 

8% by 30 June 201 7 
{(Number of Electricity 

Units Purchased and/ 
or Generated - Number 
of Electricity Units Sold) 

/ Number of Electricity 

Units Purchased and/or 
Generated) x 100} 

All 

Municipal 

Financial 

Viability and 
Management 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Optimise budget 
implementation in 
the municipality 

Municipal Financial 
Viability and 
Management 

Spend at least 90% of the 
Capital budget amount 
by 30 June 2017 (Actual 
expenditure/Approved 
capital budget). 

Office of 
the MM 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Effective Municipal 
Oversight 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Review Top Layer SDBIP 
and submit to Council by 

2A February 2017. 

Office of 
the MM 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Effective Municipal 
Oversight 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Submit Quarterly reports 
on the actual performance 
achieved against the 

Top layer SDBIP targets 
to Council. 

Office of 
the MM 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Effective Municipal 
Oversight 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Submit the annual 
performance report to AG 
by 31 August 2016. 

Office of 
the MM 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Effective Municipal 
Oversight 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Submit the annual 
financial statements by 

31 August 2016 to the 

Office of the Auditor-General. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 









RESPONSIBLE 

NATIONAL 

KPA[R] 

NDPOBJEaiVE 

[R] 

STRATEGIC 

OBJEaiVE[R] 

MUNICIPAL KPA[R] 

KPI 

Office of 
the MM 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Effective Municipal 
Oversight 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Submit Oversight Report 
of annual report to council 
by 31 March 2017. 

Office of 
the MM 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

To effectively 
Implement the 

Back to Basics 
programme 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Submit quarterly 
reports to exco on the 
implementation of Back to 
Basics programme. 

Office of 
the MM 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

To Obtain Clean 

Audit 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Submit reports to EXCO 
on the measures taken 
to ensure that matters 
raised in the 2015/16 

Audit have been resolved 
in order to ensure that 
the Municipality receives / 
maintains a Clean Audit in 
2016/2017. 

Office of 
the MM 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Mitigate the Impact 
of HIV/Aids in the 
Municipality area 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Coordinate quarterly 
meetings of the uMlalazi 
Aids Council. 

Office of 
the MM 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Mitigate the Impact 
of HIV/Aids in the 
Municipality area 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Review HIV/Aids Plan 
and submit to exco by 

30 June 2017. 

Office of 
the MM 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

To reduce Risk to 
the Organisation 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Review Enterprise Risk 

Plan and submit to exco 
by 30 June 2017. 

Office of 
the MM 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

To reduce Risk to 
the Organisation 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Review Fraud Risk Plan 
and submit to exco by 

30 June 2017. 

Office of 
the MM 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Ensure that public 
participation 
structures are 
established, 
capacitated 
and functional 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Hold meetings with 
stakeholders and 
ward committee to 
communicate the IDP 
process plan. 

Office of 
the MM 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Ensure that public 
participation 
structures are 
established, 
capacitated 
and functional 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Submit quarterly 
reports to EXCO on the 
functionality of all Ward 
Committees (include 
training and development). 

Office of 
the MM 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

To promote 
International and 
National Relations 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Submit a report to 

MCORby 30 June 2017 
on the progress made 
with the Twinning 
partnership with Songdal 
Municipality (Norway). 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 1 78 

>^<>0<XXXXXXX>000000000000 









Section D: Vision and Mission And Goals And Objectives 


RESPONSIBLE 

NATIONAL 

KPA[R] 

NDPOBJEaiVE 

[R] 

STRATEGIC 

OBJEaiVE[R] 

MUNICIPAL KPA[R] 

KPI 

Planning and 
development 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

To promote 
sustainable 
development 

Cross 

Cutting Issues 

Compile a Town 

Planning Register for 
the 2016/201 7 financial 
year on all Town Planning 
applications being 
processed and their 
status and submit 
quarterly reports to the 
Portfolio Committee. 

Planning and 
development 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

To promote integrated 
development planning 

Cross 

Cutting Issues 

Review uMlalazi 

Municipality IDP for 

201 7/2018 and submit to 
Council by 30 June 2017. 


Table 101: Strategic Focus Areas, Development Goals, Strategies and Objectives 
















Section E: 




5 . 1 Strategic Mapping 


5.1.1. DEVELOPMENT CENTRES 

5.1. 1.1. PRIMARY ADMINISTRATION CENTRE 

Eshowe is the most dominant urban area within the uMlalazi Municipality and is referred to as the Primary Administration Centre, 
owing to its diverse economy (when compared to the other main centers), superior level of infrastructure and service, and sphere 
of influence. 


5.I.I.2. SECONDARY CENTRES 

These settlements are the key links to the rural hinterland, as they are the only "trading posts" for these areas. 

The definitive reason behind these towns being classified as Secondary Centres, is their development potential as well the thresholds 
of service that exist which are significant smaller to those within the major town centre of Eshowe. 

There are two types of Secondary Centres within the uMlalazi Context i.e. Upper Secondary Centres and Lower Secondary Centres. 

The Upper Secondary Centers are important at a municipal level and reflect minimum levels of economic diversification, where 
limited tertiary services are available and marginal value-adding activities take place. These include: 


NAME 

LOCATION/DESCRIPTION 

Mtunzini 

This town is well established and offers a modern residential environment. It is attractive from 
the point of view that is located on the Indian Ocean. The business infrastructure is relatively 
poorly developed and little employment opportunities exist. The town serves as a dormitory 
town for the University of Zululand and the urban areas of Richards Bay and Empangeni. The 
center is located in proximity to both the R102 and N2 Motorway, allowing significant mobility 
for commuters 

Gingindlovu 

The town is located at the intersection between the R102 and the R66, with the N2 Motorway 
in proximity. Importantly, the N2 Motorway can be accessed or left in proximity to Gingindlovu. 

The center provides a high level of services from an engineering point of view, but social services 
are somewhat lacking. It is in competition with both Mtunzini and Eshowe internally and 
externally with Mandeni. 


Table 102: Upper Secondary Centres 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 1 82 

-^<X>000<XXXX>000000000000 





Section E: Strategic Mapping 


Lower Secondary Centres are a number of smaller settlements within the Municipality which have developed as a result of population 
concentration. These minor centres service the adjacent rural areas and are complimented by basic engineering services/infrastructure 
and community facilities, transport nodes and basic public and administration facilities. They include: 


LOCATION/DESCRIPTION 


NAME 

LOCATION/DESCRIPTION 

Nqutshini 

Located in proximity to the R34 and N2 Motorway between Gingindlovu and Empangeni/ 

Richards Bay. It is a center, which has developed as a result of proximity to both Gingindlovu and 
Mtunzini, where a higher level of services is available. The proximity to both the R102 and the 

N2 Motorway has also influenced the development of this area as a Secondary Centre. 

Ndlangubo 

This centre is located on the P230, between Empangeni/Ngwelezane and the R66. The P230 
links with the R66 approximately 10km north of Eshowe. It is an important transportation route 
and is also an identified tertiary corridor. The importance of this route is that it shortens the 
traveling distance between Richards Bay/Empangeni and Eshowe, as it offers a more direct 
route than the R34 and R66. The R34 is a Primary Corridor and has a tarred surface. On the 
other hand, the P230 is a gravel-surfaced road, which is in a poor condition in certain areas. 

Nkume 

Along the R66, approximately 10km north of Eshowe. This settlement has grown rapidly 
over the past 5 years and certainly constitutes an emerging settlement. The proximity of this 
center to the junction between the P230 and the R66 has influenced the development thereof. 
Proximity to Eshowe as the economic hub of the area makes the center a popular destination in 
respect of residential accommodation. 

Mbongolwane 

The area is also an emerging development node with a hospital and other community facilities 
centered therein. It is located approximately 25km to the west of Eshowe, on the P50. The P50 
also links Eshowe and Nkandia, further to the north-west of Eshowe. 

Khomo 

This center is located on the uMlalazi/NkandIa Local Municipality border and is closer to Nkandia 
than Eshowe. It is located in proximity to the P50, at the PI 5 and P50 split. The P50 is a 
Secondary Corridor from a transportation point of view. 


Table 103: Lower Secondary Centres 




5.1.13. TERTIARY CENTRES 

In general terms, the Tertiary Centres are emerging centers characterised by population densification, with basic administrative 
functions being available. There are localized services such as a primary school, a pension pay point, postal service, public phones, 
local (informal) markets, transport facilities and minor commercial enterprises. 

It is again of significance to note that the Tertiary Centers are also located on or near important transportation routes. These include: 


NAME 

LOCATION/DESCRIPTION 

Nkwaleni 

This centre has a strategic locality, as it is located at the junction between the R34 from 

Empangeni and the R66 between Eshowe and Melmoth. It is a highly accessible center and 
development in and around it should be encouraged. It is surrounded by commercial farming 
areas and has been slow to develop, given its strategic locality. A police station was in existence 
in this center, but was closed down. The reason for its slow development can be ascribed to the 
fact that the centre is approximately 30km north of Eshowe and that the commercial farmers 
have a high ratio of vehicular ownership, allowing for a high level of mobility. Travel by road in a 
privately owned vehicle to Eshowe, is therefore no obstacle. 

Nteneshane 

It is located in the east of the municipal area on the D518, which links the R102 and the P230, 
both roads being tertiary transportation corridors. These roads have played a significant role in 
the establishment of this centre. It however is in proximity to Ngwelezane and Empangeni, and 
development in this center will in all likelihood be slow. 

Ondini 

This centre is located on the P230, almost midway between Empangeni and Eshowe. The role 
that the P230 is fulfilling in the context of linking settlements again comes to the forefront. 

Development may be regarded as a result of proximity to Ndlangubo, a Secondary Centre. 

Oquqeni 

It is also a centre that is located on the P230, further underlining the importance of this 
transportation route as a functional route. The rate of development of this center may also be 
regarded as a result of proximity to Nkume, a Secondary Centre. 

Ziphambanwani 

This centre is emerging as a Tertiary Centre because of its locality on the R66, midway between 

Gingindlovu and Eshowe. Ease of access to both Eshowe (The Primary Administrative Centre) 
and Gingindlovu (Secondary Centre) will popularie this center. It is also located at the junction 
between the D88A and the R66, the first mentioned road linking the R1 02 and the R66. 

Nyanini 

It is only a few kilometres to the south-east of Eshowe on the R66. Proximity to the Primary 

Administrative Centre will tend to slow the tempo of development in this center. 

Impatala 

It is located to the west of Eshowe, on the P50, a secondary transportation corridor. It is located 
midway between Mbongolwane (Secondary Centre) and Eshowe (Primary Administrative 

Centre). Development is therefore expected to be slow. 

Nkulisbantwana 

It is located at the junction between the D356, a tertiary transportation corridor linking 

Eshowe with the P710, and the P710, a secondary transportation corridor to the west and 
south-west of Eshowe. The importance of a locality on or near important transportation routes 
is again emphasised. 

Shayinga 

This centre is also located on the P710 and is in relative close proximity to Nkulisbantwana to 
the north of it. 

Samungu 

This centre is located on the D356 and is showing a steady population growth rate over the past 
five (5) years. 

Danyini 

It is also located on the D356, in relative close proximity to Eshowe. It can be expected that the 
growth rate will be slow, given the proximity to Eshowe and the proximity to Samungu, which is 
showing a faster growth rate. 


LOCATION/DESCRIPTION 


Table 104: Tertiary Centres 

UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 1 8A 

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Section E: Strategic Mapping 


5.1.2. DEVELOPMENT CORRIDORS 

The definition and (and even ranking) of the above mentioned Development Centres is highly influenced by the transport routes 
that service them. The uMlalazi Integrated Development Plan has identified a number of roads for as part of their Development 
Corridor network based on condition of roads, level of access afforded by the roads and its importance at a district/regional scale. 

5.1. 2.1. PRIMARY CORRIDORS 


NAME 

LOCATION/DESCRIPTION 

The N2 Highway (and R102) 

The two routes are aligned parallel to each other in the south-eastern sector of the uMlalazi 
municipal area. It offers access to Richards Bay/Empangeni, as well as the three Secondary 
Centres (Gingindlovu, Nqutshini and Mtunzini). 

The R66 

The R68 can be considered to be an as important transportation route within the uMlalazi Area 
as the N2 Highway. Emphasis is placed on the R66 in that it forms an almost central spine 
through the municipal area as well the location of the Primary Administrative Centre, two 
Secondary Centers and three Tertiary Centers on it. It is a road that links the uMlalazi Area with 
the rest of the KwaZulu Natal interior and with the N2 Highway which in turn links to Richards 
Bay/Empangeni to the north, and Durban to the south. 

The R34 

This route is located in the north of the municipal area and is the current most effective link 
between The R66 (between Melmoth and Eshowe) and Richards Bay Empangeni. Only one 
Tertiary Centre has been identified in relation to this road (Nkwaleni). The reason is the fact that 
the area, within which this road is aligned through the uMlalazi Local Municipality, is dominated 
by commercial farming, which discourages nodal development. The importance of this road is in 
its link with the District Centre of Richards Bay/Empangeni. 


Table 105: Primary Corridors 


5.I.2.2. SECONDARY CORRIDORS 


NAME 

LOCATION/DESCRIPTION 

The P710 

This route is aligned along the western/south-western boundary of the municipal area. It links 
Mandeni to the south of Eshowe, with Mbongolwane, a Secondary Centre. Two other Tertiary 
Centers are located along the route. The road is presently gravel-surfaced, and has been 
identified in the uMlalazi IDP for upgrading by means of tarring. The route serves the farming 
areas alongside it as well as scattered human settlements. 

The P50 

This route links Eshowe and Nkandia to the north-west of Eshowe. It also links Entumeni 
with Eshowe and Mbongolwane is on this route. This corridor services an agricultural area 
of considerable size and will become increasingly important with the implementation of the 
Mbambiswano/Entumeni Agricultural project. The route is aligned through areas of outstanding 
agricultural quality. 

The PI 5 

This corridor establishes a road link between Kranskop and the P50. It is aligned through areas 
that accommodate the poorer section of the uMlalazi population. The road is generally in a 
poor condition and has a gravel surface. If improved to an acceptable standard, it will encourage 
traffic movement between the areas of Greytown/Kranskop. and Eshowe, as it will shorten the 
traveling distance to a considerable extent. The route also serves farming areas and areas of 
human settlement. 


Table 106: Secondary Corridors 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 








5.1.23. TERTIARY CORRIDORS 


NAME 

LOCATION/DESCRIPTION 

The P230 

This is identified as a Tertiary Corridor for the present, but it is expected that this route, which 
is identified for upgrading will develop over the medium term into a Secondary Corridor. Not 
only the improved condition of the road will contribute to this, but also there are already two 
Secondary Centres (Ndlangubo and Nkumo) and two Tertiary Centers (Ondini and Oquqeni), 
located along it. It is also a route, which is used extensively by tourists visiting the area. Added 
to this, it presents a shorter travelling distance between Richards Bay/Empangeni and Eshowe, 
when compared to the R34. The alternative route is the R34, which is aligned to the north of the 
municipal area and has a tarred surface. 

The D528 

This tertiary corridor links the R102 (Primary Corridor) with the P230 and is aligned through an 
area of agricultural production to the east of the Ongoye Forest. The importance of this corridor 
is the link it provides between the two aforesaid corridors. 

The D356 

This tertiary corridor is aligned between Eshowe and the P710 and serves some scattered 
human settlements and areas of agricultural production. 


Table 107: Tertiary Corridors 




Section E: Strategic Mapping 



I 

t 




I 


Map 32: Nodes and Settlements 


1 87 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

o<xxxxxx>ooooooo<xxx>oo<xx>oc 


eswwTowK 




Map 33: Corridors 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 1 88 

:>00<x>0<><X><XxX><><>0<X>00<>0<>^^ 




Section E: Strategic Mapping 





Map 34: Areas with Socio-economic Needs 


1 89 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

o<xxxxxx>ooooooo<xxx>oo<xx>o< 





J 

I 


I 

I 


i 

i 

i 

f 

i 

1 

I 






Map 35: Areas with Infrastructural Needs 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 1 90 

:>00<x>00<XxXxX>000<X>00000000 





Section E: Strategic Mapping 


aw 

ai. 


IP 


< ■5 - 


i 



rvi 

I 

I 


I 

I 

9 


I 

i 






Map 36: Land Capability for Agricultural Development in Relation to Poverty 


191 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

0<XXXXXX>O<>OO<>OO<X><X>O<X><>Ov 






Map 37: Population Density and Access to Nodes 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 1 92 

0<XX>00<XXXXXXX>00000000000 




Section E: Strategic Mapping 






Map 38: Intervention Areas: Human Resources and Community Development 


1 93 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

0<XXXXXX>O<>OO<>OO<X><X>O<X><>Ov 






Map 39: Intervention Areas: Job Creation 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 1 9A 

0<XX>00<XXXXXXX>00000000000 



Section E: Strategic Mapping 




DQQi'D 


Map 40: Combined Focus Areas 


1 95 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

o<xxxxxx>oooooooo<xx>ooooooc 



5.2 ImpkmenMion Plan 


5.2. IMPLEMENTATION PLAN 


The following sets out the uMlalazi Municipality's Implementation Plan for 2016/201 7: 


REF 


NATIONAL 

OUTCOME 

[R] 

NATIONAL KPA 
[R] 

PRE- 
DETERMINED 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

NDP 

OBJECTIVE [R] 

STRATEGIC 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

MUNICIPAL 

KPA [R] 


1.1.1 

Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and 

accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government 
system 

Municipal 

Transformation 

and 

Institutional 

Development 

To improve 
Service Delivery 
and the image 
of uMlalazi 
Municipality 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

To improve 
Service Delivery 
and the image 
of uMlalazi 
Municipality 

Municipal 

Transformation 

and 

Institutional 

Development 


1.1.2 

Corporate 

Services 

A responsive 
and 

accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government 
system 

Municipal 

Transformation 

and 

Institutional 

Development 

To improve 
Service Delivery 
and the image 
of uMlalazi 
Municipality 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

To improve 
Service Delivery 
and the image 
of uMlalazi 
Municipality 

Municipal 

Transformation 

and 

Institutional 

Development 


1.1.3 

Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and 

accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government 
system 

Municipal 

Transformation 

and 

Institutional 

Development 

To improve 
Service Delivery 
and the image 
of uMlalazi 
Municipality 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

To improve 
Service Delivery 
and the image 
of uMlalazi 
Municipality 

Municipal 

Transformation 

and 

Institutional 

Development 


1.1.4 

Corporate 

Services 

A skilled 
and capable 
workforce 
to support 
inclusive 
growth 

Municipal 

Transformation 

and 

Institutional 

Development 

Organisational 

skills 

development 
and capacity 
building 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Organisational 

skills 

development 
and capacity 
building 

Municipal 

Transformation 

and 

Institutional 

Development 


1.1.5 

Corporate 

Services 

A responsive 
and 

accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government 
system 

Municipal 

Transformation 

and 

Institutional 

Development 

Organisational 

skills 

development 
and capacity 
building 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Organisational 

skills 

development 
and capacity 
building 

Municipal 

Transformation 

and 

Institutional 

Development 


1. 1.6.1 

Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and 

accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government 
system 

Municipal 

Transformation 

and 

Institutional 

Development 

Strengthen 
and improve 
employment 
equity in the 
municipality 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Strengthen 
and improve 
employment 
equity in the 
municipality 

Municipal 

Transformation 

and 

Institutional 

Development 



197 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

o<xxxxxx>oooooooo<xx>o<o><xx> 










UNrrOF KPI KPI ANNUAL 

MEASURMENT CALCULATION TARGET BUDGET 
TYPE [R] TYPE [R] 




Fill all funded 
prioritised vacant 
posts in the 
organogram by 

30 June 2017 

No. of funded 
prioritized 
vacant posts 
filled by 

30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

R 5 000 000 

2 

0 

0 

0 

0 


Review the 
Organisational 
structure and 
submit report 
to council by 

30 June 2017 

Organisational 
structure 
reviewed 
and report 
submitted to 
council by 

30 June 2017 

Stand-Alone 

Number 

R 4 880 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Sign performance 
agreements with 
all section 56/57 
managers by 

31 July 2016 

Number of 
performance 
agreements 
signed by 

31 July 2016 

Accumulative 

Number 

R4 560 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 


Submit quarterly 
reports to the 

LLF on intership, 
learnership and in- 
service trainings/ 
programmes 
implemented 

Number 
of reports 
submitted to 
the LLF by 

30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

R 194 400 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 


Training to be 
provided to 50 staff 
by 30 June 201 7 

Number 
of staff 
trained by 

30 June 2017 

Carry Over 

Number 

R511 910 

50 

50 

50 

50 

50 


2 people from 
employment equity 
target groups to 
be employed in the 
three highest levels 
of management in 
compliance with 
approved equity plan 
by 30 June 2016 

Number 
of people 
employed in 
terms of 

EEPby 

30 June 2017 

Carry Over 

Number 

R4 880 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 1 98 

-^<>000<XXXXX>000000000000 















Section E: Implementation Plan 


5.2. IMPLEMENTATION PLAN ...continued 


The following sets out the uMlalazi Municipality's Implementation Plan for 2016/201 7: 


REF 


NATIONAL 

OUTCOME 

[R] 

NATIONAL KPA 
[R] 

PRE- 
DETERMINED 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

NDP 

OBJECTIVE [R] 

STRATEGIC 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

MUNICIPAL 

KPA [R] 


1.1.62. 

Corporate 

Services 

A responsive 
and 

accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government 
system 

Municipal 

Transformation 

and 

Institutional 

Development 

Strengthen 
and improve 
employment 
equity in the 
municipality 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Strengthen 
and improve 
employment 
equity in the 
municipality 

Municipal 

Transformation 

and 

Institutional 

Development 


1.7 

Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and 

accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government 
system 

Municipal 

Transformation 

and 

Institutional 

Development 

Effective 
and efficient 
Municipal 
Administration 
and 

Communication 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Effective 
and efficient 
Municipal 
Administration 
& and 

Communication 

Municipal 

Transformation 

and 

Institutional 

Development 


1.8 

Corporate 

Services 

A responsive 
and 

accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government 
system 

Municipal 

Transformation 

and 

Institutional 

Development 

Policy 

Development 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Policy 

Development 

Municipal 

Transformation 

and 

Institutional 

Development 


1.9 

ALL 

A responsive 
and 

accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government 
system 

Municipal 

Transformation 

and 

Institutional 

Development 

To improve 

Contract 

management 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

To improve 

Contract 

management 

Municipal 

Transformation 

and 

Institutional 

Development 


1.10.1 

Corporate 

Services 

A responsive 
and 

accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government 
system 

Municipal 

Transformation 

and 

Institutional 

Development 

To improve 
Service Delivery 
and the image 
of uMlalazi 
Municipality 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

To improve 
Service Delivery 
and the image 
of uMlalazi 
Municipality 

Municipal 

Transformation 

and 

Institutional 

Development 


1.10.2 

Corporate 

Services 

A responsive 
and 

accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government 
system 

Municipal 

Transformation 

and 

Institutional 

Development 

To improve 
Service Delivery 
and the image 
of uMlalazi 
Municipality 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

To improve 
Service Delivery 
and the image 
of uMlalazi 
Municipality 

Municipal 

Transformation 

and 

Institutional 

Development 


2.1.1 

community 

Services 

Sustainable 

human 

settlements 

and improved 

quality of 

household 

life 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

To provide Fee 
Basic Services 
to all indigent 
households 

Social 

Protection 

To provide Fee 
Basic Services 
to all indigent 
households 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 



UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 










UNrrOF KPI KPI ANNUAL 

MEASURMENT CALCULATION TARGET BUDGET 
TYPE [R] TYPE [R] 




Establish an 
Employment Equity 
Committee by 31 
December 2016 

Employment 
Equity 
committee 
established by 
31 December 
2016 

Stand-Alone 

Number 

R A880 

1 

0 

0 

0 

0 


Compile at least 

2 Municipal 
newsletters by 30 
June 2017 

Number of 
municipal 
newsletters 
compiled by 

30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

R 2 000 000 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 


Review 3 Budget 
related policies that 
were previously 
approved and 
submit to Council 
by 31 March 2017 

Budget related 
policies 
reviewed and 
submitted to 
Council by 31 
March 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

R 4 880 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 


Conduct needs 
assessments for 
use of Service 
Providers and 
submit to exco by 

31 December 2016 

Needs 
assessment 
completed 
and submitted 
to exco by 31 
December 

2016 

Accumulative 

Number 

R 19 280 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Conduct 
community 
satisfaction survey 
and submit report 
to EXCO by 31 

March 2017 

Reports 
submitted 
to EXCO on 
the customer 
satisfaction 
surveys by 31 
March 2017. 

Stand-Alone 

Number 

R4 880 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Conduct staff 
satisfaction survey 
and submit report 
to EXCO by 31 

March 2017 

Reports 
submitted 
to EXCO on 
the staff 
satisfaction 
surveys by 31 
March 2017. 

Stand-Alone 

Number 

R4 880 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Provide free basic 
refuse services to 

12 000 indigent 
households in 
rural areas with 
available resources 
by 30 June 201 7 

Number of 
households 
provided with 
access to free 
basic waste 
collection 
services by 30 
June 2017. 

Carry Over 

Number 

R 1 868 850 

12000 

12000 

12000 

12000 

12000 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 200 

>^<>0<XXXXXXXX>00000000000 















Section E: Implementation Plan 


5.2. IMPLEMENTATION PLAN ...continued 


The following sets out the uMlalazi Municipality's Implementation Plan for 2016/201 7: 


REF 


NATIONAL 

OUTCOME 

[R] 

NATIONAL KPA 
[R] 

PRE- 
DETERMINED 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

NDP 

OBJECTIVE [R] 

STRATEGIC 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

MUNICIPAL 

KPA [R] 


2.1.2 

Engineering 

Services 

Sustainable 

human 

settlements 

and improved 

quality of 

household 

life 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

To provide Fee 
Basic Services 
to all indigent 
households 

Social 

Protection 

To provide Fee 
Basic Services 
to all indigent 
households 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


2.2.1 

Engineering 

Services 

An effective, 
competitive 
and 

responsive 

economic 

infrastructure 

network 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

To facilitate the 
provision of 
potable water 
and sanitation 

Economy and 
Development 

To facilitate 
with uThungulu 
to ensure 
alignment of 
water and 
sanitation 
provisioning to 
all Municipal 
Capital and 
other large 
scale Projects 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


2.2.2 

Engineering 

Services 

An effective, 
competitive 
and 

responsive 

economic 

infrastructure 

network 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

To facilitate the 
provision of 
electricity 

Economy and 
Development 

To facilitate 
with Eskom 
to ensure 
alignment 
of electricity 
provisioning to 
all Municipal 
Wards 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


2.3 

Engineering 

Services 

An effective, 
competitive 
and 

responsive 

economic 

infrastructure 

network 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

To facilitate 
with Eskom 
to ensure 
alignment 
of electricity 
provisioning 
to all Municipal 
Wards 

Economy and 
Development 

To facilitate 
with Eskom 
to ensure 
alignment 
of electricity 
provisioning to 
all Municipal 
Wards 

Local Economic 
Development 


2.4.1 

community 

services 

Improve 
health 
and life 
expectancy 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

Ensure the 
effectiveness 
of waste 
management 
services in 
all areas and 
the provision 
of recycling 
facilities at 
appropriate 
locations) 

Healthcare 
for all 

Ensure the 
effectiveness 
of waste 
management 
services in 
all areas and 
the provision 
of recycling 
facilities at 
appropriate 
locations) 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 



UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 










UNrroF KPi 

MEASURMENT CALCULATION 
TYPE [R] 


Provide free basic 
electricity services 
to 2300 indigent 
households by 
30 June 2017 with 
available resources 


Number of 
households 
provided 
with access 
to free basic 
electricity 
services by 
30 June 2017. 


Carry Over 


KPI 

TARGET 
TYPE [R] 


Number 


ANNUAL 

BUDGET 


R 1 193 180 



3000 


4000 


5000 


6000 


7000 


Attend meetings 
with uThungulu to 
ensure alignment 
of water and 
sanitation 
provisioning to all 
Municipal Capital 
and other large 
scale Projects and 
submit quarterly 
reports to Portfolio 
Committee on 
meetings attended 


Number 
of reports 
submitted to 
the Portfolio 
Committee by 
30 June 2017 


Accumulative 


Number 


R 19 280 


Attend meetings 
with Eskom to 
ensure electricity 
provisioning in 
Municipal wards 
and submit 
quarterly reports 
to the Portfolio 
Committee on 
meetings attended 


Number 
of reports 
submitted to 
the Portfolio 
Committee by 
30 June 2017 


Accumulative 


Number 


R 19 280 


Investigate 
and implement 
green energy 
programmes in 
relation to energy 
saving projects 
such as solar water 
geysers and submit 
quarterly progress 
reports to Portfolio 
Committee 


No of progress 
reports 
submitted 
to portfolio 
committee by 
30 June 2017 


Accumulative 


Number 


R 20 510 


Raise awareness 
on recycling 
through 4 
sessions with the 
community by 
30 June 2017 


Number of 
sessions 
held by 
30 June 2017 


Accumulative 


Number 


R 2 200 000 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 202 

>^<>0<XXXXXXXX>00000000000 















Section E: Implementation Plan 


5.2. IMPLEMENTATION PLAN ...continued 


The following sets out the uMlalazi Municipality's Implementation Plan for 2016/201 7: 


REF 


NATIONAL 

OUTCOME 

[R] 

NATIONAL KPA 
[R] 

PRE- 
DETERMINED 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

NDP 

OBJECTIVE [R] 

STRATEGIC 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

MUNICIPAL 

KPA [R] 


2.A.2 

community 

services 

Improve 
health 
and life 
expectancy 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

Ensure the 
effectiveness 
of waste 
management 
services in 
all areas and 
the provision 
of recycling 
facilities at 
appropriate 
locations) 

Healthcare 
for all 

Ensure the 
effectiveness 
of waste 
management 
services in 
all areas and 
the provision 
of recycling 
facilities at 
appropriate 
locations) 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


2.5.1 

Engineering 

Services 

An effective, 
competitive 
and 

responsive 

economic 

infrastructure 

network 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

To ensure the 
provision and 
maintenance 
of municipal 
roads, 

sidewalks and 
causeways 

Economy and 
Development 

To ensure the 
provision and 
maintenance 
of municipal 
roads, 

sidewalks and 
causeways 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


2.5.2 

Engineering 

Services 

An effective, 
competitive 
and 

responsive 

economic 

infrastructure 

network 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

To ensure the 
provision and 
maintenance 
of municipal 
roads, 

sidewalks and 
causeways 

Economy and 
Development 

To ensure the 
provision and 
maintenance 
of municipal 
roads, 

sidewalks and 
causeways 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


2.5.3 

Engineering 

Services 

An effective, 
competitive 
and 

responsive 

economic 

infrastructure 

network 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

To ensure the 
provision and 
maintenance 
of municipal 
roads, 

sidewalks and 
causeways 

Economy and 
Development 

To ensure the 
provision and 
maintenance 
of municipal 
roads, 

sidewalks and 
causeways 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


2.6 

Planning & 
Development 

Sustainable 

human 

settlements 

and improved 

quality of 

household 

life 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

To plan and 
support the 
acceleration 
of sustainable 
human 
settlements 

Transforming 

Human 

Settlements 

To plan and 
support the 
acceleration 
of sustainable 
human 
settlements 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


2.7 

ALL 

Sustainable 

human 

settlements 

and improved 

quality of 

household 

life 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

Facilitate the 
Implementation 
of Operation 
Sukuma Sakhe 
(Flagship 
Programme 

Healthcare 
for all 

Facilitate the 
Implementation 
of Operation 
Sukuma Sakhe 
(Flagship 
Programme 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 



UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 










UNrroF KPi 

MEASURMENT CALCULATION 
TYPE [R] 


Review the 
Integrated Waste 
Management 
Plan (to include 
recycling and buy- 
back centres) and 
submit to council 
by 30 June 201 7 


Integrated 

Waste 

Management 
Plan (to 
include 
recycling and 
buy-back 
centres) 
reviewed and 
submitted to 
council by 
30 June 2017 


Stand-Alone 


KPI 

TARGET 
TYPE [R] 


Number 


ANNUAL 

BUDGET 


R 2 200 000 



Construct 18.7kms 
of new roads as per 
planned projects by 
30 June 2017 


Kilometer 
of roads 
constructed by 
30 June 2017 


Accumulative 


Number 


R28212 

050 


18.7 


15 


15 


15 


15 


Reseal 2km of 
surfaced roads by 
30 June 2017 


km of roads 
resealed by 
30 June 2017 


Accumulative 


Number 


R 4 500 000 


Grade 3400km of 
rural access roads 
by 30 June 201 7 


Review Housing 
Sector Plan and 
submit to Council 
by 30 June 201 7 


Km of 
rural roads 
graded by 
30 June 2017 


Housing 
Sector Plan 
reviewed and 
submitted to 
council by 
30 June 2017 


Accumulative 


Number 


R 10 463 
930 


3400 


3400 


3400 


3400 


3400 


Carry Over 


Number 


R4 880 


Submit quarterly 
consolidated 
reports to EXCO 
on mentorship 
assistance 
provided to all War 
Rooms in uMlalazi 
Municipality in 
terms of Operation 
Sukuma Sakhe 
programme 


Number 
of reports 
submitted to 
EXCO by 
30 June 2017 


Accumulative 


Number 


R 200 000 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 204 

>^<>0<XXXXXXXX>00000000000 















Section E: Implementation Plan 


5.2. IMPLEMENTATION PLAN ...continued 


The following sets out the uMlalazi Municipality's Implementation Plan for 2016/201 7: 


REF 


NATIONAL 

OUTCOME 

[R] 

NATIONAL KPA 
[R] 

PRE- 
DETERMINED 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

NDP 

OBJECTIVE [R] 

STRATEGIC 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

MUNICIPAL 

KPA [R] 


2.8 

community 

services 

A 

development- 
orientated 
public service 
and inclusive 
citizenship 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

To facilitate 
adequate 
provisioning 
and 

management 
of community 
facilities under 
the ownership 
of uMlalazi 
Municipality 
at appropriate 
locations 

Economy and 
Development 

To facilitate 
adequate 
provisioning 
and 

management 
of community 
facilities under 
the ownership 
of uMlalazi 
Municipality 
at appropriate 
locations 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


2.9 

Planning & 
Development 

Decent 

employment 

through 

inclusive 

economic 

growth 

Local Economic 
Development 

Formalise 
trading areas in 
the Municipality 
area 

Building Safer 
Communities 

Formalise 
trading areas in 
the Municipality 
area 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


2.10 

Planning & 
Development 


Local Economic 
Development 


Building Safer 
Communities 

Formalise 
trading areas in 
the Municipality 
area 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


2.11 

Engineering 

Services 

An effective, 
competitive 
and 

responsive 

economic 

infrastructure 

network 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

Ensure quality 
control of 
infrastructure 
projects 

Building Safer 
Communities 

Ensure quality 
control of 
infrastructure 
projects 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


2.12 

Protection 

Services 

All people in 
south Africa 
protected 
and feel safe 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

Mitigate the 
effectiveness 
of disasters 

Building Safer 
Communities 

Mitigate the 
effectiveness 
of disasters 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


2.13 

Protection 

Services 

All people in 
south Africa 
protected 
and feel safe 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

Mitigate the 
effectiveness 
of disasters 

Building Safer 
Communities 

Mitigate the 
effectiveness 
of disasters 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


2.14 

Community 

Services 

A responsive 
and 

accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government 
system 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

Provide for 
the cemetery 
needs in the 
Municipal area 

Inclusive Rural 
Economy 

Provide for 
the cemetery 
needs in the 
Municipal area 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


2.15 

Community 

Services 

Improve 
health 
and life 
expectancy 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

Contribute 
towards the 
development 
of Sports in the 
Municipal area 

Economy and 
Development 

Contribute 
towards the 
development 
of Sports in the 
Municipal area 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 



205 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

o<xxxxxx>ooooooo<xxx>o<o><xx> 










UNrrOF KPI KPI ANNUAL 

MEASURMENT CALCULATION TARGET BUDGET 
TYPE [R] TYPE [R] 




Appoint caretakers 
26 caretakers by 

31 March 2016 for 
the maintenance 
of rural community 
facilities 

Number of 
caretakers 
appointed by 

31 March 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

R 100 000 

26 

26 

26 

26 

26 


Provide 15 
commuter and 
trading shelters 
in KD5 by 

31 March 2017 

Number 
of shelters 
provided by 

30 June 2017 

Stand-Alone 

Percentage 

R 500 000 

15 

0 

0 

0 

0 


Provide A food 
safety training 
sessions to 
informal food 
traders by 

30 June 2016 

Number of 
food safety 
training 
sessions 
provided by 

30 June 2017. 

Accumulative 

Number 

R 4 880 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 


Undertake at least 
100 site visits to 
Capital projects by 

30 June 2017 

Number of site 
visits to Capital 
Projects 
undertaken by 
30june 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

R 50 000 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 


Hold quarterly 
meetings with 
applicable 
stakeholders to 
discuss disaster 
manaement issues 

Number of 
meetings 
held by 

30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

R 650 000 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 


Execute 2 
emergency 
exercises by 

30 June 2017 

Number of 
excercises 
executed by 

30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

R 4 880 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 


Develop a cemetery 
plan for the next 
five years to 
accommodate future 
cemetery needs and 
submit to EXCO by 

31 March 2017 

Cemetery plan 
developed and 
submitted to 
EXCO by 31 
March 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

R 450 000 

1 

0 

0 

0 

0 


Develop a 
plan for sports 
development for 
the next five years 
and submit to EXCO 
by 31 March 2017 

Sports 

development 
plan completed 
and submitted 
to EXCO by 

31 March 2017. 

Accumulative 

Number 

R 1 000 000 

1 

0 

0 

0 

0 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 206 

>^<>0<XXXXXXXX>00000000000 















Section E: Implementation Plan 


5.2. IMPLEMENTATION PLAN ...continued 


The following sets out the uMlalazi Municipality's Implementation Plan for 2016/201 7: 


REF 


NATIONAL 

OUTCOME 

[R] 

NATIONAL KPA 
[R] 

PRE- 
DETERMINED 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

NDP 

OBJECTIVE [R] 

STRATEGIC 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

MUNICIPAL 

KPA [R] 


2.16 

Protection 

Services 

All people in 
south Africa 
protected and 
feel safe 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

Contribute 
towards the 
prevention 
of Crime 

Building Safer 
Communities 

Contribute 
towards the 
prevention of 
Crime 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


2.17 

Community 

Services 

Improve 
the quality 
of basic 
education 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

Facilitate early 

childhood 

development 

Improving 
Education, 
training 
and innovation 

Facilitate early 

childhood 

development 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


3.1.1 

Planning & 
Development 

Decent 

employment 

through 

inclusive 

economic 

growth 

Local Economic 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Economy and 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 


3.1.2 

Planning & 
Development 

Decent 

employment 

through 

inclusive 

economic 

growth 

Local Economic 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Economy and 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 


3.1.3 

Planning & 
Development 

Decent 

employment 

through 

inclusive 

economic 

growth 

Local Economic 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Economy and 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 


3.2 

Planning & 
Development 

Decent 

employment 

through 

inclusive 

economic 

growth 

Local Economic 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Economy and 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 



UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 










KPI 

UNFTOF 

MEASURMENT 

KPI 

CALCULATION 
TYPE [R] 

KPI 

TARGET 
TYPE [R] 

ANNUAL 

BUDGET 

2 

2 


6/ 

7 

2 

2 


7/ 

8 

2 

2 


8/ 

9 

2 

2 


2 

2 



Report quarterly 
to the Portfolio 
Committee on 
crime prevention 
strategies 
implemented 
in partnership 
with the relevant 
stakeholders 

No of reports 
submitted 
to Portfolio 
Committee by 
30 June 2017 
on crime 
prevention 
strategies 
implemented 

Accumulative 

Number 

R A880 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 


Visit all creches 
in 26 Wards by 

30 June 2017 
to monitor the 
healthyness of 
the environment 
for childhood 
development 

Creches in 

26 Wards 
visited by 

30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

R308000 

26 

26 

26 

26 

26 


Assist 5 Tourism 

BEE entrepreneurs 
with starting 
growing 
businesses e.g. 
Research, business 
plans and skills 
development by 

30 June 2017. 

Number of 
Tourism BEE 
entrepreneurs 
assisted by 

30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

R 600 000 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 


Carry out 5 
workshops to 
promote skills 
development 
and support the 
Tourism 5MME 
business scetor by 
30 June 2017. 

Number of 
Workshops 
hosted by 

30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

R 600 000 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 


Carry out A tourism 
promotional 
activities in the 
print and other 
media by 

30 June 2017. 

Number of 
activities by 

30 June 2017. 

Accumulative 

Number 

R 600 000 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 


Assist 10 youth 

BEE entrepreneurs 
with starting 
growing 
businesses e.g. 
Research, business 
plans and skills 
development by 

30 June 2017. 

Number 
of youth 
entrepreneurs 
assisted by 

30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

R 600 000 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 208 

>^<>0<XXXXXXXX>00000000000 















Section E: Implementation Plan 


5.2. IMPLEMENTATION PLAN ...continued 


The following sets out the uMlalazi Municipality's Implementation Plan for 2016/201 7: 


REF 


NATIONAL 

OUTCOME 

[R] 

NATIONAL KPA 
[R] 

PRE- 
DETERMINED 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

NDP 

OBJECTIVE [R] 

STRATEGIC 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

MUNICIPAL 

KPA [R] 


3.3 

Planning & 
Development 

Decent 

employment 

through 

inclusive 

economic 

growth 

Local Economic 
Development 

To ensure that 
businesses 
within uMlalazi 
Municipality 
are licensed 
through 
the LED 
department 

Economy and 
Development 

To ensure that 
businesses 
within uMlalazi 
Municipality 
are licensed 
through 
the LED 
department 

Local Economic 
Development 


3.4 

Community 

Services 

Decent 

employment 

through 

inclusive 

economic 

growth 

Local Economic 
Development 

To contribute 
towards the 
reduction of 
unemployment 

Economy and 
Development 

To contribute 
towards the 
reduction of 
unemployment 

Local Economic 
Development 


4.1 

Finance 

A responsive 
and 

accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government 
system 

Municipal 

Financial 

Viability and 
Management 

Advance and 
maintain 
the financial 
viability of the 
Municipality 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Advance and 
maintain 
the financial 
viability of the 
Municipality 

Municipal 

Financial 

Viability and 
Management 


4.2 

Finance 

A responsive 
and 

accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government 
system 

Municipal 

Financial 

Viability and 
Management 

Advance and 
maintain 
the financial 
viability of the 
Municipality 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Advance and 
maintain 
the financial 
viability of the 
Municipality 

Municipal 

Financial 

Viability and 
Management 


4.3 

Engineering 

Services 

An effective, 
competitive 
and 

responsive 

economic 

infrastructure 

network 

Municipal 

Financial 

Viability and 
Management 

Improve the 
financial 
performance of 
the municipality 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Improve the 
financial 
performance of 
the municipality 

Municipal 

Financial 

Viability and 
Management 



209 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

o<xxxxxx>ooooooo<xxx>o<o><xx> 










UNrroF KPi 

MEASURMENT CALCULATION 
TYPE [R] 


Develop a database 
of businesses 
licenced in uMlalazi 
Municipality and 
submit quarterly 
reports to Portfolio 
Committee 


Database 
of licenced 
businesses 
developed 
and submitted 
quarterly 
to Portfolio 
Committee 


Accumulative 


KPI 

TARGET 
TYPE [R] 


Number 


ANNUAL 

BUDGET 


R A880 



Number of 
temporaryjob 
opportunities 
created through 
EPWP projects and 
other operational 
projects by 
30 June 2017 


Number of 
temporaryjobs 
opportunities 
created and 
maintained by 
30 June 2017 


Accumulative 


Number 


R 2 924 000 


1650 


1650 


1650 


1650 


1650 


Achieve a 
debtors payment 
percentage of 95% 
at 30 June 2017 
(Gross Debtors 
Opening Balance 
+ Billed Revenue 

- Gross Debtors 
Closing Balance 

- Bad Debts 
Written Off / Billed 
Revenue x 100) 


Payment % 
achieved at 
30 June 2017 


Stand-Alone 


Percentage 


R 157 010 


95 


95 


95 


95 


95 


Financial viability 
measured in terms 
of the available 
cash to cover 
fixed operating 
expenditure as 
at 30 June 2017 
((Available cash+ 
investments)/ 
Monthly fixed 
operating 
expenditure) 


Ratio achieved 
as at 

30 June 2017 

((Available 

cash+ 

investments)/ 
Monthly fixed 
operating 
expenditure) 


Last Value 


Number 


R 157 010 


3:1 


3:1 


3:1 


3:1 


3:1 


Limit unaccounted 
for electricity to 
less than 8% by 
30 June 2017 
{(Number of 
Electricity Units 
Purchased and/ 
or Generated 
- Number of 
Electricity Units 
Sold) / Number of 
Electricity Units 
Purchased and/or 
Generated) x 100} 


% unaccounted 
electricity at 
30 June 2017 
{(Number of 
Electricity Units 
Purchased and/ 
or Generated - 
Number of 
Electricity Units 
Sold) /Number 
of Electricity 
Units Purchased 
and/or 

Generated) X 100} 


Accumulative 


Number 


R 78 500 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016-2017 210 

>^<>0<XXXXXXXX>00000000000 















Section E: Implementation Plan 


5.2. IMPLEMENTATION PLAN ...continued 


The following sets out the uMlalazi Municipality's Implementation Plan for 2016/201 7: 


REF 


NATIONAL 

OUTCOME 

[R] 

NATIONAL KPA 
[R] 

PRE- 
DETERMINED 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

NDP 

OBJECTIVE [R] 

STRATEGIC 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

MUNICIPAL 

KPA [R] 


A.A 

All 

A responsive 
and 

accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government 
system 

Municipal 

Financial 

Viability and 
Management 

Optimise 

budget 

implementation 
in the 

municipality 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Optimise 

budget 

implementation 
in the 

municipality 

Municipal 

Financial 

Viability and 
Management 


5.1.1 

Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and 

accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government 
system 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Effective 

Municipal 

Oversight 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Effective 

Municipal 

Oversight 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 


5.1.2 

Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and 

accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government 
system 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Effective 

Municipal 

Oversight 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Effective 

Municipal 

Oversight 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 


5.2.1 

Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and 

accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government 
system 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Effective 

Municipal 

Oversight 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Effective 

Municipal 

Oversight 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 


5.2.2 

Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and 

accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government 
system 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Effective 

Municipal 

Oversight 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Effective 

Municipal 

Oversight 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 


5.2.3 

Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and 

accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government 
system 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Effective 

Municipal 

Oversight 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Effective 

Municipal 

Oversight 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 


5.3 

Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and 

accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government 
system 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

To effectively 
Implement the 
Back to Basics 
programme 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

To effectively 
Implement the 
Back to Basics 
programme 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 



UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 










KPI 

UNFTOF 

MEASURMENT 

KPI 

CALCULATION 
TYPE [R] 

KPI 

TARGET 
TYPE [R] 

ANNUAL 

BUDGET 

2 

2 


6/ 

7 

2 

2 


7/ 

8 

2 

2 


8/ 

9 

2 

2 


2 

2 



Spend at least 

90% of the Capital 
budget amount by 

30 June 2017 
(Actual expenditure/ 
Approved 
capital budget) 

Percentage of 
capital budget 
spent on 
capital 
projects by 

30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Percentage 

R 715 740 

90 

90 

90 

90 

90 


Review Top Layer 
5DBIP and submit 
to Council by 

2A February 2017 

Top Layer 

SDBIP 

reviewed and 
submitted to 
Council by 

2A February 
2017 

Stand-Alone 

Number 

R4 880 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Submit Quarterly 
reports on the 
actual performance 
achieved against 
the Top layer SDBIP 
targets to Council 

Number 
of reports 
submitted to 
Council by 

30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

R4880 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 


Submit the 
annual performance 
report to AG by 

31 August 2016 

Annual 
performance 
report 
submitted 
to Auditor 
General by 

31 August 201 6 

Stand-Alone 

Number 

R 19 280 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Submit the 
annual financial 
statements by 

31 August 2016 
to the Office of the 
Auditor-General 

Financial 
statements 
submitted by 

31 August 201 6 
to the Office of 
the Auditor- 
General 

Stand-Alone 

Number 

R 19 280 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Submit Oversight 
Report of annual 
report to council by 
31 March 2017 

oversight 

report 

submitted to 
Council by 

31 March 2017 

Stand-Alone 

Number 

R4 880 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Submit quarterly 
reports to exco on 
the implementation 
of Back to Basics 
programme 

Number 
of reports 
submitted to 
EXCO by 

30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

R4 880 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016-2017 212 

>^<>0<XXXXXXXX>00000000000 















Section E: Implementation Plan 


5.2. IMPLEMENTATION PLAN ...continued 


The following sets out the uMlalazi Municipality's Implementation Plan for 2016/201 7: 


REF 


NATIONAL 

OUTCOME 

[R] 

NATIONAL KPA 
[R] 

PRE- 
DETERMINED 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

NDP 

OBJECTIVE [R] 

STRATEGIC 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

MUNICIPAL 

KPA [R] 


5.A 

Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and 

accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government 
system 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

To Obtain 

Clean Audit 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

To Obtain 

Clean Audit 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 


5.5.1 

Office of 
the MM 

Improve 
health 
and life 
expectancy 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Mitigate the 
Impact of HIV/ 
Aids in the 
Municipality 
area 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Mitigate the 
Impact of HIV/ 
Aids in the 
Municipality 
area 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 


5.5.2 

Office of 
the MM 

Improve 
health 
and life 
expectancy 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Mitigate the 
Impact of HIV/ 
Aids in the 
Municipality 
area 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Mitigate the 
Impact of HIV/ 
Aids in the 
Municipality 
area 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 


5.6.1 

Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and 

accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government 
system 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

To reduce 

Risk to the 
Organisation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

To reduce 

Risk to the 
Organisation 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 


5.6.2 

Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and 

accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government 
system 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

To reduce 

Risk to the 
Organisation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

To reduce 

Risk to the 
Organisation 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 


5.7 

Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and 

accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government 
system 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Ensure 
that public 
participation 
structures are 
established, 
capacitated and 
functional 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Ensure 
that public 
participation 
structures are 
established, 
capacitated and 
functional 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 


5.8 

Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and 

accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government 
system 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Ensure 
that public 
participation 
structures are 
established, 
capacitated and 
functional 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

Ensure 
that public 
participation 
structures are 
established, 
capacitated and 
functional 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 



213 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

0<XXXXXX>0<>00<><X>0<><X>0<X><X' 










KPI 

UNFTOF 

MEASURMENT 

KPI 

CALCULATION 
TYPE [R] 

KPI 

TARGET 
TYPE [R] 

ANNUAL 

BUDGET 

2 

2 


6/ 

7 

2 

2 


7/ 

8 

2 

2 


8/ 

9 

2 

2 


2 

2 



Submit reports 
to EXCO on the 
measures taken 
to ensure that 
matters raised 
in the 2015/16 

Audit have been 
resolved in order 
to ensure that 
the Municipality 
receives / 
maintains a 

Clean Audit in 
2016/2017 

Number 
of reports 
submitted to 
the Executive 
Committee by 

31 March 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

R A880 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Coordinate 
quarterly meetings 
of the uMlalazi Aids 
Council 

Number of 
uMlalazi 

Aids Council 
meetings 
held by 

30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

R 450 000 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 


Review HIV/Aids 

Plan and submit to 
exco by 

30 June 2017 

HIV/Aids Plan 
reviewed and 
submitted to 
exco by 

30 June 2017 

Stand-Alone 

Number 

R 450 000 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Review Enterprise 
Risk Plan and 
submit to exco by 

30 June 2017 

Enterprise Risk 
Plan reviewed 
and submitted 
to exco by 

30 June 2017 

Stand-Alone 

Number 

R 19 280 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Review Fraud 

Risk Plan and 
submit to exco by 

30 June 2017 

Fraud Risk 

Plan reviewed 
and submitted 
to exco by 

30 June 2017 

Stand-Alone 

Number 

R 19 280 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Hold meetings with 
stakeholders and 
ward committee to 
communicate the 

IDP process plan 

Number 
of meetings 
held by 

30 September 
2016 

Accumulative 

Number 

R 300 000 

26 

26 

26 

26 

26 


Submit quarterly 
reports to EXCO on 
the functionality 
of all Ward 
Committees 
(include training 
and development) 

No of reports 
submitted to 
EXCO by 

30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

R 1 000 000 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016-2017 2 1 A 

>^<>0<XXXXXXXX>00000000000 















Section E: Implementation Plan 


5.2. IMPLEMENTATION PLAN ...continued 


The following sets out the uMlalazi Municipality's Implementation Plan for 2016/201 7: 


REF 


NATIONAL 

OUTCOME 

[R] 

NATIONAL KPA 
[R] 

PRE- 
DETERMINED 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

NDP 

OBJECTIVE [R] 

STRATEGIC 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

MUNICIPAL 

KPA [R] 


5.9 

Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and 

accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government 
system 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

To promote 
International 
& National 
Relations 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

To promote 
International 
& National 
Relations 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 


6.1 

Planning & 
development 

A responsive 
and 

accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government 
system 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

To promote 
sustainable 
development 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

To promote 
sustainable 
development 

Cross Cutting 
Issues 


6.2 

Planning & 
development 

A responsive 
and 

accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government 
system 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

To promote 
integrated 
development 
planning 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 
State 

To promote 
integrated 
development 
planning 

Cross Cutting 
Issues 












KPI 

UNFTOF 

MEASURMENT 

KPI 

CALCULATION 
TYPE [R] 

KPI 

TARGET 
TYPE [R] 

ANNUAL 

BUDGET 

Submit a report to 
MCOR by 

30 June 2017 on 
the progress 
made with 
the Twinning 
partnership 
with Songdal 
Municipality (Norway) 

Reports 
submitted to 
MCOR by 

30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

0 

Compile a Town 
Planning Register 
for the 2016/2017 
financial year on 
all Town Planning 
applications being 
processed and their 
status and submit 
quarterly reports 
to the Portfolio 
Committee 

Town Planning 
Register 
compiled and 
submitted 
quarterly to 
the Portfolio 
Committee 

Accumulative 

Number 

R 219 920 

Review uMlalazi 
Municipality IDP 
for 201 7/2018 and 
submit to Council 
by 30 June 201 7 

uMlalazi 

Municipality 

IDP for 
2017/2018 
reviewed and 
submitted to 
Council by 

30 June 2017 

Stand-Alone 

Number 

R 300 000 
















Section F: 








6. Financial Plan 


6.1. CAPITAL BUDGET FOR 2016/2017 
FINANCIAL YEAR 

The total Capital Budget for 2015/2016 Financial Year is R 77 057 440 

Below is a summary of the Municipality's Capital Budget for 2015/2016 Financial Year: 


SUMMARY 

BUDGET YEAR 

BUDGET YEAR 

BUDGET YEAR 

BUDGET YEAR 

BUDGET YEAR 

5 YEAR TOTAL 


2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

2020/2021 


MAYORAL OFFICE 

100 000 

50 000 

40 000 

30 000 

20 000 

240 000 

MUNICIPAL 

MANAGER'S OFFICE 

650 000 

40 000 

30 000 

20 000 

10 000 

750 000 

PLANNING AND 
DEVELOPMENT 

2 473 680 

1 597 950 

2 550 000 

30 000 

20 000 

6 671 630 

CORPORATE SERVICES 

5 962 000 

5 620 000 

6 485 000 

3 790 000 

9 992 000 

31 849 000 

PROTECTION SERVICES 

440 000 

4 540 000 

115 000 

60 000 

95 000 

5 250 000 

FINANCIAL SERVICES 

1 250910 

85 000 

60 000 

40 000 

30 000 

1 465 910 

COMMUNITY SERVICES 

12 660 000 

12 159 820 

7 620 000 

5 815 000 

9 315 000 

47 569 820 

ENGINEERING SERVICES 

53 520 850 

49 894 430 

61 557 880 

73 191 600 

67 825 090 

305 989 850 


77 057 440 

73 987 200 

78 457 880 

82 976 600 

87 307 090 

399 786 210 


Table 109: The following sets out the uMlalazi Municipality's Implementation Plan for 2016/2017 


FUNDING OF CAPITAL PROJECTS 2016/2017 

DESCRIPTION 

GRANT DESCRIPTION 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

2020/2021 

CAPITAL FOR DEPARTMENTS 

EQUITABLE SHARE 

16 795 390 

23 656 950 

30 291 080 

32 424 800 

34 370 290 

GRANTS: 

MUNICIPAL 

INFRASTRUCTURE GRANT 

36 612 050 

39 230 250 

41 366 800 

43 551 800 

45 736 800 

SMALLTOWN 
REHABILITATION GRANT 

4 500 000 

4 500 000 






57 907 440 

67 387 200 

71 657 880 

75 976 600 

80107 090 

OWN FUNDS 

CAPITAL REPLACEMENT 
RESERVE 

11 150 000 

6 600 000 

6 800 000 

7 000 000 

7 200 000 

INVESTMENTS 

8 000 000 





TOTAL 


77 057 440 

73 987 200 

78 457 880 

82 976 600 

87 307 090 








CHECK’^’^’^ 


77 057 440 

73 987 200 

78 457 880 

82 976 600 

87 307 090 


Table 110: Sources of Funding for the 5-Year Capital Budget (2016/2017 to 2020/2021) 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 218 

-^<>o<xxxxxxx>oooooooooooo 



















Section F: Financial Plan 


6.2. THE 5-YEAR CAPITAL 
INVESTMENT PROGRAMME 


OFFICE OF THE MAYOR 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

2020/2021 

5 YEAR TOTAL 

FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT 

100 000 

50 000 

40 000 

30 000 

20 000 

240 000 

BUILDING UPGRADE 

- 





- 

DEPARTMENTAL TOTAL 

100 000 

50 000 

40 000 

30 000 

20 000 

240 000 


Table 111: 5-Year Draft Capital Budget (2016/2017 to 2020/2021) 


MM 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

2020/2021 

5 YEAR TOTAL 

IT SOFTWARE - PERFORMANCE 

650 000 





650 000 

FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT 


40 000 

30 000 

20 000 

10 000 

100 000 

DEPARTMENTAL TOTAL 

650 000 

40 000 

30 000 

20 000 

10 000 

750 000 


PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

2020/2021 

5 YEAR TOTAL 

MOBILE OFFICE 

280 000 





280 000 

FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT 

103 500 

50 000 

50 000 

30 000 

20 000 

253 500 

BUILDING PLANS SOFTWARE 

450 000 





450 000 

INFORMAL TRADING SHELTERS 

500 000 

500 000 

2 000 000 



3 000 000 

LIVESTOCK PENS 

350 000 

500 000 

500 000 



1 350 000 

IRRIGATION SYSTEMS 

790 180 

547 950 




1 338 130 

DEPARTMENTAL TOTAL 

2 473 680 

1 597 950 

2 550 000 

30 000 

20 000 

6 671 630 


CORPORATE SERVICES: 
ADMINISTRATION 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

2020/2021 

5 YEAR TOTAL 

FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT 

42 000 

100 000 

10 000 


32 000 

184 000 

COMPUTER EQUIPMENT 

1 500 000 

2 270 000 

3 000 000 

3 500 000 

4 000 000 

14 270 000 

PARK HOME 

200 000 





200 000 

TOTAL ADMIN 

1 742 000 

2 370 000 

3 010 000 

3 500 000 

4 032 000 

14 654 000 


TOWN HALL AND OFFICES 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

2020/2021 

5 YEAR TOTAL 

FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT 

285 000 

100 000 

320 000 

140 000 

160 000 

1 005 000 

TOTAL HALLS AND OFFICES 

285 000 

100 000 

320 000 

140 000 

160 000 

1 005 000 


ZULULAND HISTORICAL MUSEUM 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

2020/2021 

5 YEAR TOTAL 

FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT 

5 000 


5 000 



10 000 

TOTAL MUSEUM 

5 000 

- 

5 000 

- 

- 

10 000 


LIBRARIES 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

2020/2021 

5 YEAR TOTAL I 

FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT 

150 000 

150 000 

150 000 

150 000 

150 000 

750 000 

BUILDING UPGRADE 






- 

TOTAL LIBRARIES 

150 000 

150 000 

150 000 

150 000 

150 000 

750 000 


219 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

o<xxxxxx>oooooc>ooo<x>o<xxx 




















































TOURISM/PUBLICITY 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

2020/2021 

5 YEAR TOTAL 

CONCRETE SIGNAGE 

100 000 





100 000 

LOG BIRD HIDES 

180 000 





180 000 

TOTAL PUBLICITY 

280 000 

- 

- 

- 

- 

280 000 


ADHOC 

FUNDING 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

2020/2021 

5 YEAR TOTAL 

EMANDAWE COMMUNITY 
HALL (WARD 10) 

MIG 


1 500 000 




1 500 000 

BONGELA COMMUNITY HALL 
(WARD 1) 

MIG 



1 500 000 



1 500 000 

MBIZA COMMUNITY HALL 
(WARD 9) 

MIG 





2 100 000 

2 100 000 

EMANYAMENI COMMUNITY 
HALL (WARD 21) 

MIG 





1 750 000 

1 750 000 

SQWANJANA COMMUNITY 
HALL (WARD 13) 

MIG 

3 500 000 





3 500 000 

MCONGWENI COMMUNITY 
HALL (WARD 13) 

MIG 



1 500 000 



1 500 000 

MABEDLE COMMUNITY HALL 
(WARD 16) 

MIG 


1 500 000 




1 500 000 

BASAMLILO HALL (WARD 26) 

MIG 





1 800 000 

1 800 000 

COMMUNITY HALLS 


3 500 000 

3 000 000 

3 000 000 

- 

5 650 000 

15 150 000 

TOTAL CORPORATE SERVICES 


5 962 000 

5 620 000 

6 485 000 

3 790 000 

9 992 000 

31 849 000 


PROTECTIVE SERVICES: TRAFFIC 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

2020/2021 

5 YEAR TOTAL I 

FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT 

80 000 

30 000 

20 000 

30 000 

20 000 

180 000 

MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT 

100 000 

180 000 

30 000 



310 000 

FIREARMS 






- 

PARK HOME 

200 000 





200 000 

SPEED MEASURING EQUIPMENT 






- 

REPLACE NFS 7939 


300 000 




300 000 

TOTAL TRAFFIC 

380 000 

510 000 

50 000 

30 000 

20 000 

990 000 


FIREFIGHTING 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

2020/2021 

5 YEAR TOTAL I 

FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT 

30 000 

30 000 

35 000 

30 000 

35 000 

160 000 

MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT 

30 000 


30 000 


40 000 

100 000 

MEDICAL RESCUE EQUIPMENT 






- 

RENEWAL OF FIRE TENDERS 






- 

FIRE TENDER 


4 000 000 




4 000 000 

TOTAL FIREFIGHTING 

60 000 

4 030 000 

65 000 

30 000 

75 000 

4 260 000 

TOTAL PROTECTIVE SERVICES 

440 000 

4 540 000 

115 000 

60 000 

95 000 

5 250 000 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 220 

>^<>0<XXXXXXX>000000000000 


































Section F: Financial Plan 


6.2. THE 5-YEAR CAPITAL 
INVESTMENT PROGRAMME 


FINANCIALSERVICES 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

2020/2021 

5 YEAR TOTAL 

COMPUTER EQUIPMENT 






- 

IT SYSTEM - MAYORAL OFFICE 






- 

IT SYSTEM - DEPUTY MAYOR AND 
SPEAKER 






- 

IT SYSTEM - MUNICIPAL MANAGER 






- 

IT SYSTEM - PLANNING AND 
DEVELOPMENT 






- 

IT SYSTEM -CORP ADMIN 






- 

IT SYSTEM - CORP - MUSEUM 






- 

IT SYSTEM - CORP - LIBRARIES 






- 

IT SYSTEM - PROTECTION - TRAFFIC 






- 

IT SYSTEM - PROTECTION - FIRE 
FIGHTING 






- 

IT SYSTEM - PROTECTION - TESTING 
STATION 






- 

IT SYSTEM - COMMUNITY - ADMIN 






- 

IT SYSTEM - ENGINEERS - ADMIN 






- 

TOOLS OF TRADE (FULL TIME EXCO) 






- 

FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT 

100 000 

75 000 

50 000 

30 000 

20 000 

275 000 

FILING CONTAINER 

77 A60 





77 A60 

TOTAL FINANCE 

177 A60 

75 000 

50 000 

30 000 

20 000 

352 A60 


STORES 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

2020/2021 

5 YEAR TOTAL I 

STORE FOR REDUNDANT ASSETS 

1 000 000 





1 000 000 

FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT 

30 000 

10 000 

10 000 

10 000 

10 000 

70 000 

CAR PORTS 

A3 A50 





A3 A50 

TOTAL FINANCE 

1 073 A50 

10 000 

10 000 

10 000 

10 000 

1 113 A50 

TOTAL FINANCIAL SERVICES 

1 250 910 

85 000 

60 000 

AO 000 

30 000 

1 A65 910 


COMMUNITY SERVICES 

ADMINISTRATION 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

2020/2021 

5 YEAR TOTAL 

FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT 

AO 000 

30 000 

20 000 

15 000 

15 000 

120 000 

COUNCILS CONTRIBUTION CRECHES 

1 500 000 





1 500 000 

TOTAL ADMINISTRATION 

1 5A0 000 

30 000 

20 000 

15 000 

15 000 

1 620 000 


221 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

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SOCIAL SERVICES 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

2020/2021 

5 YEAR TOTAL I 

UPGRADE OF OFFICES 






- 

FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT 


20 000 




20 000 

TOTAL SOCIAL SERVICES 

- 

20 000 

- 

- 

- 

20 000 


PARKS & GARDENS 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

2020/2021 

5 YEAR TOTAL I 

MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT 

550 000 

350 000 

250 000 

200 000 

200 000 

1 550 000 

PLAYPARK EQUIPMENT 

250 000 

100 000 




350 000 

PLAYPARKT0ILET5- KING 

DINUZULU 

200 000 





200 000 

COMBO COURTS - GINGINDLOVU 

- 





- 

STAFF CHANGE ROOMS 

- 

1 000 000 




1 000 000 

REPLACE NFS 7171 

320 000 





320 000 

TOTAL PARKS & GARDENS 

1 320 000 

1 A50 000 

250 000 

200 000 

200 000 

3 A20 000 


POOLS 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

2020/2021 

5 YEAR TOTAL I 

SHELTERS -SUNNYDALE 

200 000 





200 000 

MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT 

A50 000 





A50 000 

PALISADE FENCING 






- 

REPLACEMENT FILTER MEDIA 






- 

ESHOWE SWIMMING POOL 


3 000 000 




3 000 000 

TOTAL POOLS 

650 000 

3 000 000 

- 

- 

- 

3 650 000 


CEMETERY 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

2020/2021 

5 YEAR TOTAL I 

CEMETERIES PALISADE FENCING 

400 000 

300 000 




700 000 

ABLUTION FACILITIES 

100 000 





100 000 

CEMETERY PATHWAYS 

250 000 

250 000 

150 000 



650 000 

TOTAL CEMETRY 

750 000 

550 000 

150 000 

- 

- 

1 450 000 

TOTAL COMMUNITY SERVICES 

4 260 000 

5 050 000 

420 000 

215 000 

215 000 

10160 000 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 222 

>^<>0<XXXXXXXX>00000000000 






























Section F: Financial Plan 


6.2. THE 5-YEAR CAPITAL 
INVESTMENT PROGRAMME 


ADHOC 

FUNDING 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

2020/2021 

5 YEAR TOTAL 

EMVUTSHINI SPORTS FIELD 
(WARD 16) 

MIG 


2 000 000 




2 000 000 

MACHANCA SPORTS FIELD 
(WARD 8) 

MIG 



1 800 000 



1 800 000 

NKUME SPORTS FIELD 
(WARD 10) 

MIG 


1 500 000 




1 500 000 

EZIQWAOWENI SPORTS 

FIELD (WARD 10) 

MIG 




2 100 000 


2 100 000 

EMFENYANE SPORTS FIELD 
(WARD 1A) 

MIG 


2 109 820 




2 109 820 

VELESHOWE SPORTS FIELD 
(WARD 19) 

MIG 



1 700 000 



1 700 000 

MANZAMNYAMA SPORTS 
FIELD (WARD 22) 

MIG 



1 500 000 



1 500 000 

MKHUNYANA SPORTS FIELD 
(WARD 22) 

MIG 




2 000 000 


2 000 000 

SIKLEBHENI SPORTS FIELD 
(WARD 23) 

MIG 


1 500 000 




1 500 000 

MANDLOVU SPORTS FIELD 
(WARD 24) 

MIG 



1 700 000 



1 700 000 

BIYELA SPORTS FIELD 
(WARD 1) 

MIG 




2 000 000 


2 000 000 

KWANDLOVU SPORTS FIELD 
(WARD 2) 

MIG 





2 000 000 

2 000 000 

NTENESHANE SPORTS FIELD 
(WARD 23) 

MIG 





1 800 000 

1 800 000 

KWANOMZANSI SPORTS 
FIEL(21) 

MIG 





1 700 000 

1 700 000 

INCISILI SPORTS FIELD 
(WARD 19) 

MIG 





2 100 000 

2 100 000 

MAWUSHENI SPORTS FIELD 
(WARD 7) 

MIG 





1 500 000 

1 500 000 

KWABULAWAYO 

SPORTSFIELD (WARD 24) 

MIG 

8 AOO 000 





8 400 000 

SPORTSFIELDS 


8 400 000 

7 109 820 

7 200 000 

5 600 000 

9 100 000 

37 409 820 

TOTAL COMMUNITY 

SERVICES 


12 660000 

12159 820 

7 620 000 

5 815 000 

9 315 000 

47 569 820 


ENGINEERING: ADMINISTRATION 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

2020/2021 

5 YEAR TOTAL 

FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT 

25 000 

30 000 

35 000 

40 000 

45 000 

175 000 

TOTAL ADMINISTRATION 

25 000 

30 000 

35 000 

40 000 

45 000 

175 000 


223 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

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ENGINEERING: 

ROADS AND STREETS 


2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

2020/2021 

5 YEAR TOTAL 

STORM WATER MANAGEMENT 



2 100 000 

2 700 000 

4 374 800 

2 578 290 

11 753 090 

STORM WATER MANAGEMENT 

CRR 

2 000 000 


- 

- 

- 

2 000 000 

MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT 


60 000 

62 000 

64 000 

66 000 

68 000 

320 000 

SIDEWALKS 


500 000 

1 000 000 

2 200 000 

1 300 000 

1 400 000 

6 400 000 

PAVEMENT MANAGEMENT 
(KERBING) 


300 000 

310 000 

320 000 

330 000 

340 000 

1 600 000 

REHABILITATION OF 

URBAN ROADS 

CRR 

5 400 000 

5 400 000 

5 400 000 

5 400 000 

5 400 000 

27 000 000 

REHABILITATION OF 

URBAN ROADS 

EQUIT 



10 800 

000 

12 800 

000 

14 800 

000 

38 400 000 

UPGRADE OF INTERSECTION 
- SUNNYDALE LOW 

COST HOUSING 


500 000 





500 000 

PUBLIC TRANSPORT FACILITIES 
( LAYBYS SHELTERS) 


240 000 

250 000 

121 080 

270 000 

280 000 

1 161 080 

SPEED HUMPS ESH,GING 

AND MTZ 


200 000 

210 000 

220 000 

230 000 

240 000 

1 100 000 

PEDESTRIAN WOODEN 

BRIDGES (WARD 12 & WARD 22) 







- 

KDS PASSAGE 

WALKS UPGRADE 


250 000 

250 000 

250 000 

250 000 

250 000 

1 250 000 

MITCHELL STREET EXTENSION 

CRR 

2 750 000 

- 




2 750 000 

MITCHELL STREET EXTENSION 



1 449 000 




1 449 000 

GINGINDLOVUTAXI 

RANK OFFICES 



1 100 000 




1 100 000 

CONSTRUCTION AND 
REHABILITATION OF CBD ROADS 


4 500 000 

4 500 000 




9 000 000 

MATSHAMHLOPEROAD 


3 500 000 





3 500 000 

REPLACE TRAILER - NZ 7669 



200 000 




200 000 

REPLACE TRAILER -NZ 8452 



200 000 




200 000 

GING MAIN STREET PARKING 
AREA UPGRADE 


650 000 





650 000 

TOTAL ROADS & STREETS 


20850000 

17 031000 

22 075 080 

25 020800 

25 356 290 

110333170 


WORKSHOP 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

2020/2021 

5 YEAR TOTAL I 

MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT 

8 800 





8 800 

LOW LEVEL RAMP 






- 

TOTAL WORKSHOP 

8 800 

- 

- 

- 

- 

8 800 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 22 A 

>^<>0<XXXXXXXX>00000000000 

















Section F: Financial Plan 


6.2. THE 5-YEAR CAPITAL 
INVESTMENT PROGRAMME 


BUILDINGS 


2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

2020/2021 

5 YEAR TOTAL 

FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT 


25 000 

26 000 

27 000 

28 000 

29 000 

135 000 

COMMUNITY HALLS AND 

OFFICE BUILDINGS 

EQUIT 



5 500 000 

6 500 000 

7 500 000 

19 500 000 

COMMUNITY HALLS AND 

OFFICE BUILDINGS 

CRR 

1 000 000 

1 200 000 

1 400 000 

1 600 000 

1 800 000 

7 000 000 

MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT 


50 000 

52 000 

54 000 

56 000 

58 000 

270 000 

REPLACE NES 6620 


350 000 





350 000 

REPLACE NES 369 



220 000 




220 000 

TOTAL BUILDINGS 


1 425 000 

1 498 000 

6 981 000 

8184 000 

9 387 000 

27 475 000 


WASTE MANAGEMENT 
( REFUSE REMOVAL) 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

2020/2021 

5 YEAR TOTAL 

REFUSE SKIPS AND MASS 
CONTAINERS (ESH, GING AND MTZ) 


300 000 




300 000 

TRANSFER STATION (GINGINDLOVU) 

- 





- 

REFUSE BINS 

50 000 

50 000 

50 000 

50 000 

100 000 

300 000 

SHELTER - RECYCLING MTUNZINI 

- 





- 

MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT 

200 000 


200 000 



400 000 

PARK HOME 

190 000 





190 000 

FENCING - ESHOWE 

TRANSFER STATION 


800 000 




800 000 

REHABILITATION OF ESHOWE 
LANDFILL SITE 

4 500 000 





4 500 000 

REFUSE COMPACTOR 


- 




- 

TOTAL REFUSE REMOVAL 

4 940 000 

1 150 000 

250 000 

50 000 

100 000 

6 490 000 


225 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

o<xxxxxx>oooooc>ooo<x>o<xxx 

















ELECTRICITY 


2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

2020/2021 

5 YEAR TOTAL 

1 X COMPLETE 3 WAY RING 
MAIN UNIT 


2A0 000 

250 000 

260 000 

260 000 


1 010 000 

1 X COMPLETE 3 WAY RING 
MAIN UNIT 

CRR 






- 

1 XAUT0RECL05ER 






320 000 

320 000 

1XAUT0RECL05ER 

CRR 






- 

315kva MINI SUB-STATION 
TRANSFORMER 


250 000 


280 000 



530 000 

UPGRADE ROBOT 

CONTROL SYSTEM 


30 000 



65 000 


95 000 

UPGRADE STREET LIGHTS 


80 000 

90 000 

120 000 

120 000 

130 000 

5A0 000 

UPGRADE STREET LIGHTS 

CRR 






- 

STREET LIGHTS - NEW (R66) 
FROMSIZA GARAGE TO 

SASOL GARAGE 







■ 

TRANSFORMERS INDOOR 


150 000 


180 000 



330 000 

TRANSFORMERS INDOOR 

CRR 






- 

5 X COMPLETE SUBSTATION 
MV PANELS FOR HOSPITAL 
SUB-STATION AND 
INSTALLATION 

CRR 







POLE MOUNTED 
TRANSFORMERS 


110 000 

130 000 

150 000 



390 000 

POLE MOUNTED 
TRANSFORMERS 

CRR 






- 

PROTECTION RELAY 

FOR SUBSTATIONS 







- 

MV SWITCHING SUIT 







- 

ELECTRIFICATION: MTAKWENDE 







- 

SINGLE PHASE 

PREPAID METERS 







- 

SINGLE PHASE 

PREPAID METERS 

CRR 






- 

MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT 



25 000 




25 000 

STANDBY GENERATOR 


- 

- 




- 

REPLACEMENT VEHICLE 

NES 5976 







- 

RUDTHLEDGEPARK 

HOUSING ELECTRIFICATION 




60 000 

1 500 000 

1 500 000 

3 060 000 

REPLACE NES 2756 


700 000 





700 000 

REPLACE NES 6929 



300 000 




300 000 

REPLACE NES 11926 
(POOL VEHICLE) 



270 000 




270 000 

TOTAL ELECTRICITY 


1 560 000 

1 065 000 

1 050 000 

1 9A5 000 

1 950 000 

7 570 000 

TOTAL ENGINEERING SERVICES 


2A 118800 

19 67 A 000 

30 391 080 

35 239 800 

36 838 290 

1A6 261 970 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 226 

XX>0<XXXXXXX>000000000000 










Section F: Financial Plan 


6.2. THE 5-YEAR CAPITAL 
INVESTMENT PROGRAMME 


ADHOC 

FUNDING 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

2020/2021 

5 YEAR TOTAL 

VUMA ROAD (WARDS) 

MIG 

3 945 940 





3 945 940 

MATHUNJANA ROAD (WARD 5) 

MIG 




200 000 

1 300 000 

1 500 000 

MPOFANA ROAD (WARDS) 

MIG 




2 000 000 


2 000 000 

E5H0WE BUS RANK/ 
INDUSTRIAL AREA LINK ROAD 
(WARD 11) 

MIG 


7 587 370 

16 723 540 

463 110 


24 774 020 

MAKHUMALO ROAD (WARD 1 3) 

MIG 




7 000 000 


7 000 000 

EDUKANENI ROAD (WARD 26) 

MIG 




3 000 000 


3 000 000 

MTIPELA ROAD (WARD 3) 

MIG 

5 975 900 





5 975 900 

EMAHUMBE ROAD (WARD 16) 

MIG 




1 500 000 


1 500 000 

BELE ROAD (WARD 2A) 

MIG 

4 300 000 





4 300 000 

MTHETHWA ROAD (WARD 17) 

MIG 




1 500 000 


1 500 000 

MNENGWENI TO ETSHENENI 
BUS STOP (WARD 19) 

MIG 


2 057 000 




2 057 000 

ESIPHEZI ROAD (WARD 9) 

MIG 




2 500 000 


2 500 000 

KD5 BUS ROUTE ROAD 

REHAB (WARD 12) 

MIG 

10490210 





10 490 210 

EMANDAWE ROAD (WARD 10) 

MIG 


1 000 000 




1 000 000 

MBANGAYIYA CAUSEWAY 

AND ROAD (WARD 14) 

MIG 


1 621 160 




1 621 160 

EYETHENIROAD (WARD 21) 

MIG 


205 190 

2 864 410 



3 069 600 

MFOFOLOZI CAUSEWAY (WARD 1) 

MIG 


5 492 760 




5 492 760 

EMADIDIMA CAUSEWAY AND 
BRIDGE (WARD 1) 

MIG 




3 000 

000 


3 000 

000 

MBABHA CAUSEWAY (WARD 2) 

MIG 


1 500 000 




1 500 000 

KWANTOMBELA ROAD (WARD 2) 

MIG 




3 500 000 


3 500 000 

KWAMANUKUZANA ROAD 
(WARD 22) 

MIG 




629 480 

2 886 800 

3 516 280 

NDONGANE ROAD (WARD 26) 

MIG 





4 000 000 

4 000 000 

HLUNGWINI CAUSEWAY/ 

ROAD (WARD 5) 

MIG 


1 500 000 

3 135 590 



4 635 590 


Til UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

o<xxxxxx>oooooc>ooo<x>o<xxx 











ADHOC 


FUNDING 2016/2017 2017/2018 2018/2019 2019/2020 2020/2021 5YEART0TAL 


EMTILOMBO CAUSEWAY 
(WARD 10) 

MIG 


1 700 000 




1 700 000 

ENEMBE R0AD-A1662 
(WARD 6) 

MIG 



3 358 110 



3 358110 

ENEMBE CAUSEWAY (WARD 6) 

MIG 




3 500 000 


3 500 000 

MANYATHI CAUSEWAY 
(WARD 23) 

MIG 




2 859 210 


2 859 210 

VEKEZA ROAD (WARD 17) 

MIG 


1 000 000 




1 000 000 

YIMBA PEDESTRIAN 
CAUSEWAY (WARD 19) 

MIG 



3 085150 



3 085 150 

UMKHUZE RD CAUSEWAY 
(WARD 17) 

MIG 




3 000 000 


3 000 000 

KWA S'BHAMU ROAD (WARD 20) 

MIG 




2 350 000 


2 350 000 

OHIKA ROAD (WARD 2A) 

MIG 


1 956 950 




1 956 950 

EZINGWENYA ROAD (WARD 1 5) 

MIG 


1 500 000 




1 500 000 

GINGINDLOVU STORM WATER 
(WARD 18) 

MIG 


2 000 000 

2 000 000 



4 000 000 

KWNGUQU ROAD (WARD 20) 

MIG 




950 000 


950 000 

NGILANDELA ROAD (WARD 5) 

MIG 





2 000 000 

2 000 000 

MATSHEKAZANA ROAD (WARD 1) 

MIG 





1 600 000 

1 600 000 

EMVINI ROAD (WARD 26) 

MIG 





3 500 000 

3 500 000 

EMASUNDWINI ROAD (WARD 19) 

MIG 





3 000 000 

3 000 000 

MABHOKO ROAD (WARD 17) 

MIG 





2 500 000 

2 500 000 

EMACHANCA CAUSEWAY 
(WARD 8) 

MIG 





9 000 000 

9 000 000 

KWABHODWENI ROAD (WARD 22) 

MIG 





1 200 000 

1 200 000 

ROADS 


2A 712 050 

29120A30 

31 166800 

37 951 800 

30 986 800 

153 937 880 

TOTAL ENGINEERING SERVICES 


53 520850 

A9 89A 430 

61 557 880 

73191 600 

67 825 090 

305 989 850 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 228 

XX>0<XXXXXXXX>00000000000 











Section F: Financial Plan 


6.3. A SUMMARY OF THE OPERATIONAL BUDGET 
(2016/2017) 

The tables below proviide a summary of Operational Buidget of the Municipality for the 2016/201 7 Financial Year: 


DEPARTMENT 

PROPERTY 

RATES 

PROPERTY 

RATES 

PENALTIES 

SERVICE 

CHARGES 

RENTAL OF 
FACILITIES 

INTEREST 
EARNED EXT 
INVESTMENTS 


Mayoral Office 







Municipal Manager 







Planning and development 







Corp Services: Administration 







Corp Services: Halls and Offices 




166 500.00 



Corp Services: Halls and Offices 




166 500.00 



Corp Services: Museum 







Corp Services: Libraries 







Corp Services: Sports Club 




11 350.00 



Corp Services: Grant-in-aid 







Corp Services: Council General 
Expenses 

AA 170 670.00 




A 116 120.00 


Traffic 







Fire Fighting 







Disaster Management 







Aerodrome 







Testing Grounds 







Financial Services 


792 330.00 





Stores 







Health 







Clinics 







Recreation Grounds 







Parks, Gardens and Estates 




1 280 A20.00 



Swimming Pools 







Caravan Park 







Cemetries 







Engineering Services: 
Administration 







Roads and Streets 




- 



Workshop 







Buildings 







Staff Housing 




92 990.00 



Public Conveniences 







Street Cleaning 







Refuse Removal 



1 1 A22 000.00 




Sub Total 

AA 170 670.00 

792 330.00 

1 1 A22 000.00 

1 551 260.00 

A 116 120.00 



229 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

o<xxxxxx>oooooc>o<xxx>o<xxx 









INTEREST EARNED 
OUTSTANDING 
DEBTORS 

FINES 

LICENCES AND 
PERMITS 

GRANTS AND 
SUBSIDIES 

OTHER INCOME 

TOTAL REVENUE 





100 000.00 


100 000.00 





- 


- 




4 360.00 

2 850 000.00 

442 120.00 

3 296 480.00 




- 

- 

218 880.00 

218 880.00 





450 000.00 


616 500.00 





450 000.00 


616 500.00 





557 000.00 


557 000.00 



1 1 000.00 


3 454 000.00 

3 110.00 

3 468110.00 







11 350.00 












161 313 470.00 

396 130.00 

209 996 390.00 



23 700 000.00 

11 190.00 

636 700.00 

5 900.00 

24 353 790.00 





400 000.00 

1 180.00 

401 180.00 





750 000.00 


750 000.00 







- 




3 782 580.00 



3 782 580.00 


39 A 460.00 



1 625 000.00 

135 530.00 

2 947 320.00 







- 





3 800 000.00 


3 800 000.00 





- 


- 







- 





1 956 770.00 

50.00 

3 237 240.00 






7 080.00 

7 080.00 






16 500.00 

16 500.00 






188 590.00 

188 590.00 





600 000.00 

- 

600 000.00 





10 326 960.00 


10 326 960.00 







- 







- 






- 

92 990.00 






1 180.00 

1 180.00 






1 300.00 

1 300.00 





4 464 400.00 

176 690.00 

16 063 090.00 


394 460.00 

23 711 000.00 

3 798 130.00 

193 284 300.00 

1 594 240.00 

284 834 510.00 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 230 

>^<>0<XXXXXXXX>00000000000 








Section F: Financial Plan 


6.3. A SUMMARY OF THE OPERATIONAL BUDGET 

(2016/2017) ...continued 

The tables below proviide a summary of Operational Bu(jget of the Municipality for the 2016/201 7 Financial Year: 


DEPARTMENT 

PROPERTY 

RATES 

PROPERTY 

RATES 

PENALTIES 

SERVICE 

CHARGES 

RENTAL OF 
FACILITIES 

INTEREST 
EARNED EXT 
INVESTMENTS 


Housing 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 


Electricity 

- 

- 

65 860 670.00 

- 

- 


Sub Total 

- 

- 

65 860 670.00 

- 

- 


Total Revenue 

AA 170 670.00 

792 330.00 

77 282 670.00 

1 551 260.00 

A 116 120.00 









Housing: Gingindlovu 







Housing: Mpushini Park 







Housing: Sunnydale 




- 




- 

- 

- 

- 

- 









Electricity: Administration 







Electricity: Distribution 



65 860 670.00 





- 

- 

65 860 670.00 

- 

- 



Table 112: Summary of Operational Budget (2016/2017): Revenue 










INTEREST EARNED 
OUTSTANDING 
DEBTORS 

FINES 

LICENCES AND 
PERMITS 

GRANTS AND 
SUBSIDIES 

OTHER INCOME 

TOTAL REVENUE 



- 

- 

- 

83 620.00 

83 620.00 



208 980.00 

- 

10 015 700.00 

346 600.00 

76 431 950.00 



208 980.00 

- 

10 015 700.00 

430 220.00 

76 515 570.00 


394 460.00 

23 919 980.00 

3 798130.00 

203 300 000.00 

2 024 460.00 

361 350 080.00 












- 

50 630.00 

50 630.00 





- 

32 990.00 

32 990.00 





- 


- 



- 

- 

- 

83 620.00 

83 620.00 












10 015 700.00 


10 015 700.00 



208 980.00 



346 600.00 

66 416 250.00 



208 980.00 

- 

10 015 700.00 

346 600.00 

76 431 950.00 






0Cx><XXXXx)i0<XxXx>OO 


.4 • 








Section F: Financial Plan 


DEPARTMENT 

EMPLOYEE 
RELATED COSTS 

REMUNERATION 
OF COUNCILLORS 

BAD DEBTS 

DEPRECIATION 

REPAIRS AND 
MAINTENANCE 

FINANCE COSTS 


Mayoral Office 

2 085 350.00 

850 350.00 



168 340.00 



Municipal Manager 

5 707 880.00 




43 260.00 



Planning and development 

6 473 320.00 




97 070.00 



Corp Services: Administration 

6 034 680.00 




12 320.00 



Corp Services: 

Halls and Offices 

1 294 420.00 




80 620.00 



Corp Services: Museum 

687 610.00 




5 380.00 



Corp Services: Libraries 

3 459 400.00 




10 980.00 



Corp Services: Sports Club 





- 



Corp Services: Grant-in-aid 








Corp Services: Council 
General Expenses 

4 414 530.00 

18187 600.00 

970 350.00 

26 465 710.00 

755 240.00 

6 690.00 


Traffic 

11 519 400.00 


20 145 000.00 


729 370.00 



Fire Fighting 

5 610 310.00 




551 430.00 



Disaster Management 

51 170.00 




27 410.00 



Aerodrome 





7 670.00 



Testing Grounds 

2 476 160.00 




63 510.00 



Financial Services 

8 533 310.00 




96 730.00 



Stores 

2 504 500.00 




1 310.00 



Health 

3 847 180.00 




71 670.00 



Clinics 

- 




- 



Recreation Grounds 

123 400.00 




211 000.00 



Parks, Gardens and Estates 

6 084 600.00 




991 000.00 



Swimming Pools 

838 770.00 




12 550.00 



Caravan Park 





7 850.00 



Cemetries 

- 




42 200.00 



Engineering Services: 
Administration 

1 742 410.00 




7 060.00 



Roads and Streets 

5 226 600.00 




13 614 790.00 

709 490.00 


Workshop 

661 230.00 




55 570.00 



Buildings 

650 460.00 




407 590.00 



Staff Housing 





62 170.00 



Public Conveniences 

547 020.00 




1 1 040.00 



Street Cleaning 

3 244 020.00 







Refuse Removal 

4 088 790.00 


318 690.00 

83 710.00 

766 810.00 



Sub Total 

87 906 520.00 

19 037 950.00 

21 434 040.00 

26 549 420.00 

18 911 940.00 

716 180.00 










Housing 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 


Electricity 

6 475 070.00 

- 

318 170.00 

3 348 570.00 

1 723 940.00 

81 110.00 


Sub Total 

6 475 070.00 

- 

318 170.00 

3 348 570.00 

1 723 940.00 

81 110.00 










Total Expenditure 

94 381 590.00 

19 037 950.00 

21 752 210.00 

29 897 990.00 

20 635 880.00 

797 290.00 


Housing: Gingindlovu 








Housing: Mpushini Park 

- 




- 



Housing: Sunnydale 

- 




- 




- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 










Electricity: Administration 

2 087 970.00 







Electricity: Distribution 

4 387 100.00 


318 170.00 

3 348 570.00 

1 723 940.00 

81 110.00 



6 475 070.00 

- 

318 170.00 

3 348 570.00 

1 723 940.00 

81 110.00 



Table 113: Summary of Operational Budget (2016/2017): Expenditure 


233 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

o<xxxxxx>oooooc>oo<xx>o<xxx 










BULK PURCHASES 

CONTRACTED 

SERVICES 

MEDICAL AND 
LONG SERVICE 

GENERAL 

EXPENSES 

TRANFERSAND 

GRANTS 

STAFF LEAVE 

TOTAL 

EXPENDITURE 



649 900.00 


300 880.00 



4 054 820.00 



1 289 060.00 


55 500.00 



7 095 700.00 



443 130.00 


3 140 120.00 



10 153 640.00 



513 920.00 


98 980.00 



6 659 900.00 



31 630.00 


907 980.00 



2 314 650.00 



4 840.00 



311 920.00 


1 009 750.00 



184 510.00 


515 030.00 



4 169 920.00 



4 050.00 





4 050.00 






510 000.00 


510 000.00 



629 570.00 

8 163 170.00 

22 170 380.00 


900 180.00 

82 663 420.00 



10810510.00 


117 020.00 



43 321 300.00 



62 380.00 


423 040.00 



6 647 160.00 



19 890.00 


756 220.00 



854 690.00 



6 130.00 





13 800.00 



41 850.00 


136 650.00 



2 718 170.00 



1 488 020.00 


1 879 120.00 



11 997 180.00 



105 690.00 


29 540.00 



2 641 040.00 



97 850.00 


4 035 600.00 



8 052 300.00 



- 


- 



- 








334 400.00 



2 089 280.00 


2 389 900.00 



1 1 554 780.00 



6 970.00 


56 600.00 



914 890.00 



- 


7 690.00 



15 540.00 



1 540.00 


16 900.00 



60 640.00 



137 240.00 


752 140.00 



2 638 850.00 



164 510.00 


126 750.00 



19 842 140.00 



1 770.00 


18 830.00 



737 400.00 





4 800.00 



1 062 850.00 



900.00 


49 500.00 



112 570.00 



3 240.00 


229 920.00 



791 220.00 



705 870.00 


3 670.00 



3 953 560.00 



5 070 420.00 

370 000.00 

2 025 000.00 

1 703 530.00 

231 900.00 

14 658 850.00 


- 

24 564 670.00 

8 533 170.00 

40 247 760.00 

2 525 450.00 

1 132 080.00 

251 559 180.00 










- 

61 760.00 

- 

- 


- 

61 760.00 


51 9A9 320.00 

1 246 350.00 

580 000.00 

12 423 850.00 

1 415 700.00 

501 480.00 

80 063 560.00 


51 9A9 320.00 

1 308 110.00 

580 000.00 

12 423 850.00 

1 415 700.00 

501 480.00 

80 125 320.00 










51 9A9 320.00 

25 872 780.00 

9 113 170.00 

52 671 610.00 

3 941 150.00 

1 633 560.00 

331 684 500.00 



36 390.00 





36 390.00 



25 140.00 


- 



25 140.00 



230.00 


- 



230.00 


- 

61 760.00 

- 

- 


- 

61 760.00 










51 949 320.00 

1 095 640.00 


9 397 610.00 

1 415 700.00 


65 946 240.00 



150 710.00 

580 000.00 

3 026 240.00 


501 480.00 

14 117 320.00 


51 949 320.00 

1 246 350.00 

580 000.00 

12 423 850.00 

1 415 700.00 

501 480.00 

80 063 560.00 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 23 A 

>^<>0<XXXXXXXX>00000000000 









Section F: Financial Plan 


The total expenditure relating to Council and Executive includes the Draft equitable share projected expenditure (included as General 
Expenses under the Council Vote) and is summarized in the table below: 


EQUITABLE SHARE ALLOCATION 

AUDITED 

2013/2014 

BUDGET 

2014/2015 

ADJUSTED 

2014/2015 

BUDGET 

2015/2016 

BUDGET 

2016/2017 

BUDGET 

2017/2018 

Equitable share: International relations 

-100 000 

-150 000 

- 

-100 000 

-100 000 

-100 000 

Equitable share: Land use 
management system 


-1 000 000 

-1 000 000 

-1 000 000 

- 


Equitable share: Communty halls 
maintenance (Rural) 

-100 000 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Equitable share: Communty halls 
maintenance (Urban) 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Equitable share: 

Caretaking-rural buildings 

-60 000 

-200 000 

-60 000 

-300 000 

-A50 000 

-500 000 

Equitable share: Youth development 

-ABO 000 

-AOO 000 

-A90 000 

-8A0 000 

-550 000 

-600 000 

Equitable share: 

Early childhood development 

- 

-300 000 

- 

-350 000 

-AOO 000 

-AOO 000 

Equitable share: 

Community support programme 

-360 000 

-300 000 

-580 000 

-350 000 

-350 000 

-350 000 

Equitable share: 

Local economic development 

-2 090 880 

-1 990 560 

-1 60A 760 

-695 000 

-2 600 000 

-2 000 000 

Equitable share: Ceremonial events 

-50 000 

-100 000 

-100 000 

-110 000 

-120 000 

-130 000 

Equitable share: 

Commemorative celebrations 

-50 000 

-100 000 

-115 000 

-120 000 

-130 000 

-1A0 000 

Equitable share: Rates relief 

-AA 779 900 

-53 908 AOO 

-53 320170 

-70 7AA100 

-7A 725 AOO 

-82 061 730 

Equitable share: Depreciation relief 

-7 099 000 

-6 508 190 

-6 508 190 

-6 859 630 

-7 230 050 

-7 620A70 

Equitable share: Poverty alleviation 

-3 OAO 200 

-2 3A5 9A0 

-2 902 100 

-3 AA1 800 

-3 200 000 

-3 000 000 

Equitable share: Councillor's remuneration 

-6 163 060 

-8 962 000 

-8 962 000 

-9 391 000 

-9 822 000 

-10 260 000 

Equitable share: 

Ward committee remuneration 

-633 980 

-1 580 000 

-1 000 000 

-1 000 000 

-1 000 000 

-1 000 000 

Equitable share: Youth business 
advisory centre 

-370 000 

-150 000 

-150 000 

-200 000 

-250 000 

-300 000 

Equitable share: 

Re-valuation of properties 


-1 100 000 

-1 100 000 

- 

- 

- 

Equitable share: Animal pound facility 

-700 000 

-712 A20 

-615 850 

-597 8A0 

-636 700 

-678 080 

Equitable share: Rural fire prevention 

-200 000 

-300 000 

-300 000 

-350 000 

-AOO 000 

-A50 000 

Equitable share: Disaster assistance 

-630 000 

-518A50 

-650 000 

-700 000 

-750 000 

-800 000 

Equitable share: Indigent register 




-1 000 000 



Equitable share: 

Humanitarian assistance 

-700 000 

-600 000 

-700 000 

-800 000 

-800 000 

-850 000 

Equitable share: Sport development 

-730 000 

-512 000 

-722 000 

-1 300 000 

-1 300 000 

-1 300 000 

Equitable share: Cultural development 

-70 000 

-200 000 

-200 000 

-550 000 

-200 000 

-200 000 

Equitable share: Local Aids Council 

-A22 800 

-350 000 

-350 000 

-500 000 

-550 000 

-600 000 

Equitable share: Special programmes 


-A85 000 

-A85 000 

-650 000 

-550 000 

-600 000 

Equitable share: 

Operation Sukuma Sakhe 


-250 000 

-250 000 

-350 000 

-AOO 000 

-A50 000 

Equitable share: 

Work creation projects 

-1 OAO 000 

-903 070 

-1 200 000 

-1 ABA 000 

-1 300 000 

-1 300 000 

Equitable share: 

Sports fields - security 

-321 OAO 

-323 600 

-323 600 

-339 780 

-356 770 

-37A610 

Equitable share: 

Rural grounds maintenance 

-100 000 

-200 000 

-93 000 

-300 000 

-300 000 

-300 000 


235 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

o<xxxxxx>ooooooooo<x>o<xxx 










EQUITABLE SHARE ALLOCATION 

AUDITED 

BUDGET 

ADJUSTED 

BUDGET 

BUDGET 

BUDGET 


2013/2014 

2014/2015 

2014/2015 

2015/2016 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

Equitable share: 

Rural roads and causeways 

-7 912 800 

-8 379 250 

-9 008 750 

-9 504 230 

-10 326 960 

-9 286 180 

Equitable share: 

Rehabilitation of urban roads 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Equitable share: Little Flower parking 

- 


- 




Equitable share: Free refuse 

-1 363 100 

-1 551 430 

-1 560 230 

-1 650 170 

-1 703 530 

-1 793 810 

Equitable share: Solid waste relief 

-2 127 890 

-2 345 850 

-2 345 850 

-2 619 420 

-2 760 870 

-2 909 960 

Equitable share: Naickerville top up 

- 

- 

- 

- 



Equitable share: Free electricity 

-1 095 850 

-1 198 860 

-1 120 540 

-1 336 130 

-1 415 700 

-1 500 880 

Equitable share: 

Electricity meters conversions 

-100 000 

-150 000 

-150 000 

-300 000 

-300 000 

-150 000 

Equitable share: 

Electricity metering audit 




-300 000 

-300 000 

-300 000 

Equitable share: 

Increase in Eskom supply 

- 

-4 971 770 

-4 971 770 

- 

- 

- 


-82 860 500 

-103046790 

-102938810 

-120103100 

-125 277980 

-132 305 720 

Capital projects contribution 

-8 466 500 

-7 892 210 

-8 000190 

-25 433 900 

-22 868 020 

-13 642 280 


-91 327000 

-110939000 

-110939000 

-145537000 

-148146000 

-145 948 000 


Table 114: Equitable Share Projected Allocations for 2016/2017 

6.4. PROJECTS TO BE IMPLEMENTED BY 
SECTOR DEPARTMENTS 

6.4.1. 1. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT: PROJECTS COMPLETED 
WITHIN 2014/2015 FINANCIAL YEAR 


ROAD NO. 

LOCATION 

ACTIVITY 

QUANTITY (KM) 

WARD NO 

AWARD AMOUNT 

D1546 

Mvuzane 

Betterment & Regravelling 

6.3 

1 

R1, 539, 434.80 

D313 

Ntumeni 

Betterment & Regravelling 

5.7 

8 

R1,655,441.45 

P518 

Nshidi 

Betterment & Regravelling 

5.5 

22 

R1,423,815.75 

D356 

Ngudwini 

Betterment & Regravelling 

5.3 

5,6 

R1, 741, 109.02 

D133 

Ntumeni 

Betterment & Regravelling 

3.6 

7 

R1, 157,749.17 

D528 

Esiphezi 

Betterment & Regravelling 

2.4 

9 

R91 7,072.45 

P311 

Ntumeni 

Betterment & Regravelling 

4.3 

8 

R1,605,547.27 

P218 

eMadidima 

Betterment & Regravelling 

4.2 

3 

R1,350,041.71 

D777 

KwaKhoza 

Betterment & Regravelling 

2.9 

15 

R880,625.72 

A1664 

Zule 

New Gravel Road 

1.7 

6 

R91 6,080.67 

L888 

Ngudwini 

New Gravel Road 

3.0 

5 

R1, 187,808.49 

Various 

Roads 

Various 
roads under 
uMlalazi 

Blacktop Patching 

7477.31m" 


R4,255,990.07 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 236 

>^<>0<XXXXXXXX>00000000000 
















Section F: Financial Plan 


6.4.1. 2. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT: 
PROGRESS ON 2015/16 PROJECTS 


ROAD NO 

LOCATION 

ACTIVITY 

PLANNED 
OUTPUTS (KM) 

WARD NO 

PROJECT STATUS 

BUDGET 

D1592 

Ndlangubo 

Regravelling 

5.6 

24 

100% Complete 

R 1,680, 000.00 

D1562 

Mhlathuzana 

Regravelling 

4.6 

23 

100% Complete 

R1,333,000.00 

D465 

Vuma 

Regravelling 

6.0 

8 

100% Complete 

R1,570,000.00 

D2262 

Dakeni 

Regravelling 

3.2 

3 

100% Complete 

R 1,400,000.00 

L627 

Sgodo 

Regravelling 

6.6 

14 

100% Complete 

R2,000,000.00 

D528 

Siphezi 

Regravelling 

6.2 

8 

100% Complete 

R2,000,000.00 

D135 

KwaKhoza 

Regravelling 

4 

15 

0% - 10% (Awarded/ 
Awaiting Introduction) 

R1, 720,000.00 

D1553 

Manzamnyama 

Regravelling 

5 

21 

Tender phase (Appealed) 

R 1,890,000.00 

D1554 

Manzamnyama 

Regravelling 

2.2 

22 

0% - 10% (Awarded) 

R990,000.00 

L590 

Mvuzane 

Regravelling 

4.0 

1 

0% - 10% (Commenced) 

R1,410,000.00 

L797 

Kwelomoya 

Regravelling 

1.1 

10 

0% - 10% (Awarded 
Awaitng Introduction) 

R590,000.00 

L627 

Sgodo 

Regravelling 

3.0 

14 

0%- 10% 

R900,000.00 


6.4.1. 3. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT: 
2016/17 PLANNED PROJECTS 


ROAD NO 

LOCATION 

ACTIVITY 

QUANTITY (KM) 

WARD NO 

BUDGET 1 

L593 

Bhekeshowe 

Regravelling 

4.0 km 

Ward 25 

R1, 650,000 

D356 

Ngudwini 

Regravelling 

4.0 km 

Ward 5 

R1, 700,000 

D1553 

KwaGolela 

Regravelling 

4.0 km 

Ward 21 

R2,000,000 

D1549 

Khoza 

Regravelling 

4.0 km 

Ward 15 

R1, 650,000 

D1592 

Ndlangubo 

Regravelling 

3.9 km 

Ward 25 

R1, 750,000 

LI 750 

Ndlangubo 

Regravelling 

4.0 km 

Ward 26 

R 1,800,000 

D356 

Nkanini 

Regravelling 

3.8 km 

Ward 7 

R1, 950,000 

LI 250 

Mpungose 

Regravelling 

4.0 km 

Ward 10 

R2,000,000 

L593 

Mvuzane 

Regravelling 

4.0 km 

Ward 1 

R2,000,000 

D1553 

Kholweni 

Regravelling 

4.0 km 

Ward 8 

R1, 950,000 

L627 

Sgodo 

Regravelling 

1.6 km 

Ward 22 

R1, 150,000 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

















6.4.I.4. REPORT ON P218/710 
(NTUMENI TO SUNDUMBILI) 

BACKGROUND 

This road traverses over three Traditional Authority Areas 
namely; Ntuli TA, Zulu TA and Biyela TA. Once complete, this 
road with a total length of 5Akm will be a short direct route 
to Sundumbili for the Ntumeni Mbongolwane and Nkandia 
communities. This road will also reduce the travel distance by 
an average 2Akm for these communities. The upgrade from 
gravel to blacktop will improve accesiblity of amenities such as 
schools and Mbongolwane Hospital and Mbongolwane Police 
Station for the three TA. 

PROJECT DETAILS AND PROGRESS 

P218: From 0km - 6.3km: this section is currently under 
construction and surfacing of this section is planned to be 
completed at the end of March 2016, this will exclude 600m 
for the two culverts that are still to be constructed. 

Culverts at 1 .79km, 3km and S.Akm mark: these three contracts 
for the construction of the three culverts were advertised in 
February 2016 and is anticipated to be awarded by the end of 
April 2016 and the planned to be compoleted by October 2016. 

P7 1 0: Km 25.5 - 3A.7km mark: a surfacing contractor has been 
established on the site and is busy with the slurryseal and will 
commence with the double seal at the end of March 2016, this 
contract is expected to be complete by the end of April 2016. 


Km 19.0 - Km 25.5: This conctract will be advertised by the 
end of April 201 6and the awarded contractor will be expected 
to establish a sitein August 2016 and this will be a 1 2 month 
contract, expected to be completed in July 201 7. 

Between Ngudwini and Sundumbili: Nembe River Bridge at 
6.3km - this tender will be advertised by the end of July 2016 
and is expected to be awarded by October 2016. This will be a 
1 0 month contract expected to be completed by in August 201 7. 

Culvert at 5.3km: It is estimated that this tender will be 
advertised in June 2016 and will be awarded by the end of 
September 201 6. It is a 6 month contract that will be expected 
to be completed in March 2017. 

Km 1 A.5 - km 1 9.0: The tender for the earthworks, layerworks 
and surfacing will be advertised in November 2016 and is 
expected to be awarded in April 2017. This is a 10 month 
contract whill be expected to be completed in February 2018. 

Km 10 - Km 1A.5: It is estimated that the tender will be 
advertised in May 2017 and expected to be awarded in 
Sptember 2017. The contract is 10 months and is expected to 
be completed in December 2018. 

CURRENT PROGRESS: 

A surfacing contractor is currently busy on site with the surfacing 
(sections km 25.5 to km 3A.7 and km 0.0 to km 6.3) and is 
expected to be completed by the end of April 2016. By the end 
of the 2015/16 financial year, 1 0.2 km out of the total 1 A.2 km 
will be completed (Surfaced). 


T- 










Section F: Financial Plan 


6A2. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 


WARD 

NO. 

LOCAL AREA 
(ISIGODI ETC) 

STRATEGIC 

PILLAR/ 

PROGRAMME 

PROJECT/ 

FARM 

NAME 

COMMODITY 
(EG CROP, 
LAYER/ 
BROILER, 

MAIZE, BEANS, 
VEGETABLE 

ETC) 

PROJECT ACTIVITIES 

PROJECT 

SIZE 

PROJECT 

ESTIMATED 

BUDGET 

20 

Ezingeni 

Communal 

Ibutho 

vegetables 

Fencing, irrigation 
system and 
production inputs 

10 tunnels 
(10x30nn) 

R 1 690 750.00 

15 

Kwa Khoza 

Food security 

KwaKhoza 

community 

garden 

cluster 

Beans, maize 
and vegetables 

Irrigation and 
production inputs 

9,6ha 

R 1 055 765.30 

26 

Ntshelusthelu 

Food security 

Ifalethu 

vegetables 

Fencing, irrigation 
system and 
production inputs 

2ha 

R273 531.81 

14 

Mhlathuzana 

Food security 

Mpungose 

Cluster 

Vegetables 
and field crop 

Fencing, irrigation 
system and 
production inputs 

14,8ha 

R2 506 988.21 

7 

Nkanini 

Commercial 

Superior 

Veg 

Tomatoes 

Backhouse, weather 
station, irrigation 
and inputs 

15 tunnels 
(10x30m) 

R780 460.00 

6 

Mombeni 

Commercial 

Nolanga 

piggery 

Piggery 

Fencing, building of 
structure, buying 
of sows and boers 
and feed 

100 

sow unit 

R6 005 910.00 

20 

Obanjeni 

Commercial 

Sizanathi 

Piggery 

Fencing, building 
of structure, buying 
of sows and boers 
and feed 

100 

sow unit 

R8 083 710.00 

20 

Obanjeni 

Commercial 

Nyathuko 
layers 1 

Eggs 

Building of 
structure, 
production inputs 
and buying of layers 

3000 layers 

R1 864 264.00 

26 

Nkwalini 

Land reform 

Thulwane 

Sugar cane, 
citrus and 
vegetables 

Land prepartion, 
production inputs, 
establishment of 
veg and citrus 


R4 597 401.52 

20 

Obanjeni 

Communal 

Nyathuko 2 

Vegetables 

Layer house, 
packhouse, fencing, 
3000 layers 
and inputs 

10 tunnels 
(10x30m) 

R2 268 380.00 

1 

Mpaphala 

Communal 

Mayiphe- 

ndulwe 

Broiler 

Fencing, building of 
broiler structure and 
production inputs 

7x 

(10x10) m 

R2 893 543.70 

6 

Nembe 

Food security 

Nembe 

Cluster 

Vegetables 

Fencing,irrigation 
system and 
production inputs 


R2 178 853.68 

3 

Mphundumane 

Food security 

Gcefeza 

Goats 

Goats 

Fencing,division 
of camps, building 
of shed and buy 
of rams 

183 ha 

R2 158 000.00 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 










6.4.3. PRIVATE SECTOR DEVELOPMENTS 


WARD NO. 

LOCAL AREA (ISIGODI ETC) 

PROJECT ESTIMATED BUDGET 

1. Mombeni Community Service Centre (Ward 5) 

CoGTA 

COMPLETE 

2. Mixed use Development 
(portion of Bus and Taxi Rank site) Ward 1 1 

Private developer 

Tender stage 

3. KDS shopping centre (Ward 1 2) 

Private Developer 

ONGOING 

A. Eshowe Private clinic (Ward 11) 

Private Developer 

DELAYED 

5. Dam development Eshowe 


NO PROGRESS 

6. Mtunzini Mixed use Development (Ward 19) 

Private Developer 

uThungulu services unable to cater for the 
Development 

7. R66 shopping centre Ward 18 

Private Developer 

COMPLETE 

8. Mtunzini Town Square 

Private Developer 

Awaiting for the Developer to submits PDA 
application 

9. Mtunzini Beach Development & Blue flag 

Municipality, KZN Wild life 
&WESSA 



6.4.4. ELECTRICITY (ESKOM/MLALAZI LM) 

Where Indicated Schedule 6 Electrification 


WARD 

PROJECT 

NAME 

PRIORITISED 

NUMBER OF 
CONNECTIONS 

AMOUNT 

STATUS REPORT 

WAY FORWARD 

1 

Bongela 
/ Mbileni 
2012/13 

2015/16 Eskom 
Project 

400 (464 on 
Eskom list) 

R8.316.019 

mil 

New contractor 
appointed & on site 

Aug 201 5 

Poles planted & busy 
with MV & LV - will 
complete project per 
zone with outages. 
Proposed first outage 
22/2/2016 

Project -funding 
approved for 2015/16, 
Contractor commenced 
Aug 201 5 

1 

Izinyosi 

Phase 1 Pre 

Eng. 2016/17 

260 (multiyear) 

R7,02 mil 

No NPR received form 
Eskom with polygon. 

Capacity to confirm 
from Eskom 



Phase 2 Funding 

application 

2017/18 

Phase 3 Funding 
application 
2018/19 to 
complete project 



Signed letter 7/3/2016 
to DOE from MM to 
use portion of R3,9 mil 
for pre engineering 

Premarketing & 
preparations to 
readiness will be 
carried out on 
project 2016/17 

Funds will be apply for 
201 7/18 to Dept of 
Energy during 2016 to 
continue with project. 

2 

Nhlalidakiwe 

2015/16 

Eskom Project 

82 on Eskom 
list Stage B 

R 8.0 mil 

R 4.230 mil 

Meeting 

21/7/2015 -introduce 
KSN contractor 

Project - funding 
approved for 2015/16 






Muzi DIamini 
08A9779353 







Project complete 



UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 2 AO 

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Section F: Financial Plan 


6.4A. ELECTRICITY (ESKOM/MLALAZI LM) 

Where Indicated Schedule 6 Electrification 


WARD 

PROJECT 

NAME 

PRIORITISED 

NUMBER OF 
CONNECTIONS 

AMOUNT 

STATUS REPORT 

WAY FORWARD 

3 

Silambo 

2016/17 

Eskom Project 

570 

connections as 
per polygon 


Polygon received 
for project 

Eskom to commence 

Nov 2015 with Eng 
processes for 2016/17 

4 

Masundwini 

Emasundwini 

& 

Umngwenya, 

area 

Schedule six 
to commence 
2016/17 

Phase 2 

Funding 

application 

2017/18 

Phase 3 

Funding 
application 
2018/19 to 
complete project 

325 

R8, 775 mil 

NoNPR 
received from 
Eskom with 
Polygon. 
Capacity to 
confirm 
from Eskom 

Umlalazi to commence 
with schedule six 

Signed letter 
’^7/3/2016 to DOE 
from MM to use 
portion of R3,9 mil for 
pre engineering 

Premarketing & 
preparations to 
readiness will be 
carried out on project 
2016/17 

Funds will be apply for 
201 7/18 to Dept of 
Energy during 2016 to 
continue with project. 

5 

Hayinyanna / 

Zimbidli 

2013/2014 

Project - 
funding 
approved 
for 2015/16. 

801 

(808 on 

Eskom list) 

R 12 

300,431 
(ward 5 & 6) 

SWER line upgraded 
to three phase supply 
to assist project. - 
15/1/2015 meeting 
(add funding process) 

New contractor will 
move on site this week 
-end 20-21 /02/2016 

Eskom Project will 
commence 1 Oct 2015 

email from James 
2016-02-19 

5 

Ngudwini 
- sub ward 
Ngilandela 

2016 

Infills type 2 

150 


Abandoned by Eskom 
during the Samungu 
electrification project. 

On 25/2/2016- 
service provider 
headed by Ms Gugu 
was awarded the 
type 2 electrification 
contract, and was 
accordingly introduced 
to MM. 

2/3/2016 she 
introduced herself to 
the Ward Cnclr.& 
conducted the survey 
and identified houses 
that need to be 
installed with type 2 
(Bundles) . 
return on 5/3/2016 
with material and 
commence the 
installation of infills. 

MM email to 

Eskom 9/3/2016 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 










WARD 

PROJECT 

NAME 

PRIORITISED 

NUMBER OF 
CONNECTIONS 

AMOUNT 

STATUS REPORT 

WAY FORWARD 

5 

Ngudwini 

Areas 

include 

- Kwa 

Shayinja, 

Mahuzu, 

Magwaza, 

Abathembu 

2016/17 

Phase 2 

Funding 

application 

2017/18 

Phase 3 

Funding 
application 
2018/19 to 
complete project 

786 

R22 mil 

NPR received 
from Eskom 
with Polygon 

Umlalazi to take 
project over from 

Eskom & commence 
with schedule six 

Signed letter 7/3/2016 
to DOE from MM to 
use portion of R3,9 mil 
for pre engineering 

Premarketing & 
preparations to 
readiness will be 
carried out on project 
2016/17 

Funds will be apply for 
201 7/18 to Dept of 
Energy during 2016 to 
continue with project. 

Capacity constrain 
(will only be available 
with completion of 
Hayinyama project) 

6 

Hayinyama / 
Zimbidli 

Project - 
funding 
approved for 
2015/16. 

801 

(741 on 

Eskom list) 

R 13.99 mil 

2014/15 project. 

SWER line upgraded to 
three phase supply to 
assist project. 

New contractor will 
move on site this week 
-end 20-21 /02/2016 

Eskom Project will 
commence 1 Oct 2015 

email from James 
2016-02-19 

7 

Emahusheni 

Schedule six 
to commence 
2016/17 

Phase 2 Funding 

application 

2017/18 

Phase 3 Funding 
application 
2018/19 to 
complete project 

120 

R3,24mil 

No NPR 
received from 
Eskom with 
Polygon. 
Capacity 
to confirm 
from Eskom 

Signed letter 7/3/2016 
to DOE from MM to 
use portion of R3,9 mil 
for pre engineering 

Premarketing & 
preparations to 
readiness will be 
carried out on project 
2016/17 

Funds will be apply for 
201 7/18 to Dept of 
Energy during 2016 to 
continue with project. 

8 

Entumeni 

Project - 
funding 
approved for 
2015/16 

1286 

491 - phase 2 
(957 on Eskom 
list) 2014/15 


Survey completed 

Eskom completed 
internal processes 
as there are no 
consultants involved, 
contractor appointed & 
on site 

House switched on by 
Mayor on 12/2/2016 

187 already connected 

Next outages 
15/2/2016(4 trf's)& 
17/2/201 6 (7 trf's) 

Gcininhiiziyo comm 
hall will be connected 
within project 

Contractor on site 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 2A2 

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Section F: Financial Plan 


6.4A. ELECTRICITY (ESKOM/MLALAZI LM) 

Where Indicated Schedule 6 Electrification 


WARD 

PROJECT 

NAME 

PRIORITISED 

NUMBER OF 
CONNECTIONS 

AMOUNT 

STATUS REPORT 

WAY FORWARD 

11 



Annual 
applications 
- Urban area 
(Eshowe) 



Ongoing 

14 

Ngeza 
phase 2 

Project - 
funding 
approved 
for 2015/16. 

(132 on 

Eskom list) 

R 1 587 797 

(Safube comm 
hall to be connected 
within phase 2) 
27/7/2015 -KSN 
contractor introduce 

12/2/2016 -James 
mentioned complete 

Contractor on site 

KZN contractor 
commenced with 
infills connections 

15 

Mabudle 

(74) 

Izingwenya 

(100) 

Madala (50), 

Kwa- Jazi 
(70) 

Kwa - 

Phaphu (60) 

Schedule six 
to commence 
2016/17 

Phase 2 

Funding 

application 

2017/18 

Phase 3 

Funding 
application 
2018/19 to 
complete project 

350 (mostly 
infills type) 

R7,0mil 

NoNPR 
received from 
Eskom with 
Polygon. 
Capacity to 
confirm 
from Eskom 

Signed letter 7/3/2016 
to DOE from MM to 
use portion of R3,9 mil 
for pre engineering 

Premarketing & 
preparations to 
readiness will be 
carried out on project 
2016/17 

Funds will be apply for 
201 7/18 to Dept of 
Energy during 2016 to 
continue with project. 

17 

Mabhokweni 
- infills 
project 

Project - 
funding 
approved for 
2015/16. 

232 


No connections has 
been done at this 
stage. The previous 
electrical contractor to 
carry out the project 
has been stopped 
by Eskom & resulted 
that only poles has 
been planted in the 
area with no electrical 
cables / bundle attach. 
The network has not 
been completed to 
carry out infills to the 
project for the DOE 
appointed contractor 
(Ingwe Engineering). 

Mabhokweni : We need 
to meet on site on 
Monday 22/02/2016 
(lOhOO)for site 
handover - contractor 
to start 

Wait project to 
complete with 
funding - Eskom 
mentioned 3/9/2015 
that they will try & 
continue 2015. 

email from James 
2016-02-19 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 










WARD 

PROJECT 

NAME 

PRIORITISED 

NUMBER OF 
CONNECTIONS 

AMOUNT 

STATUS REPORT 

WAY FORWARD 

21 

Ezingwenya 
Phase 1 

Schedule six 
Umlalazi Project 
2014/2015 

438 - applied 
for 

Only 250 
will be done 
with R7 mil 
allocated 

R 12.2 mil 

MOA in place. 

Element Consultant 
appointed 

Element consultant 
- Tender close date 
11/12/2015 
contractor 

appointment letter to 
submit 22/2/2016 

Sod turning to follow 
& introduce contractor 
for phase 1 & 2 

Marketing process 
complete with stickers 
completed & busy 
detail design. 

Project was introduced 
to the Community in 
March 2016 

21 

Ezingwenya 
Phase 2 

Schedule six 
Umlalazi Project 
2015/2016 

188 

connections 

R 5.2 mil 
Applied - 
only received 
R4,3 mil for 
2015/16 

DOE allocated only 

R4,3 mil on for phase 2 
to complete remaining 
188 connections due 
to funding constrain 
from Nat. Treasury 

Element consultant 
- Tender close date 
11/12/2015 
contractor appointment 
letter to submit 
22/2/2016 

Sod turning to follow 
& introduce contractor 
for phase 1 & 2 

20/4/2015 -MOA done 
for 2015/16 allocation 
from DOE & busy MOU 
& detail design 
& tender. 

22 

Oyemeni 
(Izikhoshi 
falls under 
Oyemeni) 

phase 1. 

phase 2. 

phase 3. 

Project - 
funding 
approved for 
2015/16. 

(737 on 

Eskom list) 

R 12.729 mil 

Survey completed 

870 will be done in 
phase 1. 

560 will be done in 
phase 2 

Balance will be done in 
phase 3 

New contractor - 
Howard appointed 
(Mishack - site 
supervisor 

062853523) on site 

Wages dispute -will 
resolve with Eskom on 
site 5/2/2016 

Projects will not be 
complete in 2015/16 
financial year & carry 
over to 2016/17 

Project -funding 
approved for 2015/16 

27/7/2015- 
Sizazonke contractor 
introduced & also 
withdrawn - new to be 
appointed 

email from James 
2016-01-07 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 2AA 

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Section F: Financial Plan 


6.4A. ELECTRICITY (ESKOM/MLALAZI LM) 

Where Indicated Schedule 6 Electrification 


WARD 

PROJECT 

NAME 

PRIORITISED 

NUMBER OF 
CONNECTIONS 

AMOUNT 

STATUS REPORT 

WAY FORWARD 

24 

Bonisani / 
Makhehle 

Schedule six 
Umlalazi Project 
2016/17 

140 

Funding 
application 
submitted to 
DoF for 

R 4.1 mil 

Applied for schedule six 
funding for 2016/17 

Waiting DORA 
allocation for 

Umlalazi to carry out 
schedule six 

26 

Emvini area 
(right next to 
Ngodini) 

Emvini (29), 
Emalukhulwini 
(8), Wema (7), 
Ematshakafula 
(30), 

Schedule six 
to commence 
2016/17 

Phase 2 Funding 

application 

2017/18 

Phase 3 Funding 
application 
2018/19 to 
complete project 

74 total (mostly 
infills type) 

R1,48mil 

NoNPR 
received 
from Eskom 
with Polygon. 

Network 
clearance 
& capacity 
challenges 

Signed letter 7/3/2016 
to DOE from MM to 
use portion of R3,9 mil 
for pre engineering 

Premarketing & 
preparations to 
readiness will be 
carried out on project 
2016/17 

Funds will be apply for 
201 7/18 to Dept of 
Energy during 2016 to 
continue with project. 


6.4.4.1.1. UTHUNGULU DM: WATER AND SANITATION PROJECTS 


PROJECT NAME 

FUNDER 

FUNDING SOURCE 

2016/2017 
PLANNED BUDGET 

Kwahlokohloko SSA 1 

Grant 

MIG 

10,000,000 

Eshowe SSA 1 

Grant 

MIG 

1,000,000 

Mpungose Phase ID-Reticulation 

Grant 

MIG 

24,071,023 

Kwahlokohloko S/ASSA5 

Grant 

MIG 

10,000,000 

MiddledriftSSAS 

Grant 

MIG 

15,000,000 

Gingindlovu Waste Water Treatment Works 

Grant 

MIG 

50,000 

284-9 - VIP Umlalazi Sanitation Project 

Grant 

MIG 

10,000,000 

Eshowe SSA 1 

Grant 

RBIG 

80,000,000 

MiddledriftSSAS 

Grant 

RBIG 

80,000,000 

Kwahlokohloko SSA 1 

Grant 

RBIG 

90,000,000 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 














6.5. REPORT OF THE AUDIT AND PERFORMANCE 
COMMITTEE FOR THE 2013/14 FINACIAL YEAR 

6.5.1. AUDIT AND PERFORMANCE COMMITTEE 
AND ATTENDANCE 


The current Audit Committee appointed from January 2013 comprises of A independent, external members and is required to meet 
at least A times per annum as per the Audit Committee Charter. Additional meetings may be called for as the need arises. Members' 
attendance at the meetings is listed below: 


NAME 

21 AUG 2014 

20 JAN 2015 

30 APRIL 201 5 

29 AUG 2015 

(SPECIAL APC) 

17 NOV 201 5 

10 MARCH 2016 

1. Mr D Bosch (Chairperson) 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 


X- 

X- 

X- 

X- 

X- 

X- 

2. Mr Z Zulu 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 

V 


X- 

X- 

X- 

X- 

X- 

X- 

3. MrsT. Ndlela 

V 

V 

V 

V 

Resigned 

Resigned 


X- 

X- 

X- 

X- 



A. Mr ME DIamini 

V 

V 

V 

X 

V 

V 


X- 

X- 

X- 


X- 

X- 


Table 115: Audit Committee Attendance 


Also Organisational Performance Management Meetings 
X Meeting Not Attended 

6.5.2. AUDIT AND 
PERFORMANCE COMMITTEE 
RESPONSIBILITIES 

The Audit and Performance Committee has been set up in 
accordance with the Municipal Finance Management Act, No. 
56 of 2003 (Section 166) and section 1 A(2)(c) and the Local 
Government Municipal Planning and Performance Regulations, 
2001 (Regulations)and operates within the terms of the Audit 
Committee Charter approved by the Council. 

In the conduct of its duties, the Audit Committee has performed 
the following statutory duties: 

6.5.2.I. REVIEWED INTERNAL 
FINANCIAL CONTROL AND 
INTERNAL AUDITS 

The internal audit function was co-sourced and operational for 
the financial year. 

The risk based internal audit plan for the financial year ending 30 
June 2015 was approved by the Audit Committee at its meeting 
on 20 January 2015. 


V Audit Committee Meeting Attended 


The Audit Committee at each meeting assessed performance 
against the plan and reviewed the plan to ensure that critical 
risks of the operations of the Entity and the findings of the 
Auditor-General are addressed. 

The Audit and Performance Audit Committee Charter as well as 
the Internal Audit Charter were reviewed and accepted. 

Internal audit reports were completed as planned and tabled at 
the Audit Committee meetings. Internal audit reports include 
recommendations to improve internal controls together with 
agreed management action plans to resolve the issues reported on. 

To further enhance the processes in place, internal audit 
conducted follow up audits on previously reported internal 
audit findings and reported progress to senior management 
and the Audit Committee. Management is required to implement 
appropriate systems of internal controls and corrective action to 
address the identified weaknesses and possible irregularities. 

Based on internal and external audit reports the Audit 
Committee noted with concern that the key internal controls 
were inadequate and management is required to implement 
appropriate systems of internal controls and corrective action 
to address the identified weaknesses. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 2A6 

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Section F: Financial Plan 


6.5.2.2. RISK MANAGEMENT 

Because the assessment of internal controls over financial reporting 
is risk-based, the Audit Committee is responsible for overseeing 
management's risk policies and processes with a view of discussing 
the Municipality's key risk exposures with management. 

Management, with the assistance of Provincial Treasury finalised 
the Enterprise Wide Risk Management Process during August 
201 A whereby strategic risks with the potential to impede the 
Municipality's ability to achieve its business objectives and 
programme goals were identified and recorded on the risk register. 

The Municipality appointed a risk officer and Risk Committee 
who facilitated the execution of the risk management processes. 
The risk officer assisted Council and management to establish 
and communicate the organisation's risk management 
objectives, processes and direction. Minutes of meetings were 
noted in the Audit Committee meetings. 

The internal audit function provided independent assurance 
in relation to the management's assertions surrounding the 
robustness and effectiveness of risk management and the level 
of risk management maturity. 

6.5.2.3. REVIEW OF 
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND 
ACCOUNTING POLICIES. 

Accounting policies and review of the financial statements 

The Audit Committee reviewed the financial statements for 
the year and considered the appropriateness, adoption and 
consistent application of the South African Statements of 
Generally Recognised Accounting Practices (GRAP) and noted 
that there is room for improvement as various shortcomings 
were brought to the attention of management. 

Review of the Auditor-GeneraFs management report and 
audit report 

Meetings were held between the Audit Committee and 
representatives of the Auditor-General to discuss the strategic 
audit plan and management report for the year under review. 
The Audit Committee concurs with the conclusions in the final 
audit report. 

Audit Action Plan 

The Audit Committee reviewed and commented on the audit 
action plan for 201A/2015 based on the findings for 2013/1 A. 
Internal audit has provided independent assurance on whether the 
corrective actions have been implemented. The Audit Committee 
is concerned about the slow progress in this regard as a number 
of recurring findings were reported during the year under review. 


6.5.2.A. THE ADEQUACY, 
RELIABILITY AND ACCURACY 
OF FINANCIAL REPORTING 
AND INFORMATION 

Based on the results of the formal documented review of the 
design, implementation and effectiveness of the Municipality's 
system of internal financial controls conducted by the internal 
audit function during the year, considering information and 
explanations given by management and discussions with 
the external auditor on the results of their audit, the Audit 
Committee believes that the Municipality's system of internal 
financial controls is not yet fully effective to form a basis for 
the preparation of reliable financial statements and to achieve 
a clean audit. 

6.5.2.5. PERFORMANCE 
MANAGEMENT 

The Audit Committee also serves as the Performance Audit 
Committee for uMlalazi Municipality and reviewed the annual 
performance report. 

Internal Audit did review and reported quarterly on the 
Municipality's performance based on the approved organisational 
score card. Although the performance management system is 
functioning, the Audit Committee noted with concern the non- 
achievement of targets and inaccuracy of reported information. 

6.5.2.6. EFFECTIVE 
GOVERNANCE 

The Audit Committee fulfils an oversight role regarding the 
Municipality's reporting process, including the system of 
internal financial control. It is responsible for ensuring that 
the Municipality's internal and external audit functions are 
independent and has the necessary resources, standing and 
authority to enable it to discharge its duties. Furthermore, it 
oversees cooperation between the internal and external auditors, 
and serves as a link between Council and these functions. 

The Audit Committee has established communication with the 
Municipal Public Accounts Committee (MPAC) by inviting them 
to all meetings and sharing minutes of meetings. 

The Audit Committee is monitoring progress with all 
special investigations. 

The internal and external auditors have unlimited direct access 
to the Audit Committee, primarily through its chairperson. 


2 A7 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

o<xxxxxx>oooooc>o<xxx>o<xxx ) 


6.5.2.7. COMPLIANCE WITH 
LEGISLATION AND ETHICS 

The Audit Committee noted with concern instances of non- 
compliance with policies and procedures, MFMA and Regulations. 
The progress to move to full compliance is monitored on a 
quarterly basis based mainly on internal audit reports and 
feedback from the Compliance Officer. 

6.5.2.8. RECOMMENDATIONS 

■ Council should ensure that accurate, reliable and complete 
financial and performance information is submitted monthly 
by management for review by the various committees. 

■ Council should ensure that adequate progress is made with 
commitments on the quarterly Dash Board Report as well as 
the action plan for the implementation of Internal Audit and 
Auditor-General recommendations. 

■ The Municipal Manager should take action against employees 
not complying with policies, laws and regulations. In this 
regard the Compliance Officer should report monthly to 
Council on the status of compliance. 

■ Council should monitor the spending on capital projects on a 
monthly basis and take action where needed. 

■ Council must allocate adequate resources to ensure that the 
computer systems are adequate, reliable and sustainable. 

The internal audit function was outsourced and operational 
for the financial year. Internal audit presented its annual audit 
plan for the financial year ending 30 June 201 A to the Audit and 


Performance Committee at its meeting on 28 October 2013. 
The Audit and Performance Committee resolved that the internal 
audit plan be approved and to prioritizes Conditional Grants 
income and related expenditure, procurement and tenders, 
review of Financial Statements and follow up to address the 
findings of the Auditor-General. 

Internal audit submitted audit reports to the Committee for 
the period under review in 20 January 201 A, 18 June 201 A and 
21 August 201 A. 

Internal audit reports include recommendations to improve 
internal controls together with agreed management action 
plans to resolve the issues reported on. To further enhance 
the processes in place, internal audit conducts follows up 
audits on previously reported internal audit findings and 
reports progress to senior management and the Audit and 
Performance Committee. 

The Audit and Performance Committee has expressed concern 
that the overall internal audit rating of the effectiveness of 
internal controls was inadequate. Management is required 
to implement appropriate systems of internal controls and 
corrective action to address the identified weaknesses and 
possible irregularities. Although there are controls in place, the 
existing systems and procedures require enhancement and 
continued monitoring. 






Section F: Financial Plan 


6.6. REPORTS OF THE 
AUDITOR-GENERAL 
AND RESPONSES 

6.6.1. AUDITOR-GENERAL 
REPORT FOR THE 
FINANCIALYEARENDING 
30 JUNE 2015 

REPORT OF THE AUDITOR-GENERAL 
TO THE KWAZULU-NATAL PROVINCIAL 
LEGISLATURE AND THE COUNCIL ON 
THE UMLALAZI MUNICIPALITY 

REPORT ON THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 

INTRODUCTION 

1. I have audited the financial statements of the uMlalazi 
Municipality set out on pages 6 to 86 which comprise the 
statement of financial position as at 30 June 2015, the 
statement of financial performance, statement of changes 
in net assets, cash flow statement and statement of 
comparison of budget information with actual information 
for the year then ended, as well as the notes, comprising 
a summary of significant accounting policies and other 
explanatory information. 

ACCOUNTING OFFICER'S RESPONSIBILITY FOR 
THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 

2. The accounting officer is responsible for the preparation 
and fair presentation of these financial statements in 
accordance with South African Standards of Generally 
Recognised Accounting Practice (SA Standards of GRAP) 
and the requirements of the Municipal Finance Management 
Act of South Africa, 2003 (Act No. 56 of 2003) (MFMA) and 
the Division of Revenue Act of South Africa, 201 A (Act No. 
10 of 201 A) (DoRA), and for such internal control as the 
accounting officer determines is necessary to enable the 
preparation of financial statements that are free from 
material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. 

AUDITOR-GENERAL'S RESPONSIBILITY 

3. My responsibility is to express an opinion on these 
financial statements based on my audit. I conducted 
my audit in accordance with International Standards 
on Auditing. Those standards require that I comply with 
ethical requirements, and plan and perform the audit to 


obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial 
statements are free from material misstatement. 

A. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit 
evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial 
statements. The procedures selected depend on the 
auditor's judgement, including the assessment of the risks of 
material misstatement of the financial statements, whether 
due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, 
the auditor considers internal control relevant to the 
municipality's preparation and fair presentation of the 
financial statements in order to design audit procedures 
that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the 
purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of 
the municipality's internal control. An audit also includes 
evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used 
and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by 
management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation 
of the financial statements. 

5. I believe that the audit evidence I have obtained is sufficient 
and appropriate to provide a basis for my audit opinion. 

OPINION 

6. In my opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in 
all material respects, the financial position of the uMlalazi 
Municipality as at 30 June 2015 and its financial performance 
and cash flows for the year then ended, in accordance with 
5A Standards of GRAP and the requirements of the MFMA 
and DoRA. 

EMPHASIS OF MATTERS 

7. I draw attention to the matters below. My opinion is not 
modified in respect of these matters. 

UNAUTHORISED EXPENDITURE 

8. As disclosed in note A6.1 to the financial statements, 
unauthorised expenditure of R1 A,20 million was incurred 
as a result of expenditure exceeding the approved budget 
for operating expenditure. 

IRREGULAR EXPENDITURE 

9. As disclosed in note A6.2 to the financial statements, 
irregular expenditure of RA,A3 million was incurred as a 
result of procurement processes not having been followed. 

MATERIAL LOSSES 

1 0. As disclosed in note A9 to the financial statements, material 
losses of 5,69 kilowatts amounting to R8,5A million (201 A: 
5,21 kilowatts amounting to R6,09 million) were incurred 
as a result of electricity distribution losses. 


2 A9 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

o<xxxxxx>oooooc>ooo<x>o<xxx ) 


ADDITIONAL MATTERS 

11.1 draw attention to the matters below. My opinion is not 
modified in respect of these matters. 

UNAUDITED SUPPLEMENTARY SCHEDULES 

1 2. The supplementary information set out on pages 68 to 86 
does not form part of the financial statements and is 
presented as additional information. I have not audited 
these schedules and, accordingly, I do not express an 
opinion thereon. 

UNAUDITED DISCLOSURE NOTES 

1 3. In terms of section 1 25(2)(e) of the MFMA, the municipality 
is required to disclose particulars of non-compliance with 
the MFMA. This disclosure requirement did not form part 
of the audit of the financial statements and, accordingly, I 
do not express an opinion thereon. 

REPORT ON OTHER LEGAL AND 
REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS 

1 A. In accordance with the Public Audit Act of South Africa, 200A 
(Act No. 25 of 2004) (PAA) and the general notice issued in 
terms thereof, I have a responsibility to report findings on the 
reported performance information against predetermined 
objectives for selected development priorities presented in 
the annual performance report, compliance with legislation 
and internal control. The objective of my tests was to identify 
reportable findings as described under each subheading 
but not to gather evidence to express assurance on 
these matters. Accordingly, I do not express an opinion or 
conclusion on these matters. 

PREDETERMINED OBJECTIVES 

15. 1 performed procedures to obtain evidence about the 
usefulness and reliability of the reported performance 
information for basic service delivery and infrastructure 
development presented in the annual performance report 
of the municipality for the year ended 30 June 2015. 

16. 1 evaluated the reported performance information against 
the overall criteria of usefulness and reliability. 

17. 1 evaluated the usefulness of the reported performance 
information to determine whether it was presented in 
accordance with the National Treasury's annual reporting 
principles and whether the reported performance was 
consistent with the planned development priority. I further 
performed tests to determine whether indicators and 
targets were well defined, verifiable, specific, measurable, 
time bound and relevant, as required by the National 
Treasury's Framework for managing programme 
performance information. 


18. 1 assessed the reliability of the reported performance 
information to determine whether it was valid, accurate 
and complete. 

19. 1 did not identify any material findings on the usefulness 
and reliability of the reported performance information for 
basic service delivery and infrastructure development. 

ADDITIONAL MATTERS 

20. Although I identified no material findings on the usefulness 
and reliability of the reported performance information for 
the selected development priority, I draw attention to the 
following matters: 

ACHIEVEMENT OF PLANNED TARGETS 

21 . Refer to the annual performance report for information on 
the achievement of the planned targets for the year. 

ADJUSTMENT OF MATERIAL MISSTATEMENTS 

22. 1 identified material misstatements in the annual 
performance report submitted for auditing on the reported 
performance information for basic service delivery and 
infrastructure development. As management subsequently 
corrected the misstatements, I did not identify any material 
findings on the usefulness and reliability of the reported 
performance information. 

UNAUDITED SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION 

23. The supplementary information set out on pages 68 to 86 
does not form part of the annual performance report and 
is presented as additional information. I have not audited 
these schedules and, accordingly, I do not report thereon. 

COMPLIANCE WITH LEGISLATION 

24. 1 performed procedures to obtain evidence that the 
municipality had complied with applicable legislation 
regarding financial matters, financial management and other 
related matters. My material findings on compliance with 
specific matters in key legislation, as set out in the general 
notice issued in terms of the PAA, are as follows: 

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 

25. The financial statements submitted for auditing were 
not prepared in all material respects in accordance with 
the requirements of section 122 of the MFMA. Material 
misstatements of non-current assets and disclosure 
items identified by the auditors in the submitted financial 
statements were subsequently corrected, resulting in the 
financial statements receiving an unqualified audit opinion. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 250 

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Section F: Financial Plan 


EXPENDITURE MANAGEMENT 

26. Reasonable steps were not taken to prevent unauthorised, 
irregular as well as fruitless and wasteful expenditure, as 
required by section 62(1 )(d) of the MFMA. 

INTERNAL CONTROL 

27. 1 considered internal control relevant to my audit of the 
financial statements, annual performance report and 
compliance with legislation. The matters reported below 
are limited to the significant internal control deficiencies 
that resulted in the findings on compliance with legislation 
included in this report. 

LEADERSHIP 

28. The accounting officer and management did not adequately 
exercise oversight responsibility regarding financial 
reporting and compliance with laws and regulations 
relating to expenditure management and the annual 
financial statements. 

FINANCIAL AND PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT 

29. Systems and controls were not adequately designed in 
a manner to prevent, detect and address risks that have an 
impact on financial, performance and compliance reporting. 
In this regard, the accounting officer did not ensure that 
regular, accurate and complete financial reports were 


prepared, which were supported and evidenced by reliable 
information. This resulted in material corrections having to 
be made to the financial statements. 

OTHER REPORTS 

INVESTIGATIONS 

30. An internal investigation was conducted during the year 
based on an allegation of the possible misappropriation 
of the municipality's funds. The investigation was 
concluded during the year and resulted in the dismissal of 
one employee. 



4 -A 


-V .j: - . l :: .f 

Pietermaritzburg 
27 November 2015 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 


6.6.2. RESPONSES TO ISSUES RAISED BY 
AUDITOR-GENERAL IN HIS AUDIT REPORT 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2015 


FINDING 

NUMBER 

FINDING 

PLANNED ACTION 

ACTION DATE 

RESPONSIBLE 

OFFICIAL 

1 

Unauthorised, irregular 
or fruitless and 
wasteful expenditure 
not prevented 

Management will put controls in place to 
decrease the occurrence of unauthorized, 
irregular or fruitless and wasteful expenditure 

16 November 2015 

Management 

2 

Creditors' 
reconciliations not 
performed. 



Senior Manager 
Expenditure 

3 

Deficiencies in the 

Fixed Asset Register 
(Assets not described 
in the register and 
depreciation 
not charged on 
some assets) 



Deputy Chief 
Financial Officer 

A 

Assets not verified 
during municipality's 
verification process 

The Municipality is in the process of 
investigation the assets as listed above, and 
will send out the information per Department 
to the HOD'S for investigation and feedback. 


Deputy Chief 
Financial Officer 

5 

No approved policy for 
road infrastructure 

Council will endeavour to put in place a policy 
as advised 


Director 

Engineering 

Services 

6 

Suspense account not 
cleared at year end 

The balance at year end on this account 
represent creditors that were not paid at the 
reporting date, and can only be cleared once 
those creditors are paid. Management will 
change the name of account from "Creditor 
Suspense" to "Creditor Control 


Senior Manager 
Expenditure 

7 

Suppliers in service of 
the state 



Senior Manager 
Expenditure 

8.1 

Job descriptions for IT 
staff not in place 

IT structure as per the approved Corporate 
Services Organogram is going to be 
implemented during the 2015/2016 financial 
year and this will include the process of 
defining the roles and responsibilities of IT 
staff and documenting job descriptions. 

31 March 2016 

Director 

Corporate 

Services 

8.2 

No IT Strategic Plan 
in place 

Management will commence with a project 
of linking IT to the overall municipal business 
objectives and within that process an IT 
strategy will be developed for implementation 
from 

1 July 2016. 

01 July 2016 

Director 

Corporate 

Services 

8.3 

Corporate Services 
Department Organogram 
does not accurately 
reflect the current IT 
structure in place 

Recruitment for a Manager Information 
Technology is currently in progress. Only once 
this post has been filled can the approved 
structure as required by the Corporate Services 
Department Organogram be implemented 

31 March 2016 

Director 

Corporate 

Services 

8.A 

VIP Software licence 
agreement not signed 
off by the company 

Softline VIP will be made to sign off on the 
software license agreement 

31 December 2015 

Senior Manager 
Expenditure 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 252 

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Section F: Financial Plan 


6.6.2. RESPONSES TO ISSUES RAISED BY 
AUDITOR-GENERAL IN HIS AUDIT REPORT 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2015 ...continued 


FINDING 

NUMBER 

FINDING 

PLANNED ACTION 

ACTION DATE 

RESPONSIBLE 

OFFICIAL 

9.1 

Network diagram does 
not reflect current IT 
infrastructure and has 
not been approved 

The network is currently undergoing a major 
upgrade. Once completed a new network 
diagram will be documented and sent to 
management for review prior to submission to 
EXCO for approval. 

31 May 2016 

Senior Manager 
Expenditure 

9.2 

Information Systems 
Security and ICT 

Usage Policy not 
communicated to staff 

The relevant user groups within the 
municipality will be identified for the purpose 
of creating awareness and trainings regarding 
the approved IT policies. 

30 November 2015 

Senior Manager 
Expenditure & 
Senior Manager 
Corporate 

Services 

9.3 

Standard naming 
convention not applied, 
default accounts not 
disabled and duplicate 
user accounts assigned 
(Windows Active Directory, 
AbakusandVIP) 

A standard naming convention will be defined 
and documented in the Information Systems 
Security and ICT Usage Policy. This will then 
be applied to all systems. The default and 
duplicate accounts identified will be disabled 

31 May 2016 

Senior Manager 
Expenditure 

9.4 

Password Policy not 
formally documented. 

The Information Systems Security & ICT Usage 
Policy will be reviewed and amended to include 
password configuration settings required to 
be implemented on all systems utilised by 
the municipality. It must be noted that the 
updated policy will need to be approved by 

EXCO who dedicate a single meeting which is 
held in approximately May for the approval of 
all policies. 

31 May 2016 

Senior Manager 
Expenditure & 
Senior Manager 
Corporate 
Services. 

9.5 

Password settings 
not configured in 
accordance with leading 
practices (VIP) 

The Information Systems Security & ICT Usage 
Policy will be reviewed and amended to include 
password configuration settings required to 
be implemented on all systems utilised by the 
municipality. Password settings on VIP will be 
amended to be in line with leading practice. 

31 May 2016 

Senior Manager 
Expenditure 

9.6 

No review and 
monitoring of logon 
violations (Windows 
Active Directory, Abakus 
and VIP) 

A firewall has been purchased and is in the 
process of being installed. The reviewing of 
security violations will be undertaken once the 
project of deploying the firewall is completed 
and implemented. 

30 November 2015 

Senior Manager 
Expenditure & 
Senior Manager 
Corporate 
Services. 

9.7 

No Patch Management 
Policy in place 

A draft Patch Management Policy has been 
developed. The policy must still be reviewed by 
management prior to submission to EXCO for 
approval. It must be noted that EXCO dedicate 
a single meeting which is held in approximately 
May for the approval of all policies. 

31 May 2016 

Senior Manager 
Expenditure & 
Senior Manager 
Corporate 

Services 

9.8 

Some user's computers 
have outdated anti- 
virus software definition 
files and are offline 

We will look to resolve this issue with the 
deployment of the new network server and 
network forest which has started already. 

31 May 2016 

a Senior 

Manager 
Expenditure & 
Senior Manager 
Corporate 

Services 


253 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

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FINDING 

NUMBER 

FINDING 

PLANNED ACTION 

ACTION DATE 

RESPONSIBLE 

OFFICIAL 

10.1 

User account 
managennent processes 
not documented 

The Information Systems Security & ICT Usage 
Policy will be reviewed and amended to include all 
required user account management procedures. 

It must be noted that the updated policy will need 
to be approved by EXCO who dedicate a single 
meeting which is held in approximately May for 
the approval of all policies. 

31 May 2016 

Senior Manager 
Expenditure & 
Senior Manager 
Corporate 

Services 

10.2 

Terminated employees 
access not removed 
(Windows Active 
Directory) 

A review of all employees' IT accesses was done 
on 1 5 September 201 5. All employees that had 
been terminated but still had active accounts 
on IT systems were disabled. Going forward this 
review will be done on a monthly basis. 

15 September 201 5 

IT Officer 

10.3 

System administrator 
activities not reviewed 
(Windows Active 

Directory, Pastel and VIP) 

Management is in the process of reviewing the 
IT functions structure and staff responsibilities. 

It is envisaged that once the position of 

Manager Information Technology is filled 
this person will assume responsibility for 
administrator activity reviews. 

31 March 2016 

Senior Manager 
Expenditure 

10.4 

Inconsistent process 
followed for user access 
rights reviews performed 
(Abakusand VIP) 

User access right are performed, however 
this is inadequately documented as there is 
no standard procedure to perform this task. 

A procedure will be developed and all reviews 
will be documented 

30 November 2016 

Senior Manager 
Expenditure 

10.5 

An inventory of software 
licences is not maintained 

We have started with an inventory of software 
licencing within the IT function however it is 
incomplete and is a work in progress that will 
be completed soon. 

30 November 2016 

Senior Manager 
Expenditure 

11.1 

Business Continuity and 
Disaster Recovery Plans 
have not been tested 

Management is in the process of appropriating 
the relevant budget for BCP and DRP testing. 
This will be done in the 2016/17 financial 
year as the 2015/16 budget has already been 
approved. In the interim walk-through testing 
in the form of a management workshop of the 
DRP and BCP will be done. 

31 March 2016 
(walkthrough) 

31 July 2016 
(full test) 

Senior Manager 
Corporate 

Services 

11.2 

Backups not 
adequately performed 
(Abakus and VIP) 

Management has contacted the service 
provider and it was agreed that they will 
resolve the backup issues on the Abakus 
system by the 30 September 2015. VIP 
backups will be performed once backup servers 
have been purchased and implemented. 

The municipality has signed a contract with 
Metrofile for the offsite storage of backups and 
this will commence once the backup software 
purchased has been successfully installed and 
is utilised to perform backups. 

31 December 2015 

Senior manager 
expenditure 

11.3 

Servers are not stored a 
sufficient distance away 
from the floor 

Management has started the process of 
addressing environmental controls in the 
server room. A service provider has already 
done a thorough inspection of the server room 
and management is awaiting the cost and 
financial implications for budgeting purposes. 

30 September 201 6 

Senior Manager 
Corporate 

Services 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 25A 

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Section F: Financial Plan 


6.6.2. RESPONSES TO ISSUES RAISED BY AUDITOR 
GENERAL IN HIS AUDIT REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 
30 JUNE 2015 ...continued 


FINDING 

NUMBER 

FINDING 

PLANNED ACTION 

ACTION DATE 

RESPONSIBLE 

OFFICIAL 

12.1 

Supply Chain 
Managennent Policy 
did not account for IT 
acquisitions 

Policy will be updated accordingly. It must be 
noted that EXCO dedicate a single meeting 
which is held in approximately May for the 
approval of all policies 

31 May 2016 

Senior Manager 
Supply Chain 
Management 

Unit 

12.2 

Change Management 
Policy not developed 

A draft Change Management Policy and 
new supporting procedures have been 
developed. The policy must still be reviewed by 
management prior to submission to EXCO for 
approval. It must be noted that EXCO dedicate 
a single meeting which is held in approximately 
May for the approval of all policies. 

31 May 2016 

Senior Manager 
Expenditure & 
Senior Manager 
Corporate 

Services 

13 

Municipality does not 
have a firewall installed 

Management have taken a radical approach 
to deal with this matter. A service provider 
has been appointed to configure and deploy 
firewalls, and it is envisaged that this project will 
be completed on or before 1 November 2015 

30 November 2015 

Senior Manager 
Expenditure 

1A.1 

Investment and 

Cash Management 

Policy does not 
stipulate online banking 
system utilised 

The Investment and Cash Management Policy 
will be reviewed and amended to include the 
name of the online banking system. It must 
be noted that the updated policy will need to 
be approved by EXCO who dedicate a single 
meeting which is held in approximately May 
for the approval of all policies. 

31 May 2016 

Senior Manager 
Expenditure 

14.2 

Periodic reviews of 

EFT online banking 
system user activity 
logs not performed 

After engagement with the Council's banking 
institution it was agreed that there is no activity 
log detailed enough to perform the review 
required. Management was advised that the 
profile setup on the banking system has been 
designed for individual users and therefore 
a review of the activity log is not required. 

Priority levels of the user profiles are granted 
to officials that are specific to their functionary 
areas and activity logs purely indicate what the 
profile permissions provide for. Management 
is satisfied with the level of security in respect 
of setting up the profile for online banking and 
annual reviews of the profile setup per official 
will be undertaken for the online banking 
system to mitigate the risks identified. 

No Action required 

Senior Manager 
Expenditure 


Table 116: Responses to issues raised by auditor general 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 










Section G: 


7. 1. Annual 
Operational Plan 



Section H: 





IWMoJ; 




iM * 






mvS&^- %JK tab 





8. Organisational 
& Individual 
Performance 
Management System 


8.1. ORGANISATIONAL 
& INDIVIDUAL 
PERFORMANCE 
MANAGEMENT SYSTEM 

Performance management is a strategic approach to 
management, which is aimed at equipping leaders, managers, 
workers and stakeholders at different levels with a set of 
tools and techniques to regularly plan, continuously monitor, 
periodically measure and review performance of the organization 
in terms of indicators and targets for efficiency, effectiveness 
and impact. It is a requirement for local government in terms of 
the Municipal Systems Act, which requires all municipalities to: 

■ Develop a performance management system; 

■ Set targets, monitor and review performance based indicators 
linked to their integrated development plan (IDP); 

■ Publish an annual report on performance for the councilors, 
staff, the public and other spheres of government; 

■ Incorporate and report on a set of general indicators prescribed 
nationally by the minister responsible for local government; 

■ Conduct an internal audit on performance before tabling 
the report; 

■ Have their annual performance report audited by the 
Auditor-General; and, 

■ Involve the community in setting indicators and targets and 
in reviewing municipal performance. 


8.1.1. PERFORMANCE 
MANAGEMENT SYSTEM 

Performance information indicates how well a municipality 
is meeting its aims and objectives, and which policies and 
processes are working. Making the best use of available data and 
knowledge is crucial for improving the execution of its mandate. 
Performance information is key for effective management, 
including planning, budgeting, and implementation, monitoring 
and reporting. Performance information also facilitates effective 
accountability, enabling councillors, members of the public 
another interested parties to track progress, identify the scope 
for improvement and better understand the issues involved. 

The municipality delivers services essential to the well-being 
and development of the communities. To ensure that service 
delivery is as efficient and economical as possible; municipalities 
are required to formulate strategic plans, allocate resources 
to the implementation of those plans, and monitor and report 
the results. Performance information is essential to focus 
the attention of the public and oversight bodies on whether 
municipalities are delivering value for money, by comparing 
their performance against their budgets and service delivery 
plans, and to alert managers to areas where corrective action 
is required. 

Performance information also plays a growing role in budget 
allocations and will increasingly be used to monitor service 
delivery. This means the information must be accurate, 
appropriate and timely. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 260 

<x>o<xxxxxxx>oooooooooooo 


Section H: Organisational & Individual Performance Management System 


The most valuable reason for measuring performance is that 
what gets measured gets done. If an institution knows that its 
performance is being monitored, it is more likely to perform 
the required tasks- and to perform them well. In addition, 
the availability of performance information allows managers 
to pursue results-based management approaches, such as 
performance contracts, risk management, benchmarking and 
market testing. 

8.1. 1.1. LEGISLATIVE 
REQUIREMENTS 

Outlined in Section AO of the Municipal Systems Act of 2000 
(MSA), Municipalities must establish mechanisms to monitor 
and review its Performance Management System (PM5) so as 
to measure, monitor, review, evaluate and improve performance 
at organisational, departmental and employee levels. Section 
3A of the MSA furthermore points out that the Integrated 
Development Plan (IDP) has to be reviewed on an annual basis, 
and that during the IDP review process the Key Performance 
Areas, Key Performance Indicators and Performance Targets be 
reviewed and this review will form the basis for the review of 
the Organisational Performance Management and Performance 
Contracts of Section 57 Managers. 

The Municipal Planning and Performance Management 
Regulations (2001 ) stipulates that a "municipality's performance 
management system entails a framework that describes and 
represents how the municipality's cycle and processes of 
performance planning, monitoring, measurement, review, 
reporting and improvement will be conducted, organised and 
managed, including determining the roles of the different 
role-players" (Chapter 3, Section 7, Municipal Planning and 
Performance Management Regulations, 2001). 

Section A6 of the Municipal Systems Act (Act 32 of 2000), 
stipulates the following:- 

"Annual performance reports 

A6. (1) A municipality must prepare for each financial year a 
performance report reflecting - 

(a) The performance of the municipality and of each external 
service provider during that financial year; 

(b) A comparison of the performances referred to in paragraph 
(a) with targets set for and performances in the previous 

financial year; and 

(c) Measures taken to improve performance. 

(2) An annual performance report must form part of the 
municipality's annual report in terms of Chapter 1 2 of the 
Municipal Finance Management Act." 


8.1. 1 . 2 . UMLALAZI 
MUNICIPALITY: PERFORMANCE 
MANAGEMENT POLICY 
FRAMEWORK 

8.1. 1.2.1. PURPOSE OFTHE POLICY 
FRAMEWORK 

The Municipal Systems Act of 2000 and the Municipal 
Performance Regulations for Municipal Managers and Managers 
Directly Accountable to Municipal Managers of 2006, provide 
for the establishment and implementation of a performance 
management system for each and every municipality in South 
Africa. In order to comply with legislation and to improve on 
good governance and service delivery it is essential for the 
municipality to adopt a policy on performance management. 

The performance management framework will provide guidance 
in terms of the municipality's cycle and processes of performance 
planning, monitoring, measuring, reviewing, reporting, auditing 
and quality control. The Performance Management Policy as 
informed by the Municipal Systems Act (2000) and the Municipal 
Performance Regulations (2006). 

This Framework aims to: 

■ Clarify definitions and standards for performance information 
in support of regular audits of such information where appropriate 

■ Improve integrated structures, systems and processes 
required to manage performance information 

■ Define roles and responsibilities for managing 
performance information 

■ Promote accountability and transparency by providing 
Parliament, provincial legislatures, municipal councils 
and the public with timely, accessible and accurate 
performance information. 

8.1.2. ORGANISATIONAL 
PERFORMANCE 
MANAGEMENT LINKED TO 
INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCE 
MANAGEMENT 

The Municipal Systems Act requires the municipality to establish 
a PMS that is commensurate with its resources; best suited to 
its circumstances and in line with the IDP. It is required to create 
a culture of performance throughout the municipality. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 


The PM5 should obtain the following core elements: 

■ Setting of appropriate performance indicators; 

■ Setting of measurable performance targets; 

■ Agree on performance measurement; 

■ Performance monitoring, reviewing and evaluation; 

■ Continuous performance improvement; 

■ Regular performance reporting; and 

■ Intervention where required. 

In order to ensure that the municipality meets its organisational 
performance indicators, it must introduce a PMS that measures 
performance on organisational and individual level. Each 
individual is given performance objectives and targets that are 
linked to his/her team, department and the municipality. 

Once the municipal objectives and targets have been set it is 
possible to cascade these down to departments, teams and 
employees. 

8.1.3. OBJECTIVES OF 
THE PERFORMANCE 
MANAGEMENT SYSTEM 

The objectives of implementing a performance management 
system include: 

■ Facilitates strategy (IDP) deployment throughout the 
municipality and align the organization in executing its 
strategic objectives; 

■ Facilitate increased accountability; 

■ Continues and sustainable service delivery improvement; 

■ Create an organisational performance culture; 

■ Provide early warning signals; 

■ Develop open and constructive relationship between 
customers, leadership and employees; 

■ Encourage reward for good performance; 

■ Manage and improve poor performance; 

■ Link performance to skills development and career planning, 
therefore encourage learning and growth; and 

■ Comply with legislative framework. 

8.1.A. PRINCIPLES 
GOVERNING 
PERFORMANCE 
MANAGEMENT 

The process of developing a performance management system 
for the uMlalazi Municipality was guided by a detailed process 
plan whereby the following principles informed the municipality's 
performance management system: 

■ Simplicity - The system is developed to operate accurately 
and effectively, but still in a simple and user friendly manner 
which will enable the municipality to develop, implement. 


manage and review the system without placing an unnecessary 
great burden on the existing capacity of the municipality. 

■ Politically acceptable and administratively manageable - 

The system is developed to be acceptable to political role 
players on all levels and flexible enough to be accepted by 
the municipal council and to enjoy the buy-in across political 
differences. The process will involve both councillors and 
officials, but the day- to-day management of the process 
will be done administratively with regular progress reporting 
to the political level. 

■ Implementable - Considering the resource framework of 
the municipality, the PMS should be implementable within 
the resources of the municipality, which will include time, 
institutional, financial, and technical resources. 

■ Transparency and accountability - The development and 
implementation of a PMS should be inclusive, transparent 
and open. The general public should, through the system be 
made aware of how the operations of the municipality are 
being administered, how public resources are being spent and 
who is responsible for what. The implementation framework, 
captured as part of this policy, will outline the implementation 
of this principle. 

■ Efficient and sustainable - The PMS should, like other 
services within the municipality, be cost effective and should 
be professionally developed, managed and operated in a 
sustainable manner. 

■ Public participation - The constituency of the municipality 
should be granted their legal rights, in terms of the 
Constitution and the MSA, through encouragement of public 
participation by the municipality during the development and 
implementation of a PMS. The implementation framework 
indicates the time, kind of involvement and responsibilities 
in terms of public participation. 

■ Integration - The PMS should be developed and implemented 
in such a manner that it will be integrated within the 
integrated development process of the municipality and its 
individual employee performance management. 

■ Objectivity - The PM-System must be developed on a sound 
value system where the management of the system and the 
information is based upon being objective and credible. The 
adopted performance assessments ensure objectivity and 
credibility in the management of performance. 

■ Reliability - The PMS should provide reliable information on 
the progress made by the municipality in achieving the 
objectives as set out in its IDP. The system provides for the 
use of source documents to verify the information put into 
the system. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 262 

>^<>0<XXXXXXXX>00000000000 


Section H: Organisational & Individual Performance Management System 


8.1.5. PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT CYCLE 

The municipality needs to adopt a performance management and reporting cycle which include timeframes to complete the process. 
The cycle should start with the strategy session of Council and include the IDP and budget processes. The IDP and budget should 
be converted to a Service Delivery Budget Implementation Plan (5DBIP) as corporate performance management tool and cascaded 
down to the PM5 of the municipality. The interaction of the performance management and reporting framework and other business 
processes is summarized in the diagram below. 


IDP 

-► 

BUDGET 

-► 

SDBIP 

-► 

PMS 

-► 

ANNUAL REPORT 




ORGANISATIONAL 

1 


STRATEGIC VISION 
& MISSION 

OBJECTIVES 

1 



DEFINED 



OUTCOMES 

Mjjjjlllll 

■lllllllllfl 

BUSINESS 

PLANNING 


^ I 


RESULTS 

INCORRECT 


ALLOCATION OF 
RESPONSIBILITY TO 
MANAGEMENT 


4r 


-k 

> 


TRAINING 

CAPACITY 

BUILDING 



■ 




CORRECT USAGE 

OF STAFF & 
RESOURCE 

H 

COUNSELLING 

EVALUATION 


HUMAN 

RESOURCE 

MANAGEMENT 


4r 


MONITORING AND 
EVALUATION 


4r 


■> 


MANAGEMENT 

INFORMATION 

SYSTEMS 


Figure 37: Performance Management Cycle 


263 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

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PHASE 

ORGANISATIONAL ACTIVITY 

INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITY 

TIMEFRAME 

STRATEGY 

Approve IDP and Budget 


June 

PLANNING 

Development of Service 
Delivery Implementation 

Plan (5DBIP) 


July 

Confirm portfolios of Council 
and Departments 

Confirm Portfolios 
of Managers 

July 


Performance Agreements of 
Section 57 Managers 

July 


Performance Contracts/Plans 
with rest of staff 

August 

Update Skills Development 
Plan (SDP) 

Finalise Career 

Development Plans 

August 

Agree performance weighting 
and rewards for year 


August 

MONITOR, MEASURES 
REVIEW 

Monthly Monitoring 5DBIP 
and SDP 


Monthly 

Quarterly Review/s SDBIP 
and SDP 

Bi-annual or 
quarterly reviews 

September 

December 

March 


Annual Performance Appraisal 

June 

Reward and Recognition 


December 

June 

REPORTING 

Quarterly Report/s 


September 

December 

March 

Mid-year assessment to Council 

Mid-year Assessment Report 

Jan 

Annual Report 

Annual Staff 

Performance Report 

July 

PERFORMANCE 

IMPROVEMENT 

Performance 

Improvement Plans 


January 

July 


Table 117 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 26A 

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Section H: Organisational & Individual Performance Management System 


8.1.6. CORPORATE PERFORMANCE 

The IDP process and the performance management process must be seamlessly integrated. The IDP fulfils the planning stage of performance 
management. Performance management in turn, fulfils the implementation management, monitoring and evaluation of the IDP. 

Corporate performance is the first step to seamlessly integrate the IDP and performance management. Corporate performance is 
measured through the 5DBIP. 


The 5DBIP is a plan where the IDP and budget is converted into measurable criteria on how, where and when the strategies, objectives 
and normal business processes of the municipality will be implemented. It also allocates responsibility to departments to deliver 
the services in the IDP and budget. The 5DBIP needs to be approved by Council within 28 days after the budget has been approved. 


The process in determining the performance measures can be summarized as follows: 



r ^ 

CORPORATE & INDIVIDUAL 
PERFORMANCE 

L ^ 


Figure 38 

Performance against the 5DBIP needs to be reviewed on at least a quarterly basis and the performance against the set criteria 
needs to be entered on the 5DBIP. 


The leadership team should use the web-based 5DBIP system to manage corporate performance and as an early warning system to 
identify areas of poor / slow performance and take performance improvement actions. It will be tabled quarterly at Council meetings. 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 


8.1.7. INDIVIDUAL 
PERFORMANCE: 

SECTION 57 MANAGERS 

Once the SDBIP has been approved, the portfolios of the council, 
departnnents and S57 appointees need to be confirmed. 

The Local Government Municipal Systems Act 2000 requires 
the Municipal Manager and the Managers reporting directly 
to the Municipal Manager to enter into annual Performance 
Agreements. The employment contract of the Municipal 
Manager and other Section 57 Managers should be directly 
linked to their Performance Agreements. These Performance 
Agreements therefore consist of two distinct parts: 


■ Performance Agreement: This is an agreement between the 
Section 57 Manager and the Municipality, which regulates the 
performance required for a particular position and the 
consequences of the performance. The Agreement deals 
with only one aspect of the employment relationship, namely 
performance. This agreement is normally for a period of 
5-years but must be reviewed and renewed annually, subject 
to the individual's annual performance. 

■ Performance Plan: The Performance Plan is an Annexure to the 
Performance Agreement and stipulates in detail the performance 
requirements for a single financial year. The Departmental 
Business Plan or scorecard (sorted per Department) transcends 
into the Performance Plan/s of the respective Section 57 
Managers according to their areas of responsibility 






Section H: Organisational & Individual Performance Management System 


8.2. ORGANISATIONAL PERFORMANCE 
MANAGEMENT SCORECARD (2016/2-017) 



IMATIOIMAL 
OUTCOME [R] 

NATIONAL KPA 
[R] 

PRE- 
DETERMINED 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

NDP OBJECTIVE 
[R] 

STRATEGIC 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

MUNICIPAL KPA 
[R] 


Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government 
system 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

To improve Service 
Delivery and the 
image of uMlalazi 
Municipality 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

To improve Service 
Delivery and the 
image of uMlalazi 
Municipality 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 


Corporate 

Services 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government system 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

To improve Service 
Delivery and the 
image of uMlalazi 
Municipality 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

To improve Service 
Delivery and the 
image of uMlalazi 
Municipality 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 


Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government system 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

To improve Service 
Delivery and the 
image of uMlalazi 
Municipality 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

To improve Service 
Delivery and the 
image of uMlalazi 
Municipality 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 


Corporate 

Services 

A skilled and 
capable workforce 
to support 
inclusive growth 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Organisational 
skills development 
and capacity 
building 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Organisational 
skills development 
and capacity building 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 


Corporate 

Services 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government system 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Organisational skills 
development and 
capacity building 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Organisational 
skills development 
and capacity building 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 


Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government system 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Effective and 
efficient Municipal 
Administration & 
Communication 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Effective and 
efficient Municipal 
Administration & 
Communication 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 


Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government system 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Strengthen 
and improve 
employment 
equity in the 
municipality 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Strengthen 
and improve 
employment 
equity in 
the municipality 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 


Corporate 

Services 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government system 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Strengthen 
and improve 
employment 
equity in the 
municipality 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Strengthen 
and improve 
employment 
equity in the 
municipality 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 


Corporate 

Services 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government system 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

Policy 

Development 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Policy 

Development 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 



UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 









KPI 

UNIT OF 
MEASURMENT 

KPI 

CALCULATION 
TYPE [R] 

KPI TARGET 
TYPE [R] 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

BUDGET 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 


Fill all funded 
prioritized vacant 
posts in the 
organogram by 30 
June 2017 

No. of funded 
prioritized vacant 
posts filled by 

30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

2 

R 5 000 000 

0 

2 

0 

0 


Review the 
Organisational 
structure and submit 
report to council by 

30 June 2017 

Organisational 
structure reviewed 
and report 
submitted to council 
by 30 June 2017 

Stand-Alone 

Number 

1 

R A880 

0 

0 

0 

1 


Sign performance 
agreements with 
all section 56/57 
managers by 

31 July 2016 

Number of 
performance 
agreements signed 
by 31 July 2016 

Accumulative 

Number 

5 

R A560 

5 

0 

0 

0 


Submit quarterly 
reports to the 

LLF on intership, 
learnership and 
in-service trainings/ 
programmes 
implemented 

Number of 
reports submitted 
to the LLF by 

30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

A 

R 194 400 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Training to be 
provided to 50 staff 
by 30 June 2017 

Number of 
staff trained by 

30 June 2017 

Carry Over 

Percentage 

50 

R511 910 

0 

20 

50 

0 


Compile at least 

2 Municipal 
newsletters by 

30 June 2017 

Number of municipal 
newsletters compiled 
by 30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

2 

R 2 000 000 

0 

1 

0 

1 


2 people from 
employment equity 
target groups to 
be employed in the 
three highest levels 
of management in 
compliance with 
approved equity 
plan by 30 June 2016 

Number of 
people employed 
in terms of EEP by 

30 June 2017 

Carry Over 

Number 

2 

R4 880 

0 

0 

0 

2 


Establish an 
Employment Equity 
Committee by 

31 December 201 6 

Employment 

Equity committee 
established by 

31 December 2016 

Stand-Alone 

Number 

1 

R4 880 

0 

1 

0 

0 


Review 3 Budget 
related policies that 
were previously 
approved and 
submit to Council by 
31 March 2017 

Budget related 
policies reviewed 
and submitted 
to Council by 

31 March 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

3 

R4 880 

0 

0 

0 

3 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 268 

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Section H: Organisational & Individual Performance Management System 


8.2. ORGANISATIONAL PERFORMANCE 
MANAGEMENT SCORECARD (201 6/2-01 7) 



IMATIOIMAL 
OUTCOME [R] 

NATIONAL KPA 
[R] 

PRE- 
DETERMINED 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

NDP OBJECTIVE 
[R] 

STRATEGIC 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

MUNICIPAL KPA 
[R] 


ALL 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government system 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

To improve 

Contract 

management 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

To improve 

Contract 

management 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 


Corporate 

Services 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government system 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

To improve Service 
Delivery and the 
image of uMlalazi 
Municipality 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

To improve Service 
Delivery and the 
image of uMlalazi 
Municipality 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 


Corporate 

Services 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government system 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 

To improve Service 
Delivery and the 
image of uMlalazi 
Municipality 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

To improve Service 
Delivery and the 
image of uMlalazi 
Municipality 

Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 


community 

Services 

Sustainable 

human 

settlements and 
improved quality 
of household life 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

To provide Fee 

Basic Services 
to all indigent 
households 

Social Protection 

To provide Fee 

Basic Services 
to all indigent 
households 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


Engineering 

Services 

Sustainable 

human 

settlements and 
improved quality 
of household life 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

To provide Fee 

Basic Services 
to all indigent 
households 

Social Protection 

To provide Fee 

Basic Services 
to all indigent 
households 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


Engineering 

Services 

An effective, 

competitive 

and responsive 

economic 

infrastructure 

network 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

To facilitate the 
provision of 
potable water 
and sanitation 

Economy and 
Development 

To facilitate with 
uThungulu to 
ensure alignment 
of water and 
sanitation 
provisioning to all 
Municipal Capital 
and other large 
scale Projects 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


Engineering 

Services 

An effective, 

competitive 

and responsive 

economic 

infrastructure 

network 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

To facilitate 
the provision 
of electricity 

Economy and 
Development 

To facilitate 
with Eskom to 
ensure alignment 
of electricity 
provisioning to all 
Municipal Wards 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 



UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 









KPI 

UNIT OF 
MEASURMENT 

KPI 

CALCULATION 
TYPE [R] 

KPI TARGET 
TYPE [R] 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

BUDGET 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 


Conduct needs 
assessments for 
use of Service 
Providers and 
submit to exco by 

31 December 2016 

Needs assessment 
completed 
and submitted 
to exco by 

31 December 2016 

Accumulative 

Number 

1 

R 19 280 

0 

0 

1 

0 


Conduct community 
satisfaction survey 
and submit report 
to EXCO by 

31 March 2017 

Reports submitted 
to EXCO on 
the customer 
satisfaction surveys 
by 31 March 2017. 

Stand-Alone 

Number 

1 

R A880 

0 

0 

1 

0 


Conduct staff 
satisfaction survey 
and submit report 
to EXCO by 

31 March 2017 

Reports submitted 
to EXCO on the staff 
satisfaction surveys 
by 31 March 2017. 

Stand-Alone 

Number 

1 

R A880 

0 

0 

1 

0 


Provide free basic 
refuse services to 

12 000 indigent 
households in rural 
areas with available 
resources by 

30 June 2017 

Number of 
households 
provided with 
access to free 
basic waste 
collection services 
by 30 June 2017. 

Carry Over 

Number 

12000 

R 1 868 850 

12000 

12000 

12000 

12000 


Provide free basic 
electricity services 
to 2300 indigent 
households by 30 
June 2017 with 
available resources 

Number of 
households 
provided with 
access to free basic 
electricity services 
by 30 June 2017. 

Carry Over 

Number 

2300 

R1 193 180 

2300 

2300 

2300 

2300 


Attend meetings 
with uThungulu to 
ensure alignment 
of water and 
sanitation 
provisioning to all 
Municipal Capital 
and other large 
scale Projects and 
submit quarterly 
reports to Portfolio 
Committee on 
meetings attended 

Number of reports 
submitted to the 
Portfolio Committee 
by 30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

A 

R 19 280 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Attend meetings 
with Eskom to 
ensure electricity 
provisioning in 
Municipal wards 
and submit 
quarterly reports 
to the Portfolio 
Committee on 
meetings attended 

Number of reports 
submitted to the 
Portfolio Committee 
by 30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

A 

R 19 280 

1 

1 

1 

1 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 270 

>^<>0<XXXXXXXX>00000000000 












Section H: Organisational & Individual Performance Management System 


8.2. ORGANISATIONAL PERFORMANCE 
MANAGEMENT SCORECARD (201 6/2-01 7) 



IMATIOIMAL 
OUTCOME [R] 

NATIONAL KPA 
[R] 

PRE- 
DETERMINED 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

NDP OBJECTIVE 
[R] 

STRATEGIC 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

MUNICIPAL KPA 
[R] 


Engineering 

Services 

An effective, 

competitive 

and responsive 

economic 

infrastructure 

network 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

To facilitate 
with Eskom to 
ensure alignment 
of electricity 
provisioning to all 
Municipal Wards 

Economy and 
Development 

To facilitate 
with Eskom to 
ensure alignment 
of electricity 
provisioning to all 
Municipal Wards 

Local Economic 
Development 


community 

services 

Improve health 
and life expectancy 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Ensure the 
effectiveness 
of waste 
management 
services in all 
areas and the 
provision of 
recycling facilities 
at appropriate 
locations) 

Healthcare for all 

Ensure the 
effectiveness 
of waste 
management 
services in all 
areas and the 
provision of 
recycling facilities 
at appropriate 
locations) 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


community 

services 

Improve health 
and life expectancy 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Ensure the 
effectiveness 
of waste 
management 
services in all 
areas and the 
provision of 
recycling facilities 
at appropriate 
locations) 

Healthcare for all 

Ensure the 
effectiveness 
of waste 
management 
services in all 
areas and the 
provision of 
recycling facilities 
at appropriate 
locations) 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


Engineering 

Services 

An effective, 

competitive 

and responsive 

economic 

infrastructure 

network 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

To ensure the 
provision and 
maintenance of 
municipal roads, 
sidewalks and 
causeways 

Economy and 
Development 

To ensure the 
provision and 
maintenance of 
municipal roads, 
sidewalks and 
causeways 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


Engineering 

Services 

An effective, 

competitive 

and responsive 

economic 

infrastructure 

network 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

To ensure the 
provision and 
maintenance of 
municipal roads, 
sidewalks and 
causeways 

Economy and 
Development 

To ensure the 
provision and 
maintenance of 
municipal roads, 
sidewalks and 
causeways 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


Engineering 

Services 

An effective, 

competitive 

and responsive 

economic 

infrastructure 

network 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

To ensure the 
provision and 
maintenance of 
municipal roads, 
sidewalks and 
causeways 

Economy and 
Development 

To ensure the 
provision and 
maintenance 
of municipal 
roads, sidewalks 
and causeways 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


Planning & 
Development 

Sustainable human 
settlements and 
improved quality 
of household life 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

To plan and support 
the acceleration 
of sustainable 
human settlements 

Transforming 

Human 

Settlements 

To plan and support 
the acceleration 
of sustainable 
human settlements 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 



271 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

o<xxxxxx>oooooc>ooo<x>o<xxx 









KPI 

UNIT OF 
MEASURMENT 

KPI 

CALCULATION 
TYPE [R] 

KPI TARGET 
TYPE [R] 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

BUDGET 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 


Investigate and 
implement green 
energy programmes 
in relation to energy 
saving projects such 
as solar water 
geysers and submit 
quarterly progress 
reports to 

Portfolio Committee 

No of progress 
reports submitted 
to portfolio 
committee by 30 

June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

4 

R20510 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Raise awareness on 
recycling through 

4 sessions with the 
community by 

30 June 2017 

Number of sessions 
held by 30 June 

2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

4 

R 2 200 000 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Review the 

Integrated Waste 
Management Plan 
(to include recycling 
and buy-back 
centres) and submit 
to council by 

30 June 2017 

Integrated Waste 
Management Plan 
(to include recycling 
and buy-back 
centres) reviewed 
and submitted to 
council by 

30 June 2017 

Stand-Alone 

Number 

1 

R2 200 000 

0 

0 

0 

1 


Construct 18.7kms 
of new roads as per 
planned projects by 
30 June 2017 

Kilometer of 
roads contructed 
by 30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

18.7 

R 28 21 2 050 

2 

5 

10 

18.7 


Reseal 2km of 
surfaced roads by 

30 June 2017 

km of roads 
resealed by 

30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

2 

R4 500 000 

0 

0 

0 

2 


Grade 3400km of 
rural access roads 
by 30 June 2017 

Km of rural 
roads graded by 

30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

3400 

R 10463 930 

850 

850 

850 

850 


Review Housing 
Sector Plan and 
submit to Council by 
30 June 2017 

Housing Sector 

Plan reviewed and 
submitted to council 
by 30 June 2017 

Carry Over 

Number 

1 

R4 880 

0 

0 

0 

1 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 272 

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Section H: Organisational & Individual Performance Management System 


8.2. ORGANISATIONAL PERFORMANCE 
MANAGEMENT SCORECARD (201 6/2-01 7) 



NATIONAL 
OUTCOME [R] 

NATIONAL KPA 
[R] 

PRE- 
DETERMINED 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

NDP OBJECTIVE 
[R] 

STRATEGIC 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

MUNICIPAL KPA 
[R] 


Planning & 
Development 

Sustainable 

human 

settlements and 
improved quality 
of household life 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

Facilitate the 
Implementation of 
Operation Sukuma 
Sakhe (Flagship 
Programme 

Healthcare for all 

Facilitate the 
Implementation of 
Operation Sukuma 
Sakhe (Flagship 
Programme 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


community 

services 

A development- 
orientated public 
service and 
inclusive citizenship 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

To facilitate 
adequate 
provisioning and 
management 
of community 
facilities under 
the ownership 
of uMlalazi 
Municipality 
at appropriate 
locations 

Economy 

and Development 

To facilitate 
adequate 
provisioning and 
management 
of community 
facilities under 
the ownership 
of uMlalazi 
Municipality 
at appropriate 
locations 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


Planning & 
Development 

Decent 
employment 
through inclusive 
economic growth 

Local Economic 
Development 

Formalise trading 
areas in the 
Municipality area 

Building 

Safer Communities 

Formalise trading 
areas in the 
Municipality area 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


Planning & 
Development 

An effective, 

competitive 

and responsive 

economic 

infrastructure 

network 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Formalise trading 
areas in the 
Municipality area 

Building 

Safer Communities 

Ensure quality 
control of 
infrastructure 
projects 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


Engineering 

Services 

An effective, 

competitive 

and responsive 

economic 

infrastructure 

network 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Ensure quality 
control of 
infrastructure 
projects 

Building 

Safer Communities 

Ensure quality 
control of 
infrastructure 
projects 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


Protection 

Services 

All people in south 
Africa protected 
and feel safe 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Mitigate the 
effectiveness 
of disasters 

Building 

Safer Communities 

Mitigate the 
effectiveness 
of disasters 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


Protection 

Services 

All people in south 
Africa protected 
and feel safe 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Mitigate the 
effectiveness 
of disasters 

Building Safer 
Communities 

Mitigate the 
effectiveness 
of disasters 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


Community 

Services 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government system 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Provide for the 
cemetery needs in 
the Municipal area 

Inclusive 

Rural Economy 

Provide for the 
cemetery needs in 
the Municipal area 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


Community 

Services 

Improve health and 
life expectancy 

Basic 

Service Delivery 

Contribute 
towards the 
development 
of Sports in the 
Municipal area 

Economy and 
Development 

Contribute 
towards the 
development 
of Sports in the 
Municipal area 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 



273 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

o<xxxxxx>oooooc>ooo<x>o<xxx 









KPI 

UNIT OF 
MEASURMENT 

KPI 

CALCULATION 
TYPE [R] 

KPI TARGET 
TYPE [R] 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

BUDGET 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 


Submit quarterly 
consolidated 
reports to EXCO 
on mentorship 
assistance provided 
to all War Rooms in 
uMlalazi Municiaplity 
in terms of 

Operation Sukuma 
Sakhe programme 

Number of reports 
submitted to EXCO 
by 30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

A 

R 200 000 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Appoint caretakers 

26 caretakers 
by 31 March 2016 
for the 

maintenance of rural 
community facilities 

Number of 
caretakers 
appointed by 

31 March 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

26 

R 100 000 

0 

0 

26 

0 


Provide 15 commuter 
and trading shelters 
in KD5 by 

31 March 201 7 

Number of shelters 
provided by 

31 March 2017 

Stand-Alone 

Number 

15 

R 500 000 

0 

0 

15 

0 


Provide A food 
safety training 
sessions to informal 
food traders by 

30 June 2016 

Number of food 
safety training 
sessions provided 
by 30 June 2017. 

Accumulative 

Number 

A 

RA880 

0 

2 

0 

2 


Undertake at least 
100 site visits to 
Capital projects by 

30 June 2017 

Number of site 
visits to Capital 
Projects undertaken 
by 30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

100 

R 50 000 

25 

25 

25 

25 


Hold quarterly 
meetings with 
applicable 
stakeholders to 
discuss disaster 
management issues 

Number of 
meetings held by 

30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

A 

R 650 000 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Execute 2 
emergency 
exercises by 

30 June 2017 

Number of 
excercises executed 
by 30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

2 

RA880 

0 

1 

0 

1 


Develop a cemetery 
plan for the next 
five years to 
accommodate future 
cemetery needs and 
submit to EXCO by 

31 March 2017 

Cemetery plan 
developed and 
submitted to EXCO 
by 31 March 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

1 

R A50 000 

0 

0 

1 

0 


Develop a plan for 
sports development 
for the next five years 
and submit to EXCO 
by 31 March 2017 

Sports development 
plan completed and 
submitted to EXCO 
by 31 March 2017. 

Accumulative 

Number 

1 

R1 000 000 

0 

0 

1 

0 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 27A 

>^<>0<XXXXXXXX>00000000000 












Section H: Organisational & Individual Performance Management System 


8.2. ORGANISATIONAL PERFORMANCE 
MANAGEMENT SCORECARD (201 6/2-01 7) 



IMATIOIMAL 
OUTCOME [R] 

NATIONAL KPA 
[R] 

PRE- 
DETERMINED 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

NDP OBJECTIVE 
[R] 

STRATEGIC 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

MUNICIPAL KPA 
[R] 


Protection 

Services 

All people in south 
Africa protected 
and feel safe 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

Contribute 
towards the 
prevention of 

Crime 

Building Safer 
Communities 

Contribute 
towards the 
prevention of 

Crime 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


Connmunity 

Services 

Improve the 
quality of basic 
education 

Basic Service 
Delivery 

Facilitate early 

childhood 

development 

Improving 

Education, training 
and innovation 

Facilitate early 

childhood 

development 

Basic Service 
Delivery and 
Infrastructure 
Development 


Planning & 
Development 

Decent 
employment 
through inclusive 
economic growth 

Local Economic 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Economy and 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 



Decent 
employment 
through inclusive 
economic growth 

Local Economic 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Economy and 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 



Decent 
employment 
through inclusive 
economic growth 

Local Economic 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Economy and 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 



Decent 
employment 
through inclusive 
economic growth 

Local Economic 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Economy and 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 

Local Economic 
Development 



Decent 
employment 
through inclusive 
economic growth 

Local Economic 
Development 

To ensure that 
businesses 
within uMlalazi 
Municipality 
are licensed 
through the LED 
department 

Economy and 
Development 

To ensure that 
businesses 
within uMlalazi 
Municipality 
are licensed 
through the LED 
department 

Local Economic 
Development 


Planning & 
Development 

Decent 
employment 
through inclusive 
economic growth 

Local Economic 
Development 

To contribute 
towards the 
reduction of 
unemployment 

Economy and 
Development 

To contribute 
towards the 
reduction of 
unemployment 

Local Economic 
Development 



UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 









KPI 

UNIT OF 
MEASURMENT 

KPI 

CALCULATION 
TYPE [R] 

KPI TARGET 
TYPE [R] 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

BUDGET 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 


Report quarterly 
to the Portfolio 
Committee on 
crime prevention 
strategies 
implemented in 
partnership with the 
relevant stakeholders 

No of reports 
submitted to 

Portfolio Committee 
by 30 June 2017 on 
crime prevention 
strategies 
implemented 

Accumulative 

Number 

A 

R A880 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Visit all creches in 

26 Wards by 

30 June 2017 
to monitor the 
healthyness of the 
environment for 
childhood development 

Number of 

Wards visited by 

30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

26 

R 308 000 

7 

7 

7 

5 


Assist 5 Tourism 

BEE entrepreneurs 
with starting 
growing businesses 
e.g. Research, 
business plans and 
skills development 
by 30 June 2017. 

Number of 

Tourism BEE 
entrepreneurs 
assisted by 

30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

5 

R 600 000 

0 

2 

3 

0 


Carry out 5 workshops 
to promote skills 
development and 
support teh Tourism 
5MME business scetor 
by 30 June 2017. 

Number of 
Workshops hosted 
by 30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

5 

R 600 000 

1 

1 

2 

1 


Carry out A tourism 
promotional 
activities in the print 
and other media by 

30 June 2017. 

Number of 
activities carried out 
by 30 June 2017. 

Accumulative 

Number 

A 

R 600 000 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Assist 10 youth BEE 
entrepreneurs with 
starting growing 
businesses e.g. 
Research, business 
plans and skills 
development by 

30 June 2017. 

Number of youth 
entrepreneurs 
assisted by 

30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

10 

R 600 000 

2 

3 

3 

2 


Develop a database 
of businesses 
licenced in uMlalazi 
Municipality and 
submit quarterly 
reports to Portfolio 
Committee 

Database of 
licenced businesses 
developed and 
submitted quarterly 
to Portfolio 
Committee 

Accumulative 

Number 

A 

R A880 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Number of 
temporaryjob 
opportunities 
created through 
EPWP projects and 
other operational 
projects by 

30 June 2017 

Number of 
temporaryjobs 
opportunities 
created and 
maintained by 

30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

1650 

R 2 92A 000 

1650 

1650 

1650 

1650 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 276 

>^<>0<XXXXXXXX>00000000000 












Section H: Organisational & Individual Performance Management System 


8.2. ORGANISATIONAL PERFORMANCE 
MANAGEMENT SCORECARD (201 6/2-01 7) 



IMATIOIMAL 
OUTCOME [R] 

NATIONAL KPA 
[R] 

PRE- 
DETERMINED 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

NDP OBJECTIVE 
[R] 

STRATEGIC 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

MUNICIPAL KPA 
[R] 


Finance 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government system 

Municipal Financial 
Viability and 
Management 

Advance and 
maintain the 
financial viability of 
the Municipality 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Advance and 
maintain the 
financial viability of 
the Municipality 

Municipal Financial 
Viability and 
Management 


Finance 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government system 

Municipal Financial 
Viability and 
Management 

Advance and 
maintain the 
financial viability of 
the Municipality 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Advance and 
maintain the 
financial viability of 
the Municipality 

Municipal Financial 
Viability and 
Management 


Engineering 

Services 

An effective, 

competitive 

and responsive 

economic 

infrastructure 

network 

Municipal Financial 
Viability and 
Management 

Improve the 
financial 
performance of 
the municipality 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Improve the 
financial 
performance of 
the municipality 

Municipal Financial 
Viability and 
Management 


All 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government system 

Municipal Financial 
Viability and 
Management 

Optimise budget 
implementation in 
the municipality 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Optimise budget 
implementation in 
the municipality 

Municipal Financial 
Viability and 
Management 


Finance 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government system 

Municipal Financial 
Viability and 
Management 

Advance and 
maintain the 
financial viability of 
the Municipality 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Advance and 
maintain the 
financial viability of 
the Municipality 

Municipal Financial 
Viability and 
Management 


Engineering 

Services 

An effective, 

competitive 

and responsive 

economic 

infrastructure 

network 

Municipal Financial 
Viability and 
Management 

Improve the 
financial 
performance of 
the municipality 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development 

State 

Improve the 
financial 
performance of 
the municipality 

Municipal Financial 
Viability and 
Management 



UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 









KPI 

UNIT OF 
MEASURMENT 

KPI 

CALCULATION 
TYPE [R] 

KPI TARGET 
TYPE [R] 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

BUDGET 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 


Achieve a debtors 
payment percentage 
of 95% at 30 June 

2017 (Gross Debtors 
Opening Balance 
+ Billed Revenue 
- Gross Debtors 

Closing Balance - 
Bad Debts Written 

Off/ Billed 

Revenue X 100) 

Payment % achieved 
at 30 June 2017 

Stand-Alone 

Percentage 

95 

R 157 010 

95 

95 

95 

95 


Financial viability 
measured in terms of 
the available cash to 
cover fixed operating 
expenditure as at 30 
June 2017 ((Available 
cash+ investments)/ 
Monthly fixed 
operating expenditure) 

Ratio achieved as 
at 30 June 2017 
((Available cash+ 
investments)/ 

Monthly fixed 
operating expenditure) 

Last Value 

Number 

3:1 

R 157 010 

3:1 

3:1 

3:1 

3:1 


Limit unaccounted 
for electricity to less 
than 8% by 30 June 
2017 {(Number 
of Electricity Units 
Purchased and/or 
Generated - Number 
of Electricity Units 

Sold) / Number of 
Electricity Units 
Purchased and/or 
Generated) x 100} 

% unaccounted 
electricity at 30 June 
2017 {(Number of 
Electricity Units 
Purchased and/ 
or Generated 
- Number of 
Electricity Units 

Sold) / Number of 
Electricity Units 
Purchased and/or 
Generated) x 100} 

Accumulative 

Number 

8 

R 78 500 

8 

8 

8 

8 


Spend at least 

90% of the Capital 
budget amount by 

30 June 201 7 (Actual 
expenditure/Approved 
capital budget) 

Percentage of 
capital budget spent 
on capital projects 
by 30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Percentage 

90 

R715 7A0 

25 

50 

75 

90 


Financial viability 
measured in terms of 
the available cash to 
cover fixed operating 
expenditure as at 30 
June 2017 ((Available 
cash+ investments)/ 
Monthly fixed 
operating expenditure) 

Ratio achieved as 
at 30 June 2017 
((Available cash+ 
investments)/ 

Monthly fixed 
operating expenditure) 

Last Value 

Number 

3:1 

R 157 010 

3:1 

3:1 

3:1 

3:1 


Limit unaccounted 
for electricity to less 
than 8% by 30 June 
2017 {(Number of 
Electricity Units 
Purchased and/ 
or Generated 
- Number of 
Electricity Units 

Sold) / Number of 
Electricity Units 
Purchased and/or 
Generated) x 100} 

% unaccounted 
electricity at 30 June 
2017 {(Number of 
Electricity Units 
Purchased and/ 
or Generated 
- Number of 
Electricity Units 

Sold) / Number of 
Electricity Units 
Purchased and/or 
Generated) x 100} 

Accumulative 

Number 

8 

R 78 500 

8 

8 

8 

8 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 278 

>^<>0<XXXXXXXX>00000000000 












Section H: Organisational & Individual Performance Management System 


8.2. ORGANISATIONAL PERFORMANCE 
MANAGEMENT SCORECARD (201 6/2-01 7) 



IMATIOIMAL 
OUTCOME [R] 

NATIONAL KPA 
[R] 

PRE- 
DETERMINED 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

NDP OBJECTIVE 
[R] 

STRATEGIC 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

MUNICIPAL KPA 
[R] 


All 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government system 

Municipal Financial 
Viability and 
Management 

Optimise budget 
implementation in 
the municipality 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Optimise budget 
implementation in 
the municipality 

Municipal Financial 
Viability and 
Management 


Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government system 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Effective Municipal 
Oversight 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Effective Municipal 
Oversight 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 


Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government system 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Effective Municipal 
Oversight 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Effective Municipal 
Oversight 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 


Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government system 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Effective Municipal 
Oversight 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Effective Municipal 
Oversight 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 


Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government system 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Effective Municipal 
Oversight 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Effective Municipal 
Oversight 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 


Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government system 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Effective Municipal 
Oversight 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Effective Municipal 
Oversight 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 


Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government system 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

To effectively 
Implement the 

Back to Basics 
programme 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

To effectively 
Implement the 

Back to Basics 
programme 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 


Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government system 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

To Obtain 

Clean Audit 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

To Obtain 

Clean Audit 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 



UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 









KPI 

UNIT OF 
MEASURMENT 

KPI 

CALCULATION 
TYPE [R] 

KPI TARGET 
TYPE [R] 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

BUDGET 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 


Spend at least 

90% of the Capital 
budget amount by 

30 June 201 7 (Actual 
expenditure/Approved 
capital budget) 

Percentage of capital 
budget spent on 
capital projects by 

30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Percentage 

90 

R 715 740 

25 

50 

75 

90 


Review Top Layer 
5DBIP and submit 
to Council by 

24 February 2017 

Top Layer SDBIP 
reviewed and 
submitted to Council 
by 24 February 2017 

Stand-Alone 

Number 

1 

R4 880 

0 

0 

1 

0 


Submit Quarterly 
reports on the 
actual performance 
achieved against 
the Top layer SDBIP 
targets to Council 

Number of reports 
submitted to Council 
by 30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

4 

R4 880 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Submit the annual 
performance report 
to AG by 

31 August 2016 

Annual performance 
report submitted to 
Auditor General by 

31 August 2016 

Stand-Alone 

Number 

1 

R 19 280 

1 

0 

0 

0 


Submit the annual 
financial statements 
by 31 August 2016 
to the Office of the 
Auditor-General 

Financial 
statements 
submitted by 

31 August 2016 
to the Office of the 
Auditor-General 

Stand-Alone 

Number 

1 

R 19 280 

1 

0 

0 

0 


Submit Oversight 
Report of annual 
report to council by 

31 March 2017 

oversight report 
submitted to 

Council by 

31 March 2017 

Stand-Alone 

Number 

1 

R4 880 

0 

0 

1 

0 


Submit quarterly 
reports to 
exco on the 
implementation 
of Back to Basics 
programme 

Number of reports 
submitted to EXCO 
by 30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

4 

R4 880 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Submit reports 
to EXCO on the 
measures taken to 
ensure that matters 
raised in the 

2015/16 Audit have 
been resolved in 
order to ensure that 
the Municipality 
receives / maintains 
a Clean Audit in 
2016/2017 

Number of reports 
submitted to 
the Executive 
Committee by 

31 March 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

1 

R4 880 

0 

0 

1 

0 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 280 

>^<>0<XXXXXXXX>00000000000 












Section H: Organisational & Individual Performance Management System 


8.2. ORGANISATIONAL PERFORMANCE 
MANAGEMENT SCORECARD (201 6/2-01 7) 



IMATIOIMAL 
OUTCOME [R] 

NATIONAL KPA 
[R] 

PRE- 
DETERMINED 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

NDP OBJECTIVE 
[R] 

STRATEGIC 
OBJECTIVE [R] 

MUNICIPAL KPA 
[R] 


Office of 
the MM 

Improve health 
and life expectancy 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Mitigate the Impact 
of HIV/Aids in the 
Municipality area 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Mitigate the Impact 
of HIV/Aids in the 
Municipality area 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 


Office of 
the MM 

Improve health 
and life expectancy 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Mitigate the Impact 
of HIV/Aids in the 
Municipality area 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Mitigate the Impact 
of HIV/Aids in the 
Municipality area 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 


Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government system 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

To reduce Risk to 
the Organisation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

To reduce Risk to 
the Organisation 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 


Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government system 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

To reduce Risk to 
the Organisation 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

To reduce Risk to 
the Organisation 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 


Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government system 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Ensure that public 
participation 
structures are 
established, 
capacitated 
and functional 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Ensure that public 
participation 
structures are 
established, 
capacitated 
and functional 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 


Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government system 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

Ensure that public 
participation 
structures are 
established, 
capacitated 
and functional 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

Ensure that public 
participation 
structures are 
established, 
capacitated 
and functional 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 


Office of 
the MM 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government system 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

To promote 
International & 
National Relations 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

To promote 
International & 
National Relations 

Good Governance 
and Public 
Participation 


Planning & 
Development 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government system 

Cross 

cutting Issues 

To promote 
sustainable 
development 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

To promote 
sustainable 
development 

Cross 

Cutting Issues 


Planning & 
Development 

A responsive 
and accountable, 
effective and 
efficient local 
government system 

Cross 

cutting Issues 

To promote 
integrated 
development 
planning 

Developing a 
capable and 
Development State 

To promote 
integrated 
development 
planning 

Cross 

Cutting Issues 



Table 118: Organisational Performance Management Scorecard 2016/2017 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 









KPI 

UNIT OF 
MEASURMENT 

KPI 

CALCULATION 
TYPE [R] 

KPI TARGET 
TYPE [R] 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

BUDGET 

Q1 

Q2 

Q3 

Q4 


Coordinate the 
meeting of the 
uMlalazi Aids 

Council 

Number of uMlalazi 
Aids Council 
meetings held by 

30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

A 

R 450 000 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Review HIV/Aids Plan 
and submit to exco 
by 30 June 2017 

HIV/Aids Plan 
reviewed and 
submitted to exco 
by 30 June 2017 

Stand-Alone 

Number 

1 

R 450 000 

0 

0 

0 

1 


Review Enterprise 
Risk Plan and 
submit to exco by 

30 June 2017 

Enterprise Risk 

Plan reviewed and 
submitted to exco 
by 30 June 2017 

Stand-Alone 

Number 

1 

R 19 280 

0 

0 

0 

1 


Review Fraud Risk 

Plan and submit to 
exco by 30 June 2017 

Fraud Risk Plan 
reviewed and 
submitted to exco 
by 30 June 2017 

Stand-Alone 

Number 

1 

R 19 280 

0 

0 

0 

1 


Hold meetings with 
stakeholders and 
ward committees 
to communicate the 
IDP process plan 

Number of 
meetings held by 

30 September 2016 

Accumulative 

Number 

27 

R 300 000 

27 

0 

0 

0 


Submit quarterly 
reports to EXCO on 
the functionality of 
all Ward Committees 
(include training and 
development) 

No of reports 
submitted to EXCO 
by 30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

4 

R1 000 000 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Submit a report to 
MCOR by 30 June 

201 7 on the progress 
made with the 
Twinning partnership 
with Songdal 
Municipality (Norway) 

Reports 

submitted to MCOR 
by 30 June 2017 

Accumulative 

Number 

1 

0 

0 

0 

0 

1 


Compile a Town 
Planning Register 
for the 2016/2017 
financial year on 
all Town Planning 
applications being 
processed and their 
status and submit 
quarterly reports 
to the Portfolio 
Committee 

Town Planning 
Register compiled 
and submitted 
quarterly to the 
Portfolio Committee 

Accumulative 

Number 

4 

224080 

1 

1 

1 

1 


Review uMlalazi 
Municipality IDP 
for 2017/2018 and 
submit to Council by 
30 June 2017 

uMlalazi Municipality 
IDP for 201 7/2018 
reviewed and 
submitted to Council 
by 30 June 2017 

Stand-Alone 

Number 

1 

R 338 350 

0 

0 

0 

1 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 282 

<>0000<XXXXX>000000000000 















9. Achievements 


9.1. SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT 

■ Students registered through Annual Mayoral Registration Bursary Fund: 


2012/13 2013/14 2014/15 2015/16 


60 Students 19 Students 42 Students 104 Students 


Table 118 


■ 23 in-service training provided to the youth of 
uMlalazi municipality 

■ Early Childhood Development Program -Constructed 16 
Creches in partnership with Devine Life Society and through 
MIG funding. 

■ Youth Business Advisory Centre established. (50 Co-operatives 
registered and 20 skilled & 80 Private Companies registered and 
40 skilled). 

■ Commemorative Cultural Days (Fleritage day, Diwali)Sponsored. 

■ Annual Cultural Dance Competitions 

■ Protection Services Department provides road safety 
campaigns to various schools within the municipality. 

■ Destitute / pauper burial provided (dignity) 

■ Special Programs - Disability Forum, Women's Sector 
and Men's Sector; Child Protection + Senior Citizens 
Forum established. 

■ Annual SALGA games and annual Jacob Zuma/Derrick Spenser 
soccer tournaments 

9.2. HEALTH 

■ Local AIDS Council launched in November 201 1 at Mpushini 
Park Hall. 

■ Municipality has a 5 year HIV Strategy, which aim to reduce 
new HIV infections. 

■ 20 Ward AIDS committees established. 

■ Operation Sukuma Sakhe program launched and 25 War 
Rooms established. 

■ Food security for People Living with HIV and AIDS - 30 monthly 
food parcels given and encourage one-home-one garden 
through Dept, of Agriculture. 

■ 257 CCGs within uMlalazi Municipality:(199 appointed by 
DOH and 58 appointed by DSD). They support LAC and OSS 
interventions through health education, palliative care, DOT 
support, male medical circumcision and referrals. 


9.3. LOCAL ECONOMIC 
DEVELOPMENT 

■ 23 community gardens fenced - formalization of informal 
economy around the municipal area - training of informal 
economy role players. More than 70 temporaryjobs created 
during erection of fencing for local people especially youth, 
women and disabled. 

■ Eshowe Taxi Rank development in partnership with KZN EDTEA 
with 41 Trading Units, comprising of 4 anchor shops and 37 
normal size shops. 

■ Gingindlovu Shopping Centre - more 90 jobs during 
construction and 70 permanent jobs. 

■ Tronox Mining also provides job opportunities for 
local communities. 

■ Established and Functional Informal Traders Forum/ Informal 
Traders Smart Cards provided to informal traders. 

■ Annual LED/Youth In Business Summit is hosted by the 
municipality 

■ 201 1 -86 EPWP beneficiaries increase to 825 in 2015. 
Jobs creation for local people, through infrastructure projects 
contractors. 

■ 201 1 - 120 CWP beneficiaries increased to 1 1 1 5 in 2015. 

9.A. HOUSING PROJECTS 

■ Bhekeshowe Rural Housing project with 1000 units 
completed. 

■ Gingindlovu Housing Project with 143 units completed 

■ Sunnydale Phase 2 with 404 units completed 

■ uYaya, Ingudwini, and Mombeni Rural Housing projects are 
under construction with 1000 units each 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 284 

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Section I: Achievements 


9.5. ELECTRICTY 
PROJECTS 

■ Mhlathuzana Electrification Project 660 
connections completed. 

■ Gingindlovu Electrification Project 1 A3 connections completed. 

■ Makhilimba Electrification Project 278 connections, 

95% complete. 

■ Ezingwenya Electrification Project 250 connections, 
marketing stage. 

■ Samungu Electrification Project 1382 connections completed. 

■ Entumeni Electrification Project (phase 1) 1286 
connections completed. 

■ Dibhazi/ Mankumbu - 936 Connections, 90% complete 

■ Ngeza Electrification Project (phase 1) - 867 
connections, completed 

■ Manzamnyama Electricity Project - 203 
connections, completed 

■ Sibhakuza Electricity Project - A01 connections, completed 

■ Nhlalidakiwe Electricity Project - 369 connections, 

90% complete 

■ Saroni project (phase 1)- 539 connections, completed 

■ Mabhudle project - 1 1 A connections, completed 

■ Mpehlele project - A10 connections, completed 

■ Infills Project: Eziqwaqweni - 230 connections, completed. 

■ Bonisani Electricity Project - 60 connections, completed 

9.6. FREE BASIC SERVICES 

■ Free Basic Electricity provided to1530 rural households and 
768 households in urban area wards. 

■ Free Refuse removal provided to 1 1 , 1 1 5 rural households 
and 1,103 urban households 

■ Indigent Support provided to 350 households registered on 
indigent register 


9.7. INFRASTRUCTURE 
PROJECTS 

■ Sports Field : Biyela Ward 01 

■ Sport Field : Emathwaseni (Sithilo) Ward 02 

■ Mabhudle Creche Ward 15 

■ Sport Field : Mabhokweni Ward 17 

■ Ethondo River Causeway Ward 21 

■ Inhiababo Causeway Road Ward 1 7 

■ Eshowe Waste Transfer Station Ward 1 1 

■ Butcher Street Ward 1 1 

■ Ngoje Access Road Ward 8 

■ Upgrade D135 KwaKhoza Ward 15 

■ Mbongolweni Access Road Ward 19 

■ Kwa-Mondio Bus Shelter Ward 22 

■ Nhlanzanyoni Causeway Ward 07 

■ Ohhahheni Access Road and Causeway Ward 22 

■ Inhiababo Causeway Ward 17 

■ Covering Gingindlovu Taxi Rank Ward 18 

■ KDS Internal Roads Ward 12 

■ Sunnydale Internal Roads Ward 1 1 

■ Nomyaca Sports Field 

■ Isandiwana/Naickerville Intersection (Ward 18) 

■ Gciza Access Road (Ward 1 7) 

■ Nogobhoza Access Road (Ward 15) 

■ Ngwadia Access Road (Ward 19) 

■ Esifubeni Access Road (Ward 10) 

■ Imbalenhie Creche (Ward 8) 

■ Lethukuthula Creche (Ward 2A) 

■ Ndlongolwane Access Road (Ward A) 



UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 






UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 286 

0<><XX><X><XX>0<>00<XXX><>0<>0<>0<>0 


Annexures 






iti 


ii 

■CM* 









Annexurejl: 
Summary Of 
Projects Per Ward 


Ward1:CllrNLBIYELA 

Population: 7451 
Number of HH: 1474 


PROJECT /ISSUE 

2015/2016 

2016/2017 

RESPONSIBLE 

L590 

R 1 410 000 (Rollover Project) Progress 
- Contractor Onsite 


DOT 

L593 


R 2 000 000 

DOT 

L694 


R 2000 000 

DOT 

Mfomfolozi causeway 

100% Complete 


MIG 

ELECTRICITY 

Bongela/Mbileni (464 Connections) 

R 8 316 019.00 (Progress - Contractor 
Onsite - This project will also rollover 
to 201 6/1 7 Financial Year) 


E5K0M 

WATER 

Middle Drift - Phase 2: 

Izinyosi; Bongela; 

Nkunzempunga; Mfomfolozi; Mbileni; 
Nyimbithwa; Mvuzane 

R 1 6 000 000 (This project starts in 
Nkandia but also caters for uMlalazi 

LM: Ward 1 and 2 - Progress at 80%) 

R 3 000 000 

Uthungulu 

Middle Drift SSA5 (Ward 1, 2, 3 & 4) - 

Izinsundu, Ntamoyenkunzi. 

Part of Mpaphala, 

Khangelani, Kwa Gasa, 

Mbizane, Buthanani, 

Shushu, Matshamhiophe, 
Nhlalamnyango 

Progress - Introduced Project to 
Traditional Authority & SOD turned in 
February 2016 

R15 000 000. 00 

uThungulu 


HOUSING 


Mvuzane (1000 Units) 


Tranche 2 - Detailed 

Dept of H 5 



Planning 



AGRICULTURE 


Mayiphendulwe Co-Operative Based 


R2 893 543.70 

Dept of 

in Mphaphala - (Broiler Project) 


(For Fencing, building 
of broiler structure and 
production inputs) 

Agriculture 


EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT 


Sibonokuhle Creche 

100% Completed 


Devine Life/ 




uMlalazi 


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Annexure J1: Summary Of Projects Per Ward 


Ward 2; Cllr DT NGONYAMA 

Population: 7936 
Number of HH: 1458 


PROJECT /ISSUE 

2015/2016 

2016/2017 

RESPONSIBLE 

ROADS 

P218/P710 (Mbongolwane to 

Mandeni) 

R 1 1 50 000 - Progress: P2 1 8 - 
Stabilizing the final layer, the V drains 
will be installed. P710 - Tarring has 
commenced) This project will likely roll 
over to 201 6/1 7 Financial year. 


DOT 

Ntumeni to Madungela (P218) 

R 43 350 


DOT 

ELECTRICITY 

Mankumbu/Dibhasi (936 connections) 

90% Complete 


Eskom 

Nhlalidakiwe (369 Connections) 

90% Complete 


Eskom 


WATER 


Middle Drift - Phase 2: Izinyosi; 

Bongela; Nkunzempunga; Mfomfolozi; 
Mbileni; Nyimbithwa; Mvuzane 

R 1 6 000 000 (This project starts in 
Nkandia but also caters for uMlalazi 

LM: Ward 1 and 2 Progress at 80%) 

R 3 000 000 

Uthungulu 

Middle Drift SSA5 (Ward 1, 2, 3 

& 4) - Izinsundu, Ntamoyenkunzi. 

Part of Mpaphala, Khangelani, Kwa 

Gasa, Mbizane, Buthanani, Shushu, 
Matshamhiophe, Nhlalamnyango 

(Progress - Introduced Project 
to Traditional 

Authority & SOD turned in 

February 2016 

R15 000 000. 00 

uThungulu 

Machotshaneni 

Progress : Planning Stage 

R 2 000 000 


HOUSING 

uYaya Housing Projects (Nkosi Ntuli) 

Progress - Tranche 3 - Construction 


DoHS 

EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT 

ECD CENTER (SOOsqm building 
with additional facilities 
(next to Kwazikwakhe School) 


R 2 500 000.00 

DSD 

Ward 3: ClIrMMM NTULI 

Population: 7234 

Number of HH: 1366 

PROJECT /ISSUE 

2015/2016 

2016/2017 

RESPONSIBLE 

ROADS BUDGETED BY DOT 

D2262 Dakeni Regravelling 

R1 400 000 (Progress - Complete) 


DOT 

NAME OF THE ROAD (UMLALAZI MUNICIPALITY) 

Mtipela Ntabankulu Road 


R 5 975 900 

uMlalazi 

Slambo (570 Connections) 

Progress - Pre Engineering Phase (Full 
commencement will be in 2016/17) 



WATER BUDGETED BY UTHUNGULU 

Middle Drift SSA5: (Ward 1, 2, 3 & 4) 

Izinsundu; Ntamoyenkunzi; Mpaphala; 
Shushu; Matshamhiophe; 
Nkunzempunga; Khangelani; 

Kwa Gasa; Mbizane; Buthanani; 
Matshamhiophe; Nhlalamnyango 

Progress - Introduced Project to 
Traditional 

Authority & SOD turned in 

February 2016 

R15 000 000 

Uthungulu 

AGRICULTURAL FACILITIES 

Gcefeza Goats Co-Operative - Based 
in Mphundumane 


R2 158 000.00 (Fencing 
(183ha), division of 
camps, building of shed 
and buy of rams 

Dept, of Agric 

HOUSING 

uYaya Housing Project (1000 units) 


Tranche 3- Construction 

DoHS 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 










Ward 4: ClIrKKHUMALO 

Population: 8912 
Number of HH: 1599 


2015/2016 2016/2017 


ROADS BUDGETED BY MUNICIPALITY 


Ndlongolwane 

100% Complete 


uMlalazi 

Matshamhlophe Road 


R3 500 000 

uMlalazi 

ELECTRICITY 

Masundwini Electrification (325 
Connections) 


R660 000 (These funds 
will be used in 2016/17 
for the PreEngineering 
Process) Total for the 
Project is R8 776 000 

UMlalazi 


WATER BUDGETED BY UTHUNGULU 


Middle Drift 55A5: (Ward 1,2,3 

Progress - Introduced Project to 

R15 000 000 

Uthungulu 

&4) Izinsundu; Ntamoyenkunzi; 

Traditional Authority & SOD 



Mpaphala; Shushu; Matshamhlophe; 
Nkunzempunga; Khangelani; 

KwaGasa; Mbizane; Buthanani; 
Matshamhlophe; Nhlalamnyango 

turned in February 2016 




RESPONSIBLE 


PROJECT /ISSUE 


RURAL HOUSING 


Oyaya Rural Housing Project 
(1000 Units) 

Progress :Trance 3- 
Construction Phase 


uMlalazi 

Mvuzane Rural Housing (4 Sub wards) 

Progress: Tranche 2 - 
Detailed Planning 


uMlalazi 

SOCIAL FACILITIES 

IPhupho labadala Old Age Home 


TBC 

Lotto Fund 


SPORTS AND RECREATION 


Indanyini Sports Field 

R6 500 000 (Progress - 


DSR 


Under Construction) 




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Annexure J1: Summary Of Projects Per Ward 


Ward 5: Cllr NS ZULU 

Population: 9785 
Number of HH: 1910 


2015/2016 2016/2017 


ROADS BUDGETED BY DOT 


L888 uMmangaliso PS Access 

R1 187 808.00 (Progress - Completed) 


DOT 

D356 Ngudwini (Regravelling) 


R1 700 000 (4km) 

DOT 

P710 Upgrade (Ntumeni - Sundumbili) 

Major Project 

Project has Commenced: Progress - 
P218 Stabilising the final layer, the V 
drains will be installed. P710 - Tarring 
has commenced) 


DOT 


ELECTRICITY 


Hayinyama/Zimbidli (801 Connections) 

R 12 300 (Ward 5/6) - Progress - 

Contractor onsite) 


Eskom 

Ngudwini - (Sub ward: Ngilandela) 

(150 infills) 

New Service Provider was 
awarded the type 2 electrification, 
survey has been conducted and 
identified houses that need to be 
installed with type 2 electricity. 



Ngudwini (Kwa Shayinja, Mahuzu, 
Magwaza, Abathembu) - 786 
Connections 


Rl.eSm will be used 
for Premarketing & 
preparations. Total 
amount for the Project - 

R22 000 000.00 


HOUSING 

Uthungulu 

Ngudwini Housing Project (Phase 1) 

Progress- Ongoing (Contractor: 
IMPRODEV) onsite Qhawe LamaQhawe 
was terminated 


DOHS 

Uyaya Rural Housing Phase 1 (Wards: 
2,3, 4,5) 1 000 units 

Tranche 3- Construction (Progress 800 
houses Complete) 



EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT 

Maqotha Creche 

Progress - Under Construction 


Devine Life 


RESPONSIBLE 


PROJECT /ISSUE 


291 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - 

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INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 






Ward 6: Cllr FM MNTENGU 

Population: 6930 
Number of HH: 1393 


2015/2016 2016/2017 


ROADS BUDGETED BY DOT 


A1 664 (Zule - New Gravel Road) (1 .7Km) 

R 916,080.67 - Progress: Completed 
2015/16 


DOT 

P710 Upgrade (Ntumeni - Sundumbili) 

Project has Commenced: Progress - 


DOT 

Major Project 

P218 Stabilising the final layer, the 

V drains will be installed. P710 - 




Tarring has commenced) 




RESPONSIBLE 


PROJECT /ISSUE 


Hayinyama/Zimbidli (801 

R 12 300 880 Progress - 


Eskom 

Connectionswaiting funding approval) 

Contractor Onsite) 




RURAL HOUSING 


Mombeni Rural housing (1000 units) 

Tranche 3 - Construction - 


DOH 


935 units Completed 




AGRICULTURAL FACILITIES 


Nembe Cluster 


R2 178 853.68 (Fencing, 
irrigation system and 
production inputs) 

DoA 

Nolanga Piggery 


R6 005 910.00 (Fencing, 
building of structure, 
buying of sows and 
boers and feed) 

DoA 


COMMUNITY FACILITIES 


Mombeni Community Services Centre 

Project Complete - Awaiting MEC for 


COGTA 


CoGTA to Officially Flandover 




Ward 7: Cllr MM CEBEKHULU 

Population: 7809 
Number of HH: 2079 


2014/2015 2015/2016 2016/2017 


ROADS BUDGETED BY DOT 


D133 

R 1 330 000 

Complete 


DOT 

D528 (6.2km) Esiphezi 


R 2 000 000 (Complete) 


DOT 

D537 (Nkanini) 



R 1,950,000 

DOT 


ELECTRICITY 


Saron Phase 1 

Complete 



Eskom 

Phase 2: 


Awaiting Funding 


ESKOM 

Emahhusheni (120 
Connections) 



R280 000 will be spent 
on Pre-Engineering in 
this F/Y 

(Total Value = R2.96m) 

uMlalazi 


AGRICULTURAL FACILITIES 


Superior Vegitables 



R780 460.00 

DOA 

Co-op Tomatoes 
Backhouse, weather 
station, irrigation 
and inputs 



(15 tunnels(10x30m) 



RESPONSIBLE 


PROJECT /ISSUE 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 292 

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Annexure J1: Summary Of Projects Per Ward 


Ward 8: Cllr WP Mzimela 

Population: 9207 
Number of HH: 1778 


2015/2016 2016/2017 


ROADS BUDGETED BY DOT 


D465 Betterment & ReGravelling (2.7 km) 

R 1 570 000 (Progress - Complete) 


DOT 

D1553 Kholweni (Regravelling) 

4.0 km 

R 1,950,000 

DOT 

L945 (Ntumeni) 


R1 950 000 

DOT 

ELECTRICITY 

Entumeni Phase 2 (957 Connections) 

R20 163 417 (Progress - 
Contractor Onsite. 187 already 
connected by February.) 


Eskom 

WATER BUDGETED BY UTHUNGULU) 

Vuma Extension- 

R 378 627.00 (Progress - Complete) 




RESPONSIBLE 


PROJECT /ISSUE 


SANITATION BUDGETED BY UTHUNGULU 


VIP sanitation project (Ward 8 and 14) 

R 10 700 000 (Progress 95% Complete) 


Uthungulu 

EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT (Creches) 

Imbalenhie Creche 

Complete 


Uthungulu 

Kholweni Creche 

Under Construction 


Devine Life 

RURAL HOUSING 

Kholweni Housing Scheme (1000 Units) 

Progress: Tranche 2 - Detailed Planning 


Depths 

AGRICULTURAL FACILITIES 

Ntumeni/ Vuma Cluster Maize and Beans) 

R2 104 792.00 


uMlalazi 


Ward 9: ClIrM DLUDLA 

Population: 821 1 
Number of HH: 1538 


PROJECT /ISSUE 

2015/2016 

2016/2017 

RESPONSIBLE 

D528 Rehabilitation of Siphezi Road (2.4km) 

R91 7 072.48 (Progress - Complete) 


DOT 

ELECTRICITY 

Eshowe Nb15- Siphezi (107 Connections) 

Awaiting Funding 


Eskom 


WATER AND SANITATION 


Eshowe SSA 1 (Eshowe Town, 

King Dinizulu T/S, KwaMfana, 

Nyanini, Berea, Thawini, Ntenjane, 
Emncongweni 

Siqwanjana IzindophI) (Portions 9,1 1, 
12& 13) 

R 41 000 000 Progress at 38% 

R 49 000 000 

UThungulu 

Kwahlokohloko SSA 1: Mandawe 
(partial), Mbizo 2, Ncemaneni, Zigagayi, 
Emaqeleni, Isiphezi, Kwa-Mpofu, 
Kwa-Hlokohloko / Thintumkaba, 
Eziqwaqweni (Ward 26), Mhlathuzana 
Mtilombo 

Mbizo 1 

R 63 000 000 Progress at 64% 

R50 000 000 

uThungulu 


RURAL HOUSING 


Mpungose Rural Housing 

Progress - Appointed Bahlomile 


DoHS 

(Ward 09, 10, 14) 1000 units 

Development. Has been Introduced 

T/A. Studies have been conducted. 
Preparation complete & awaiting 
funding from DoHS to commence 




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WardIO: Cllr EM ZWANE 

Population: 936A 
Number of HH: 1596 


2014/2015 2015/2016 2016/2017 


ROADS BUDGETED BY DOT 


L797 Kwelomoya Road 


R590 000 - (Progress - 
Contractor Appointed, 
Awaiting Introduction to 
T/A and Community) 


DOT 

L1250 Mpungose 
(Regravelling - Akm) 



R2 000 000 

Dot 


ROADS BUDGETED BY THE MUNICIPALITY 


Esifubeni Road 


R3 000 000 - (Project 


uMlalazi 



Complete) 




RESPONSIBLE 


PROJECT /ISSUE 


ELECTRICITY 


Eziqwaqweni Infills (350 
connections 

R5 250 000(2014/15 
Project). Progress- 
Approximately 

230 connections 
completed Contractor 
has not completed all 
connections & is off site 
temporally due to lack of 
Eskom funding - Project 
will commence once 
funding is approved. 



Eskom 

WATER AND SANITATION 

HOUSING 

Mpungose Housing 

Project (9, 10,1 A) 


Progress - Appointed 
Bohlomile Development. 

Has been Introduced 

T/A. Studies have been 
conducted. 


DoH 



Preparation complete & 

awaiting funding from 
DoHS to commence 



SPORTS 

Nkume Sports Park 



R 2 100 000 (Progress- 

DSR/uMlalazi 


Under Construction: 95% 
Complete. Contractor is 
putting in grass) 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 29A 

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Annexure J1: Summary Of Projects Per Ward 


WardlliClIrMMKHANYILE 
Population: 8345 
Number of HH: 2964 


PROJECT /ISSUE 

2015/2016 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

RESPONSIBLE 

Kangela Road 

R 3 760 230 

R8190 760- 

Contractor has been 
Awarded; Awaiting 
Appeals period, then the 
project will Commence) 


uMlalazi 

Osborn Road Phase 1 

R 5 793 910 



uMlalazi 

Urban Roads 
Rehabilitations 
(Municipal Wide) 
(Equitable) 

Progress: Winham Rd 
(Goes to Traffic Dept) & 

Charles Horsley Rd 

(Sunnydale) are being 
done. 



uMlalazi 

Sunnydale/ King 

Dinuzulu Link Road 

R 3 594 650 (Progress - 
Complete) 



uMlalazi 

Stornnwater 
Managements (CRR) 

R3 100 000 

R 2 000 000 


uMlalazi 

Mitchell Street Extension 


R 2 750 000 


uMlalazi 

Speed Humps (Ging MTZ 
and Eshowe) 

R 140 000 

R 200 000 

R 210 000 

uMlalazi 

Upgrade intersection- 
Sunnydale Low Cost 
Housing 


R 500 000 


uMlalazi 

Side Walks (All 3 Towns) 

R 550 000 

R 500 000 

R 1 000 000 

uMlalazi 

Kerbing (All 3 Towns) 

R 300 000 

R 300 000. 

R 310 000 

uMlalazi 


ELECTRICITY 


Upgrade Street Lights 

R 143 000 

R 80 000 

R 90 000 

uMlalazi 

Free Electricity 

R 1 336 130 

R1 415 700 

R 1 500 880 

uMlalazi 

Electricity Meter 
Conversions 

R300 000 

R300 000 - Applications 
are available for those 
who wish to convert. 

R 150 880 

uMlalazi 


COMMUNITY SERVICE FACILITIES 


Rehabilitation of Eshowe 
Landfill site 


R 4 500 000 


uMlalazi 

Sunnydale Pool 
Rehabilitation 


R200 000 (For pool 
Shelters) 


uMlalazi 

Eshowe Swimming Pool 
Rehabilitation 



3 500 000 

uMlalazi 

Rutledge Middle income 
130 units 

Progress - Awaiting Bulk 
Services 



DOH 

Proposed Bus/Taxi Rank 
Mixed Development 

Scotts and Company 
have submitted a 
development application 
- Awaiting Council 
Approval (5/05/2016) 



DED/uMlalazi 

Cemetery Palisade Fencing 


R 400 000 

R300 000 

uMlalazi 

Cemetery Ablution Facilities 


R 100 000 


uMlalazi 

Cemetery Pathways 


R 150 000 

R 150 000 



UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 








Ward 11: Cllr MM KHANYILE ...continued 

Population: 8345 
Number of HH: 2964 


2015/2016 2016/2017 2017/2018 


WATER AND SANITATION 


Eshowe WCWDM 
(11 & 12) 

R 30 000 000 Progress 
at 3% 

R 20 000 000 

R 10 000 000 

uThungulu 

Eshowe 55A 1 (Eshowe 
Town, King 

Dinizulu T/5, Kwa-Mfana, 
Nyanini, Berea, Thawini, 
Ntenjane, Ennncongweni 
Siqwanjana Izindophi) 
(Portions 9,11, 12&13) 

R 41 000 000 Progress 
at 38% 

R 49 000 000 


UThungulu 


HOUSING 


Sunnydale Phase 2 (402 
Units) 

Project Complete 



DoHS 

Sunnydale Phase 2 
Extension (117 units) 

Tranche 1: Detailed 
Planning 



DoHS 

Mpushini Park Housing 
Developnnent (3000 
units) 

Tranche 1: Feasibility 
Studies (Progress - 
Contractor Onsite 
Conducting Feasibility 
Studies) 



DoHS 


BUSINESS 


Youth Business Advisory 
Centre 

In Place and Functional 

R 250 000 - (For the 
Operation of) 


uMlalazi 

Market stalls for Street 
Traders 

RIO 000 000- 

(Progress - Complete & 
Handed Over by MFC in 
February 2016) 



uMlalazi 

10 Trading Shelters 
along Osborne Rd 

R410 000 (Progress 
- Completed & Handed 
Over by His Worship The 
Mayor in Feb 2016) 



uMlalazi 

Youth Advisory Centre 
(Operation of) 

R 200 000 

R 250 000 

R 300 000 

uMlalazi 

Free Refuse 

R 1 336 130 

R 1 703 530.00 

R 1 793 810 

uMlalazi 


RESPONSIBLE 


PROJECT /ISSUE 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 296 

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Annexure J1: Summary Of Projects Per Ward 


Ward12;CllrMEDLAMINI 

Population: 5638 
Number of HH: 1819 


2015/2016 2016/2017 2017/2018 


ROADS 


KD5 Bus Route 
(Mthiyane Road) 
Rehabilitation 


RIO 490 210 


uMlalazi 

Sunnydale/ King Dinuzulu 
Link Road/ Emgovuzweni 

Project is complete 



uMlalazi 

Stormwater Management 
(CRR) (All Urban Areas) 

R3 100 000 

R 2 000 000 


uMlalazi 

Speed Humps/ guard rails 

R 1A0 000 

R 150 000 

R 180 000 

uMlalazi 

Pedestrian Wooden Bridges 
(Ward 1 2 & Ward 22) 


R 200 000 

R 210 000 

uMlalazi 

KDS Passage Walks Upgrade 


R 250 000 

R 250 000 

uMlalazi 


ELECTRICITY 


Free Electricity 


R 1 415 700 

R1 500 000 

uMlalazi 

Electricity meter 
conversions 

R 300 000 

R 300 000 (Applications 

R 300 000 

uMlalazi 

Free Electricity 

R 1 336 130 

R 1 415 700 

R1 500 000 

uMlalazi 


COMMUNITY SERVICE FACILITIES 


KDS Outdoor 

Outdoor Gynasium is 

R200 000 


uMlalazi 

Gymnasium & Ablutions 

complete and Operational 

(For the construction of 
Ablution Facilities) 




BUSINESS CENTRES 


KDS Shopping Centre 




Private 

Developer 

KDS and Ging 

Trading Areas 

Ongoing discussions 
with S/Provider and 
beneficiaries on the type 
of Shelters 



uMlalazi 


SPORTS & RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 


Play park Equipment 

R 550 000 

R 250 000 

R 250 000 


Play Park Toilets 


R200 000 




COMMUNITY SERVICES 


Refuse collection 

R 2 619 420 

R 2 760 870 

R 2 909 960 

uMlalazi 

Creche 


Awaiting Suitable Site 


Devine Life 


WATER AND SANITATION 


Eshowe SSA 1 (Eshowe 

R 41 000 000 Progress 

R 49 000 000 


UThungulu 

Town, King Dinizulu T/S, 
Kwa-Mfana, Nyanini, 
Berea, Thawini, 

Ntenjane, Emncongweni 
Siqwanjana Izindophi) 
(Portions 9,11, 12&13) 

at 38% 





RESPONSIBLE 


PROJECT /ISSUE 


297 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

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Ward13:Cllr5GNGEMA 

Population: 9065 
Number of HH: 2650 


2015/2016 2016/2017 2017/2018 RESPONSIBLE 


ROADS BUDGETED BY DOT 


ROADS BUDGETED BY MUNICIPALITY 


KD5 Bus Route 


RIO A90 210 (Areas of 


uMlalazi 

(Mthiyane Road) 


KwaMondi will benefit 



Rehabilitation 


greatly from the rehab 
of this road as they are 
also users) 




WATER AND SANITATION 


E5H0WE 55A1 (Eshowe 

R41 000 000 Progress 

R49 000 000 


UThungulu 

Town, King Dinizulu 

T/5, Kwa-Mfana, 

Nyanini, Berea, Thawini, 
Ntenjane, Emncongweni 
Siqwanjana Izindophi) 
(Portions 9, 11, 12 & 13) 

at 38% 





RURAL HOUSING 


KwaMondi Rural Housing 

Tranche 2: Detailed 



Dep. of H. 5 

Project (1000 units) 

Planning (Project also 
awaiting funding) 





COMMUNITY FACILITIES 


Siqwanjana Hall 


R4 000 000 


uMlalazi 

Takalani Creche 

Progress : Complete 



uMlalazi 


PROJECT /ISSUE 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 298 

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Annexure J1: Summary Of Projects Per Ward 


Ward 14; ClIrKB MAGWAZA 

Population: 8711 
Number of HH: 1490 


2015/2016 2016/2017 2017/2018 


ROADS BUDGETED BY DOT 


D1652 (Mhlathuzana) 
Regravelling (A.6Km) 


R 1 333 000 (Project 
Connplete) 


DOT 

L627 (Sgodo) 

Regravelling (6.6Km) 


R 2 000 000 (Completed) 

R 900 000 (To do 
remaining KMs) 

DOT 

D15A8 (Mpumazi) 
ReGravelling 



R 1 550 000 (4Km) 

DOT 


ROADS BUDGETED BY MUNICIPALITY 


RESPONSIBLE 


PROJECT /ISSUE 


Ntenjane Causeway 


R2 167 796 (Completed) 


uMlalazi 


ELECTRICITY 


Ngeza Phase 1 (867 
connections) 

R 1 A 900 000 (Complete) 



Eskom 

Ngeza Phase 2 (132 


R 1 587 797 Contractor 


Eskom 

Connections) 


on site with infills 




COMMUNITY SERVICE FACILITIES 


Mpungose Rural Housing 
(Ward 09, 10, 13, 1 A) 

1000 units 


Tranche 2: Studies 
Complete, 


DoHS 



Beneficiaries Established 
(Awaiting Funding) 



28A-6 VIP Sanitation 
Project (8& 1A) 


R 3 150 000 (Progress 
at 97%) 


uThungulu 


LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 


Mpungose Cluster - 



R2 506 988.21 - 

DOA 

Vegetables and field crop 



Fencing, irrigation 


(1A.8ha) 



system and production 
inputs 



299 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - 

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INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 







Ward15: Cllr MH QWABE 

Population: 9A63 
Number of HH: 1878 


PROJECT /ISSUE 

2015/2016 

2016/2017 

RESPONSIBLE 

ROADS BUDGETED BY DOT 

D1 549 (Regravelling - 4.0 km) KwaKhoza 


R 1,650,000 

DOT 

ROADS BUDGETED BY MUNICIPALITY 

Nogobhoza Road 

R 5 165 737 (Progress - Complete) 


uMlalazi 

ELECTRICITY 

Mabudle (114 connections): 

(Progress - Complete) 


Eskom 

Mabudle additional : 

Mabudle (74), Izingwenya (100), 

Madala (50), Kwa- jazi (70), 

Kwa - Phaphu (60) 


R 525 000 for 
Premarketing & 
preparations to 

readiness will be carried 
out on project 2016/17 

(Total Budget = R7m) 

Eskom 


WATER AND SANITATION 


Ezingwenya Extension (Reticulation) 

Complete 


Uthungulu 

VIP Sanitation Project (15, 17 and 21) 


RIO 000 000 (Progress 
- The Project has been 
introduced to the T/A) 

uThungulu 


SPORTS & RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 


KwaYabu Sportfield (priority) 

R 2 658 980 (Progress - 99 % 

Complete (To be handed over soon 
once grass is fully grown) 


uMlalazi 

HOUSING 

KwaKhoza Housing project (1000 units) 

Tranche 2: Planning Stage 

Complete - Awaiting Funding 


D.H.S 

LED/AGRICULTURE 

KwaKhoza Community Garden Cluster: 

R 1 055 765.30 (Beans, maize and 
vegetables Irrigation and production 
inputs - 9.6ha) 


DOA 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 300 

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Annexure J1: Summary Of Projects Per Ward 


Ward 16; Cllr IF NDWANDWE 

Population: 11850 
Number of HH: 2089 


PROJECT /ISSUE 

2015/2016 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

RESPONSIBLE 

ELECTRICITY 

Makhilimba(280 
connections - Ward 1 6 & 20) 

R 6 500 000 (Progress - 
Completed) 


R 900 000 (To do 
remaining KMs) 

Eskom 

Infills (Amahubu; 
Ezimpongo; Abayehli; 
Amabhoko; Hemfane 
and KwaMunteytika) 

Progress - Planning 



Eskom 

WATER 

Borehole: Judea 

R1 10 000 Testing Pump 
(and awaiting Results) 



UThungulu 

Borehole: Amahubhu 
Package Plant 


R180 000 


UThungulu 

28A-10- VIP Sanitation 
Project (6 and 16) 



R 20 000 000 

uThungulu 

RURAL HOUSING 

Nzuza Housing Project 
(1000 houses) 

Progress - Tranche 

1: Feasibility Study 

(Previous S/Provider was 
terminated & New S/P 
has been appointed) NEW 
PSC has been selected 



Dep. Human 
Settlement 

SPORTS AND RFECREATION 

Mvutshini Sportsfield 



R2 000 000 

uMlalazi 

Ward 17: Cllr TG5HANDU 

Population: 6871 

Number of HH: 1257 

PROJECT /ISSUE 

2015/2016 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

RESPONSIBLE 

ROADS BUDGETED BY PEOPLE 

Gciza causeway 

R 6A3 632 (Progress - 
Complete) 



uMlalazi 

ELECTRICITY 

Nyezane/Vekeza 
(Priority Project) 

Detail Design Complete 

Mabhokweni : Previous 
Contractor Terminated 
by E5K0M. Introduced 
new contractor at 

Nyezane Comm Hall 



Eskom 

WATER AND SANITATION 

Nhlababo (Borehole) 

R 110 000 

Boreholes drilled & 
Awaiting Results 


uThungulu 

Ogaya (Borehole) 

R 110 000 



Uthungulu 

VIP Sanitation Project 


RIO 000 000 (Project has 
been introduced to T/A) 




RURAL HOUSING 


Nzuza Housing Project 
(1000 units) 


Progress - Tranche 
1 : Feasibility Study 
(Previous S/Provider 
was terminated & New 
5/P has been appointed) 
NEW PSC has been selected 


Dept of H.5 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 












Ward18: Cllr EA TALMAGE 

Population: 3928 
Number of HH: 1303 


2015/2016 2016/2017 


ROADS BY MUNICIPALITY 


Naickerville/ Sandiwana Sch Intersection 
(D134) 

Complete 


uMlalazi 

Gingindlovu Main Road Parking 

Area upgrade 


R650 000 

uMlalazi 

Sidewalks (Municipal Wide) 

(Ging MTZ E5H) 

R 300 000 - (Completed Kudu Street) 

R 500 000 

uMlalazi 

Stormwater Management - Ging and MTZ 

R 2 000 000 

R 2 000 000 

uMlalazi 

Speed Humps 

R 1 AO 000 - Completed (Springbok Rd 
and New Housing Development) 

R 150 000 

uMlalazi 


ELECTRICITY 


New Gingindlovu Housing Projects 

R1 500 000. (Progress: Complete - 


Eskom 

(143 Connections) 

Remaining Houses will be electrified 
once occupied 




WATER AND SANITATION 


Gingindlovu Water Treatment 


R 2 500 000 (0% 
(Planning Phase) - No 
Groundwork Yet) 


Gingindlovu Waste water 

Treatment upgrade 


R 5 000 000 (Progress- 
Planning Phase) 



HOUSING DEVELOPMENT 


1000 Rural Houses under iNkosi Khoza 

Tranche 2: Planning Phase Complete 
- Awaiting Funding for the project to 


uMlalazi/ DOH 


commence 




COMMUNITY FACILITIES 


Gingindlovu Community Hall 

R 1 700 000 (In Progress appointed 
contractor is on site) 


uMlalazi 

Disaster Management Center 


R7 600 000 

CoGTA 

New Informal Trader Stalls 

R 500 000 (Progress - Ongoing 
discussions with beneficiaries on the 
type of shelters 


uMlalazi 


WASTE MANAGEMENT 


Refuse, Skips Mass Containers 

R 600 000 (10 skips purchased for the 


uMlalazi 

(GNG.MTZ E5H) 

three towns and will be allocated in 




consultation with clirs) 



Solid Waste Relief 

R 1 650 170 

R 1 776 590 

uMlalazi 

Litter Bins -annual allocation 

R 50 000 

R 50 000 

uMlalazi 


COMMUNITY ISSUES 


Finalisation of title deeds for 

Naickerville houses 

Progress - Nala Attorneys have been 
appointed to process title deeds (67 

transfers have been processed) 


DeptHS 

Bus Shelters: Amatikulu 

R 100 000 (Progress - Complete) 



LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

R66 Shopping Centre Phase 2 

Progress - Complete 


Private Developer 


RESPONSIBLE 


PROJECT /ISSUE 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 302 

XX>0<XXXXXXX>000000000000 






Annexure J1: Summary Of Projects Per Ward 


Ward 19; CllrJK POWELL 

Population: 7250 
Number of HH: 1900 


2015/2016 2016/2017 


ROADS BY MUNICIPALITY 


Urban Roads Rehabilitations (Municipal 
Wide) (CRR) 

R 5 AOO 000 Progress - Williams Road 
and Palm Ridge (Opposite SPAR) have 
been Completed 

R5 AOO 000 (Funds 
Designated for urban 
roads in all three towns) 

uMlalazi 

Speed Humps (ESH,GNG,MTZ) 

R 200 000 

R 200 000 

uMlalazi 

Stormwater Management (ESH, GNG, 
MTZ) 

R 600 000 

R 2 000 000 

uMlalazi 

Sidewalks (MTZ, GING, ESH) 


R 500 000 

uMlalazi 


COMMUNITY SERVICE FACILITIES 


RURAL HOUSING - Nzuza Housing 

Progress - Tranche 1: Feasibility Study 


uMlalazi 

(1000 units) 

(Previous S/Provider was terminated & 
New S/P has been appointed) 




WATER AND SANITATION 


Ngwadia, Nyonibizumuntu, Maqhulu, 

R110 000 

Boreholes drilled & 

uThungulu 

Mabhokweni Boreholes 


Awaiting Results 



LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 


Trading Stalls 


A Trading Stalls (to 

uMlalazi 



be erected on Flely 




Flutchins Street) 



RESPONSIBLE 


PROJECT /ISSUE 


303 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - 

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INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 






Ward18: CLLRMGZONDI 

Population: 10688 
Number of HH: 2067 


PROJECT /ISSUE 

2015/2016 

2016/2017 

RESPONSIBLE 

ELECTRICITY 

Makhilimba (Ward 1 6 and 20) 

R6.5m (Progress - Project Complete : 
315 Connections) 


Eskom 


WATER AND SANITATION 


284-7 VIP Sanitation Project 

R 16 520 000 (Progress - 99% 


Uthungulu 

(10,13,20) 

Complete) 




AGRICULTURE 


Ezingeni: Ibutho Vegetables Co- 
Operative 


R 1 690 750.00 - 

Fencing, Irrigation 
system and production 
inputs 10 tunnels 
(10x30m) 

DOA 

Obanjeni: Sizanathi Piggery Co- 
Operative 


R 8 083 710.00 (Fencing, 
building of structure, 
buying of sows and boers 
and feed) 

DOA 

Obanjeni: Nyathuko Layers Co- 
Operative (Eggs) 


PI 86A 26A.00- Building 
of structure, production 
inputs and buying of 
layers 3000 layers 

DOA 

Obanjeni - Nyathuko Co-Operative 


R2 268 380.00 - 
Vegetables Layer 
house, packhouse, 
fencing,3000 layers 
and inputs 10 
tunnels(10x30m) 

DOA 


HOUSING 


Nzuza Rural Housing (1000 units) 

Progress - Tranche 1: Feasibility Study 
(Previous 5/Provider was terminated 
& New 5/P has been appointed) NEW 
P5C has been selected 


Dept of H.5 

Ogagweni Ruaral Housing (1000 units) 




ECDs 

Doveyane Creche 

Progress - Under Construction 


Devine Life/LM 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 BOA 

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Annexure J1: Summary Of Projects Per Ward 


Ward 21; CLLR NM MNQAYI 

Population: 6939 
Number of HH: 1236 


2015/2016 2016/2017 


ROADS BY KZN-DOT 


D1553 (KwaGolela) 


R 2 000 000 

DOT 

D1153 (Manzamnyama) 

R 1 890 000 (Progress - Awarded 


DOT 


(Awarding was appealed - Appeal 




Process) 




RESPONSIBLE 


PROJECT /ISSUE 


ELECTRICITY 


Izingwenya Schedule 6 (A38 conns) 

Phase 1:R 12.2 mil 


Eskom 

Izingwenya Schedule 6 (188 conns) 

Phase 2: R 5.2 mil 




(Progress - Phasel & 2: Project was 
Introduced and Launched 15 March 
2016) 




WATER 


Izikoshi; Esiwohlweni; Nozandia; 
Vongotho Priorities 

Completed 


Uthungulu 

Emanyameni Springs 

R1A2 1A5.00 - Completed and Fully 
Operational 


Uthungulu 

SANITATION 

VIP Sanitation Project (15, 17 and 21) 

R2 900 000 (Progress - Ongoing: 

Project has been Introduced to T/A) 



EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT 

Mayemeni Creche 

Progress - Under Construction 


uMlalazi/ D.L 


HOUSING 


Ogagweni Housing Project (1000 units) 

Tranche 1: Application Stage - Project 
will be Introduced to the T/A 


DOHS 


Awaiting date for availability of Inkosi 




305 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - 

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INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 






Ward 22: CLLR MZ NKWANYANA 

Population: 7150 
Numberof HH: 1180 


2015/2016 2016/2017 


ROADS BUDGETED BY DOT 


D1 554 (Manzamnyama) 

R 990 000 - Tender has been awarded 


DOT 


& Awaiting project to be Introduced to 




TA& Establish site 



L627 Sgodo Regravelling 1.6 km 


R 1,150,000 

DOT 


ROADS BY MUNICIPALITY 


Pedestrian Wooden Bridges: Ward 12 

R 200 000 (Progress - Feasibility 


uMlalazi 

and 22 

Studies are being done as the river 
seems too wide for a wooden bridge) 




RESPONSIBLE 


PROJECT /ISSUE 


ELECTRICITY 


Manzamnyama (203 connections): 

Complete 


Eskom 

Sibhakuza (401 connections): 

Complete 


Eskom 

Oyemeni (737 conns)- 870 will be done 

R 12 729 000.00 Sizazonke contractor 


Eskom 

in phase 1 - 560 will be done in phase 

introduced & also withdrawn - new 



2 - Balance will be done in phase 3 

contractor was appointed) 




WATER 


KwaHlokohloko 5/A 55A5 -RIO 000 000 
Oyemeni, Phongola, Lubisana, 

Gugushe, Ohhaheni, Makhehle (partial), 
Makholokholo (partial), Nteneshane, 
Hlobane, Macekane, Sabe 1 & 2 

R 5 000 000 (Progress - Reservoir 
is completed and handed over 
(Reticulation to Commence) 

RIO 000 000 

Uthungulu 

Mkhunyane Scheme Rehabilitation 

R140 000 (Completed and Operational) 


Uthungulu 

RURAL HOUSING PROJECT 

Mzimela Rural Housing (1000 units) 

Tranche 1: Application Stage 
(Implementing Agent will be introduced 
to the T/A on the 1 2th/04/201 6) 


DoHS 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 306 

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Annexure J1: Summary Of Projects Per Ward 


Ward 23; CLLR MM MZIMELA 

Population: 9022 
Number of HH: 1556 


PROJECT /ISSUE 

2014/2015 

2015/2016 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

RESPONSIBLE 

ROADS BUDGETED BY DOT 

D1562 

(Mhlathuzana) 

A. 6km Regravelling 


R 1 333 000 
(Progress - 
Complete) 



DOT 

ELECTRICITY 

No budget 
allocation yet from 
E5K0M 





Eskom 

WATER AND SANITATION 

WARD 23, 23 

-KwaHlokohloko 

5/A55A5-R157 

8AA 57A Oyemeni, 
Phongola, Lubisana, 
Gugushe, Ohhaheni, 
Makhehle(partial), 

R 11 000 000 

R 5 000 000 

R 5 500 000- 
Reservoir is 
completed and 
handed over 
(Reticulation 


Uthungulu 

Makholokholo 
(partial), Nteneshane, 
Hlobane, Macekane, 
Sabe 1 & 2 



to Commence) 



Jojo Tanks 

6 Tanks 






COMMUNITY SERVICE FACILITIES 


Ncekwane Creche 


R 1 000 000 

Construction 


Divine Life/LM 

RURAL HOUSING 

Dept H S 

Mzimela 

Housing Project 
(20,21,22,23) 


Advertised 





SPORTS & RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 


Siklebheni Sports 
Field 


uMlalazi 


AGRICULTURAL ISSUES 


Mhlalwini Livestock 
(New Project) 


R1 171 600.00 



DOA 

Community Gardens 

R 120 000. 






307 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - 

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INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 








Ward 24: CLLR MB BIYELA 

Population: 9438 
Number of HH: 1563 


PROJECT /ISSUE 

2014/2015 

2015/2016 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

RESPONSIBLE 

ROADS BUDGETED BY DOT 

D1592 (5 km) 


R 1 680 000 

100% Complete 


DOT 


ROADS BY BUDGETED BY MUNICIPALITY 


Bele road (6 km) 



R 4 300 000 - 
Appeals Period - 
Intention to award 


uMlalazi 

Makhehle 

Causeway 

R 1 205 114 

In Progress 

100% Completed 


uMlalazi 

Rural Roads 
and Causeways 
(Municipal Wide) 


R 9 504 230 

R 10 326 960- 
Grader Program 

R8 568 180 



ELECTRICITY 


Makhehle and 


R4 100 000 

Tender Phase But 


uMlalazi 

Bonisanani Island 



its expected to be 



(140 Connections) 



completed this 
financial year 




WATER 


WARD 24 & 25 

R 5 400 000 

R 10 000 000 

R R3 904 298 - 


Uthungulu 

- R90 000 000 



Construction of 



Mpungose Phase 



retie + Bulk pipeline 



ID Reticulation 



2 reservoirs (Ward 



((Kwahlokohloko 



24 - Reservoir 



55A 2&3) - Habeni, 
Ngodini, Ematsheni, 
Ntsheluntshelu, 
Mqadayi, Enqoleni, 
Nomyaca, Mashishi, 
Khabingwe, 
Emgosinaneni, 
Elemoya 



complete) 




RURAL HOUSING DEVELOPMENT 


Rural Housing 


EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT 


Lethukuthula 

Creche 

Complete 




uMlalazi 

Imbalenhie Creche 

R871 917 

Complete 



uMlalazi/ 

Divine Life 


SPORTS & RECREATION 


KwaBulawayo 


R8 461 870 

25% Complete 


Sportfield (Ward 25) 



(Delayed by Rock 
Structure) 



AGRICULTURAL FACILITY 


Fencing of 

community Gardens: 

R 120 000 




uMlalazi 

Biyela Progressive 
(Dry Beans Project) 


R 2 797 752.80 



IDC/DAE 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 308 

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Annexure J1: Summary Of Projects Per Ward 


Ward 25: CLLR TE NSELE 

Population: 6890 
Number of HH: 1336 


PROJECT /ISSUE 

2014/2015 

2015/2016 

2016/2017 

RESPONSIBLE 

ROAD BUDGETED BY DOT 

D1 592 Betterment and 
ReGravelling (Ndlangubo) 
(3.9km) 



1,750,000 


L797 


R 590 000 


DOT 

L593 Bhekeshowe 
Regravelling (4.0 km) 



R 1,650,000 


ELECTRICITY 

Elomoya to Mpehlela 
(410 conns) 

Complete 




Infills to be identified 





WATER 

WARD 24, 25 & 26 - 
R90 000 000 Mpungose 
Phase ID Reticulation 
((Kwahlokohloko 

55A 2&3) - Habeni, 
Ngodini, Ematsheni, 
Ntsheluntshelu, 

Mqadayi, Enqoleni, 
Nomyaca, Mashishi, 
Khabingwe, 

Emgoswaneni, Elemoya 

R 5 400 000 

R 10 000 000 

R3 904 298 - 
Construction of retie 
+ Bulk pipeline 2 
reservoirs (Ward 24 - 
Reservoir complete) 


Empongo (no water) 





Mpehlela Borehole 

Pump Installation 


R 550 000 

100% Complete 

uThungulu 

CRECHES /ECD 

Ebele Creche 




uMlalazi 

RURAL HOUSING 

Bhekeshowe Rural 
Housing : Phase 1 

Complete 




SPORTS & RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 

KwaBulawayo Sports 
Complex (Priority) 


R8 461 870 

25% Complete (Delayed 
by Rock Structure) 

Sports & 
Recreation 


AGRICULTURAL FACILITIES 


Inqabayesizwe Co-Op 


R 89 524 


DOA 


309 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

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Ward 26: CLLR TA HLAT5HWAY0 

Population: 9529 
Number of HH: 2586 


PROJECT /ISSUE 

2014/2015 

2015/2016 

2016/2017 

RESPONSIBLE 

ROADS BUDGETED BY DOT 

P230 Upgrade (UMIalazi 
to Empangeni) 

Under construction 


Under Construction 

DOT 


WATER 


WARD 24,25 & 26 - R90 
000 000 Mpungose 

Phase 1D Reticulation 
((Kwahlokohloko 55A 

2&3) - Habeni(Ward25), 
Ngodini, Ematsheni 
(Ward 24),Ecekeni, 
Ntsheluntshelu, 

Mqadayi, Enqoleni, 
Nomyaca, 

Mashishi(Ward 24), 
Khabingwe(ward 25), 
Enngoswaneni(Ward25), 
Elemoya(Ward25) add 
Ncemaneni, 

R 15 000 000 


R R3 904 298 - 
Construction of retie 
+ Bulk pipeline 2 
reservoirs (Ward 24 - 
Reservoir complete) 

Uthungulu 

Kwahlokohloko 55A 1 
(Wards:9;10;14&26) 

- Mandawe; Mbizo 2; 
Ncemaneni; Isiphezi; 
Zigagayi; Emaqeleni; Kwa 
Mpofu; Thintumkhaba; 
Eziqwaqweni; 
Mhlathuzana; Mtilombo 

R 47 000 000 

R 110 629 000 

R 15 000 000 
- Construction - 
(Introduced to T/A and 
the community (SOD 
Turned) 

Uthungulu 


ELECTRICITY 


Emvini (29), 


R 1 480 000 

Premarketing & 

uMlalazi LM 

Emalukhulwini (8) , Wema 



preparations to 


(7), Ematshakafula (30) , 



readiness will be carried 
out on project 2016/17 



COMMUNITY SERVICE FACILITIES 


Kwa Bhekeshowe Rural 
Housing (ward 24, 26) 
1000 units 



Phase 1: Complete 

DOH 

Empongo (no water) 





Mpehlela Borehole 

Pump Installation 


R 550 000 

100% Complete 

uThungulu 

CRECHES /ECD 

1. Ntsheluntshelu Creche 



Under Construction 

uMlalazi 

COMMUNITY HALLS 

2. Ntsheluntshelu 




uMlalazi 

AGRICULTURAL FACILITIES 

Ntshelusthelu Food 
security: Ifalethu 
Vegetables Co-OP 



R273 531.81 - Fencing, 
irrigation system and 
production inputs - 2ha 

uMlalazi/ DOA 

Thulwane Sugar cane, 
citrus and vegetables 
(Co-Op) 



R4 597 401.52 -Land 
prepartion, production 
inputs,establishment of 
veg and citrus 

uMlalazi/ DOA 


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AnnexureJ2: 
Broad Ward Needs 
(As Per CBP) 


UMLALAZI MUNICIPALITY BROAD COMMUNITY NEEDS AS PER COMMUNITY BASED PLAN 



Mvuzane Causeway 
D1654 & Causeway/ Bridge 
Emadidima Causeway/ Bridge 


ROADS BY UMLALAZI MUNICIPALITY 


mfomfolozi causeway 
Uncisini & Causeway/ Bridge 
Ntoza (Priority) 

Onyukela etsheni Lengwe 
Oyakwa Biyela Bongela School 
KwaDlani to Induna uXulu 
Gobhotane to Ediphini 
Matshekazane (follow up) 
Mpaphala Eskoleni 
Kwa Phaka to Embileni 
Ehhashi 
Bongela 

Nyimbitwa Causeway 
Road Maintenance (Graders) 


ELECTRICITY 


Mbileni and Ezinyosini (400connections) 
Ntumeni (Ezimpongo Eziphezulu) 
Bongela 


WATER 


Nkezweni Extension 

1 6 X water Tankers (Mpaphala & Mvuzane) 

Middle Drift 55A5: Izinsundu; Ntamoyenkuzi; Mpaphala; Shushu; Matshamhiophe; Nkunzempunga; Khangelani; KwaGasa; 
Mnbizane; Buthanani; Matshamhiophe; Nhlalamnyango 

Middle Drift - Phase 2: Izinyosi; Bongela; Nkunzempunga; Mfofoflozi; Mbileni; Nyimbithwa; Mvuzane 


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Annexure J2: Broad Ward Needs (As Per CBP) 



IzimpisiiBongela; Mfofolozi; Mbileni; Nvimbithwa;Mvunzane;lnzin5undu; Ntamoyenkuzi; Mpaphala; Shushu; Matshamhlophe; 
Nkunzempunga 


COMMUNITY SERVICE FACILITIES 


Bongela Community Hall 
Nxusa Community Hall 
Ezinyosi Community Hall 
Ezimpongo Community Hall 
Embileni Community Hall 
Enkunzempunga Community Hall 


SPORTS & RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 


Manduluza Sportsfields 

Ezimpongo Eziphansi Sportfileds 

Mbileni sportsfields 

Enkunzempunga Sportsfields 

Biyela Sportsfield (Caretakership & improvements) 

Multi purpose centre / 1 stop service 

Skills development centre 


RURAL HOUSING 


Mvuzane (1000 houses) 


HEALTH FACILITIES 


Mobile clinics, Ezinyosi & Ntoza 


BUSINESS CENTRES 


Malls / shopping centre (investments) 
Multi purpose sports facilities 
Youth Centre 


AGRICULTURAL FACILITIES 


Fencing of grazing camps 


COMMUNITY ISSUES 


Drugs. 

Bus Shelters 


SAFETY & SECURITY ISSUES 


Fire fighters 
Crime 

Security (Policing)-School. 
Working on Fire 


EDUCATION ISSUES 


Kugobhotane High School 
Enkunzempunga Primary School 
Ezimpongo High School 
Bursaries/ Learnership 


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UMLALAZI WARD NEEDS 2014 - 2019 - WARD 1, COUNCILOR N L BIYELA 
PROJECT /ISSUE 

EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT 


Enkunzempunga creche 
Ezimpongo Eziphezulu creche 
Ezinyosi Creche 


COMMUNICATION ISSUES 


Community base organisation (Network). 


TRANSPORTS & ROADS ISSUES 


Transport (School kids) 

Employment Opportunities (EPWP: WAP&FFW) 



D465 Betterment & Regravel (2.7km) 


ROADS BY MUNICIPALITY 


Mathanda 

Kwa-Dludla. 

Mabululu Road 
MBABH A CAUSEWAY 
KWANGCOBO ROAD 
KWANTOMBELA ROAD 
KWABHENGU ROAD 
ENSONGENI BRIDGE 
EMAMBA BRIDGE 
ESTILO BRIDGE 
Mabululu 
khokhoba road 
Road Maintenance (Graders) 


ELECTRICITY 


Mankumbu/Debhasi (936 connections) 
Nhlalidakiwe 


WATER (BUDGETED BY UTHUNGULU) 


Middle Drift - Phase 2: Izinyosi; Bongela; Nkunzempunga; Mfofoflozi; Mbileni; Nyimbithwa; Mvuzane 
1 6 X Water Tankers (Stilo; Sonani; Ephusheni; Mazithanqaze) THERE IS WATER FROM PIPES 


SANITATION VIP TOILETS PROJECT 


Mankumbu; Dibhase; Nolila; Nhlalidakiwe; Matini; lzinyathi;Maphogo; Mathonsi; Mamba 


COMMUNITY SERVICE FACILITIES 


Community Hall (better than Sonani) 


EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT 


Mkhambeni Creche 
Emaqhogo Creche (Mankumbu) 
Kwazikwakhe Creche 


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Annexure J2: Broad Ward Needs (As Per CBP) 


UMLALAZI WARD NEEDS 2014 - 2019 - WARD 2, COUNCILOR D T NGONYAMA 
PROJECT /ISSUE 
RURAL HOUSING 


SPORTS & RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 


Kwandlovu Sportsfield and Equipment 


AGRICULTURAL FACILITIES 


Stock dams 
EDUCATION 

High school Mkhambeni 
Training of dress makers 

uMlalazi/InkandIa Smart Gowth Development Centre 
Masibambisane (Grazing) - lOOjob opportunities 
Masibambisane (Bush Clearing) - 55 job opportunities 


SAFETY & SECURITY ISSUES 


Fire fighters 
Crime 

Security (Policing)-School. 
Working on Fire 


COMMUNITY ISSUES 


Job creation initiatives 
Youth Center 

Employment initiatives through community projects 



P218 Betterment & Regravel (Mphundumane) 
P218 Betterment & Regravel (Mbongolwana) 
A1728 (Doveyane) contract 1 (Mbongolwane) 
A1728 (Doveyane) contract 1 (Mbongolwane) 
D1545 Betterment & Regravel (Ndayini) 


ROADS BY MUNICIPALITY 


From P710 to Edakeni 

From D 1 542 to Kwachili 

From D1542 to Sibalukhulu road 

From P218 to Othukela 

From D1 544 to Ezindonini 

From D 1542 to Kwachili 

From D1 544 to Mdungwane 

From D1 544 to Njomane road 

From D1 544 to Esilambo to KwaSthole 

From Esilambo to Endlovane 

From esitolo Embhizane to Bhanku 

From P218 to Kopokopo 


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From Emacotshaneni to mtiphela/Ntabankulu 

From D15AA to Mtiphela 

From P710 to Kwanzuza 

From P 710 to Msomi 

From P710 to KwaShezi 

Road Maintenance (Graders) 


ELECTRICITY 


Slambo 

Mbizane 

Mpunzenkulu 

Mpundumane 

Nkunzempunga 

Gobhogobho 

Mngwenya 

Mkhwishimani 

Ezinyathi 

eDakeni 

Gasa 


WATER 


Middle Drift 55A5: Izinsundu; Ntamoyenkuzi; Mpaphala; Shushu; Matshamhiophe; Nkunzempunga; Khangelani; KwaGasa; 
Mnbizane; Buthanani; Matshamhiophe; Nhlalamnyango 

Borehole to be installed at Buthanani 
Enkawini spring 

Nkulisabantwana (borehole to be equiped) 

22 X Water Tankers (Kopokopo; Edakeni; Slambo) 


SANITATION 


28A-3 - VIP Sanitation Project (Ward 2 & 3) 

Mkhwishimane; Dakeni; Khanfelani; KwaGasa; Mbizane; Buthanani; Nkulisabantwana; Nkunzempunga 


COMMUNITY SERVICE FACILITIES 


Slambo Community Flail (big One) 
Skills development centres 
Paypoint shelter (Mphundumane) 


SPORTS & RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 


Slambo Sportfield 


AGRICULTURAL FACILITIES 


Fencing of grazing camps 
Training of dress makers 
Mkhishwane Community Garden 
Oyayasimunye (16 job opportunities) 

Masibambisane (Bush Clearing) - 300 job opportunities 


COMMUNITY ISSUES 


Employment initiative 


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Annexure J2: Broad Ward Needs (As Per CBP) 



Fire fighters 
Working on Fire 


HEALTH ISSUES 


Flospital staffing is very slacky and not enough to serve and attend properly to the sick people 


EDUCATION ISSUES 


Bursaries/ Learnerships for the school leavers, they end up not furthering their education because of the lack of financial assistance 



Mafimofu (Ngedlezi-KwaMgubhu-P326) 
L125A (Maguqa) 


ROADS BY MUNICIPALITY 


Wolongo 

Umhashazo 

Obhukwini 

Kwazihleke 

Ndlongolwane (priority) 
Mathuthu next to Ndlongolwane 
Phansi kwezintaba 
Maconi 

Nongcongwana 

Emhiwehlweni 

Ushushu 

Ntamoyenkunzi 

Bhoshobane 

Emndeni 


Emgwenya 
KwaMgubhu 
Nkiyane 
Mgoqongwane 
Khanda road 


Nqomfuka 

Ekuphileni 

Rural Road Maintenance Prgramme (Graders) 


ELECTRICITY 


Masundwini (270 houses) 
Mhlwehlweni (3A houses remaining) 
Mngwenya (55 connections) 
Ngilandela 


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7 X Water Tankers (Manduluza; Mbongolwane) 
Nkunzempunga; Mphundumane; Matshamhiophe; Mpapahala 
Manqannane Extension 

Boreholes: Oyaya/Masundwini; Manqannane; Mbongolawne 


COMMUNITY SERVICE FACILITIES 


Ngedlezi Community Hall 

Masundwini 

Library 

Thembalesizwe Hall Renovations 
mphundumane community hall 
Matimofu community hall 
Nkunzempunga community hall 
Mpaphala community hall 
Mandlesizwe Peace Centre (Buglar guards) 


CRECHES /ECD 


TNdayini 

2. Bhoshobane 

3. Ngedlesi Creche 


RURAL HOUSING 


Oyaya Rural housing (1000 houses) 
Mvuzane Rural Housing (A Subwards) 


SAFETY & SECURITY 


Mbongolawne Firestation 


SHELTER FACILITIES 


TNdayini, 2.Groundini 3.Ezisulwini, 
A.emaSundwini B.Mphaphala S.Mahanayini 
Paypoint shelters 


SPORTS & RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 


Ngedlesi Sportfield 
Holongo Sportsfields 
Multi purpose sports facilities 


AGRICULTURAL FACILITIES 


Stock dams 

Fencing of grazing camps 

Nursery (vegetables / fruits/ medicine) 

Fencing of springs 

Fencing Community Gardens & Co-Ops 
Agricultural assistance (training &financial) 
Masibambisane (Bush Clearing) - A6job opportunities 


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Annexure J2: Broad Ward Needs (As Per CBP) 



Adult Education & Training 

uMphundumani High School 

Gqokinsimbi & Mafunda High Schs classrooms) 

Bursaries/ Learnership 


SAFETY & SECURITY ISSUES 


Security in all Municipal houses 
Security Policing in all Schools 
Fire station 
Working Fire 


HEALTH ISSUES 


Masundwini gateway clinic 
Ngedlezi Clinic 

Ambulance services (not avalilability in time) 


SOCIAL SERVICES ISSUES 


Financial assistance to poor families 
Orphanage 

Home base care givers 


TOURISM 


Mbongolwane Wetland - Tourism (access&fence) 


LOCAL ECEONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 


Mbongolwane One-stop shop/ Mall 
Bakery; Poultry; Pig ect (renovations) 
Block Marking 

Sawing & Dress Makers Training 
Employment opportunities: WAP&FFW 



D356 Betterment & Regravelling (5km) 

D1608 

Mvumase 

Mpofana (near Nhlolini ) 

Nkonjane Bridge 
Mnyameni Causeway 


ROADS BY MUNICIPALITY 


Mathunjana 
Mpofana to Ediphini 
Mthonga - Manzababayo 
Mvumase - Mathunjana (priority) 
Ngilandela (priority) 

Umngwenya Road + Pedestrian Bridge 
Nothweni Causeway 


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Nkabase Causeway 

Pholweni Causeway 

Hlungwini Causeway & Road 

Kwelensizwa Causeway 

Manzababayo Causeway 

Indlemnyama Causeway 

Nguqa Causeway 

Odakeni Causeway 

Mbakelato KwaPhika (P710) (priority) 

Enembe Causeway Upper & Lower Mbakela 

Road Maintenance (Graders) 


ELECTRICITY 


Samungu (Ward 5 & 6) 
Ezihlushwaneni 


WATER 


Magwaza; Phandaphansi; Emankwanyaneni; Mbakele; KwaMshibe; KwaPhika; Emahuzu; Shayinja 

Mpofana Jojo Tank 

Buthanani (borehole to be drilled) 

8 X Water Tankers 
Mahuzu Extension 


SANITATION 


uMlalazi Sanitation Phase A (1500 VIP toilets) 


COMMUNITY SERVICE FACILITIES 


Emankwanyaneni Hall 
Ofeni Hall 
One stop shop 
Paypoint Shelters 


SPORTS AND RECREATION 


Sportfields All sub wards (Ngudwini) 


EDUCATION 


A classrooms at Phandaphansi 
Hall at Ndluyesilo High School 
Library 
Skills Centre 


AGRICULTURAL FACILITIES 


Isiqalo/ Ngudwini (50job opportunities) 
Fencing of grazing camps 


HEALTH 


Simoyi Clinic 


SAFETY AND SECURITY 


Mobile Police Station (Priority) 


LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 


Employment initiative: EPWP (FFW&WAP) 


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Annexure J2: Broad Ward Needs (As Per CBP) 



A166A-lzule Road (contract 1) Enembe /Zule 
A166A-lzule Road (contract 2) Enembe /Zule 
A1664-lzule Road Phase 2 (Enembe/Zule) 

D356 Betterment & Regravel (Mombeni) 

D883 Betterment & Regravel (Mombeni): 1.9km 
Nyakana Bridge 
Ematigulu Bridge 
Matigulu. 

A1664 (Umanagaliso Road) 

Izule Road (Phase 2) 


ROADS AND CAUSEWAYS 


Machibini Causeway 
Enembe Causeway 
Mombeni Causeway 
Kwa-Gumede. 

Small road to Emakhaya. 

Hhonothi Causeway 
Inembe. 

Emcezi. 

Emanzini amhiophe. 

Unpaved Road Maintenance (Graders) 


ELECTRICITY 


Hayinyama (R9 718 500) 

Hlangana (R11 454 500) 

Zimbidli (621 connections): R13.99mil 
Eshowe Nb15 - Gcotsheni (RIO 944 115) 

Mbongolwane 1 32/22kv,20mva substation establish 1 32kv tee ofline to supply Mbongolwane substation 
Mphendle/ Makenganneni 


WATER 


Mankengana; Hlangana; Mpendle/ Gebisa; Hlabathini; Izimbidli; Makentshaneni; Mqheze; Batshikizi; Izinsundu; Makhuni; 
Matsheni 


RURAL HOUSING 


Mombeni rural housing 1000 units R63 000.00 per household 


EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT (CRECHE) 


Hlangana Peace Centre 
Bhekuzulu/ Nyembe Peace Centre 


SAFETY & SECURITY 


Samaungu Police Station 


SCHOOLS 


Nodade High School 
Hlabathini High School 
Library 


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KwaSogekle Clinic 


SHELTER FACILITIES 


Paypoint shelters 


SPORTS & RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 


Gcotsheni Sportfield 


AGRICULTURAL FACILITIES 


Fencing of grazing camps 


COMMUNITY FACILITIES 


Mombeni Community Services Centre 
Mankentshaneni Community Hall 
Hlabathini Community Hall 


SAFETY & SECURITY ISSUES 


Disaster management 
Distraction of Infrastructure 


ENVIRONMENTAL 


The community is bothered by the wild animals 


EDUCATION ISSUES 


Bursaries/ Learnership 


SOCIAL SERVICES ISSUES 


Home affairs/ Mobile Home affairs 
Welfare 


TRANSPORTS & ROADS ISSUES 


Roads/ Bridges maintenance 


EMPLOYMENT FACILITIES 


Employment initiative: WAP (3 to be added to 6) 



L516 (To Kwa-Qedumona. 
L516 to Mathibelana School. 
L5AA 

Umwabu River Causeway 
Umshafen River Causeway 
Esidibha Causeway 
Emahushani Causeway 
Realignment of D365 
Ematigulu Bridge 
Badibile School to Edamini. 
D202 

D2402 to L516. 

D356 kwa-Gobiqolo 


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Annexure J2: Broad Ward Needs (As Per CBP) 



D356toD2402. 

D356 to Emadibini School. 
Edamini 

Emagweni to P311. 
Kwa-Bethane. 

Kwa-Magwaza 
Mahosheni- 
Manzabilayo road 
Matigulu ku Dosobhane 
Mkhize to Phindangene Store 
Mkono 

Mpushini Park road. 

P311 

Saron to Kwa-Mpanza 


ROADS BY MUNICIPALITY 


Banzabilayo 
Saron to Kwa-Mpanza 
Nhlanzanoni road 
Bagibile School to Edamini 
Emakhehleni. 

Esikhaleni. 

Gobiqolo to Bethwane 
Kwa-Magwaza 


ELECTRICITY 


Saron (539 connections): R6.3mil 
Zimbidli (Ward 6) - overlaping to ward 7 
Infills of 525 connections 


WATER 


Nkunzempunga 

Mfomfolozi 

Mbileni 

Nyimbithwa 

Mvuzane 


SANITATION 


Mankentshane 

Donsintaba 


COMMUNITY SERVICE FACILITIES 


Sidipha Community Hall (big one) 

Mathibelane Renovations 

Skills development centres 

Creches / ECD (Early childhood dev. centres) 

Mahosheni. And Manzabilayo 

Shelters for Hawkers 


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Mobile police stations /satelite 
Road signs 


HEALTH FACILITIES 


Clinics (Mabhoko Clinic) 


SHELTER FACILITIES 


Saron 

Danyini 

Qedumona; GreenHill; Noris; Manzabilayo; 
Mabiyela Omnyama; Magwaza 
Paypoint shelters 


BUSINESS CENTRES 


One stop 5MME services centre 
Shelters for Hawkers 


CRECHES /ECD 


Manzabilayo Creche 
Esibizane Creche 
Mthibelane Creche 
Emzamo Creche 
Cool Cat Creche 
Donsintaba Creche 


SPORTS & RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 


Nkanini Sportsfield (Completion) 
Mawusheni Sportfield 


AGRICULTURAL FACILITIES 


Fencing of Sibizane Community Garden 

Fencing of Mawusheni Community Garden 

Inwamu 

Manzabilayo 

Tractor Assistance 


EDUCATION 


High school 

Training of dress makersand sewing machines to be obtained 


COMMUNITY ISSUES 


All sub-wards need electricity 
Orphanage 

Youth development programme 
Employment opportunities Community project 
Sports Development and Equipment 


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Annexure J2: Broad Ward Needs (As Per CBP) 



D397 Betterment & Regravel (Ntumeni) 
P397 Betterment & Regravel (Ntumeni) 
D465 Betterment & Regravel (2.7 km) 
REHAB OF L9A5 


ROADS BY MUNICIPALITY 


Emnyameni Causeway 
Emachanca Causeway 
Mankankaneni Causeway 
Ncubululu Causeway (priority 3) 

Vuma road 
Ntumeni road 

Kukhanyile Road Rehabilitation (priority 2) 

Jonjosi Road Rehabilitation (priority 1) 

Ngunundu road 
Nkangala Road (Regravelling) 

Unpaved Road Maintenance (Graders) and Speed Humps 


ELECTRICITY 


Nsukazi 

Yamela 


WATER BUDGETED BY UTHUIMGULU) 


VumaNtshempevu Scheme to link Vuma WTW 

Extensions Mahuzu; Sqandaqanda; Machannca; Itshempemvu; VumaSahnge; Nkangala; Ngoje; Ngunundu 
Mpiloyomuntu Scheme: Machanca Water Main upgrading (was initialy done by the community) 

Machanca Borehole 


SANITATION BUDGETED BY UTHUNGULU (PLANS TO 2017) 


VIP toilets in all subwards 


EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT (Sukuma Sakhe) 


Imbalenhie Creche (under construction) 

Vulamehio Creche 

Khuthala Creche (Upgrading - 12urglary12g) 

Vuma Creche 

Yamukela Creche (Security - 12urglary) - Upgrading 


RURAL HOUSING 


Sukuma Sakhe - AO Houses through War Room 
Kholweni Housing Scheme 
Shange Housing Scheme 


HEALTH FACILITIES 


Vuma Clinic 

Vulamehio Clinic (priority) - site was identified 


SHELTER FACILITIES 


Bus shelters (Needed at Ntumeni/Kholweni) 
Paypoint shelter (Vuma) 


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UMLALAZI WARD NEEDS 2014- 2019 - WARD 8, COUNCILOR Z A MHLONGO 
PROJECT /ISSUE 

SPORTS & RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 


Machanca Sportsfield Rehabilitation 
Masilo Sportfield (under construction) 


AGRICULTURAL FACILITIES 


Fencing of grazing camps and Community Gardens 
Masibambisane Tractors (be controlled by the Municipality) 
Nhlisa School be assisted with a tractor for a garden 
Masibambisane (Bush Clearing) - 120 job opportunities 


EDUCATION 


Phaphama Primary School (eHlanzeni) - 
Bursaries/ Learnerships 
School uniforms 


LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 


Fencing of Community Gardens X A 

Youth development programme 

Training of dress makers 

Masibambisane: Cow Flotel & Milk Processing 

Employment initiative: EPWP (FFW & WAP) 

Shelters for Flawkers 

Masibambisane: Biogas Plant 



Rehabilitation of Esiphezi Road 


ROADS BY MUNICIPALITY 


Mbiza No 1 
Mpofu 

Esiphezi Road & Causeway 
Unpaved Road Maintenance (Graders) 


ELECTRICITY 


Eshowe Nb15- Esiphezi 


WATER 


KwaFllokohloko SSA 1 (Wards: 9;10;14&26) - Mandawe; Mbizo 2; Ncemaneni; Esiphezi; Zigagayi; Emaqeleni; KwaMpofu; 
Thintumkhaba; Eziqwaqweni; Mhlathuzana; Mtilombo 

Conversion of Raw Water Pipeline to Eshowe , R6 122 028, Ward 9 & 26 -Ncemaneni, Thintumkhaba 
Mpofu Rising Main 


SANITATION 


Isiphezi; KwaMpofu; KwaFllokohloko; Thintumkhaba; Mbizo 1 


COMMUNITY SERVICE FACILITIES 


Mpungose Rural Flousing (Ward 09, 10, 13, 14) 
Mpofu Peace Centre 
Mbiza 2 Community Flail 


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Annexure J2: Broad Ward Needs (As Per CBP) 



Thintumkhaba Community Hall 
Ekukhanyeni Peace Centre 

One stop social service centres (Mbiza) 

Orphanage/ Cunina (Sphezi) 

Old age home 


EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT (CRECHES) 


Mbiza 2 Creche 


RURAL HOUSING 


Mpungose Housing (1000) 


SHELTER FACILITIES 


Mbiza No 2/ Ezimbizeni Bus/ Taxi Commutter Shelter 
Esiphilile/ Ezimakethe Bus/ Taxi Commutter Shelter 
Mlalazi Bus/ Taxi Commutter Shelter 
Paypoint shelters (Isiphezi/ kwa-Mpofu) 


AGRICULTURAL FACILITIES 


Stock dams (Mpofu) 

Mbiza No. 1 Jojo Tanks & water drums 
Thintumkhaba Fencing of Community gardens 
Mbiza No. 2 (got a pump need pipes & Jojo Tanks) 


COMMUNICATIONS 


Cellphone network towers (KwaMpofu; Thintumkhaba & Mpofu) 


SAFETY & SECURITY 


Mobile police stations /satelite (Thintumkhaba) 


SPORTS & RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 


Youth Centre (Mbiza) 

Sports centre (Mbiza NO. 1 & 2 ) 

Training of dress makers and sewing machines to be obtained 
Block Making 


COMMUNITY ISSUES 


Crime & Drugs. 


SAFETY & SECURITY ISSUES 


CPF 


BUSINESS ISSUES 


Poultry - 100 kitches (Mbiza nO. 2) 

Sewing (a) Mbiza 

Youth development programme (1. Thintumkhaba. 2. Mbiza) 
Employment initiative (FEW x 5) 


EDUCATION ISSUES 


Bursaries/ Learnership 
Esiphezi High school 


SOCIAL SERVICES ISSUES 


Disabled help (War Room) 


TRANSPORTS & ROADS ISSUES 


Transport (School kids) Isiphezi 
Public transport 

Zibambele (Mpofu; Thintumkhaba; Sphezi) 


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Madonsela - Mtilombo - Eziqwaqweni Road & Causeway 


ROADS BY MUNICIPALITY 


Clinic - Emaqeleni Road - P230+ Causeway 
P230 - Mtshali -Diphini,Ziqwaqweni 
Mshayazafe Road 
DIothovu Road 

Off Eziqwaqweni -Shoba Road 
Off Eziqwaqweni - Ngema Road 
Esifubeni Road- Ntenjane & Causeway 
Off Eziqwaqweni Road - Manyoni Road 
Off Eziqwaqweni KwaNkosi Road 
Off P230 - Mandawe Primary 
Mhlathuze Road near Ntontonto (new) 
KwaNgwenya Road (new) 

Emandawe Road 
Gawozi Road 
Ezibomvu Road 

Malandela Road (from P230 to R66) 

Road Maintanance 


ELECTRICITY 


Mtilombo 

Infills 


WATER AND SANITATION 


KwaHlokohloko 55A 1 (Wards: 9;10;14&26) - Mandawe; Mbizo 2; Ncemaneni; Esiphezi; Zigagayi; Emaqeleni; KwaMpofu; 
Thintumkhaba; Eziqwaqweni; Mhlathuzana; Mtilombo 


EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT CENTRES 


Imbizo 1 
Echibini 


SAFETY AND SECURITY 


Satellite Police Station Imbizo 1 


COMMUNITY SERVICE FACILITIES 


Multi Purpose Centres (Emaqeleni) 

Emaqeleni Hall 
Mandawe Hall 
Mtilombo Hall 

Paypoint Shelters, with Toilets(Eziqwaqweni & Mandawe) 
Land Use Management System 


SPORTS 


Nkume Sports Park, Emaqeleni (netball,volleyball,tennis,soccer & swimming pool) 

Mandawe Sportsfield 

Eziqwaqweni Sportsfield 

Mtilombo Sportsfield 

Nkume Gymnesium 


EDUCATION 


Mobile Clinic Eziqwaqweni (at least once a week) 
High School at Eziqwaqweni / Mtilombo 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 328 

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Annexure J2: Broad Ward Needs (As Per CBP) 



Masibambisane (Bush Clearing) - 100 job opportunities 


EMPLOYMNENT OPPORTUNITIES 


Employment Opportunities (EPWP: WAP&FFW) 



Kangela Road 
Osborn Road 

Butcher Street Traffic Sgnals 

Roads Rehabilitations (Eshowe Junior School Parking) 

Bus&Taxi Rank_lndustrial Area Link Road 

Sunnydale/ King Dinuzulu Link Road 

Holy Childhood Traffic Circle Improvements 

Main Street Bridge Widening 

Stormwater Improvements 

Unpaved Road Maintenance 

Speed Humps (Addonis/ Addison Streets) 

Road: Butcher Street - Ruthledge/ Pearson-Kangela 
upgrade intersection-Sunnydale low cost housing 
Fleurdale Intersection 
Private Hospital Access off PA7 (R66) 


ELECTRICITY 


R66 Street Lights (From Siza to Excell) 

Increase of Elecricity Supply(Eskom) 

Bulk Services Ruthledge Park New Delopment 
Prepaid meters for electricity 


UTHUNGULU: WATER AND SANITATION 


RA6 AAO 575 Eshowe Town proper, King Dinizulu T/S, Kwa-Mfana, Nyanini, Berea, Thawini, Ntenjane, Emncongweni, 
Siqwanjana, Izindophi 
Eshowe Water Works 
Sunnydale shortage (SIberg Road) 

Water Borne Sewerage system (all suburbs) Priority 


COMMUNITY SERVICE FACILITIES 


New Eshowe Testing Station 
Tennis Court Sunnydale 
rehabilitation of eShowe Landfil site 
Eshowe Swimming Pool Rehabilitation 

uMlalazi Recreation and Entertainmanet 
Park: Development Kwande Investments 

- 260 Construction jobs 

- 130 Direct jobs 

Sunnydale Housing Project Phase 3 


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Rutledge Middle income 130 units 
Bus/Taxi rank - priority 
Regional Cemetery 
Sunnydale Clinic 


BUSINESS CENTRES 


Youth Business Advisory Centre 
Market stalls for Street Traders 
Training of SMMEs and Cooperatives 
Mini Factories Butcher Street Extension 
Business sites (Rezoning and Special consent) 


SPORTS & RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 


Multi purpose sports facilities 
Sunnydale Sportfield Rehabilitation 


AGRICULTURE 


Sunnydale Community Gardens 
AGRICULTURAL FRESH PRODUCE STORE 


EDUCATION 


Sunnydale Primary School 
ABET (Sunnydale Peace Centre) 


COMMUNITY ISSUES 


Development of industrial zone 
Access to social security 
Creation of sports & recreation sector 
Housing ownership / Title deeds 
Church Site 

Skills Development, motor mechanic, electrical engineering, 
Eshowe Sports Club 



R66/ P47 & Kangela Intersection Improv. 

R66/ P47 & Kangela Intersection Traffic Calming 


ROADS BY MUNICIPALITY 


Roads Rehabilitations 

KDS Bus Route (Mthiyane Road) Rehabilitation 
Sunnydale/ King Dinuzulu Link Road/ Emgovuzweni 
Passage walks to be cleaned/maintained 
Stormwater Management 
Unpaved Road Maintenance (Graders) 

Speed Humps/ guard rails 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 330 

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Annexure J2: Broad Ward Needs (As Per CBP) 



Increase of Elecricity SupplylEskom) 

High Mast KD5 Sportsfield 

Ring Feed Electricity Supply (Auto Recloser Instalation) 
Mtakwende electrification (Formalization) Town Planning 


WATER 


KD5 Sewer Manhole (under construction) 
Eshowe Water Works 

R46 440 575 three year estimated budget for: 
Essowe Town Porper KDS Kamfana, 

Nyaninil bera, Thawini, Ntenjane, Emncongweni 
Ezindopho, Mtakwende 


COMMUNITY SERVICE FACILITIES 


KDS Community Hall Maintenance/ Gymnesium 
Municipal Offices Improvements 
Mandawe Regional Cemetry 


HOUSING 


Sunnydale Phase 2 Extension 

Sunnydale Phase 3 

Mtakwende; Maqeda 

Tin Town , Scrapyard Township Houses 

Emathuneni (Formalisation) Town Planning 


Mtakwende (Formalisation) Town Planning 



One stop SMME services centre 


KDS Shopping Centre 

KDS Taxi Rank Covering Shelter & Public Toilets 

Mall at Total Garage 

Community Gardens 

SMME Training & Development 


SPORTS & RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 


Play park 
Sports Park 

Consolidation of Town Planning Scheme 
KDS Sportfield Changerooms 


COMMUNITY ISSUES 


Refuse collection 

Clearing of the bushy un occupied land 

Resources within the library and its small 

Increase operational times for the library 

Water sipping under person's home at no 11 7 Umziki Road 

Library (Increased of Resources and operational hours)(Cllr will engage with Corperate) 
Public toilet at the KDS Taxi Rank 


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D1652 to Ophongolo 
D1652 to Ice Cream Road 


ROADS BY MUNICIPALITY 


Mbangayiya Causeway And Road 

Ohologo To Embangayiya Bride 

Emfanyane To Kwanzuza Bridge 

Eskhaleni KwaZulu to Makhilimba Road Regravelling 

Eskhaleni KwaZulu to KwaSkhakhane Road Regravelling 

Eskhaleni kwaZulu to Emancangweni Regravelling 

New Road Esikhaleni to Didiza Road 

New Road Esikhaleni to Hlalakahle Temple 

New Road KwaNdlovu Echibini to Ekupholeni 

New Road KwaSthole Ezihlahleni to KwaNxumalo 

Ntenjane Causeway 

Embeceni Causeway 

Ndlovini Mozane Bridge to Engongonini Regravelling 
Embhonga to Esiphalamende Regravelling 
Epitshini to Mlalazi kwaNgobese Regravelling 
KwaMthembu Bus Stop to KwaNgobese Regravelling 
KwaDladlato Emtilombo Regravelling 
KwaShevu to Engongonini Regravelling 
KwaDladlato Etsheni likaMbonya 
Mhlathuzana Store to Baba u Ndlovu 
Udakane Access road 
Road Maintenance 


ELECTRICITY 


Ngeza (867 connections) 

Izikoshi 

Umhiathuzana (660 connections): R15mil 


WATER AND SANITATION 


Completion of Middledrift Purification Plant 

KwaHlokohloko SSA 1 (Wards: 9;10;14&26) - Mandawe; Mbizo 2; Ncemaneni; Esiphezi; Zigagayi; Emaqeleni; KwaMpofu; 
Thintumkhaba; Eziqwaqweni; Mhlathuzana; Mtilombo 

VIP toilets in all subwards (April 2014 - June 2015) - R25.065m 


EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT (CRECHES) 


Mpumazi 

Mkhilimba 

Mfenyane 

Uhologo 

Izinkiliji (Partial) 

Izimpohio 

Mbangayiya 

Siqwanjana 

KwaNoshungu 

Ngeza 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 332 

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Annexure J2: Broad Ward Needs (As Per CBP) 



Mpungose Rural Housing 

(Ward 09, 10, 13, U) 1000 units R53000 per household 


SPORTS & RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 


Hologo Sportsfields 
Kwanoshungu Sportsfields 
Emfenyane Sporfields 
Ngeza Sportsfield 
Ntenjane Sportsfield 
Mbangayiya Sportsfield 
Skills development centres 
Mobile service centre(sassa, dsd, h/af) 


HOUSING 


Mpungose 

Mzimela 

Zulu 


SAFETY & SECURITY 


Mpumazi Mobile Police Station 
Mzimela Mobile Police Station 


HEALTH FACILITIES 


Mpumazi Mobile Clinic 
Mhlathuzane Mobile Clinic 
Ndlovini Mobile Clinic 


AGRICULTURAL FACILITIES 


Tractors 

Fencing of Community Gardens 
Mkhungazi Community Garden 
Nhlisa Community Garden 
Dipping tanks 

Masibambisane (Bush Clearing) - 100 job opportunities 


EDUCATION 


High school Entenjane 
Primary Emfenyane 
High School Emfenyane 
High School Edangwini 
Training of dress makers 


COMMUNITY ISSUES 


Ngeza Hall 
Hologo Hall 
Mbonga Hall 
Mhlathuzane Hall 
Ngeza Creche 
Hologo Creche 


333 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

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Sbanesihle Creche 

Hologo Creche 

Mpumazi Shopping Centre 

Ndlovini Shopping Centre 

Lightning Conductors 

Communication Tower Mhlathuzana 

Communication Tower Mbangayiya 

Communication Tower Noshungu 

Pension Paypopint Mpumazi 

Pension Paypoint Noshungu 

Pension Paypoint Mbangayiya 

Pension Paypoint Mhlathuzana 

Fencing of Grave yards Entenjane 

Employment Opportunities (EPWP: WAP&FFW) 

Shelter for hawkers 

Youth Centre 

Sports field 



D135 (Upgraded to Blacktop) 


ROADS BY MUNICIPALITY 


Nogobhoza Road 
Mabhudle Road (priority) 

Izingwenya Road 

Phindulimi School Access Road & 2 Causeways 
KwaNyoni 

Njinini Pedestrian Bridge 

Mtshingwane/ Makhahleni/ Mpushini/ Phoqo 

Ezithwethweni 

Ediphini - Enjinini 

Mtengemuntu Entabeni 

Machunwini 

Matibomvana 

KwaMakhonza 3 Causeways 
Kwelengane Road & 3 Causeways 
Yokoyoko Pedestrian Bridge 
Kwa Manono 

Mntengemuntu Causeway 
KwaKhoza Road 
Kwaphaphu 
Road Maintenance 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 33 A 

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Annexure J2: Broad Ward Needs (As Per CBP) 



Mabhudle (1099 connections): R22.6Amil 

Catherine Booth; Kwelwngane; Mobolo; Dikinyane; Phindulimi; Embobheni; Ematsheni; Emtshingweni; Emabhudle; Salvesh/ 


WATER AND SANITATION 


Mobolo 

Phaphu 

Kwelengane 

Dikanyane - Phindulimu 

Izingwenya Extension 

Mpushini 

Ebumba to Solvation Army 


COMMUNITY SERVICE FACILITIES 


Bhekemehlweni Paypoint 
Tribal Court Paypoint 
Mehlwana Paypoint 
Tshakane Hall (Nogobhoza) 
Ezingwenya Hall 
Nogobhoza Hall rep 
Kwajazi Hall 
Kwelengane Hall 
Bambanani Creche 
Kwelengane Creche 
Mtshingwane Creche 
Mpangazitha Creche 
Phaphu/ Bhekemehlweni Creche 
Ematsheni Peace Centre 
KwaHadebe Creche 
OneStop Shop Ezinjeni 


SPORTS & RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 


Kwayabu Sportsfield (priority) 

Phaphu Sportsfield 
Mabhudle Sportsfield 
Phindulimu Sportsfield (priority) 

Phindulimi School (Renovations & Repairs) 


HOUSING 


KwaKhoza Rural Housing 


335 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

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D884 Betterment & Regravel (Mvutshini to Nsingweni) (Priority Project) 
Mkhukhuze Bridge (elevation - Makhilimba) 

Gumbamane Road (Gravelling) 


ROADS BY MUNICIPALITY 


Mahubhu (Priority 4) 
Safube (Priority 5) 
Gawula (Priority 2) 
Ezimpongo (Priority 1) 
Hemfane (Priority 6) 
Mabhoka (Priority 3) 
Road Maintanance 


ELECTRICITY 


Ensingweni 

Makhilimba (280 connections) 

Infills (Mahubhu; Izimpongo; Abayehli; Amabhoko; Hemfane) 


WATER 


Estimated budget for: 

Eshowe Town, KD5, Kwamfana, 

Nyanini, Berea, Thawini, Ntenjane, Emncongweni, (Ward 16), Sqwanjana (Ward 16), Ezindopho, Mtakwende 
Borehole:Hemfane/ Makhilimba Pump 


SANITATION 


Gawula 

Izimpongo 

Amahubha 

Hemfane 

Abahedli 

Amabhoko 

Mawundlu (Ward 16) 

Emncongweni (Ward 16) 

Sanitation in all sub-wards 


COMMUNITY SERVICE FACILITIES 


Izimpongo Community Hall 
Amahubhu Community Hall 
Gawula Community Hall 
Amabhoko Community Hall 


LIBRARY 


Hemfane Library 


CEMETRIES 


Cemeteries 


RURAL HOUSING 


Nzuza Housing Project (1000 houses) 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 336 

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Annexure J2: Broad Ward Needs (As Per CBP) 



Satelite Police Station 

Road Signs - Safube; Gawula next Mhlongo Store 


HEALTH FACILITIES 


Mobile clinics (Safube) 


SHELTER FACILITIES 


Bus shelters XA (D88A -R66;Mvutshini) 

Paypoint shelters (Makhimba; Mvutshini - priority) 


SPORTS & RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 


Mvuntshini Sportsfield 


AGRICULTURAL FACILITIES 


Mkhukhuze Dipping tanks 

Fencing of Community Gardens : (Nqalamaphophoma; Snethemba; 
Siyathokoza; Nyonibizumuntu 
One-Home-One Garden: Kwadladia; Nzuza 
Farmers support 


EDUCATION 


Safube High school 

Registration & Tuition fees for Matriculants with Tertiary Institutions 
Training of dress maker sand sewing machines to be obtained 
Skills Centre 


LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 


Wombane Cultural Village 

EPWP (FFW&WAP be spread in all sub-wards) 

Recycling 


COMMUNITY ISSUES 


Fire fighters 
Bus shelters 



KwaShandu Road 
Vekeza Road 


ROADS BY MUNICIPALITY 


Kheswa road. 
Madida road. 
Mbatha road. 
Mnengweni road. 
Msomi road. 
Mthethwa road. 
Chili road. 

Gciza causeway 


337 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

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Mkhukhuze 
Nhlababo Rd 
Cushwa Road 
Mabhoko Rd 
Nkwalini road. 
Road Maintanance 


ELECTRICITY 


Nyezane/Vekeza 


WATER AND SANITATION 


Vekeza / Nyezane 390 hh 
Mabhokweni 1 376 hh 
Mabhokweni 2 400 hh 
Maqhulu 390 hh 
Ogaya 480 hh 
Jojo Tank 
Water Scheme 


EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT 


Mkhukhuze Creche 
Maqhulu creche renovations 
Ngiba Creche 


COMMUNITY SERVICE FACILITIES 


Nhlababo Hall Renovation 
Maqhulu Hall 
Mabhokweni Hall 
Vekeza Community Hall 
Ncinyane Multi-Purpose Complex 


RURAL HOUSING 


Nzuza Housing Project 


HEALTH FACILITIES 


Mabhokweni Clinic 


SPORTS & RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 


Mabhokweni Sportsfield , 
Vekeza Sportsfield 
Sport Kits for Local Teams 
Maquiu Sport Complex 


AGRICULTURAL FACILITIES 


Dipping tanks 

Fencing of Community gardens: 


EDUCATION 


High school (Nhlababo) 

Training of dress makers in progress 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 338 

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Annexure J2: Broad Ward Needs (As Per CBP) 



CPF 

Lightning conductors 
Security (Policing)-5chool. 


SOCIAL SERVICES ISSUES 


Food parcels and blankets 

Water seepage at Ingwenya High School 


LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 


EPWP 

Herbal Medicine Growing 



Matigulu to Catherine Booth Hospital - tarred 


ROAD BY MUNICIPALITY 


Naickerville/ Sandiwana Sch Intersection (D13A) 

Ethafeni (regravelling) 

Gingindlovu Main Road Rehabilitation/Buses 
Sidewalks : Isandiwana High Sch towards Busy Bee 
Stormwater Improvement - contineous maintenance 
Urban Roads Rehabilitation: Kudu Street 
Rautenbach Street Extension 
Lilburn Street 

Speed Humps (Bushbuck Rd, Busy Bee, new House Dev) 
Rural Roads Programme (Graders) 


ELECTRICITY 


New Gingindlovu Housing Projects (143 Connections) 
Infills: Thafeni 


WATER 


Naickerville Housing Development (143 Connections) 
Supply of Water from Phobane Dam for Ethafeni 


SANITATION 


Toilet full at Thafeni Peace Centre 


HOUSING DEVELOPMENT 


Ging Housing Phase 2 for 500 houses (Low Cost) 
Land for Middle Income houses (Scheme) 

1000 Rural Houses under iNkosi Khoza 
Ging Extension Housing Phase 1 - 143 Houses 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

























Gingindlovu Community Hall 

Multi purpose centre (Naickervill/ Hillview) -sport park 
Skills development centres (LED to run computer centre) 
Cemeteries 

Upgrading of the existing Bus Rank (Shelter & Trading area) 

GingTaxi Rank Offices 

Additional Public Toilet - opposite Inkanyezi 

Ethafeni Library to cover wards 1 5 & 1 8 

Ging old aged Home 


SAFETY & SECURITY 


Street lights 


SPORTS & RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 


Upgrading of Play Park (swings and sand pit to be added) 
Hilview Play Park for the new 500 houses 
Thafeni Play Park ( priority 1) - Peace Centre 
Ging Creche Play Park (priority 2) 

Park Benches -annual allocation 
New Goal Post - Ethafeni 
Swimming Pool 

Ging Sportsfield Operational & Maintenance 


WASTE MANAGEMENT 


Gingindlovu Transfer Station 
Fencing of the Existing Dump Site 
Refuse Compactor 
Gingindlovu Buy Back Centre 
Litter Bins -annual allocation 


COMMUNITY ISSUES 


Finalisation of title deeds for Naickerville houses 
Transportation of school kids 


LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 


Employment initiatives:WAP; FEW; Sizabonke 
Trees and Flora - annual allocation 
Community Issues 
Land for regions groups 
2 Notice Boards (Hillview & Naickerville) 

Bus Shelters: Isandiwana; Thafeni Sch; Matikulu/ Thafeni Turn off 
Training of dress makers - Ethafeni 
R66 Gingindlovu Shopping Complex 
Clearing overgrown properties 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 3 AO 

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Annexure J2: Broad Ward Needs (As Per CBP) 



D88A from Masundwini to Ensingweni upgrade, (priority 1) 
Veleshowe via iBhadi causeway to Moyeni Hall cross, (priority 2) 
Muller via Mnengweni to Moyeni crossing, (priority 3) 

N2/ P2/A speed humps (Masundwini, iBhadi and Nkwanyana) 
Felefele bus road to eMnengweni. 

P378 Rehabilitation 


ROADS BY MUNICIPALITY 


Sholo causeway 
Madida causeway 
Ngcobo Causeway 

Yimba pedestrian bridge & causeway. 
iBhadi Causeway/ Mthembu Causeway 
Emasundwini Road and Zebra Crossing on R102 
Mnengweni to Etsheni Road 
Mthunzini Sidewalk (From BP to Mthunzini) 

Roads Rehabilitation (Grading and Quarry) 

Speed Humps( Raphia Crescent, Cycad Drive, iBhadi, Nkwanyana and Masundwini) 

Rural Roads Programme (Graders) 

New Bus Stops and Upgrading of Nkwanyana, Masundwini, Mbongolwani,Emoyeni bus stops 

Hely Hutchinson road maintenance: from road Island to Zini River Estate 

Pavements 

Quarrying and Culverts 

Mzileni to Malishozi 

Velaphi to Dikwe 

Malushozi to Mzamo Store 

Malishozi to Sabeka River/ Emoyeni School 

Maliyakhe to Ngciba Creche 

Ngema kraal to Nkwazela 

Emoyeni turn-off atR1 02-cleaning if culverts pipes 
Ngobe road 

Mdletshe to Khuzwayo 


ELECTRICITY 


In-fills (Sabeka / Nsingweni ) electrification project 

Nsingweni/ Veleshowe Electification (20 customers) and Community Hall 

Veleshowe Community Hall be connected (priority 1) 

Ngwadia (Ibhadi) - 13 connections for Infills 
Masundwini (Nsingweni) - 17 Connections/ Infills 
Mthunzini Sports field Flood Lights 


SANITATION 


Ensingweni, Sabeka and Nyonibizumuntu 

Waterborne Sewage Scheme expansion in Mthunzini 

New Vacuum Honey Sucker to service: Mtunzini, Obanjeni, and Gingindlovu 

Tshekhombe extension 

Tiolets in Emoyeni High School 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 













Upgrade of Nyonibizumuntu Water Scheme 

Ntsingweni 

Ngwadia 

Metered house Connections 


COMMUNITY SERVICE FACILITIES 


Mthunzini Middle income houses Obanjeni and Mthinzini (Lot 167) 
Ngwadia Pre school / Creche (Priority 1) 

Rural Housing - Nzuza Housing Scheme 
Community Development Workers (Ward 19) 


HEALTH FACILITIES 


SHELTER FACILITIES 

Bus shelters: I.Nkwanyana, 2.Masundwini, S.Mbongolweni 
Moyeni crossing, 5. BP Garage 
2Ahr service at Nsingerni Clinic 
Bizumuntu Clinic 

Community care givers: Nkandia, Nyezane, Nyoni-Bizumuntu 
Moyeni Market stalls / Hawkers Shelters 


SPORTS & RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 


Mthunzini Sportfields upgrade (Flood lights) 

Nsingweni Soccer field Improvement (priority 1) 

Sports equipment - goal posts , flood lights, change rooms & ablutions 
Incisili Sportfield with Changerooms 
Sports equipment - goal posts, changerooms & ablutions 
Ngwadia Sportsfield (Soccer & Netball) 

Grass planting; change rooms; ablutions and fencing 


LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 


Trading area and park upgrade:Mtunzini opposite Spar 

- Informal trading Shelters 

- Upgrade of public toilets 

- Seating areas and tables 

- Landscaping and paths 

Gymnasium (Sabeka Community Center) 

Mthunzini Shopping Center/Commercial Development 


COMMUNITY ISSUES 


Wheel chairs 
Ibhadi Stalls 
Emoyeni Trading market 
Manzini Creche: Toys and Kitchen 
Local Aids Council 

Sabeka Peace Center (Security room for Computers and Sewing Macine) 


AGRICULTURAL ISSUES 


Garden Working Equipment 
Tractors 

Seeds & Fertilizer 
Weed Eradication 
OSS 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 3A2 

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Annexure J2: Broad Ward Needs (As Per CBP) 



D1659 (1553) Betterment & Regravel (Obanjeni) 
L1374 (Obanjeni) 

D1553 Betterment & Regravel (Obanjeni 
D1552 

P240 Speed humps 
Traffic Calming (Speed Humps) 


ROADS BY MUNICIPALITY 


Kwanguqu Causeway 
Doviyane (Njabulweni School) 
Mthembu Causeway & Road 
Ibhadi Road 

Road Maintenance (Graders) 


WATER AND SANITATION (BUDGETED BY UTHUNGULU) 


No budget allocation yet from UTHUNGULU 


WATER AND SANITATION (PLANS TO 2017) 


Obanjeni 

Ebhadi 

Zamokuhle 

Nguqu 

Ezingeni 

Sbhamu 

Izikoshi 

Vongotho 


COMMUNITY SERVICE FACILITIES 


Libraries (Obanjeni) 

Skills development centres 
Cemeteries 

Maintenance of Obanjeni Hall 
RURAL HOUSING 


CRECHES 


Siphumelele Creche (Major Repairs) 

Vukani Creche (Priority 2) 

Emacekeni 

Bonakahle 

Emakholweni 

Doveyane 

Ensingweni Creche 

Veleshowe Creche (Priority 1) 


SHELTER FACILITIES 


Market stalls / Hawkers Shelters 


BUSINESS CENTRES 


Obanjeni MPCC: One Stop/ SMMEs 


343 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

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UMLALAZI WARD NEEDS 2014 - 2019 - WARD 20, COUNCILOR M G ZONDI 
PROJECT /ISSUE 

SPORTS & RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 


Obanjeni Sportfield / complex 


AGRICULTURAL FACILITIES 


Nursery (vegetables / fruits/ medicinal) 
Agricultural centre 


COMMUNITY ISSUES 


Employment initiative: EPWP (FFW&WAP) 
Cemeteries fencing (priority) 

Ambulance services 

Rolled out of Land Use Management Plan 


HEALTH 


Clinics 


AGRICULTURAL ISSUES 


Tractors 

Seeds 


SAFETY & SECURITY 


Implementation of sector policing 


EDUCATION ISSUES 


Bursaries/ Learnership 
Training of creche teachers. 
Comprehensive Technical 


SOCIAL SERVICES ISSUES 


Home affairs/ Mobile Home affairs 
Indondo Disability Institution 



Izikoshi Causeway 
Kwelezinqola Causeway 


ROADS BY MUNICIPALITY 


Ekalishini-Hlongwane-Emphafeni (Priority 2) 
uMlalazi Bridge-Green-Ekukhanyakufikile Regraveling 
KwaKhanyile-Professor-Ebuhleni 
Kwakhanyile-Ethondo-Ebuhleni (Priority ) 
KwaMagwaza-Ekalishini-Ebuhleni (Priority 1) 
Qwayinduku-Mpophomeni-Emanyameni (phezulu) 
Emanyameni Upper-Kwakhanyakufikile-Emahhashini (Stanger) 
Ezingwenya-Felisilwane-Esiwohlweni 
Esiwohlweni-Kwakhanyakufikile-Emahhashini (Priority 5) 
Kwatshopo Regraveling (Priority 4) 

Ezikoshi 


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Annexure J2: Broad Ward Needs (As Per CBP) 



Felisilwane 

Nkawana Causeway 

Engoje Causeway 

Ntshelezini Causeway (priority 1) 

Evongotho Causeway 

Road Maintenance (Graders) 


ELECTRICITY 


Prepaid Electricity in all Sub-Wards 

Lightning Conductors 

Electricity-Felisilwane (infills) 

Emanyameni 

Esiwohlweni 

KwaQwayinduku 


WATER AND SANITATION 


Ezikoshi; Esiwohlweni; Nozandia; Vongotho Priorities 
Emanyameni Emzansi (Priority) 

Qwayinduku to reach all the areas 
Toilets in all Sub-Wards 


COMMUNITY SERVICE FACILITIES 


Izingwenya Comm Hall (priority 1) 
Ezikoshi Comm Hall (priority 3) 
Emanyameni Comm Hall (priority 2) 
Qwayinduku Peace Centre 


SPORTS & RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 


Thondo Sportsfield(priotity 1) 
Kwanomzansi/ Emanyameni Sportsfield 


EDUCATION 


High School 

Further Education and Training (FET) Centre 


EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT 


Ezingwenya Creche(priority 2) 
Emanyameni Creche(priority 1) 


HEALTH 


Mobile Clinic Services to be improved 
Emanyameni Clinic 


RURAL HOUSING/ HUMAN SETTLEMENT 


300 Houses for Destitutes 
Houses in all Sub-Wards 


AGRICULTURE 


One Home One Garden 
Community Gardens (Co-Ops) 
Farmers Support 


3 AS UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

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UMLALAZI WARD NEEDS 2014 - 2019 - WARD 21, COUNCILOR N M MNQAYI 
PROJECT /ISSUE 

LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 


Business Support (SMMEs) 

Zibambele Work Tools 

Employnnent initiative: EPWP (FFW&WAP) 



D1551 Betterment & Regravel (Ongoye) 
D1562 Betterment & Regravel (Mhlathuzana) 
Traffic Calming/ Speed Humps: P240 
Manzamnyama to Entuze Clinic 
P240 to EMkhunyala. 


ROADS BY MUNICIPALITY 


Ohhahheni Road 

Mhlathuzana Causeway Approaches Ntshidi 
EDipha 2. 

Elubisana to Ongoye. 

ENkosini Mkhwanazi. 

EPhayindini. 

Esikoleni eMbuyiseni. 

Kulezikhumba. 

Kwa Mkhize. 

Kwa Nkwanyana. 

KwaBhodweni. 

Kwa Nkwanyana. 

KwaBhodweni. 

KwaMankunzana Priority 1 
KwaManzamnyama - Entuze & Causeway 
KwaNontongo. 

KwaVelabahleke - Manzamnyama Priority 2 
Donseni Primary School. 

Oyemeni. 

Phongola. 

UGugusha. 

UMhIathuzana. 

Siyabonga Sportsfield to Ezimeme 
Manzamnyama Causeway - Ongoye Forest 
Road Maintenance 


ELECTRICITY 


Amanzamnyama 

Sibhakuza 

Oyemeni 


UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 346 

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Annexure J2: Broad Ward Needs (As Per CBP) 



WARD 23, 23 -KwaHlokohloko 5/A 55A5 -R1 57 8AA 574 Oyemeni, Phongola, Lubisane, Gugushe, Ohhaheni, 
Makhehle(partial), Makholokholo (partial), Nteneshane, Hlobane, Macekane, Sabe 1 & 2 

Manzamnyama 
Mkhunyana spring 


SANITATION 


Oyenneni 

Phongola 

Lubisane 

Gugushe 

Ohhaheni 

Mhlathuzana 

Mkhunyane (Partial) 

Mhlathuzana (Partial) 

Mkhunyane (Partial) 

Manzamnyama 

Mankunzana 

Ngoje 


COMMUNITY SERVICE FACILITIES 


Investigation COGTA: disaster affected houses Rural housing 

Oyemeni Community Hall 

Phongolo Community Hall 

Manzanyana Community Hall 

Ohhahheni Peace Centre 

Multi purpose centre 

Libraries (Oyemeni) 

Mankunzana Community Hall 
Skills development centres 


CRECHES 


Lubisane Creche 
Manzamnyama Creches 
Cemeteries and fencing 


SAFETY & SECURITY 


Mobile police stations 


HEALTH FACILITIES 


Clinics (Oyemeni, Velabahleke & Manzamnyama) 


SHELTER FACILITIES 


Bus shelters 
Pay point shelters 


BUSINESS CENTRES 


Malls / shopping centre 


347 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

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UMLALAZI WARD NEEDS 2014 - 2019 - WARD 22, COUNCILOR M Z NKWANYANA 
PROJECT /ISSUE 

SPORTS & RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 


Mazamnyama Sportsfield 
Ohhahheni Sportsfields 
Entshithi Sportsfields 
Youth Centre 


COMMUNICATIONS 


Post Office 
ART CENTRE 

Housing investigation Houses affected by floods 

Training of dress makers and sewing machines to be obtained 


COMMUNITY ISSUES 


Employment Initiatives 
Home base care givers 
Youth training 

Youth development programme 



P518 (Ntshidi) 

D1562 to Emhiathuzana Bridge. (Enkosini uNzuza.) 
D1 556 Betterment & Regravelling (6 km) 


ROADS BY MUNICIPALITY 


Manyathi Causeway 

Encekwane P518 to Eziphukuphukwini to Ntshidi D1556 link to N2 

Road MC Ohhahheni Rd frm D1556 - emfukwini - Ongoye (Mhlathuzane Bridge) 

eBhodweni to eNcekwane. 

Emthintombi to Embuyiseni H5 

Ncekwana. From P518 passing Eziphukuphukwini to Ntshidi D1556 
eNtshidi. D1556 to Esklebheni P230 


WATER 


WARD 23, 23 -KwaHlokohloko 5/A 55A5 -R157 844 574 Oyemeni, Phongola, Lubisane, Gugushe, Ohhaheni, 
Makhehle(partial), Makholokholo (partial), Nteneshane, Hlobane, Macekane, Sabe 1 & 2 


SANITATION 


Mkhuphulangwenya 
Makholokholo (Partial) 
Makhehle (Partial) 
Makhehle (Partial) 
Makholokholo (Partial) 
Nteneshane 
Hlobane 
Macekane 
Sabe 1 & 2 


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Annexure J2: Broad Ward Needs (As Per CBP) 



Community Hall (Nteneshane) 
KwaDlamu Creche 
Ntshidi Creche 
KwaNcede Creche 
Mhlaleni Creche 


SAFETY & SECURITY 


Mobile police stations /satellite 


HEALTH FACILITIES 


Mobile clinics 


SPORTS & RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 


Ncekwane Sportsfields 

Nteneshane Sportsfield add row for Ntshidi 5F 


SHELTER FACILITIES 


Ntshidi 
Nteneshane 
Kwa Gumede 
Kwa Ncikwane 
Kwa Nxele 
Vulingqondo 
Siqedusizi 
Qhamuka 
Kwa Mangazi 


PAYPOINT SHELTERS 


Qedusizi 

Ntshidi 

Mhlathuzana shelter 

Training of dress makers and sewing machines to be obtained 


COMMUNITY ISSUES 


Stock dams 

Employment Opportunities 
Maintenance of cemeteries 


AGRICULTURAL ISSUES 


Agricultural assistance, Fencing and Tractor Service 

Ntshidi and Enhiahleni Garden 

KwaDlamu Garden 

Embotsheni Garden 

Ephilibane (Bekezela) Garden 

Mhlathuzana Garden 

Training of dress makers and sewing machines to be obtained 


SPORTS & RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 


Sportfield and Sports Equipment 


3 A9 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

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D1592 & R34 tarring 
D1592 (6 km) tarring 
D1592&R34 
D1 554 Tarring 

Umhiathuze Bridge linking D1952 & R34 


ROADS BY MUNICIPALITY 


Bele road 

Qhilika road from P230 
Makhehle Causeway 
Khehlehle Road & Causeway 


ELECTRICITY 


Makhehle and Bonisanani 
Khehlehle 

Infills: Ndlangubo; Fasimba; Mkhuphulangwenya; Mngampondo; Bele; Nqoleni; Vulinqondo; Mkhehle 


WATER 


WARD 24 & 25 - Mpungose Phase 1 D Reticulation ((Kwahlokohloko 55A 2&3) - Habeni, Ngodini, Ematsheni, Ntsheluntshelu, 
Mqadayi, Enqoleni, Nomyaci, Mashishi, Khabingwe, Emgosinaneni, Elemoya 

Water Tankers 


SANITATION 


Enqoleni 
Mngampondo 
Nomyaca (Partial) 

Ndlangubo / Khabingwe 
Ufasimba 

Mkhuphulangwenya;Makhehle; Khehlehle 


RURAL HOUSING DEVELOPMENT 


Rural Housing (ward 24, 26) 


COMMUNITY SERVICE FACILITIES 


Ndlangubo Community Hall 
Makhehle Hall 
Mkhuphulangwenya Hall 
Mngampondo Hall 
Multi Purpose Centre (Ndlangubo) 
Maphela Peace Centre 


EARLY CHILDHOOD EEVELOPMENT (CRECHES) 


Lethukuthula Creche 
Qhilika Creche (priority) 
Bonisani Creche 
Vulinqondo Creche 


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Annexure J2: Broad Ward Needs (As Per CBP) 



Cemeteries & Fencing 

Nqeleni; Ndlangubo; Fasimba; Mngampondo; 
Mkhuliphangwenya & Bonisani 


HEALTH FACILITY 


Mobile Clinic 
Wheelchairs 


EDUCATION 


Primary School 


SPORTS & RECREATION 


Mandlovu Sportsfield 
Mngampondo Sportfield 
Manyathi Sportsfield 
Ufasimba Sportsfield 
KwaBulawayo Sportfield 
Mkhuphulangwenya Sportsfield 


BUSINESS CENTRES 


Ndlangubo Market / Trading Centre, 


SAFETY & SECURITY 


Satelite Office 
Police station 
Road signs 
CPF: Crime 


AGRICULTURAL FACILITY 


Ofasimba; Mngampondo; Vulinqondo; 

Ndlangubo & Mnyathi Community Gardens 

Training of dress makers and sewing machines to be obtained 

Siyaphambili Operators (50 Job opportunities) 

Masibambisane (Bush Clearing) - 50 job opportunities 


COMMUNITY ISSUES 


Recycling 


SOCIAL SERVICES ISSUES 


Flome Affairs 

Jobs creation / Employment: EPWP (FFW&WAP) 


351 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

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Basamlilo -Phasel (Bhekeshowe) 
Mpehlela Road (Priority 1) 


ROADS BY MUNICIPALITY 


1. EIomoya Road 

2. Mvini Road 
B.Mpongo Road 

A. Mpehlela Road 

B. MdIalose 

G. Edipha Emaqhwakazi 
7. KwaBhonga 

S.Ebele Road & Causeway (Priority 2) 

9. Enqoleni 

10. Ematheku 

H. Maqhwakazi and Khabingwe Rehabilitation (Priority 3) 
Habeni Road Rehabilitation Xulu to Edipha (Priority 1 ) 
Roads Rehabilitation 


ELECTRICITY 


Elomoya to Mpehlela 

Ondini 

Ehlanzeni 

Empongo & Ubhonga 
Khabingwe 
Maqhwakazi 
Ebele Infills 


WATER 


WARD 2A, 25 & 26 - Mpungose Phase 1 D Reticulation ((Kwahlokohloko 55A 2&3) - Habeni, Ngodini, Ematsheni, 
Ntsheluntshelu, Mnqadayi, Enqoleni, Nomyaca, Mashishi, Khabingwe, Emgoswaneni, Elemoya 

Empongo 

Ebele 

KwaBhonga 


SANITATION 


Elomoya (Partial) 

Elomoya (Partial) 

Habeni 

Emgoswaneni 
Mpehlela (Partial) 

Maqhwakazi 

Khabingwe 

Reconstruction of toilets (whole ward) 


COMMUNITY SERVICE FACILITIES 


Skills development centre (KwaBulawayo) 


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Annexure J2: Broad Ward Needs (As Per CBP) 



Ebele Creche 
Matsheni Creche 
Ezimpongo Creche (Priority 3) 
Ngqayizivele Creche 
Ondini Creche (Priority 2) 
Ekhabingwe Creche 
Mgoswaneni Creche (Priority 1) 
Maqhwakazi Creche (Priority A ) 


HEALTH FACILITIES 


Clinics 


SPORTS & RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 


KwaBulawayo Sports Complex (Priority) 


AGRICULTURAL FACILITIES 


Stock dams 

Fencing of Community gardens 

Ebaleni Nursery (vegetables / fruits/ medicinal) 


EDUCATION 


High school (Ngqayizivele ) 

Training of dress makers and sewing machines to be obtained 


COMMUNITY ISSUES 


Community project- poultry 


AGRICULTURAL ISSUES 


Farmer support (Masibambisane) 


TRANSPORTS & ROADS ISSUES 


Zibambele programme 



LI 330 Road 
A1622 Road 
LI 750 Road 

Bridge linking Ward 26 to R34 


ROADS BY MUNICIPALITY 


Encemaneni Road 

Emvini Road & Causeway 

Ngodini/Ewema Causeway 

Estolo (Kwa Mbuyisa)/Ngodini 

Edukwaneni 

Ndongande 

Ntsheluntshelu/ Mbizane Causeway 


353 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

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Nqoleni to Kwa Nomyaca 
Unpaved Road Maintenance (Graders) 


ELECTRICITY 


Engodini Ennakhulwini (6); Ennvini/Ewema (24) - are 200m away from existing power line. 
KwaNomyaca; Mnqadayi; Nqoleni; Ncemaneni; Ecekeni; Ntsheluntshelu; Basamlilo 


WATER BUDGETED BY UTHUNGULU 


WARD 24,25 & 26 Mpungose Phase 1D Reticulation ((Kwahlokohloko 55A 2&3) - Habeni(Ward25), Ngodini, Ematsheni (Ward 
24), Ecekeni, Ntsheluntshelu, Mqadayi, Enqoleni, Nomyaca, Mashishi(Ward 24), Khabingwe(ward 25), Emgoswaneni(Ward25), 
Elemoya(Ward25) add Ncemaneni, 

Kwahlokohloko 55A 1 (Wards: 9;10;14&26) - Mandawe; Mbizo 2; Ncemaneni; Esiphezi; Zigagayi; Emaqeleni; KwaMpofu; 
Thintumkhaba; Eziqwaqweni; Mhlathuzana; Mtiloombo 

Increase of water pipe-lines capacity by bigger pipes 
Ncemaneni, 

Kwampofu, Ngodini , Mnqadayi ,Cekeni,Basamlilo,Ntsheluntshelu & Nqoleni add Nomyaca 


SANITATION BUDGETED BY UTHUNGULU 


Ncemaneni; Ntsheluntshelu; Mqadayi; Cekeni; Nomyaca; Nqoleni; Basamlilo; Engodini 


COMMUNITY SERVICE FACILITIES 


Kwabhekeshowe Rural Housing (ward 24, 26) 


CRECHES / ECD (EARLY CHILDHOOD DEV. CENTRES) 


Ncemaneni 

Nqoleni 

Mnqadayi 

Ecekeni 

Nomyaca 

Ntsheluntshelu Creche 


COMMUNITY HALLS 


eNgodini/Nqoleni 

Ntsheluntshelu 

Basamlilo 


HEALTH FACILITIES 


Ntsheluntshelu + Basamlilo Mobile Clinic operating under tree 
Engodini Clinic Mobile clinic operating at the creche 
Encemaneni Clinic operating at the hall 
Hospice Enqoleni 


BUSINESS CENTRES 


Enqoleni Shoping Complex 


SPORTS & RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 


KwaNomyaca Stadium: Combo Courts 

Ncemaneni 

Ngodini 

Ntsheluntshelu 

Nqoleni 

Mnqadayi 


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Annexure J2: Broad Ward Needs (As Per CBP) 



Stock dams: (Ncemaneni, Ngodini, Mnqadayi, Nqoleni) 

Fencing of grazing campslNcemaneni ,Nomvaca) 

Ncemaneni Community Garden 

Ngodini Community Garden 

Cekeni Community Garden 

Nomyaca Community Garden 

Dipping tanks (Ngodini, Mnqadayi & Ncemaneni) 


EDUCATION 


eNcemaneni High School 

Ntsheluntshelu Classrooms (Grade R - Grade A ) 

Basamlilo Technical School 

Learner Transport (Ntsheluntshelu, Cekeni, Mnqadayi) 
Nqoleni Library PRIORITY 


LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 


EPWP (FFW & WAP) 

CWP (Ngodini & Ncemaneni) 
Training of Co-Operatives 


355 UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY - INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2016 - 2017 

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