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Full text of "Release abatement measure plan : pre-construction remediation activities (Former) Everett Staging Yard, 1 Horizon Way, Everett, Massachusetts / [prepared for: Massachusetts Department of Environmenta Protection, Bureau of Waste Site Cleanup, Northeast Regional Office ; prepared by: GZA"

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August 18, 2015 
GZA File No: 01.00171521.10 

Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection 
Bureau of Waste Site Cleanup 
Northeast Regional Office 
205B Lowell Street 
Wilmington, Massachusetts 01887 

Re: Release Abatement Measure Plan 

Pre-Construction Remediation Activities 
(Former) Everett Staging Yard 
1 Horizon Way 
Everett, Massachusetts 
Release Tracking Number 3-13341 

To Whom It May Concern: 

GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc. (GZA), on behalf of Wynn MA, LLC (Wynn MA), has prepared this 
Release Abatement Measure (RAM) Plan to describe those Response Actions pursuant to the 
Massachusetts Contingency Plan (MCP) that will be completed prior to the initiation of the 
construction of the Wynn Resort in Everett on the land-side portion of the above-referenced 
Disposal Site (the Site). Additional Response Actions will be the subject of future submittals under 
the MCP. 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 


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Soil, groundwater, and sediment at the Disposal Site have been contaminated by historic 
activities, including the former use of the Site as a chemical manufacturing facility. The activities 
described in this RAM Plan will reduce the risks associated with soil and groundwater 
contamination in three areas of the Site identified as the A-5 Area, the CES-2 Area, and the Low 
pH Area. Soil containing elevated concentrations of arsenic and lead in the A-5 Area will be 
excavated and disposed of off-Site. Elevated concentrations of arsenic in soil and groundwater in 
the CES-2 Area will be addressed through a combination of the excavation and disposal of soil off- 
Site. Soil and groundwater in the Low pH Area will be treated using in-situ 
solidification/stabilization (ISS) to both reduce the ability of groundwater to flow through the 
Area, and raise the pH to limit the further mobilization of metals from soil to groundwater. During 
the RAM activities, real-time perimeter air monitoring will be conducted to assure the protection 
of both on-Site workers and off-Site residents. 

INTRODUCTION 

A Site Locus Map is presented as Figure 1; an Exploration Location Plan is included as Figure 2; 
and the areas that will be subject to the provisions of this RAM Plan are delineated on Figure 3. 
This RAM Plan has been prepared in accordance with 310 CMR 40.0444 of the MCP, and with the 
Limitations in Appendix A. This RAM Plan will be submitted electronically through MassDEP's 








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Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection 

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eDEP online filing system. A copy of the RAM transmittal form (BWSC-106) is included in 
Appendix B. 

The Disposal Site has been designated as a Public Involvement Plan (PIP) Site in accordance with 
Section 40.1404 of the MCP. A draft version of this RAM Plan was presented at a public meeting 
on June 2, 2015, at 7:00 PM in the third-floor City Council Chamber at Everett City Hall, at 
484 Broadway. The original comment period for the RAM Plan ended on June 22, 2015; however, 
at the request of the PIP petitioners, the comment period was extended to July 22, 2015. A list of 
comments received, and responses to those comments, is included as Appendix C. 

This RAM Plan relies on information presented in prior reports submitted for the Disposal Site, 
including: 

• Phase I Initial Site Investigation Report, Alford Street, Everett, Massachusetts, prepared by 
Consulting Engineers & Scientists, Inc. (CES) and dated January 15,1997; 

• Phase II - Comprehensive Site Assessment, Everett Staging Yard, Chemical Lane, Everett 
Massachusetts, DEP RTN 3-13341, prepared by Tetra Tech Rizzo (TTR) and dated December 
26, 2007; 

• Phase II Comprehensive Site Assessment, Everett Staging Yard, 1 Horizon Way, Everett, 
Massachusetts, MassDEP RTN 3-13341, prepared by GEI Consultants, Inc. (GEI) and dated 
February 10, 2012; and 

• Phase III Remediation Action Plan, Everett Staging Yard, 1 Horizon Way, Everett, 
Massachusetts, MassDEP RTN 3-13341, prepared by GEI and dated August 27, 2013. 

The following sections of this submittal are intended to address the specific requirements for a 
RAM Plan under 310 CMR 40.0444. 

PERSON ASSUMING RESPONSIBILITY FOR RAM 

The entity assuming responsibility for this RAM is Wynn MA, LLC. Information for Wynn MA's 
contact person is provided below: 

Mr. Robert DeSalvio 

President 

Wynn MA, LLC 

3131 Las Vegas Boulevard South 
Las Vegas, Nevada 89109 
Tel: 702-770-7000 

DESCRIPTION OF RELEASE, SITE CONDITIONS AND SURROUNDING RECEPTORS 

The following sections provide a description of the Site and surrounding area conditions, the Site 
and regulatory history (including a description of the release being addressed by the RAM), and 
the results of recent subsurface assessment activities. 


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SITE AND SURROUNDING AREA CONDITIONS 


This RAM Plan addresses certain conditions on the land-side portion of the Site, which includes 
approximately 25 acres of land within the City of Everett (Figure 1). The latitude and longitude 
for the Site are 42.395 degrees north and 71.069 degrees west, respectively. The Universal 
Transverse Mercator (UTM) coordinates are 4,695,683 meters north and 329,684 meters east. 
Access to the land-side portion of the Site is limited by the presence of a chain-link fence with two 
gates: one gate is in the eastern portion of the Site, along Horizon Way, and the second gate is 
located on the northern portion of the Site across an extension of Horizon Way. The ground 
surface at the Site is generally bituminous pavement (center), unpaved, or compacted coarse 
gravel. The ground surface at the land-side portion of the Site is generally flat with a gentle slope 
toward the southwest. Based on an April 2013 survey prepared by Harry R. Feldman, Inc. 
(Professional Land Surveyors), ground surface elevations on the land-side portion of the Site range 
from approximately 8 to 13 feet NAVD88. 

The Site is adjoined to the northeast by a vehicle maintenance and repair facility operated by the 
Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA); to the southeast by properties along Alford 
Street, including a vacant commercial building and facilities operated by the Boston Water and 
Sewer Commission (BWSC) and the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA); to the 
southwest by the Mystic River; and to the northwest by railroad tracks for the MBTA Commuter 
Rail, beyond which are several large commercial/retail buildings associated with the Gateway 
Center. 

The Site is located within the Boston Basin, a regional depression of bedrock consisting primarily 
of Cambridge Argillite, a partially metamorphosed siltstone. Site conditions generally consist of 
fill over a variable sequence of naturally deposited organics, sand and gravel, and silty clay over 
weathered rock and bedrock. Filling over naturally deposited materials occurred in the area of 
the Site from the late 1800s through the early 1960s. More recent naturally deposited sediments 
along the shoreline include sand, silt, and organics. 

Depth to groundwater ranges from approximately 4 to 10 feet. Groundwater at the Site flows 
generally toward the east on the southern portion of the Site and generally toward the south on 
the northern portion of the Site. 

According to a Massachusetts Geographic Information System (MassGIS) map, a copy of which is 
included in Appendix D, the Site is not located in or within 500 feet of a Zone II public water supply, 
potentially productive aquifer, a Zone A surface water body, an Interim Wellhead Protection Area, 
a protected wetlands habitat, or an Area of Critical Environmental Concern. Protected open space 
associated with Gateway Park is located approximately 400 feet to the northwest of the Site. 

SITE AND REGULATORY HISTORY 


Investigations conducted between 1995 and the present have identified several contaminants in 
soil, groundwater, and sediments at the Disposal Site, including metals, volatile organic 
compounds (VOCs), volatile petroleum hydrocarbon (VPH) fractions and target analytes, semi¬ 
volatile organic compounds (SVOCs), extractable petroleum hydrocarbon (EPH) fractions and 


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target analytes, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The sources of contamination at the 
Disposal Site include past industrial operations, leakage from a former aboveground storage tank 
(AST), and the placement of contaminated fill. According to historic reports, the Site was occupied 
by the Cochran Chemical Company, the Merrimac Chemical Company and the Monsanto Chemical 
Company from the late 1800s until the late 1960s. The buildings on the land-side portion of the 
Site were razed in the 1970s. The land-side portion of the Site has been used primarily as a 
material storage and staging yard since the mid-1990s when rock and fine-grained sediment 
("tunnel muck") from the construction of the Deer Island Outfall was stockpiled on it in a 1- to 7- 
foot thick layer. There are currently no buildings at the Site. 

In 1995, Consulting Engineers and Scientists, Inc. (CES) of Lakeville, Massachusetts, performed a 
limited subsurface investigation at the Site prior to it being used as the tunnel muck stockpile 
area. Arsenic and lead concentrations in soil samples collected during the investigation exceeded 
the applicable MCP Reportable Concentrations (RCS-2). On January 18,1996, O'Donnell Sand and 
Gravel ("O'Donnell"), the property owner at the time, submitted a Release Notification Form 
(RNF) to MassDEP, and MassDEP assigned RTN 3-13341 to the release. Later in 1996, the 
excavated tunnel muck and rock were stockpiled and/or spread across the upland portion of the 
Site. In mid-1999, tunnel muck from the Site was used to cap a separate portion of the former 
Monsanto property, located across the railroad tracks and west of the Site, as part of the 
construction of the Gateway Center Mall, but a 1- to 7-foot thick layer of the tunnel muck remains 
at the Site. 

In December 1996, CES conducted a Phase I Initial Site Investigation (ISI). Arsenic and lead 
concentrations in the soil exceeded the applicable RCS-2 standards, and dissolved arsenic and 
lead in groundwater exceeded the RCGW-2 standard. In January 1997, on behalf of O'Donnell, 
CES submitted a Phase I ISI and Tier Classification (Phase I report) to MassDEP. The Disposal Site 
was classified as a Tier II Disposal Site. The Phase I report identified arsenic, lead, and low pH as 
contaminants of concern (COCs). O'Donnell submitted a Phase II Extension Request to MassDEP 
in February 1999 and sold the property to Mystic Landing, LLC ("Mystic Landing") in 2001. 

In 2001, on behalf of Mystic Landing, Rizzo Associates (a predecessor to Tetra Tech Rizzo, Inc. of 
Framingham, Massachusetts ("Tetra Tech Rizzo")) performed a limited subsurface investigation 
at the Site, including the collection of soil and groundwater samples. The findings of the 
subsurface investigation were similar to CES's findings. Between 2005 and 2007, Tetra Tech Rizzo 
conducted additional subsurface investigations, including the collection of additional soil, 
groundwater and sediment samples. The results of these investigations were also generally 
consistent with those from previous sampling rounds. 

In June and July 2007, Williams Environmental, Inc. (Williams) conducted a supplemental 
subsurface investigation at the Site, including the excavation of 40 test pits and the collection of 
soil, groundwater and sediment samples. As with previous analyses of environmental media 
conducted at the Site, lead and arsenic were the contaminants detected at the highest 
concentrations and with the greatest frequency. 

In December 2007, on behalf of Mystic Landing, Tetra Tech Rizzo submitted a Phase II 
Comprehensive Site Assessment (Phase II CSA) and Tier II Extension Request to MassDEP. The 


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Human Health Risk Assessment included in Tetra Tech Rizzo's CSA concluded that there was No 
Significant Risk (NSR) and No Substantial Hazard associated with the current use of the Site as a 
construction material storage yard or for similar uses that did not disturb the surficial layer of 
tunnel muck. 

FBT Everett Realty, LLC (FBT) purchased the Site from Mystic Landing in October 2009. On 
February 11, 2010, GEI Consultants, Inc. (GEI) submitted an Eligible Person Certification and 
Revised Tier Classification Submittal to MassDEP on behalf of FBT. The Disposal Site remained a 
Tier II Disposal Site based on the Revised Tier Classification Submittal and, pursuant to 310 CMR 
40.0570, the deadlines for conducting response actions at the Disposal Site were re-established. 
Wynn MA is also an Eligible Person as discussed on page 10 of this RAM Plan. 

In February 2012, GEI submitted a Phase II CSA based only on data previously developed by others 
because GEI's access to the Site was reportedly denied by the Site occupant. As part of the Phase 

II CSA, GEI conducted a Method 3 Risk Characterization which concluded that a Condition of NSR 
to human health existed at the Site for most of the then current uses of the Site, but that NSR 
could not be demonstrated for foreseeable future Site uses. NSR could not be demonstrated for 
future commercial workers or future visitors exposed to site-wide soils, for future construction 
workers exposed to site-wide soils or shallow groundwater, or for utility workers exposed to soil, 
shallow groundwater, or ambient air within a potential utility trench in a specific area near the 
northern corner of the Site. 

Because of the delay in obtaining access to the Site, FBT filed a Notification of Delay with MassDEP, 
requesting that the deadline for the Phase III - Remedial Action Plan (RAP) be extended from 
February 2013 to June 2013, and that the deadline for the Phase IV - Remedy Implementation 
Plan (RIP) be extended from February 2014 to June 2014. FBT subsequently filed a second 
Notification of Delay requesting that the Phase III RAP deadline be extended to September 2013, 
and the Phase IV deadline be extended to June 11, 2015. 

GEI conducted additional soil and groundwater investigations in December 2012 and March 2013. 
These investigations included the installation of a series of soil borings and monitoring wells on 
the land-side portion of the Site, and the collection and analysis of soil and groundwater samples. 
The results of the additional investigations were generally consistent with those previously 
documented. GEI also conducted a bench scale evaluation of in-situ solidification/stabilization 
(ISS) of soils as a remedial alternative for certain areas of the Site. On August 30, 2013, FBT filed 
a Phase III RAP for the Site outlining the selected Remedial Action Alternatives (RAA). The Phase 

III RAP identified three areas of concern to be addressed to reach a Permanent Solution under the 
MCP on the land-side portion of the Site. These areas are depicted on Figure 3, and are described 
below. For the water-side portion of the Disposal Site, GEI selected "Further Assessment and 
Monitoring" as the recommended RAA, indicating that this approach would initially result in a 
Temporary Solution, but that the "remediation planned on the land-side portion of the Site is 
likely to change conditions on the water-side portion of the Site and this RAA will allow the impact 
of those changes to be evaluated." 


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The three land-side areas identified in the Phase III RAP are as follows: 

A-5 Area: The A-5 area is situated in the northern portion of the Site in the vicinity of previous 
exploration location A-5, where lead and arsenic concentrations (216,000 and 153,000 mg/kg, 
respectively) were detected in a soil sample obtained by Williams in 2007 from approximately 
8 feet below ground surface (bgs). GEI conducted several rounds of soil sampling in the A-5 area 
in an attempt to duplicate the original sample and to delineate the impacts in this area. However, 
GEI was unable to duplicate the elevated A-5 results. Arsenic concentrations in the samples 
collected by GEI were lower than the initial A-5 analytical results by two orders of magnitude or 
more, but many were above the Upper Concentration Limit (UCL) of 500 mg/kg. Similarly, lead 
concentrations in the samples collected by GEI were lower than the initial A-5 analytical results 
but many exceeded the UCL of 6,000 mg/kg. No specific source for the elevated arsenic and lead 
levels has been identified, and the impacts appear to be random and related to fill material. 
Groundwater samples collected from this area have not indicated concentrations of metals above 
the applicable Method 1 GW-3 Standards. GZA has conducted additional soil sampling (discussed 
below) in the A-5 Area to further delineate the extent of releases in the area. 

CES-2 Area: The CES 2 area is situated in the northern portion of the peninsula, in the vicinity of 
previous exploration CES-2. Arsenic has been detected in both soil and groundwater in this area. 
The highest concentration of arsenic in soil (9,470 mg/kg) was observed in CES-2-3, while the 
maximum dissolved concentration of arsenic (114,000 ug/L) was detected in a groundwater 
sample from CES-2-2. Unlike the Low pH area (see below), soil and groundwater pH levels in the 
CES-2 area are relatively neutral, ranging from 4.74 to 6.82. GZA has conducted additional 
assessments of the CES-2 Area to determine the extent of this area that are discussed below. 

Low pH Area: The Low pH Area includes the southern corner of the peninsula where the pH has 
been measured to be at or below 4, with the lowest levels detected at the southern end in 
SHORE-9. Overall, the pH of groundwater in the land-side portion of the Site ranges from 1.63 to 
7.93. Dissolved arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, nickel and zinc, along with total cyanide, have 
been detected above the applicable Method 1 GW-3 Standards, with the concentrations of 
arsenic, cadmium and lead in groundwater samples from certain wells above their respective 
UCLs. As indicated in the Phase III RAP, a plot of dissolved lead concentrations against pH indicates 
a strong correlation between pH below 4 and dissolved lead concentrations above the UCL. GZA 
has conducted additional assessment in this area to further delineate the extent of groundwater 
with a pH below 4. 

Based on the results of the Method 3 Risk Characterization Update in the Phase III RAP, the 
following Remedial Objectives were identified: 


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Location 

Remedial Objective Description 

Media 

Primary 

Constituents 

of Concern 

A-5 Area 

• Reduce soil concentrations to below 

UCLs 

• Remove soil with arsenic and lead 
concentrations similar to sample A-5 

• Reduce risk for future construction 

workers 

Soil 

Arsenic 

Lead 

CES-2 Area 

• Remove potential source material 

• Reduce groundwater concentrations 

to below UCLs 

• Reduce risk for future construction 

workers 

Soil 

Groundwate 

r 

Arsenic 

Lead 

Low pH 

Area 

• Treat potential source material 

• Reduce groundwater concentrations 
to below UCLs 

• Adjust pH to greater than 
approximately 4 

Soil 

Groundwate 

r 

Arsenic 

Lead 

Low pH 


The remedial alternative selected by GEI for the land-side portion of the Site included the in-situ 
solidification/stabilization (ISS) of contaminated soil in the Low pH Area and CES-2 Area, and the 
excavation and off-site disposal of contaminated soil from the A-5 Area. However, as discussed 
below, GZA proposes to excavate and dispose of soil from the CES-2 Area; because of the more 
complicated geochemistry of arsenic, excavation and removal is a more appropriate option for 
achieving the remedial objectives described above. 

RECENT SUBSURFACE ASSESSMENT ACTIVITIES 


The following sections summarize recent subsurface assessment activities. 

A-5 Area 

On October 31 and November 3, 2014, GZA engaged New England Boring Contractors 
(NEB) of Brockton, Massachusetts to install 12 soil borings, GZ101 through GZ112, at the Site to 
further assess the areal extent of lead and arsenic impacts in soil in the A-5 Area. The soil borings 
were installed using a GeoProbe* direct-push rig; soils were sampled continuously throughout the 
borings and logged by a GZA representative. Soil borings were advanced to approximately 12 
feet bgs. Boring locations are shown on Figure 2 and boring logs are included in Appendix E. 
Subsurface conditions observed during drilling included varying thicknesses of tunnel muck, fill, 
organics, clayey silt and silty clay, with a fine to medium sand layer observed in several of the 
borings. The fill ranged in thickness from approximately 4 to 8 feet, and was underlain by a layer 
of peat. 


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Selected soil samples were field-screened for total VOC vapors using a PID. Field screening 
results were below the detection limits (BDL) of the PID unit for samples from soil borings GZ101 
to GZ105, GZ107, and GZ109 to GZ111; readings ranged from BDL to 20.2 ppm in boring GZ106, 
from BDL to 11.1 ppm in boring GZ108, and from BDL to 0.9 ppm in boring GZ112. Soil samples 
were collected at approximate 2-foot intervals from each of the borings and submitted to ESS 
Laboratory (ESS) of Cranston, Rhode Island for analysis of total arsenic and total lead. Analytical 
data are summarized on Table 1, and analytical laboratory reports are included in Appendix F. 

The laboratory analytical results indicated that concentrations of both arsenic and lead 
were present above laboratory detection limits in all soil samples analyzed. Soil samples exceeded 
the MCP S-2/GW-3 Standards for arsenic (20 mg/kg) in at least three samples from each of the 
12 borings, and exceeded the UCL for arsenic (500 mg/kg) in borings GZ101 to GZ106, GZ109, 
GZ111 and GZ112. The highest concentrations of arsenic were detected in samples collected from 
boring GZ102, with a maximum detection of 13,500 mg/kg reported for the 2- to 4-foot bgs 
interval. Arsenic concentrations dropped significantly within the underlying natural materials; the 
highest arsenic concentration in samples obtained at or below 10 feet bgs was 17 mg/kg. 

Laboratory analytical results indicated that concentrations of lead exceeded MCP 
S-2/GW-3 Standards (500 mg/kg) in at least two samples from each of the 12 borings performed, 
and exceeded the applicable UCL (9,000 mg/kg) in borings GZ102 and GZ111. The highest 
concentrations of lead were detected in boring GZ102, with a maximum detection of 
21,900 mg/kg in the 2- to 4-foot bgs interval. As with arsenic, lead concentrations dropped 
significantly within the natural materials. The highest lead concentration in samples obtained at 
or below 10 feet bgs was 48.4 mg/kg. 

Based on the analytical data developed as part of recent assessment activities, the A-5 
Area has been expanded southerly to include exploration locations GZ101, GZ102 and GZ103, and 
is bounded by explorations A-5-2, A-5-3, A-5-4, A-5-5, A-5-6, GZ104, GZ106, GZ107, GZ108, and 
GZ109. The average arsenic and lead concentrations in soil samples obtained from the top 10 
feet in this latter set of explorations were 157 mg/kg and 1,015 mg/kg, respectively. 

CES-2 Area 

On January 23, 2015, constant head hydraulic conductivity (K) testing was performed in 
two existing monitoring wells (CES-2-1 and CES-2-2) within the CES-2 Area, and in one well 
immediately outside of the CES-2 Area (BOR-109-3), to characterize the hydrogeologic properties 
of the shallow soils and to support groundwater flow calculations in preparation for dewatering 
of the area during remediation. At each monitoring well location, the initial depth-to-water level 
and total well depth were measured. A pressure transducer was then installed within the 
monitoring well approximately 1 to 5 feet from the bottom of the well. A submersible pump was 
installed in the well and set up to discharge water into a 5-gallon bucket. Once the water level in 
the monitoring well stabilized to the measured pre-test level, the pump was turned on to begin 
extracting water. The flow rate of the pump, as well as the groundwater level, were monitored to 
establish a groundwater level equal to approximately 2/3 of the length of the saturated portion 
of the well screen, when possible. The flow rate and hydraulic head were regularly recorded and 


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monitored for approximately 15 to 30 minutes to confirm a stabilized flow rate and hydraulic 
head. The procedure was reported three times at each well. Results of the sampling were used 
to calculate hydraulic conductivities using the Hvorslev constant head equation for a well point- 
filter in uniform soil. Average hydraulic conductivity estimates calculated from the test results for 
CES-2-1 and CES-2-2 were 0.06 and 0.43 feet/day, respectively. The average hydraulic 
conductivity calculated for BOR-109-3 was 17.77 feet/day; however, BOR-109-3 penetrated the 
fill layer and was screened in a sand layer beneath the fill. Information concerning the hydraulic 
conductivity calculations is included as Appendix G. 

Dewatering of the CES-2 excavation will be necessary to facilitate the excavation of the 
impacted soils. GZA prepared a numerical groundwater flow model for the Site using Modflow 
and GMS software. The model was developed using available geologic and hydrogeologic 
information from the Site (e.g., soil boring and monitoring well logs, groundwater flow, hydraulic 
conductivity, and tidal information). The steady-state flow model included an evaluation of 
groundwater extraction rates needed to dewater the CES-2 remedial area to an elevation 
of -6 feet (NAVD88), assuming cutoff walls would be footed in the underlying organic silt layer on 
the southwestern, southeastern, and northeastern sides of the excavation. Results of the model 
indicated that a groundwater extraction rate between 0.3 and 2 gallons per minute will be 
required. 

Low pH Area 

On November 5, 6, 7 and 10, 2014, GZA engaged NEB to install 14 soil borings (GZ201 to 
GZ214). These borings were performed to further assess the extent of the Low pH Area in the 
southern peninsula. Boring locations were selected outside of the proposed GEI treatment area 
to assess the extent of groundwater with a pH of 4 or less. The soil borings were executed using 
a drill rig equipped with hollow-stem augers. Soils were characterized by a GZA representative by 
a combination of split spoon sampling and drill cutting observations. Soil borings extended to 
depths of 14 to 17 feet below bgs. Selected soil samples were field-screened for total VOC vapors 
using a PID; all results were below the PID unit detection limit of 0.1 parts per million (ppm). No 
laboratory analysis of soil samples was performed. Boring logs are included in Appendix E. 

Prior to work commencing on borings within the 100-foot Buffer Zone to Coastal Bank 
(Buffer Zone), and in accordance with Special Conditions amended to the Negative Determination 
of Applicability of the Wetlands Protection Act by the Everett Conservation Commission on 
October 23, 2014, Filtrexx erosion control socks were placed around the rig for those borings. 

Monitoring wells were installed in all 14 soil borings and were constructed using 2-inch 
diameter PVC wellscreen and riser. The annular space around each well casing was filled with 
clean silica sand, and a layer of bentonite was place above the sand. The well was backfilled to 
ground surface with excess drill cuttings, and was completed with a steel standpipe equipped with 
a locking cap. Well installations extended to the top of the naturally occurring material, and wells 
were screened across the water table. Screen depths extended to 15 feet bgs for all wells except 
GZ201, which was screened to 14 feet bgs where refusal was encountered. 


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The newly-installed monitoring wells were allowed to equilibrate for at least 60 hours 
prior to the collection of groundwater samples. On November 13, 2014, GZA collected 
groundwater samples from each of the newly installed wells using EPA Low Stress (low flow) 
sampling techniques. Field screening for pH during well purging indicated the range of pH at 
sampling was from 3.24 to 7.76, with only one well (GZ210) exhibiting a pH below 4. The samples 
were submitted to ESS for analysis of dissolved RCRA 8 metals and pH. Analytical data are 
summarized on Table 2, and analytical laboratory reports are included in Appendix F. 

Laboratory analytical results for pH ranged from 3.19 to 7.03, with only one well (GZ210) 
exhibiting a pH below 4. Laboratory analytical results indicated that all analytes were below 
applicable MCP Upper Concentration Limits (UCLs) for RCRA 8 Metals, but that Method 1 GW-3 
standards were exceeded for cadmium (maximum detection was 45.10 pg/L), lead (maximum 
detection was 49.2 pg/L), and arsenic (maximum detection was 4,370 pg/L). Exceedances of GW-3 
standards were observed in groundwater analytical results from monitoring wells GZ202, GZ206, 
GZ208, GZ209, GZ210, GZ211, GZ212 and GZ213, generally located in the southern and eastern 
areas of the peninsula. Based on these results, the ISS area has been extended to include GZ210. 

ELIGIBLE PERSON SUBMITTAL 


On January 2, 2015, Wynn MA acquired the portion of the Site in Everett, Massachusetts. On 
February 5, 2015, Wynn MA filed an Eligible Person Submittal and a Revised Tier II Classification 
with MassDEP for RTN 3-13341. 

OBJECTIVES, PLANS AND SCHEDULE 

The objective of this RAM Plan is the removal or encapsulation of contaminants in the areas 
identified in Figure 3 to achieve the remedial objectives identified on page 7. Specifically, the 
following scope of work for the RAM is proposed: 

• Excavation and off-Site disposal of soils from within the A-5 Area; 

• Excavation and off-Site disposal of soils from within the CES-2 Area; and 

• ISS of soils within the Low pH Area. 

The RAM is anticipated to begin in September 2015, with work in all three areas occurring 
concurrently. The anticipated duration of the RAM is approximately three to four months. 

Procedures to be employed for the completion of these tasks are outlined below. 

SITE PREPARATION 


Prior to the initiation of the RAM, erosion controls will be placed along the Mystic River as 
required under the Wetlands Protection Act (WPA) Order of Conditions issued authorizing these 
RAM activities (MassDEP File # 022-0095). Erosion controls for the excavation will consist of 
staked hay bales and silt fence placed immediately inward of the top of Coastal Bank along the 
Low pH Area and CES-2 Area. The Low pH, CES-2 Area and A-5 Area materials management areas 
(MMAs) will also be established at this time. The MMAs for the CES-2 Area and A-5 Area will be 


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lined with two layers of polyethylene sheeting (minimum 6-mil thickness). The Low pH area MMA 
will be used for the temporary storage of shallow soils (mainly tunnel muck) from above the 
treatment area and will not be lined. 

HEALTH AND SAFETY PROTOCOLS 


Excavation work in the RAM areas will be conducted by personnel trained to handle contaminated 
materials per Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Regulation 29 CFR 1910.120. 
Procedures will be followed to protect the health and safety of all on-site workers and the 
community. A Site-Specific Health and Safety Plan (HASP) specifying these procedures is attached as 
Appendix H. All personnel involved in the implementation of the RAM will be required to address 
the risks covered by the attached HASP. Procedures for the monitoring and control of fugitive dusts 
are outlined below. 

A-5 AREA EXCAVATION 


The RAM in the A-5 Area will consist of the excavation and off-Site disposal of soils. The duration 
of this element of the RAM is anticipated to be approximately 1 month. 

Soil in the A-5 Area will be excavated to an average depth of approximately 8 feet bgs 
(approximately 1 foot into the underlying peat layer). GZA anticipates that this excavation can be 
performed without dewatering because the depth to groundwater is 4 to 10 feet bgs. If 
dewatering is required, the dewatering water will be recharged immediately upgradient of the 
excavation in accordance with 310 CMR 40.0045. As discussed above, groundwater samples 
obtained from this area have not indicated concentrations of dissolved metals above Method 1 
GW-3 Standards. The excavated soil will be transported to the A-5 Area MMA identified on 
Figure 3 for characterization and subsequently transported off-Site for disposal as described 
below. The anticipated volume of soil to be disposed off-Site from this area is approximately 
1,800 cubic yards. 

The excavation will either be backfilled with existing on-Site material, or secured and incorporated 
into the planned excavation for a future subsurface parking garage. The method of excavation 
will be selected by the remediation contractor subject to the approval of the LSP and Wynn MA, 
and in compliance with the HASP. 

CES-2 AREA 


The RAM in the CES-2 Area will consist of the excavation and off-Site disposal of soils. The 
duration of this element of the RAM is expected to be from 1 to 2 months. 

Soil in the planned excavation area will be excavated to a depth of approximately 15 feet bgs. 
Because the depth of excavation will extend to, and below, the groundwater table and the 
excavation is proximate to the Mystic River, excavation shoring and dewatering will be required. 
Shoring is anticipated to consist of hot-rolled steel sheet piling with sealed interlocks to minimize 
groundwater infiltration. The sheeting will be installed along the waterside limit of the area to a 
depth of approximately 45 feet bgs; the actual depth of sheeting will depend on field conditions 


An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/VIH 




















































August 18, 2015 

Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection 

File No. 01.0171521.10 
Page / 12 

and the size of sheet-piling used. Additional sheeting will be installed approximately 
perpendicular to the shoreline, along the northern and southern extents of the planned 
excavation. The extent of proposed sheeting within the CES-2 area is depicted on Figure 3. 
Procedures for groundwater treatment and discharge are discussed below. 

After sheeting has been installed, overburden material from the top 6 feet will be excavated and 
stockpiled separately within the CES-2 MMA identified on Figure 3. This excavation work will 
include grading the slope in the western portion of the excavation area to allow equipment access. 
Excavation of impacted soils is expected to be conducted in narrow cells perpendicular (east-west 
direction) to the shore; each cell will be backfilled to pre-existing grades prior to the excavation 
of an adjacent cell. To the extent possible, on-Site materials will be used for backfill. This 
approach will minimize the need for bracing spans and increase excavation productivity; however, 
final excavation design will be developed by the remediation contractor subject to the approval 
of the LSP and Wynn MA, and in compliance with the HASP. 

Impacted soils will either be live loaded, or transported to the CES-2 MMA for temporary 
stockpiling before off-Site disposal. The anticipated volume of soil to be disposed off-Site from 
the CES-2 Area is approximately 4,500 cubic yards. 

Confirmatory soil samples will be obtained from the bottom of the excavation in the CES-2 Area. 
The specific number of samples collected will be dependent on the final size of the excavation. 
The soil samples will be analyzed for RCRA 8 metals to confirm that the remedial objectives have 
been met. 

Subsequent to the completion of the RAM activities outlined above, up to four monitoring wells 
will be installed in the CES-2 Area to assess groundwater conditions. Well locations will be 
dependent on field conditions, with consideration given to future redevelopment activities (for 
example, to facilitate future sampling, monitoring wells will not be installed in areas where 
significant vehicle access or materials storage is expected as part of construction). Existing wells 
remaining in place immediately outside of the CES-2 excavation area after remediation will be 
used to assess groundwater conditions outside of, but in proximity to the remediation area. 
Groundwater samples will be collected for analysis for dissolved RCRA-8 metals and pH to confirm 
the continued achievement of the remedial objectives. 

LOW PH AREA 


The RAM in the Low pH Area (groundwater with a pH of 4 or less) will consist of ISS. The duration 
of this element of the RAM is expected to be from 2 to 3 months. 

As detailed in the ISS bench scale testing report prepared by KEMRON in support of the GEI Phase 
III RAP, an ISS mixture consisting of 6% Type I Portland cement resulted in a treated material with 
an unconfined compressive strength (UCS) of 151.9 psi and a permeability of 3.4xl0' 7 centimeters 
per second (cm/sec). Testing performed on the leachates using the U.S. Environmental Protection 
Agency (EPA) Method 1315 leaching procedure showed that for the 6 % Type I Portland cement 
ISS mixture, lead was detected at only two intervals with a maximum concentration of 
0.005 milligrams per liter (mg/L), arsenic was detected at concentrations ranging from 0.012 to 


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August 18, 2015 

Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection 

File No. 01.0171521.10 
Page / 13 


0.084 mg/L, and cadmium was not reported above the detection limit of 0.0038 mg/L. These 
concentrations were significantly less than the lead, arsenic and cadmium UCLs of 0.15 mg/L, 
9.0 mg/L and 0.05 mg/L, respectively. These concentrations were also below the Method 1GW-3 
Standards for lead, arsenic, and cadmium of 0.01 mg/L, 0.09 mg/L and 0.004 mg/L, respectively. 
Additionally, the lead and arsenic concentrations in the leachate from the treated sample were a 
factor of 480 lower and a factor of 4 lower than the respective lead and arsenic concentrations in 
the leachate from the untreated sample. Finally, the pH of the leachate from the 6% Type I 
Portland cement ISS mixture ranged between 9.5 and 9.9. Taken collectively, these data indicate 
that ISS will achieve the remedial objectives. 

A sheet pile wall will be installed along the waterside limit of the ISS area to provide bank stability, 
minimize groundwater infiltration, and prevent or minimize the potential migration of 
stabilization chemicals introduced into the subsurface during the ISS process. The extent of 
proposed sheet pile wall within the Low pH Area is depicted on Figure 3. The sheeting will be 
installed along the waterside limit of the Low pH Area to a depth of approximately 20 feet bgs. 

After sheeting has been installed, the top 4 feet of soil will be excavated from within the planned 
treatment area and transported to the Low pH Area MMA identified on Figure 3 for temporary 
storage. Removing the top 4 feet of material will create a below-grade mixing platform to keep 
the ISS mixing process contained and to allow room for expansion of the solidified material. The 
ISS treatment zone will extend from the bottom of the excavation (i.e., 4 feet bgs) to 
approximately 1 foot into the silty sand unit underlying the fill material resulting in a treatment 
zone that extends from approximately 4 feet to 15 feet bgs. The ISS treated material will expand 
as part of the treatment and partially fill the space previously occupied by the excavated soil. At 
the completion of ISS, the sheeting will be removed and the surface of the ISS treated area will be 
re-graded to existing grades using the previously stockpiled overburden material. The anticipated 
volume of soil to be treated using ISS is approximately 19,000 cubic yards. 

Composite samples of treated soil will be collected during the implementation of ISS for quality 
assurance purposes. Field testing will include visual inspection for homogeneity and 
measurement of pH and will be performed as frequently as practicable, but not less than daily. 
Color will also be monitored but will not be used as a criterion for adequate ISS mixing due to the 
significant color contrast observed in soils on Site. The procedures for evaluating these criteria 
are: 

• Homogeneity : The treated material will first be visually inspected for overall mixing. The 
material should be thoroughly mixed into a homogeneous mass and be free from large lumps 
(greater than 3 inches) or pockets of fines, sand or gravel. Occasional lumps of up to 3 inches 
in their largest dimension will be permitted. Insufficiently homogeneous mixtures will be 
rejected, and the cell will be remixed and re-sampled. 

• jdIH: The pH of the treated material will be measured using short (6 to 9 and 9 to 12) range pH 
strips. Samples with a pH less than 10.5 standard units (S.U.) will be considered not 
adequately mixed. If the pH is below 10.5 S.U., then the grout quantity will be checked, the 
cell remixed (with added grout, if needed), and additional samples collected. 


An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/VIH 








































August 18, 2015 

Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection 

File No. 01.0171521.10 
Page / 14 

If the field evaluation indicates that the treated materials fail one or more of these criteria, the 
ISS cell will be considered not adequately mixed, and the contractor will be instructed to reprocess 
it. Following re-mixing of the cell, another set of representative samples will be collected from 
the remixed cell and subjected to the inspection described above. 

To evaluate the effectiveness of ISS, the area will be divided into approximately 50 foot by 50 foot 
grids, and one sample of treated material will be collected from each grid. We will submit these 
samples to a laboratory to be evaluated for UCS and pH. The ISS performance standards will be 
considered met if he average UCS is greater than 50 psi after either 14 or 28 days. 

Subsequent to completion of the RAM activities outlined above, a network of monitoring wells 
will be installed along the perimeter of the treated area to assess groundwater conditions. Well 
locations will be dependent on field conditions, with consideration given to future redevelopment 
activities (for example, to facilitate future sampling, monitoring wells will not be installed in areas 
where significant vehicle access or materials storage is expected as part of construction). Existing 
wells remaining in place immediately outside of the ISS area after remediation will be used to 
assess groundwater conditions outside of, but in proximity to the remediation area. Groundwater 
samples will be collected on a quarterly basis for at least one year for analysis for dissolved RCRA 8 
metals and pH to confirm the achievement of the remedial objectives. 

REMEDIATION WASTE MANAGEMENT 

The following sections outline proposed procedures for the management of remediation waste 
during implementation of the RAM. 

SOIL MANAGEMENT 


An excavated materials management plan (MMP) is included as Appendix I. Excavated soil from 
each remediation area will be transported to the designated MMA and stockpiled for 
characterization (for soils within the impacted zones) or potential future reuse (for overburden 
material). Based on visual assessment, tunnel muck material will be stockpiled separately from 
other excavated materials. 

Representative samples from the stockpiled materials to be disposed of off-Site will be collected 
and analyzed for disposal-related parameters to identify appropriate licensed disposal facilities to 
receive the stockpiled material. 

Based on the data from the initial investigations at the Site, the A-5 and CES-2 soil may contain 
lead levels exceeding the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) criterion. If this is the 
case, we will evaluate possible on-Site treatment options (e.g., stabilization) prior to transport 
and disposal off-Site. The treatment of excavated soil will employ an in-situ chemical treatment 
process (known as the MAECTITE® process) that converts lead to an insoluble form. Treatment 
chemicals are applied directly to the stockpiled soils in liquid form and then mechanically mixed 
with the soil. The treated material is then analyzed for TCLP lead to verify the effectiveness of the 
process. This is a commonly used technique for addressing leachable metals that GZA has used 
successfully at several sites in Massachusetts. 


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August 18, 2015 

Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection 

File No. 01.0171521.10 
Page / 15 


The appropriate licensed disposal facilities, and the need for any on-Site treatment prior to 
transport, will be identified based on the analyses of representative samples of the stockpiled 
material. 

Soil transported off-Site will be handled in accordance with the Bill of Lading (BOL) procedures 
specified in the MCP at 310 CMR 40.0030. Each load of soil transported for disposal will be 
accompanied by the appropriate BOL form. The form will be prepared and stamped by GZA's 
Licensed Site Professional, and Wynn MA will be designated as the soil generator. The endorsed 
tracking/receipt forms issued by the licensed disposal facility will be included in the RAM 
Completion Report. 

GROUNDWATER MANAGEMENT 


Dewatering effluent will be managed by on-site treatment and up-gradient discharge to an on¬ 
site recharge area or by off-site transport and disposal. Dewatering is anticipated for the CES-2 
Area, and may also be required, but is not expected, for the A-5 Area. No dewatering is 
anticipated for the Low pH Area. 

Dewatering effluent from the CES-2 area recharged on-site will be required to meet MCP GW-3 
standards. The effluent discharged to the on-site recharge area will be sampled and tested for 
dissolved lead, dissolved arsenic, and pH on approximately day 1, day 3, day 6, and weekly for the 
first month of discharge, and at approximately 30-day intervals after that. In accordance with the 
MCP (310 CMR 40.0045[4][a]&[b]), hydraulic containment of groundwater will be maintained so 
that the up-gradient discharge of dewatering effluent to the recharge area is contained or 
recaptured within the boundaries of the Site. The contractor will prepare a recharge area design 
for approval by the LSP and Wynn MA, and in compliance with the HASP. 

A preliminary review of groundwater data from the CES-2 Area suggests that, in order to meet 
effluent limits, the treatment train will likely include equalization, metals precipitation through 
clarification, filtration and sludge management, cyanide destruction through a two stage 
oxidation process, arsenic polishing by ion exchange or adsorbent resin, and neutralization. Bench 
scale testing of the proposed effluent treatment will be conducted to assess treatment options 
and effectiveness. 

Dewatering water, treated or not, that does not meet any one of the discharge criteria may be 
transported off-site for disposal under an appropriate waste manifest. 

ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PLAN 

The following environmental monitoring plan will be implemented during RAM activities at the 
Site. 


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August 18, 2015 

Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection 

File No. 01.0171521.10 
Page / 16 


WORK ZONE AIR MONITORING 


Real time particulate (dust) monitoring will be conducted within the work zone during soil 
excavation and handling activities using a direct reading instrument (TSI Dusttrack II Aerosol 
Monitor 8530 or equivalent) for particulate matter. Although air monitoring during the bench 
scale ISS program conducted by KEMRON did not indicate detectable concentrations of hydrogen 
cyanide (HCN) or hydrogen sulfide (H2S) during the mixing process, real time monitoring for HCN 
and H2S will be conducted during ISS implementation using a MultiRAE Lite Model PGM 620X or 
equivalent. 

PERIMETER AIR MONITORING 


The work zone monitoring will be augmented with an AirLogics automated real-time Site perimeter 
air monitoring system operated throughout the duration of the remedial work. The data collected 
by the AirLogics system will be used to evaluate compliance with the Site perimeter limits for total 
VOCs and dust described below, and to identify any need to suspend or modify remediation 
activities as a result of RAM-related air emissions. The perimeter air monitoring system will 
operate on a continuous, 24-hour basis until soil excavation and stabilization activities associated 
with the RAM have been completed. 

The automated perimeter air monitoring system will consist of eight individual monitoring 
stations with associated analytical instrumentation, a meteorological system, a computer control 
system, and an alarm system linked to the analytical instrumentation by an integrated 
communication/telemetry package. The meteorological station will be used to identify which 
stations are upwind, downwind, or crosswind of Site activities on a real-time basis. Proposed air 
monitoring system locations are indicated on Figure 3. 

The analytical instrumentation within each perimeter station will consist of a total volatile organic 
photoionization detector (PID) for the measurement of total VOCs (TVOCs), and a respirable particulate 
meter for the measurement of dust as a surrogate for polynuclear artomatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and 
metals. The PIDs, along with the Respirable Particulate Meters, are housed in weather-tight enclosures. 
The system operates on solar power, and is configured with on-board battery backup. The following is 
a description of each of the key analytical instruments: 

• Photoionization Detector 

Volatile organic substance concentrations are measured utilizing portable photoionization 
detectors (Photovac 2020 PID). The PIDs measure volatile organic compounds by passing the air 
sample past an analytical detector and electronically measuring the resulting response. The PIDs 
are configured to respond to total organic compounds without differentiation of individual 
compound concentrations. The limit of detection is 10 parts per billion by volume (ppbv). 

• Respirable Particulates 

Direct-reading real-time particulate meters (DustTrak) are used to monitor particulate (dust). The 
measurement of dust levels is accomplished using infrared electromagnetic radiation to sense 


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August 18, 2015 

Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection 

File No. 01.0171521.10 
Page / 17 


airborne particles. The dust meter can be configured to respond only to dust particles < 10 micron 
in diameter (PM10), dust particles < 2.5 microns (PM2.5), or total suspended particulate. For this 
project, the particulate meters will be configured to measure PM 10. The limit of detection is 
1 ug/m 3 (microgram per cubic meter). 

• Meteorological System 

An on-Site meteorological tower (RM Young sensors) is used to measure wind speed, direction, 
dry-bulb temperature, and relative humidity. The central computer system receives continuous 
information from the meteorological system and computes a 2-minute running average wind 
speed and direction value. The 2-minute running average wind direction is used to identify which 
of the monitoring stations is upwind, downwind, or crosswind. This information is stored 
electronically, and printed out in daily reports. 

• Computer Control System 

Data generated by the instrumentation and the meteorological station, as well as operational 
parameters, are continuously uploaded via radio telemetry links to a central computer system 
which will be located in the project trailer or some other secure location with continuous electrical 
power. The central computer system communicates with each perimeter monitoring station every 
minute to obtain the latest data values from the individual sensors. The retrieved data are then 
displayed on the central computer screen, and stored in a database along with the meteorological 
data and other operational status information. The monitoring data is automatically archived and 
used to print out summary graphs at the end of each day. 

• Communications 


The system utilizes a proprietary software package to allow for communication between the 
instruments, environmental control equipment, meteorological station, alarm display, and the 
central computer. Communication is accomplished with radio telemetry links operating on a fixed 
frequency licensed to AirLogics by the FCC. 

The system will be configured to generate 15-minute time-weighted averages of TVOC and 
particulate levels. This set-up will include alarm conditions for TVOCs of 1 ppm and for PM10 of 
either 75 pg/m3 over upwind background (for the CES-2 Area) or 150 pg/m3 over upwind 
background (for the A-5 and Low pH Areas), along with warning level alarms designed to alert 
project personnel of potential air quality issues. Daily reports depicting a graphical summary of the 
results of the real time monitoring will be automatically printed out at the end of each day, and 
GZA's on-Site personnel will prepare a daily summary of AirLogics system data. Daily summary 
sheets will be included in the subsequent RAM Status Reports and/or Completion Report. 

The particulate PM10 action levels were selected based on National Ambient Air Quality Standards 
(NAAQS) and Massachusetts Ambient Air Quality Standards (MAAQS) over a 24-hour period. By 


An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/VIH 




















































August 18, 2015 

Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection 

File No. 01.0171521.10 
Page / 18 

using the 24-hour average as a 15-minute alarm condition, elevated particulate concentrations can 
be addressed prior to having an exceedance of the NAAQS/MAAQS values or the action levels. 

In order to establish the PM10 action level, GZA developed soil-derived dust exposure point 
concentrations (EPCs) for each of the three remediation areas. The EPCs were generated using the 
PM10 action levels and the arithmetic mean concentrations! of soil analytical data from each of 
the three remediation areas, but limited to those depths that will be disturbed during remediation 
(i.e., the top ten feet for the A-5 Area, the top 15 feet for the CES-2 Area, and the top 15 feet for 
the Low pH Area). Documentation of the risk evaluation is included in Appendix J. 

Should VOC or PM10 action levels be exceeded in any 15-minute interval, work within the RAM 
areas will be halted to assess the potential cause or causes of the exceedance and corrective actions 
will be taken as necessary. Corrective actions may include, but are not limited to, alteration of work 
practices to minimize dust generation or application of water for dust suppression. 

REQUIRED PERMITS 

The following permits have been identified as required to implement this RAM: 

• A WPA Order of Conditions (MassDEP File # 022-0095), received as noted above. 

• The application of remedial additives (e.g., Portland cement used during ISS) within 50 feet of 
any surface water body or any tributary thereto requires approval by MassDEP. A written 
plan for the application of remedial additives is presented below. Approval, conditional 
approval, or denial of the plan by MassDEP must be provide within 30 days of receipt; 
however, approval of the plan is presumed if MassDEP does not issue a written approval or 
denial within that timeframe. 

• DigSafe will be notified by the contractor. 

GZA has not identified any additional permits that will be required for the proposed work. 


LSP SEAL AND SIGNATURE 

The seal and signature of the Licensed Site Professional (LSP) for this RAM Plan 
(Lawrence Feldman, LSP #8107) are provided on the attached transmittal forms in Appendix A. 


1 For certain constituents of concern (COCs), the maximum detected concentrations were used as the 
EPCs due to the relatively small sample size and/or the elevated laboratory reporting limits for the non- 
detected results. 


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August 18, 2015 

Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection 

File No. 01.0171521.10 
Page / 19 


CERTIFICATION FOR GREATER THAN 1500 CUBIC YARDS OF SOIL [310 CMR 40.0444(1)(H)] 

In accordance with Section 40.0442(5) of the MCP, Wynn MA has indicated that it has sufficient 
financial resources to manage greater than 1,500 cubic yards of excavated materials in the 
manner and time frames specified in 310 CMR 40.0030. 

APPLICATION OF REMEDIAL ADDITIVES NEAR SENSITIVE RECEPTORS 

As indicated by 310 CMR 40.0046(3)(a)(4) and 40.0046(3)(b), a written plan for the application of 
Remedial Additives must be submitted to MassDEP for the application of Remedial Additives 
within 50 feet of any surface water body or tributary of a surface water body. The ISS process to 
be employed at the Site will include the application of Portland cement, which can be considered 
a Remedial Additive, and as previously documented, the Mystic River adjoins the Site to the 
southwest. Portions of the Low pH Area, where ISS will be undertaken, are within 50 feet of the 
Mystic River. Based on the anticipated volume of soil requiring ISS, and the projected mixture of 
6% Type I Portland cement by weight, GZA estimates that approximately 1,800 tons of Portland 
cement will be utilized. The application of Remedial Additives for the purposes of this RAM is a 
"one-time" event that will be completed over a period of approximately two to three months. As 
indicated above, the ISS treatment zone will extend from the bottom of the excavation (i.e., 4 feet 
bgs) to approximately 1 foot into the silty sand unit underlying the fill material. Groundwater in 
the treatment area has been measured at between 5 and 6 feet bgs. 

As noted above, a sheet pile wall will be installed along the waterside limit of the ISS area to 
provide bank stability, minimize groundwater infiltration, and prevent or minimize the potential 
migration of stabilization chemicals introduced into the subsurface during the ISS process. During 
ISS implementation, potential changes to local groundwater quality are likely to include an 
increase in pH and alkalinity. However, given the installation of the sheet pile wall, and the nature 
of the remedial additive, GZA does not anticipate an adverse impact on the Mystic River related 
to the proposed remediation. However, visual observations of both the Mystic River and the 
Coastal Bank outside of the sheet pile wall will be conducted on a daily basis during ISS 
implementation to detect the breakout of remedial additives. 

Groundwater flow direction is not anticipated to be significantly altered during ISS 
implementation; however, shallow groundwater flow will be impacted after the stabilized 
monolith has been created. GZA anticipates that shallow groundwater post-remediation will be 
redirected around the monolith through untreated soils that will have hydraulic conductivities 
one to two orders of magnitude higher than the ISS area. Subsequent to completion of the ISS 
field program, a network of monitoring wells will be installed along the perimeter of the treated 
area to assess groundwater conditions. 

PUBLIC NOTIFICATION 

Public involvement activities have been conducted in accordance with 310 CMR 40.1403(3)(d). 
Copies of the notices are included as Appendix K. 


An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/VIH 






























August 18, 2015 

Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection 

File No. 01.0171521.10 
Page / 20 


If you should require any further information concerning the planned RAM activities, please do 
not hesitate to contact the undersigned at (781) 278-3700. 

Very truly yours, 


GZA GEOENVIRONMENTAL, INC. 



Senior Project Manager 



Albert J. Ricciardelli 
Consultant/Reviewer 


Lawrence Feldman, LSP 
Senior Principal 



Attachments: 


Table 1 

Soil Analytical Data (Area 5) 

Table 2 

Groundwater Analytical Data (Low pH Area) 

Figure 1 

Site Locus 

Figure 2 

Site Plan 

Figure 3 

Proposed Pre-Construction Release Abatement Measure 
(RAM) Remediation Areas 

Appendix A 

Limitations 

Appendix B 

Transmittal Form BWSC106 

Appendix C 

PIP Comments and Responses to Comments 

Appendix D 

MassGIS Map 

Appendix E 

Boring Logs 

Appendix F 

Laboratory Analytical Data 

Appendix G 

K Test Data 

Appendix H 

Site Specific Health and Safety Plan 

Appendix 1 

Excavated Materials Management Plan 

Appendix J 

PM10 Risk Evaluation Tables 

Appendix K 

Public Notification 


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GZA File No . 01 . 0171521.10 
[Date] 


Table 1 

Soil Analytical Results 
A-5 Area 
1 Horizon Way 
Everett, Massachusetts 


Boring ID 

GZ101 

GZ102 

GZ103 



Sample 

GZ101S01S02 

GZ101S03S04 

GZ101S05S06 

GZ101S07S08 

GZ101S09S10 

GZ101S11S12 

GZ102S01S02 

GZ102S03S04 

GZ102S05S06 

GZ102S07S08 

GZ102S09S10 

GZ103S01S02 

GZ103S03S04 

GZ103S05S06 

GZ103S06S07 

GZ103SO8SO9 

GZ103S10S11 

Sample Depth [Ft BGS] 

0-2 

2-4 

4-6 

6-8 

8-10 

10-12 

0-2 

2-4 

4-6 

6-8 

8-10 

0-2 

2-4 

4-6 

6-8 

8-10 

10-11 

Sample Date 

10 / 31/2014 

10 / 31/2014 

10 / 31/2014 

10 / 31/2014 

10 / 31/2014 

10 / 31/2014 

10 / 31/2014 

10 / 31/2014 

10 / 31/2014 

10 / 31/2014 

10 / 31/2014 

10 / 31/2014 

10 / 31/2014 

10 / 31/2014 

10 / 31/2014 

10 / 31/2014 

10 / 31/2014 



















Arsenic 

151 

10.8 

4750 

133 

6.08 

9.12 

697 

13500 

10400 

6470 

39.5 

17.5 

280 

74.1 

317 

2420 

11.4 

Lead 

1170 

153 

4640 

112 

7.74 

13.7 

631 

21900 

14900 

5110 

62.1 

197 

2590 

620 

777 

70.4 

13.8 


Nets*: 

1. All results are presented in milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg), i.e. parts per million (ppm). 

2. Analytes detected above laboratory reporting limits are shown in bold. 

3. Concentrations detected above Massachusetts Contingency Plan (MCP) S-2 Soil & GW-2 Standards are highlighted in yellow. Concentrations detected above MCP Upper Concentration Limits (UCLs) are highlighted in orange. 


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Data\A-5 Area Soil Samples\Table 1 - GZA A-5 Area Samples.xls* 




















































GZA File No 01.0171521.10 
[Date] 


Table 1 

Soil Analytical Results 
A-5 Area 
1 Horizon Way 
Everett, Massachusetts 


Boring ID 



GZ104 

GZ105 

GZ106 

Sample 

GZ104S01S02 

GZ104S03S04 

GZ104S0SS06 

GZ104S07S08 

GZ104S09S10 

GZ105S01S02 

GZ105S03S04 

GZ105S05S06 

GZ105S07S08 

GZ105S09S10 

GZ10SS11S12 

GZ106S01S02 

GZ106S03S04 

GZ106S05S06 

GZ106S07S08 

GZ106S09S10 

GZ106S11S12 

Sample Depth (Ft BGS] 

0-2 

2-4 

4-6 

6-8 

8-10 

0-2 

2-4 

4-6 

6-8 

8-10 

10-12 

0-2 

2-4 

4-6 

6-8 

8-10 

10-12 

Sample Date 

10/31/2014 

10/31/2014 

10/31/2014 

10/31/2014 

10/31/2014 

10/31/2014 

10/31/2014 

10/31/2014 

10/31/2014 

10/31/2014 

10/31/2014 

11/3/2014 

11/3/2014 

11/3/2014 

11/3/2014 

11/3/2014 

11/3/2014 



















Arsenic 

22.1 

1050 

524 

8.98 

13.7 

15.5 

52.6 

49.8 

138 

529 

20.6 

23.4 

50.1 

188 

809 

15.5 

13.4 

Lead 

527 

5390 

3440 

61.2 

27.9 

680 

682 

402 

459 

94.6 

14.7 

330 

1270 

4850 

2890 

73.4 

22.3 



J:\l 70,000-179,999\171521\171521-10 


D€L\Laboratory Analytical Data\A-S Area Soil Samples\Table 1 6ZA A 5 Area Sample* xKx 














































GZA File No. 01.0171521.10 
[Date] 


Tabic 1 

Soil Analytical Results 
A-5 Area 
1 Horizon Way 
Everett, Massachusetts 


Boring ID 

GZ107 

GZ108 

Sample 

GZ107 SO ISO 2 

GZ107S03S04 

GZ107S05S06 

GZ107S07S08 

GZ107S09S10 

GZ107S11S12 

GZ108S01S02 

GZ108S03S04 

GZ108S05S06 

GZ108S07 

GZ108S08 

GZ108S09S10 

GZ108S11S12 

Sample Depth [Ft BGS] 

0-2 

2-4 

4-6 

6-8 

8-10 

10-12 

0-2 

2-4 

4-6 

6-7 

7-8 

8-10 

10-12 

Sample Date 

10/31/2014 

10/31/2014 

10/31/2014 

10/31/2014 

10/31/2014 

10/31/2014 

10/31/2014 

10/31/2014 

10/31/2014 

10/31/2014 

10/31/2014 

10/31/2014 

10/31/2014 















Arsenic 

10.6 

101 

83.9 

268 

5.56 

11.9 

17.7 

45.6 

151 

202 

448 

46.8 

7.67 

Lead 

191 

818 

730 

813 

11.4 

13.5 

215 

710 

1380 

2300 

682 

178 

10.1 


J:\l 70,000-179,999\171521\171521-10 


DEl\l 3 borat<xy Analytical Data\A-5 Area Soil SamplesVTable 1 - GZA A 5 Area Samples.xlsx 

































GZA File No. 01.0171521.10 
(Date) 


Table 1 

Soli Analytical Results 
A-5 Area 
1 Horizon Way 
Everett, Massachusetts 


Boring ID 



GZ109 

GZ110 

GZ111 

Sample 

GZ109S01S02 

GZ109S03S04 

GZ109S05 

GZ109S06 

GZ109S07S08 

GZ109S09S10 

GZ109S11S12 

GZ110S01S02 

GZ110S03S04 

GZ110S05S06 

GZ110S07S08 

GZ110S09S10 

GZ110S11S12 

GZ11 ISO 1502 

GZ111S03S04 

GZ111S05S06 

GZ111S07 

GZ111S09S10 

GZ111S11S12 

Sample Depth [Ft BGS] 

0-2 

2-4 

4-5 

5-6 

7-8 

8-10 

10-12 

0-2 

2-4 

4-6 

6-8 

8-10 

10-12 

0-2 ‘ 

2-4 

4-6 

6-8 

8-10 

10-12 

Sample Date 

11/3/2014 

11/3/2014 

11/3/2014 

11/3/2014 

11/3/2014 

11/3/2014 

10/31/2014 

10/31/2014 

10/31/2014 

10/31/2014 

10/31/2014 

10/31/2014 

10/31/2014 

11/3/2014 

11/3/2014 

11/3/2014 

11/3/2014 

11/3/2014 

11/3/2014 





















Arsenic 

10.6 

41.2 

19.3 

50.3 

603 

43.6 

17 

16.8 

26.2 

41.4 

337 

50.6 

13.5 

45 

339 

1160 

1040 

3.86 

12.4 

Lead 

418 

1830 

456 

63.5 

191 

586 

17.5 

312 

1820 

2500 

4080 

829 

25.2 

843 

10600 

13400 

2450 

7.1 

18 


J:\l 70,000-179,999\171521\171521-10 


DElAUboratcry Analyt.cai Dau\A-5 Vea Soil Samples\Table 1 GIA A 5 Area Samples xB» 









































GZA File No. 01.0171521.10 
[Date] 


Table 1 

Soil Analytical Results 
A-5 Area 
1 Horizon Way 
Everett, Massachusetts 


Boring ID 

GZ112 

MCP Standards 

Sample 

GZ112S01S02 

GZ112S03S04 

GZ112S05S06 

GZ112S07S08 

GZ112S09S10 

GZ112S11S12 

MCP S-2 Soil & GW-2 

UCL 

Sample Depth [Ft BGS] 

0-2 

2-4 

4-6 

6-8 

8-10 

10-12 



Sample Date 

11/3/2014 

11/3/2014 

11/3/2014 

11/3/2014 

11/3/2014 

11/3/2014 












Arsenic 

10.5 

138 

694 

11.2 

24.8 

21.7 

20 

500 

Lead 

451 

4590 

8110 

30.8 

39.1 

48.4 

600 

9000 


J:\170,000-179,999\171521\171521-10 


DElALaboratory Analytical DataVA-S Area Soil Samples\Table 1 GZA A-5 Area Samples.xlsx 



























GZA File No. 01.0171521.10 
[Date] 


Table 2 

Groundwater Analytical Results 
Low pH Area 
1 Horizon Way 
Everett, Massachusetts 


Well ID: 

Date: 

GZ201 

11/13/2014 

GZ202 

11/13/2014 

GZ203 

11/13/2014 

GZ204 

11/13/2014 

GZ205 

11/13/2014 

GZ206 

11/13/2014 

GZ207 

11/13/2014 

GZ208 

11/13/2014 

GZ209 

11/13/2014 

GZ210 

11/13/2014 

GZ211 

11/13/2014 

GZ212 

11/13/2014 

GZ213 

11/13/2014 

GZ214 

11/13/2014 

M< 

Method 1 GW-3 

3P 

UCL 

RCRA 8 Metals 

Barium 

42.5 

46.5 

33.1 

28.7 

26.7 

46.9 

49.4 

50.8 

33.0 

38.8 

29.0 

28.5 

32.5 

47.2 

<2.5 

<10.0 

<10.0 

<10.0 

50000 

100000 

Cadmium 

<2.5 

4.8 

<2.5 

<2.5 

<2.5 

6.6 

3.1 

20.7 

5.9 

3.7 

25.4 

42.2 

45.1 

4 

300 

10 

^nno 

Chromium 

<10.0 

<10.0 

<10.0 

<10.0 

<10.0 

<10.0 

<10.0 

<10.0 

<10.0 

19.5 

<10.0 

<10.0 

<10.0 

150 

1000 

9000 

Lead 

<10.0 

49.2 

<20.0 

<10.0 

<20.0 

<10.0 

<20.0 

<20.0 

17.3 

47.6 

27.0 

<10.0 

14.2 

Silver 

Arsenic 

Selenium 

Mercury 

<5.0 

27 7 

<10.0 

586 

<5.0 

<0.20 

<5.0 

4 9 

<5.0 

8.0 

<5.0 

8.8 

<5 0 

<5 0 

<5.0 

<10.0 

<10.0 

<5.0 

<5.0 

<5.0 

( 

583 

38.2 

28.6 

572 

310 

2300 

3740 

4370 

193 

900 

<5.0 

<0.20 

<5.0 

<0.20 

<5.0 

<0.20 

<5.0 

<0.20 

<5.0 

<0.20 

<5.0 

<0.20 

<5.0 

<0.20 

<5.0 

<0.20 

<5.0 

<0.20 

<5.0 

0.3 

<5.0 

<0.20 

<5.0 

<0.20 

<5.0 

<0.20 

100 

20 

100000 

200 

pH- Field Data 
pH- Lab Data 

5.73 

5.56 

5.79 

5.62 

7.76 

7.03 

5.50 

5.40 

7.57 

6.78 

5.70 

5.61 

5.73 

5.56 

6.43 

6.33 

5.02 

4.82 

3.24 

3.19 

4.69 

4.80 

5.26 

5.24 

5.76 

5.78 

5.70 

5.62 

-- 

- 


Notes: 

1. RCRA 8 metals results are presented in micrograms per liter (ug/L). ^ . .. .. .. 

2. Analytes detected above laboratory reporting limits are shown in bold. Concentrations above Massachusetts Contingency Plan (MCP) Method 1 GW-3 Standards are highlighted in yellow. No concentrations were detected above MCP Upper Concentration Limits (UGL) 

3. < indicated an analyte was not detected above laboratory repoting limits; -- indicates that an analyte does not have an applicable MCP standard. 


J:\170,000-179,999\171521\171521-10.DEL\Laboratory Analytical 


Data\Groundwater\Table 2 - Low pH Area Groundwater Results Highlighted xls 


















































































































































































FIGURES 



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APPROXIMATE DISPOSAL SITE BOUNDARY GEI / HISTORICAL EXPLORATIONS GEI / HISTORICAL EXPLORATIONS 

® GEI BORING ® HISTORIC BORING 


GZA EXPLORATIONS 


1. GZA EXPLORATION LOCATIONS WERE LOCATED USING 
A TRIMBLE GEOXH 3.5G EDITION GPS UNIT ALL OTHER 
LOCATIONS PROVIDED BY GEI CONSULTANTS. INC. 


WYNN EVERETT 

EVERETT, MA 


EXPLORATION LOCATION PLAN 


SHALLOW ENVIRONMENTAL BORING 
^ LOW PH MONITORING WELL 


GEI TEMPORARY WELL 
E| GEI TEST PIT 
GEI WELL 


HISTORIC SURFACE SOIL 
HISTORIC TEST PIT 
HISTORIC WELL 
TEMPORARY WELLS 


140 


SCALE IN FEET 


PREPARED BY 

^^NGZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc. 

] Engineers and Scientists 
www.gza.com 

PREPARED FOR 

PROJ MGR DEL 

REVIEWED BY DEL 

CHECKED BY DEL 

FIGURE 

DESIGNED BY DEL 

DRAWN BY SMW 

SCALE 1 INCH = 70 FT 

o 

DATE 

08-18-2015 

PROJECT NO. 

01.0171521.10 

REVISION NO 

2 


TGW313 


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UNLESS SPECIFICALLY STATED BY \M*ITTEN AGREEMENT THIS DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF GZA 
GEOENVIRONMENTAL. INC (GZA) THE INFORMATION SHOWN ON THE DRAWING IS SOLELY FOR THE USE BY GZA’S 
CLIENT OR THE CLIENT’S DESIGNATED REPRESENTATIVE FOR THE SPECIFIC PROJECT AND LOCATION IDENTIFIED ON 
THE DRAWING THE DRAWING SHALL NOT BE TRANSFERRED. REUSED. COPIED. OR ALTERED IN ANY MANNER FOR 
USE AT ANY OTHER LOCATION OR FOR ANY OTHER PURPOSE WITHOUT THE PRIOR WRITTEN CONSENT OF GZA. ANY 
TRANSFER REUSE. OR MODIFICATION TO THE DRAWING BY THE CLIENT OR OTHERS. WITHOUT THE PRIOR WRITTEN 
EXPRESS CONSENT OF GZA. WILL BE AT THE USERS SOLE RISK AND WITHOUT ANY RISK OR LIABILITY TO GZA 


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. 


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V ' - ;jy - - ^ 

\ / • 
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MATERIALS MANAGEMENT AREA 


GROUNDWATER MANAGEMENT 
AND RECHARGE AREA 


UNLESS SPECIFICALLY STATED BY WRITTEN AGREEMENT. THIS DRAWING IS THE SOLE PROPERTY OF GZA 
GEOENVIRONMENTAL. INC. (GZA). THE INFORMATION SHOWN ON THE DRAWING IS SOLELY FOR USE BY GZA'S 
CLIENT OR THE CLIENT'S DESIGNATED REPRESENTATIVE FOR THE SPECIFIC PROJECT AND LOCATION IDENTIFIED ON 
THE DRAWING THE DRAWING SHALL NOT BE TRANSFERRED. REUSED. COPIED, OR ALTERED IN ANY MANNER FOR 
USE AT ANY OTHER LOCATION OR FOR ANY OTHER PURPOSE WITHOUT THE PRIOR WRITTEN CONSENT OF GZA. ANY 
TRANSFER. REUSE, OR MODIFICATION TO THE DRAWING BY THE CLIENT OR OTHERS. WITHOUT THE PRIOR WRITTEN 
EXPRESS CONSENT OF GZA, WILL BE AT THE USER'S SOLE RISK AND WITHOUT ANY RISK OR LIABILITY TO GZA 


WYNN EVERETT 
EVERETT, MASSACHUSETTS 


PROPOSED PRE-CONSTRUCTION RELEASE ABATEMENT 
MEASURE (RAM) REMEDIATION AREAS 


PREPARED BY 


GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc. 
Engineers and Scientists 
www gza.com 


PROJ MGR DEL 

REVIEWED BY MH 

CHECKED BY MH 

DESIGNED BY MH 

DRAWN BY JJZ 

SCALE 1" = 80 FEET 

DATE 

05-27-2015 

PROJECT NO 

01.0171521.00 

REVISION NO 


FIGURE 


240' 


SOURCE: 

1. THE BASE MAP WAS DEVELOPED FROM ELECTRONIC FILES PROVIDED BY FELDMAN, 
PROFESSIONAL LAND SURVEYORS ON JANUARY 15. 2015, CAD FILE: 

14517-EX-FBT-1-15-2015.DWG. 


LEGEND 

_ _ PROPOSED SHEET PILE WALL 

_ . . - PROPOSED EROSION AND SEDIMENTATION CONTROL BARRIER 


- RIVERFRONT AREA 

TOP OF COASTAL BANK 

- TOP OF COASTAL BANK (COINCIDENT WITH 100YEAR FLOOD ELEVATION) 
100-FT BUFFER ZONE (FROM COASTAL BANK) 

inn YFAR FLOOD ZONE AE (9 00' NAVD88) - FIRM PANEL 0439E, EFFECTIVE 
_ DATE^UNE 4 2010 & FIRM PANEL 0014G, EFFECTIVE DATE SEPT 25, 2009 
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COASTAL BEACH / TIDAL FLATS / LAND CONTAINING SHELLFISH 
LAND UNDER THE OCEAN / LAND CONTAINING SHELLFISH 


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CONTROL 

^ MEAN HIGH WATER 


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v MEAN HIGH WATER 
_ (ALONG BULKHEAD) 

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APPROXIMATE STAGING 
AREA FOR ISS AND 
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PROPOSED 
SEDIMENTATION AND 
EROSION CONTROL 


PROPOSED 
SEDIMENTATION AND 
EROSION CONTROL 


MATERIALS MANAGEMENT AREA 


SHEET PILE WALL 


A-5 AREA 



















































































































































APPENDIX A 


LIMITATIONS 




GEOHYDROLOGICAL LIMITATIONS 



Use of Report 

1. GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc. (GZA) prepared this report on behalf of, and for the exclusive use of 
our Client for the stated purpose(s) and location(s) identified in the Proposal for Services and/or 
Report. Use of this report, in whole or in part, at other locations, or for other purposes, may lead to 
inappropriate conclusions; and we do not accept any responsibility for the consequences of such 
use(s). Further, reliance by any party not expressly identified in the agreement, for any use, without 
our prior written permission, shall be at that party’s sole risk, and without any liability to GZA. 

Standard of Care 


2. GZA’s findings and conclusions are based on the work conducted as part of the Scope of 
Services set forth in the Proposal for Services and/or Report and reflect our professional 
judgment. These findings and conclusions must be considered not as scientific or 
engineering certainties, but rather as our professional opinions concerning the limited data 
gathered during the course of our work. Conditions other than described in this report may 
be found at the subject location(s). 

3. GZA’s services were performed using the degree of skill and care ordinarily exercised by 
qualified professionals performing the same type of services, at the same time, under 
similar conditions, at the same or a similar property. No warranty, expressed or implied, is 
made. Specifically, GZA does not and cannot represent that the Site contains no hazardous 
material, oil, or other latent condition beyond that observed by GZA during its study. 
Additionally, GZA makes no warranty that any response action or recommended action will 
achieve all of its objectives or that the findings of this study will be upheld by a local, state 
or federal agency. 

4. In conducting our work, GZA relied upon certain information made available by public 
agencies, Client and/or others. GZA did not attempt to independently verify the accuracy 
or completeness of that information. Inconsistencies in this information which we have 
noted, if any, are discussed in the Report. 

Subsurface Conditions 


5. The generalized soil profile(s) provided in our Report are based on widely-spaced 
subsurface explorations and are intended only to convey trends in subsurface conditions. 
The boundaries between strata are approximate and idealized, and were based on our 
assessment of subsurface conditions. The composition of strata, and the transitions 
between strata, may be more variable and more complex than indicated. For more specific 
information on soil conditions at a specific location refer to the exploration logs. The 
nature and extent of variations between these explorations may not become evident until 
further exploration or construction. If variations or other latent conditions then become 
evident, it will be necessary to reevaluate the conclusions and recommendations of this 
report. 


April 2012 


PAGE 1 





6. Water level readings have been made, as described in this Report, in and monitoring wells 
at the specified times and under the stated conditions. These data have been reviewed and 
interpretations have been made in this report. Fluctuations in the level of the groundwater 
however occur due to temporal or spatial variations in areal recharge rates, soil 
heterogeneities, the presence of subsurface utilities, and/or natural or artificially induced 
perturbations. The observed water table may be other than indicated in the Report. 

Compliance with Codes and Regulations 

7. We used reasonable care in identifying and interpreting applicable codes and regulations 
necessary to execute our scope of work. These codes and regulations are subject to various, 
and possibly contradictory, interpretations. Interpretations and compliance with codes and 
regulations by other parties is beyond our control. 

Screening and Analytical Testing 

8. GZA collected environmental samples at the locations identified in the Report. These 
samples were analyzed for the specific parameters identified in the report. Additional 
constituents, for which analyses were not conducted, may be present in soil, groundwater, 
surface water, sediment and/or air. Future Site activities and uses may result in a 
requirement for additional testing. 

9. Our interpretation of field screening and laboratory data is presented in the Report. Unless 
otherwise noted, we relied upon the laboratory’s QA/QC program to validate these data. 

10. Variations in the types and concentrations of contaminants observed at a given location or 
time may occur due to release mechanisms, disposal practices, changes in flow paths, 
and/or the influence of various physical, chemical, biological or radiological processes. 
Subsequently observed concentrations may be other than indicated in the Report. 

Interpretation of Data 

11. Our opinions are based on available information as described in the Report, and on our 
professional judgment. Additional observations made over time, and/or space, may not 
support the opinions provided in the Report. 

Additional Information 


12. In the event that the Client or others authorized to use this report obtain additional 
information on environmental or hazardous waste issues at the Site not contained in this 
report, such information shall be brought to GZA's attention forthwith. GZA will evaluate 
such information and, on the basis of this evaluation, may modify the conclusions stated in 
this report. 


April 2012 


PAGE 2 






Additional Services 


13. GZA recommends that we be retained to provide services during any future 
investigations, design, implementation activities, construction, and/or property 
development/ redevelopment at the Site. This will allow us the opportunity to: i) observe 
conditions and compliance with our design concepts and opinions; ii) allow for changes 
in the event that conditions are other than anticipated; iii) provide modifications to our 
design; and iv) assess the consequences of changes in technologies and/or regulations. 

Conceptual Site Model 

14. Our opinions were developed, in part, based upon a comparison of site data to conditions 
anticipated within our Conceptual Site Model (CSM). The CSM is based on available 
information, and professional judgment. There are rarely sufficient data to develop a 
unique CSM. Therefore observations over time, and/or space, may vary from those 
depicted in the CSM provided in this report. In addition, the CSM should be evaluated and 
refined (as appropriate) whenever significant new information and/or data is obtained. 

Risk Characterization 


15. Our risk evaluation was performed in accordance with generally accepted practices of 
appropriate Federal and/or state regulatory agencies, and of other consultants undertaking 
similar studies at the same time, for similar purposes, and under similar circumstances. 
The findings of the risk evaluation are dependent on the numerous assumptions and 
uncertainties inherent in the risk characterization process. Sources of the uncertainty may 
include Site conditions; Site use; the nature, extent, concentration and distribution of 
contaminants; and the available toxicity and/or health/risk based regulatory information. 
Consequently, the findings of the risk characterization are not an absolute characterization 
of actual risks; but rather serve to highlight potential incremental risks associated with 
activities indicated in the Report. Actual risks may be other than indicated in the Report. 


April 2012 


PAGE 3 









































































APPENDIX B 


TRANSMITTAL FORM BWSC106 





Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection 

Bureau of Waste Site Cleanup 

RELEASE ABATEMENT MEASURE (RAM) 
TRANSMITTAL FORM 

Pursuant to 310 CMR 40.0444 - 0446 (Subpart D) 

A. SITE LOCATION: 



BWSC 106 


Release Tracking Number 



13341 


1 . Site Name/Location Aid: EVERETT STAGING YARD 

2. Street Address: 1 HORIZON WAY 

3. City/Town: EVERETT 4. Zip Code: 021490000 


F 5. Check here if the disposal site that is the source of the release is Tier Classified. Check the current Tier Classification 
Category. 

r a. Tier I F b. Tier ID F c. Tier II 


B. THIS FORM IS BEING USED TO: (check all that apply) 

1. List Submittal Date of Initial RAM Plan (if previously submitted): 

(mm/dd/yyyy) 

F 2. Submit an Initial Release Abatement Measure (RAM) Plan. 

r a. Check here if the RAM is being conducted as part of the construction of a permanent structure. If checked, you must 
specify what type of permanent structure is to be erected in or in the immediate vicinity of the area where the RAM is to be 
conducted. 

b. Specify type of permanent structure: (check all that apply) r i. School F ii. Residential F iii. Commercial 

r jv. Industrial F v . Other Specify. _ 

F 3 . Submit a Modified RAM Plan of a previously submitted RAM Plan. 

F 4 . Submit a RAM Status Report. 

F 5 . Submit a Remedial Monitoring Report. (This report can only be submitted through eDEP, concurrent with a RAM Status 
Report.) 

a. Type of Report: (check one) j initial Report F ii. Interim Report F iii. Final Report 

b. Frequency of Submittal: 

Ti. A Remedial Monitoring Report(s) submitted every six months, concurrent with a RAM Status Report, 
r ii. A Remedial Monitoring Report(s) submitted annually, concurrent with a RAM Status Report. 


c. Number of Remedial Systems and/or Monitoring Programs: 

A separate BWSC 106A, RAM Remedial Monitoring Report, must be filled out for each Remedial System 
and/or Monitoring Program addressed by this transmittal form. 


I - 6 . Submit a RAM Completion Statement. 

F 7. Submit a Revised RAM Completion Statement. 


8 . Provide Additional RTNs: 


F a. Check here if this RAM Submittal covers additional Release Tracking Numbers (RTNs). RTNs that have been previously 
linked to a Primary Tier Classified RTN do not need to be listed here. This section is intended to allow a RAM to cover more than 
one unclassified RTN and not show permanent linkage to a Primary Tier Classified RTN. 


b. Provide the additional Release Tracking Number(s) 
covered by this RAM Submittal. 


□■I 


□ I 


F 9 . Include in the RAM Plan or Modified RAM Plan a Plan for the Application of Remedial Additives near a sensitive receptor, 
pursuant to 310 CMR 40.0046(3). 

(All sections of this transmittal form must be filled out unless otherwise noted above) 


Revised: 8/5/2013 


Page 1 of 6 

























Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection 

Bureau of Waste Site Cleanup 

RELEASE ABATEMENT MEASURE (RAM) 
TRANSMITTAL FORM 

Pursuant to 310 CMR 40.0444 - 0446 (Subpart D) 


BWSC 106 

Release Tracking Number 
3 


13341 


C. RELEASE OR THREAT OF RELEASE CONDITIONS THAT WARRANT RAM: 

1. Media Impacted and Receptors Affected: (check all that apply) 1“ a. Paved Surface T b. Basement 1“ c. School 


I - d. Public Water Supply 
f 7 j. Ground Water 
r p. Soil Gas 
r u. Others Specify: 

I - e. Surface Water 

I - k. Sediments 

r q. Sub-Slab Soil Gas 

I - f. Zone 2 V~ g. Private Well 

H 1. Wetland i~ m. Storm Drain 

I - r. Critical Exposure Pathway 

r h. Residence 

I - n. Indoor Ail 

r s. NAPL 

f 7 i. Soil 

I - o. Air 

r t. Unknown 

2. Sources of the Release or TOR: (check all that apply) 


l~ a. Transformer 

I - b. Fuel Tank 

r c. Pipe 

I - d. OHM Delivery 

r e. AST f~ f. Drums 

f - g. Tanker Truck 

I - h. Hose 

U i. Line 

r j. (JST Describe: 


r k. Vehicle V~ 1. 

Boat/V essel 

m. Unknown 

F n Other- HISTORIC FILL AND MANUFACTURING 



3. Type of Release or TOR: (check all that apply) 

I - a. Dumping 

b. Fire f” 

c. AST Removal 

I - d. Overfill 

I - e. Rupture 

I - f. Vehicle Accident 

r g. Leak 

I - h. Spill r i. Test Failure 

r j. TOR Only 

I - k. UST Removal 

Describe: 





f - 1. Unknown 

[7 m Other- HISTORIC FILL AND MANUFACTURING 




4. Identify Oils and Hazardous Materials Released: (check all that apply) \7 a oils T~ b. Chlorinated Solvents 

\7 c Heavy [7 d 0thers Specify: LOW PH IN GROUNDWATER 

Metals 


D. DESCRIPTION OF RESPONSE ACTIONS: 

r i . Assessment and/or Monitoring Only 

I - 3. Deployment of Absorbent or Containment Materials 

r 5. Structure Venting System/HVAC Modification System 

r 7 . Product or NAPL Recovery 

I - 9. Groundwater Treatment Systems 

f 7 11. Remedial Additives 

r 13. Active Exposure Pathway Mitigation System 
r 15. Monitored Natural Attenuation 


(check all that apply, for volumes list cumulative amounts) 

I - 2. Temporary Covers or Caps 
r* 4. Temporary Water Supplies 
r 6. Temporary Evacuation or Relocation of Residents 
r 8. Fencing and Sign Posting 
r 10. Soil Vapor Extraction 
r 12. Air Sparging 

I - 14. Passive Exposure Pathway Mitigation System 
r 16. In-Situ Chemical Oxidation 


Revised: 8/5/2013 


Page 2 of 6 























Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection 

Bureau of Waste Site Cleanup 

RELEASE ABATEMENT MEASURE (RAM) 
TRANSMITTAL FORM 

Pursuant to 310 CMR 40.0444 - 0446 (Subpart D) 


BWSC 106 


Release Tracking Number 



13341 


D. DESCRIPTION OF RESPONSE ACTIONS (cont.): (check all that apply, for volumes list cumulative amounts) 


P 17. Excavation of Contaminated Soils 





P a. Re-use, Recycling or Treatment 

P i. On Site 

Estimated volume in cubic yards 

19000 



I” ii. OffSite 

Estimated volume in cubic yards 



iia. Receiving Facility: 


Town: 


State: 

iib. Receiving Facility: 


Town: 


State: 

iii. Describe: N-SITU SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION OF SOILS 


P b. Store 

P i. On Site 

Estimated volume in cubic yards 




P ii. Off Site 

Estimated volume in cubic yards 



iia. Receiving Facility: 


Town: 


State: 

iib. Receiving Facility: 


Town: 


State: 

P c. Landfill 

P i. Cover 

Estimated volume in cubic yards 



Receiving Facility: 


Town: 


State: 


P ii. Disposal 

Estimated volume in cubic yards 

8800 


Receiving Facility: TBD 


Town: TBD 


State: MA 

P 18. Removal of Drums, Tanks or Containers: 
a. Describe Quantity and Amount: 




b. Receiving Facility: 


Town: 


State: 

c. Receiving Facility: 


Town: 


State: 

P 19. Removal of Other Contaminated Media: 
a. Specify Type and Volume: 




b. Receiving Facility: 


Town: 


State: 

c. Receiving Facility: 


Town: 


State: 


P 20. Other Response Actions: 
Describe: 


P 21. Use of Innovative Technologies: 
Describe: 


Revised: 8/5/2013 


Page 3 of 6 
















































Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection 

Bureau of Waste Site Cleanup 

RELEASE ABATEMENT MEASURE (RAM) 
TRANSMITTAL FORM 

Pursuant to 310 CMR 40.0444 - 0446 (Subpart D) 


BWSC 106 

Release Tracking Number 
3 ^ 


13341 


E. LSP SIGNATURE AND STAMP : 

I attest under the pains and penalties of perjury that I have personally examined and am familiar with this transmittal form, including any and 
all documents accompanying this submittal. In my professional opinion and judgment based upon application of (i) the standard of care in 
309 CMR 4.02( 1), (ii) the applicable provisions of 309 CMR 4.02(2) and (3), and 309 CMR 4.03(2), and (iii) the provisions of 309 CMR 4.03(3), 
to the best of my knowledge, information and belief. 


> if Section B of this form indicates that a Release Abatement Measure Plan is being submitted, the response action(s) that is (are) the 
subject of this submittal (i) has (have) been developed in accordance with the applicable provisions of M.G.L. c. 21E and 310 CMR 40.0000, 
(ii) is (are) appropriate and reasonable to accomplish the purposes of such response action(s) as set forth in the applicable provisions of 
M.G.L. c. 21E and 310 CMR 40.0000 and (iii) comply(ies) with the identified provisions of all orders, permits, and approvals identified in this 
submittal; 

> if Section B of this form indicates that a Release Abatement Measure Status Report and/or Remedial Monitoring Report is being 
submitted, the response action(s) that is (are) the subject of this submittal (i) is (are) being implemented in accordance with the applicable 
provisions of M.G.L. c. 2 IE and 310 CMR 40.0000, (ii) is (are) appropriate and reasonable to accomplish the purposes of such response 
action(s) as set forth in the applicable provisions of M.G.L. c. 21E and 310 CMR 40.0000 and (iii) comply (ies) with the identified provisions 
of all orders, permits, and approvals identified in this submittal; 


> if Section B of this form indicates that a Release Abatement Measure Completion Statement is being submitted, the response action(s) 
that is (are) the subject of this submittal (i) has (have) been developed and implemented in accordance with the applicable provisions of 
M.G.L. c. 21E and 310 CMR 40.0000, (ii) is (are) appropriate and reasonable to accomplish the purposes of such response action(s) as set 
forth in the applicable provisions of M.G.L. c. 21E and 310 CMR 40.0000 and (iii) comply(ies) with the identified provisions of all orders, 
permits, and approvals identified in this submittal: 


I am aware that significant penalties may result, including, but not limited to, possible fines and imprisonment, if I submit information which I 
know to be false, inaccurate or materially incomplete. 


1. LSP#: 

2. First Name: 
4. Telephone: 

7. Signature: 

8. Date: 


8107 

3. Last Name: 

5. Ext: 


8/18/2015 9. LSP Stamp: 

(mm/dd/yyyy) 


LAWRENCE 


781-278-3700 


LAWRENCE FELDMAN 


FELDMAN 


6. Email: 



Revised: 8/5/2013 


Page 4 of 6 




























Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection 

Bureau of Waste Site Cleanup 

RELEASE ABATEMENT MEASURE (RAM) 
TRANSMITTAL FORM 

Pursuant to 310 CMR 40.0444 - 0446 (Subpart D) 

F. PERSON UNDERTAKING RAM: 



BWSC 106 

Release Tracking Number 


13341 


1. Check all that apply: 

l - a. change in contact name 

r b. change of address 

F c. change in the person undertaking 
response actions 

2. Name of Organization: 

WYNN MA, LLC 




3. Contact First Name: 

ROBERT 

4. Last Name: 

DESALVIO 


5. Street: 

3131 LAS VEGAS BLVD, SOUTH 

6. Title: 

PRESIDENT 


7. City/Town: 

LAS VEGAS 

8. State: NV 

9. ZIP Code: 

891090000 

10. Telephone: 

702-770-7000 

11. Ext: 

12. Email: 

robert.desalvio@wynnre 


G. RELATIONSHIP TO RELEASE OR THREAT OF RELEASE OF PERSON UNDERTAKING RAM: 

F Check here to change relationship 

F"l.RPorPRP F a. Owner I - b. Operator c. Generator F d. Transporter 

r e. Other RP or PRP Specify: _ 

F 2. Fiduciary. Secured Lender or Municipality with Exempt Status (as defined by M.G.L. c. 2IE, s. 2) 
r 3. Agency or Public Utility on a Right of Way (as defined by M.G.L. c. 21E, s. 5(j)) 

F 4. Any Other Person Undertaking RAM Specify Relationship. _ 


H. REQUIRED ATTACHMENT AND SUBMITTALS: 

I - 1. Check here if any Remediation Waste, generated as a result of this RAM, will be stored, treated, managed, recycled or reused at 
the site following submission of the RAM Completion Statement. You must submit a Phase IV Remedy Implementation Plan along with 
the appropriate transmittal form (BWSC 108). 

r 2 . Check here if the Response Action(s) on which this opinion is based, if any, are (were) subject to any order(s), permit(s) and/or 
approval(s) issued by DEP or EPA. If the box is checked, you MUST attach a statement identifying the applicable provisions thereof. 


F 3. Check here to certify that the Chief Municipal Officer and the Local Board of Health have been notified of the implementation of a 
Release Abatement Measure. 

r 4. Check here if any non-updatable information provided on this form is incorrect, e.g. Release Address/Location Aid. Send 
corrections to bwsc.edep@state.ma.us. 

r 5 . If a RAM Compliance Fee is required for this RAM, check here to certify that a RAM Compliance Fee was submitted to DEP, P. O. 
Box 4062. Boston, MA 02211. 

F 6. Check here to certify that the LSP Opinion containing the material facts, data, and other information is attached. 


Revised: 8/5/2013 


Page 5 of 6 


























Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection BWSC 106 

Bureau of Waste Site Cleanup 

Release Tracking Number 

RELEASE ABATEMENT MEASURE (RAM) 

TRANSMITTAL FORM 

Pursuant to 310 CMR 40.0444 - 0446 (Subpart D) 

I. CERTIFICATION OF PERSON UNDERTAKING RAM: 

1.1. ROBERT DESALVIO , attest under the pains and penalties of perjury (i) that I have personally examined and am familiar 

with the information contained in this submittal, including any and all documents accompanying this transmittal form, (ii) that, based on my 
inquiry of those individuals immediately responsible for obtaining the information, the material information contained in this submittal is, to 
the best of my know ledge and belief, true, accurate and complete, and (iii) that 1 am fully authorized to make this attestation on behalf of the 
entity legally responsible for this submittal. I/the person or entity on whose behalf this submittal is made am/is aware that there are 
significant penalties, including, but not limited to, possible fines and imprisonment, for willfully submitting false, inaccurate, or incomplete 
information. 

2. By: ROBERT DESALVIO 3. Title: PRESIDENT 

(Signature) 

4. For: WYNN MA, LLC 5. Date: 8/18/2015 


13341 



(Name of person or entity recorded in Section F) (mm/dd'yyyy) 

f - 6. Check here if the address of the person providing certification is different from address recorded in Section F. 

7. Street: 

8. City/Town: 9. State: 10. ZIP Code: 

11. Telephone: 12. Ext: 13. Email: 


YOU ARE SUBJECT TO AN ANNUAL COMPLIANCE ASSURANCE FEE OF UP TO $10,000 PER 
BILLABLE YEAR FOR THIS DISPOSAL SITE. YOU MUST LEGIBLY COMPLETE ALL RELEVANT 
SECTIONS OF THIS FORM OR DEP MAY RETURN THE DOCUMENT AS INCOMPLETE. IF YOU SUBMIT AN INCOMPLETE FORM, 

YOU MAY BE PENALIZED FOR MISSING A REQUIRED DEADLINE 


Date Stamp (DEP USE ONLY:) 


Received by DEP on 
8/18/2015 3:58:57 PM 


Revised: 8/5/2013 


Page 6 of 6 






























APPENDIX C 


PIP COMMENTS AND RESPONSES TO COMMENTS 




Commenters 

Comment Code 

Entity or Individual 

M&E-2 

McCarter & English, 265 Franklin Street, Boston, MA 02110-3113, Leigh A. 
Gilligan, Partner 

Responses to Comments Received on Draft Release Abatement Measure Plan 

M&E 2-1 

Wynn and GZA have elected to perform the remedial actions at the Site via 
multiple MCP Preliminary Response Actions rather than via the MCP's 
Comprehensive Response Action process. Specifically, Wynn and GZA plan to 
implement multiple Release Abatement Measures (RAMs) rather than 
developing a comprehensive Phase IV Remedy Implementation Plan (RIP) in 
accordance with 310 CMR 40.0870. As stated in the MCP (310 CMR 40.0405(3)), 
"the purposes of Release Abatement Measures are to remediate limited or 
localized releases, and/or to mitigate the impacts of larger releases until such 
time as more comprehensive remedial actions can be instituted at the disposal 
site, in accordance with 310 CMR 40.0800." 


Please explain why a RAM Plan rather than a Phase IV RIP is being used to 
implement remedial actions at the Site and how Wynn and GZA see this 
approach as consistent with 310 CMR 40.0405(3). Please address specifically 
why a Preliminary Response Action approach has been selected when the 
Comprehensive Response Action process (i.e., completion of Phase II and Phase 

III evaluations) is already in progress for the Site, and the results of same are 
plainly being relied upon by GZA. This seems to be a significant distinction 
between the use of RAMs on other larger scale projects where comprehensive 
response actions have not yet commenced or been as far along. 


Resoonse: The proposed RAM will remediate longstanding localized conditions 
in three distinct areas in order to reduce risk on an accelerated schedule which, 
as the commenter recognizes, is a completely appropriate use of a RAM as 
specifically authorized by the MCP. Further response actions on the land-side 
portion of the Site will be the subject of a second RAM. The use of RAMs for 
significant site remediation activities is common, and the approach being taken 
on the project site is not unusual. This approach has been discussed with, and 
approved by, MassDEP. As requested by MassDEP, response actions for the 
water-side portion of the Site will involve the preparation of a supplemental 

Phase II Comprehensive Site Assessment, a supplemental Phase III Identification, 
Evaluation and Selection of Comprehensive Remedial Action Alternatives, a 

Phase IV Remedy Implementation Plan, and a Phase IV Completion Statement, 
all in accordance with the MCP. 

M&E 2-2 

The most recent publicly documented Risk Characterization was conducted as 
part of the Phase III Remedial Action Plan (GEI, 2013). However, Wynn and GZA 
have collected additional soil and groundwater samples since that Risk 
Characterization was completed. 














Please explain how data for the samples collected since the 2013 Risk 
Characterization update and impact the findings and conclusions of the 2013 

Risk Characterization. Specifically, please describe how exposure point 
concentrations and associated quantitative risk estimates are impacted by these 
additional data. 

Response: The data collected since the 2013 Risk Characterization are generally 
consistent with the earlier data. The evaluation of risk related to the potential 
generation of dust in connection with the RAM activities is presented in 

Appendix J to the RAM Plan, the PM 10 Risk Evaluation Tables. Otherwise, the 

GEI Risk Characterization is sufficient pending further risk characterization that 
will be completed upon the completion of response actions at the Site. See also 
response the response to M&E 2-23 below.. 

M&E 2-3 

The Stage 1 and II Environmental Risk Characterization prepared by Menzie-Cura 
& Associates, Inc. (MCA) (2006) stated that a condition of Substantial Hazard 
existed due to "continuing discharge of contaminated groundwater to surface 
water where the levels of oil or hazardous material attributable to the release 
already exceed Massachusetts Surface Water Standards" (MCA, 2006). A 
condition of Substantial Hazard has continued to exist almost 10 years after it 
was identified. 

Please explain how Wynn plans to address this Substantial Hazard. 

Response: The continuing discharge referenced bv MCA is associated with 
conditions in the Low pH area. That is why GZA has focused remediation in this 
portion of the Site on the area where the groundwater has a pH lower than 4. 

The RAM in the Low pH Area will immediately address this longstanding 
condition by increasing the pH of the groundwater in the Low pH Area and 
reducing the permeability of the soil in that Area, both of which will serve to 
reduce the concentrations of site-related dissolved metals being discharged to 
surface water. 

M&E2-4 

4. The Phase II Comprehensive Site Assessment (GEI, 2012) concluded from 

MCA's Stage II Ecological Risk Characterization (2006) that "[t]he sediments near 
the Site pose a significant risk of harm to the benthic (i.e. sediment-dwelling) 
invertebrate community at the Site. Concentrations of arsenic and copper in the 
softshell clam from the Site exceeded the levels associated with toxicological 
effects to benthic invertebrates. The results of the chronic sediment toxicity 
tests in four of the five samples showed significantly reduced survival, growth, 
or reproduction relative to "local conditions" samples," (GEI, 2012). The Draft 

RAM Plan states that "remediation planned on the land-side portion of the Site 
is likelv to change conditions on the water-side portion of thp SitP M (pmph^k 
supplied). 










Please explain how the remediation of the land-side portion of the Site is 
expected to change conditions on the water-side portion of the Site. 

Additionally, please describe specifically what effect the remedial actions are 
expected to have on copper concentrations in surface water and sediment and 
the basis for these expectations in light of the fact that the leachate testing 
performed for the in-situ stabilization (ISS) mixture did not include copper. 

Response: The referenced quotation was from the GEI Phase III report regarding 
its selection of a Temporary Solution for the water-side portion of the Site. The 
entire sentence, as it appears in the RAM Plan, is: 

For the woter-side portion of the Disposal Site, GEI selected "Further Assessment 
and Monitoring" as the recommended RAA, indicating that this approach would 
initially result in a Temporary Solution, but that the "remediation planned on the 
landside portion of the Site is likely to change conditions on the waterside portion 
of the Site and this RAA will allow the impact of those changes to be evaluated." 

Wynn MA intends to achieve a Permanent Solution for the water-side portion of 
the Site by removing and capping impacted sediments. Further details 
concerning more recent surface water and sediment data, and potential 
comprehensive response actions for addressing that data, will be presented in 
the forthcoming supplemental Phase II and Phase III reports for the water-side 
portion of the Site. 

M&E 2-5 

5. The Phase III Remedial Action Plan (GEI, 2013) indicates that a Temporary 
Solution may be achieved for the water-side portion of the Site. 

Please explain whether Wynn plans to achieve a Temporary Solution or a 
Permanent Solution for the water-side portion of the Site. 

Response: Wynn MA intends to achieve a Permanent Solution for the entire 

Site, including the water-side portion. 

M&E 2-6 

6. The Phase III Remedial Action Plan (RAP) (GEI, 2013) included a post 
remediation risk characterization to evaluate potential risks following 
implementation of the selected Remedial Action Alternative. This risk 
characterization identified Significant Risks after remediation for the following 
receptors: future hypothetical park visitor, future hypothetical resident, and 
future construction worker. 

Please describe possible remedial alternatives that could be implemented to 
address these identified significant risks, and please provide a comparison of the 
costs to eliminate these risks, without relying on an Activity and Use Limitation 
(AUL) to do so, relative to the cost of the planned remedy which leaves 
significant contamination (and associated risk) in place at the Site. 

Response: Given the horizontal and vertical extent of contamination on the 
land-side portion of the Site, there is no remedial alternative that would achieve 

















a Condition of No Significant Risk for that portion of the Site without an Activity 
and Use Limitation that would also be consistent with the evaluation criteria 
specified by the MCP. There will be no significant risks upon the completion of 
the remediation, the construction of the Wynn Resort in Everett, and the 
imposition of the Activity and Use Limitation. 

M&E2-7 

7. The Phase III Remedial Action Plan (RAP) (GEI, 2013) did not include an 
evaluation of remedial alternatives that would achieve or approach background 
conditions. 

Please describe possible remedial alternatives that could be implemented to 
achieve or approach background conditions at the Site, and please provide a 
comparison of the costs to achieve background relative to the cost of the 
planned remedy. 

Response: Given the horizontal and vertical extent of contamination on the 
land-side portion of the Site, and considering the criteria for the requested 
evaluation as specified by the MCP, it is not feasible to achieve or approach 
background conditions for that portion of the Site . 

M&E 2-8 

8. The Draft RAM Plan states that "the Phase III RAP identified three areas of 

concern to be addressed to reach a Permanent Solution under the MCP on the 
land-side portion of the Site" (GZA, 2015). The Phase III (RAP) also stipulates that 
an achievement of a Permanent Solution is dependent on an AUL. 

Please describe in detail what conditions will be included in the AUL (i.e., 
activities and uses that will be prohibited in order to maintain a condition of No 
Significant Risk and obligations and conditions that will be imposed by the AUL). 

Response: The substance of the AUL will be determined upon the completion of 
response actions at the Site. However, given the nature of the contaminants at 
the Site, the AUL will focus on the prevention of uncontrolled exposure to 
contaminated soil remaining on the land-side portion of the Site. To prevent 
such exposure, the AUL will require buildings, pavement, and/or clean fill to limit 
inadvertent exposure to contaminated soil, as well as the adherence to a Health 
and Safety Plan and a Soil Management Plan during activities that might expose 
that soil. 

M&E 2-9 

9. The Draft RAM Plan (GZA, 2015) states the following remedial objectives: 

Location 

Remedial Objective Description 

Media 

Primary 

Constituents 

of Concern 

A-5 Area 

• Reduce soil concentrations to 

below UCLs 

Soil 

Arsenic 

Lead 


















• Remove soil with arsenic and 

lead concentrations similar to 
sample A-5 

• Reduce risk for future 

construction workers 



CES-2 

Area 

• Remove potential source 
material 

• Reduce groundwater 
concentrations to below UCLs 

• Reduce risk for future 

construction workers 

Soil 

Groundwater 

Arsenic 

Lead 

Low pH 

Area 

• Treat potential source 

material 

• Reduce groundwater 
concentrations to below UCLs 

• Adjust pH to greater than 
approximately 4 

Soil 

Groundwater 

Arsenic 

Lead 

Low pH 

Please explain how the proposed remedial actions will achieve the remedial 
objectives of reducing soil and groundwater concentrations below UCLs, 
removing potential source material, removing soil with arsenic and lead 
concentrations similar to sample A-5, and reducing risk for future construction 
works. 

Please explain how it will be demonstrated that the remedial objectives have 
been achieved following completion of the remedial activities. 

Resoonse: For both the A-5 Area and CES-2 Area, the proposed RAM activities 
consist of the excavation and off-site disposal of soils exhibiting elevated 
concentrations of the contaminants of concern in those areas. This will reduce 
the risk for construction workers who may otherwise be exposed to those soils. 

As indicated in the RAM Plan, average concentrations of lead and arsenic in the 
samples bounding the A-5 Area are already below UCLs, and the excavation of 
soils at CES-2 will continue until the average post-excavation concentrations of 
the contaminants of concern are below the UCLs. Groundwater sampling will be 
conducted in the CES-2 Area and the Low pH Area to confirm the achievement 
of the remedial objectives for groundwater. 

M&E 2-10 

10. The Draft RAM Plan (GZA, 2015) states that "based on the analytical data 
developed as part of recent assessment activities, the A-5 Area has been 
expanded southerly to include exploration locations GZ101, GZ102 and GZ103, 
and is bounded by explorations A-5-2, A-5-3, A-5-4, A-5-5, A-5-6, GZ004, GZ006, 
GZ007, GZ008, and GZ009" (GZA, 2015). As a point of clarification, should 
samples GZ004, GZ006, GZ007, GZ008, and GZ009 be GZ104, GZ106, GZ107, 
GZ108, and GZ109? It appears that several of the samples bounding the A-5 Area 

















excavation exceed UCLs for arsenic in soil, including A-5-3, GZ104, GZ106, and 
GZ109. 

Please explain the basis for leaving in place these soils that exceed UCLs and 
how achievement of the remedial objective of reducing soil concentrations to 
below UCLs will be demonstrated. 

These sample locations do not appear to be included in Figure 3 - Proposed Pre- 
Construction RAM Remediation Areas. 

Please add these locations to the figure so that reviewers and the public can 
confirm that the proposed areas shown are bounded as described in the text. 

Response: That is correct; "GZ004, GZ006, GZ007, GZ0C8, and GZ009" should be 
"GZ104, GZ106, GZ107, GZ108, and GZ109." Figure 2 has been revised to show 
the areas of proposed excavation. Although soil in discrete locations above the 
UCLs may remain after excavation, the average concentrations within the A-5 

Area will be reduced to below the UCLs, as specified in the MCP. 

M&E 2-11 

11. Please explain how the boundaries of the proposed CES-2 Area excavation 
were determined. 

Response: The boundaries of the CES-2 excavation were determined using a 
combination of soil and groundwater data, with a focus on locations with arsenic 
concentrations in groundwater exceeding UCLs, and locations with arsenic 
concentrations in soil exceeding the UCL or the acute risk value calculated in 

GEI's Phase III report. 

M&E 2-12 

12. Please describe where concentrations above UCLs are expected to remain 
following the proposed remedial actions and a list of the samples used to 
characterize those areas. 

Response: Following the completion of the RAM. the average soil 
concentrations will be below UCLs. See also response to M&E 2-10. 

M&E 2-13 

13. Please explain the basis for sidewall and bottom sampling frequency in the 
CES-2 and A-5 excavation areas. 

Response: Confirmatory sampling is not anticipated in the A-S Arpa herancp 
explorations have already bounded the area of elevated concentrations of the 
contaminants of concern both vertically and horizontally. Confirmatory soil 
samples will be obtained from the bottom of the excavation in the CES-2 Area. 

The specific number of samples collected will be dependent on the final size of 
the excavation. The soil samples will be analyzed for RCRA-8 metals to confirm 
that the remedial objectives have been met. 

M&E 2-14 

14. One of the stated remedial objectives for the CES-2 Area is to reduce 
groundwater concentrations to below UCLs; however, the Draft RAM Plan does 














not include proposed monitoring of the groundwater following the excavation, 
which would seem to be both prudent and necessary. 

Please explain how it will be demonstrated that this remedial objective has been 
achieved. 

Response: Groundwater samples will be collected to demonstrate that the 
remedial objective has been achieved. 

M&E 2-15 

15. The Draft RAM Plan (GZA, 2015) does not include excavation designs for the 
A-5 Area and CES-2 Area. 

Please provide these designs for public comment. 

Response: Final excavation designs for the A-5 Area and CES-2 Area will be 
developed by the selected remediation contractor. Details regarding the 
excavation designs will be included in the documents placed in the repositories, 
and notice of the availability of these documents will be provided to those 
individuals who express an interest. 

M&E 2-16 

16. Please describe how the boundaries of the Low pH Area were defined. 

Response: The Low pH area includes all locations where the pH of groundwater 
has been measured at or below 4. 

M&E 2-17 

17. Please describe how dust will be suppressed during ex-situ soil mixing 
activities. 

Response: The ex-situ treatment of soil will be limited to certain soils from the 
CES-2 and A-5 Areas exhibit Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) 
characteristics requiring such treatment prior to disposal. As discussed in the 

RAM Plan, if ex-situ soil treatment is required, the treatment chemicals will be 
applied in liquid form to minimize the potential for the generation of dust. 
Consistent with the specifications being developed for the remedial contractor, 
additional dust suppression measures will be implemented as necessary using 
standard industry techniques, such as alteration of work practices to minimize 
dust generation or application of water. Perimeter dust monitoring will be 
conducted as described in the RAM Plan during all RAM activities, including any 
ex-situ soil treatment. 

M&E 2-18 

18. Please quantify and describe the human health risks associated with ex-situ 
mixing of soils containing lead concentrations that exceed the TCLP criterion. 

Response: The average concentrations of contaminants detected in those soils 
slated for ex-situ treatment are generally consistent with the soil exposure point 
concentrations (EPCs) developed for the CES-2 Area. Accordingly, the same dust 
action level of 75 pg/m 3 will be used during any ex-situ treatment. See RAM 
Appendix J, as well as the responses to M&E 2-17 and M&E 2-23. 















M&E2-19 

19. The Draft RAM Plan (GZA, 2015) states, "in order to meet effluent limits, the 
treatment train will likely include equalization, metals precipitation through 
clarification, filtration and sludge management, cyanide destruction through a 
two stage oxidation process, arsenic polishing by ion exchange or adsorbent 
resin, and neutralization," (GZA, 2015). 

Please provide the design of this treatment train for public comment. 

Response: The specific design of the treatment train will be developed by the 
selected remediation contractor. As described in the RAM Plan, the efficiency of 
the treatment train will be assessed at regular intervals to confirm that the 
discharge meets MCP GW-3 Standards. Details of the treatment train will be 
included in documents placed in the repositories, and notice of the availability of 
these documents will be provided to individuals who express an interest. 

M&E 2-20 

20. The Draft RAM Plan (GZA, 2015) states that hydraulic containment of 
groundwater will be maintained and the contractor will prepare a recharge area 
design. Please provide the hydraulic containment design for public comment. 

Response: The specific design of the hvdraulic containment will be developed 
by the selected remediation contractor. Hydraulic containment will be 
confirmed on an on-going basis using the existing monitoring well network at 
the Site. Details of the hydraulic containment design will be included in 
documents placed in the repositories, and notice of the availability of these 
documents will be provided to individuals who express an interest. 

M&E 2-21 

21. According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), 
"particles less than 2.5 micrometers in diameter (PM2.5) are referred to as 
"fine" particles and are believed to pose the greatest health risks," (USEPA, 

2015). 

Please describe the basis for monitoring for PM 10 dust particles instead of or in 
addition to PM2.5 and total suspended particulate. 

Response: According to USEPA, the main sources of PM2.5 particles are 
"combustion activities (motor vehicles, power plants, wood burning, etc.) and 
certain industrial processes," while the main sources of "coarse" particles (i.e., 
particles with diameters between 2.5 and 10 micrometers) include "crushing or 
grinding operations, and dust from paved or unpaved roadways" 
(http://epa.gov/pmdesignations/faa.htm). Since the RAM activities fall in the 
latter category, monitoring for PM 10 particles and not PM 2.5 particles is 
appropriate. 

M&E 2-22 

22. Please describe the basis for the total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs) 
action level of 1 parts per million (ppm) for the 15-minute time-weighted 
average, and please explain how this action level will maintain a condition of No 















Significant Risk in accordance with the MCP for nearby receptors during 
construction. 

Response: Based on the analytical data, GZA does not consider monitoring for 
VOCs necessary to ensure a Condition of No Significant Risk for nearby receptors 
in connection with the RAM activities because VOCs are not a contaminant of 
concern in the RAM areas. However, the 1 ppm action level was retained as a 
conservative measure. 

M&E 2-23 

23. The Draft RAM Plan (GZA, 2015) states that the PM10 dust action levels were 
selected based on National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) and 
Massachusetts Ambient Air Quality Standards (MAAQS) and that GZA developed 
soil-derived dust exposure point concentrations (EPCs) for each of the 
remediation areas. 

Please describe how these values were used to select the PM 10 action levels. 

Response: The National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for PM10 is 150 
ug/m3 for a 24- hour period (http://www.epa.gov/air/criteria.html); the health- 
based primary standard for PM10 is 150 ug/m3 averaged over a 24-hour period 
based on the Massachusetts Ambient Air Quality Standards (MAAQS) 
(http://www.mass.gov/eea/agencies/massdep/air/quality/particle-pollution- 
and-air-quality.html). 

GZA used the 150 ug/m3 standard to evaluate risks to commercial workers and 
residents potentially impacted by dust generated during the remediation of the 
A-5, Low pH, and CES-2 areas. For each area, GZA developed soil exposure point 
concentrations (EPCs) generally based on the arithmetic mean 
concentrations. GZA then estimated contaminant concentrations in dust by 
multiplying the soil EPCs by the PM10 of 150 ug/m3 (and a unit conversion 
factor). Based on this risk evaluation, GZA concluded that the 150 ug/m3 action 
level would be sufficient to maintain a condition of No Significant Risk to the 
noted potential receptors for the A-5 and Low pH Areas. However, for the CES-2 
Area, a more stringent PM10 action level of 75 ug/m3 was selected to maintain 
a Condition of No Significant Risk to the potential receptors. See also RAM Plan 
Appendix J. 

M&E 2-24 

24. Please describe the required calibration methodology and frequency for the 
air monitoring equipment and how calibration information will be documented. 

Response: Each air monitoring station will be calibrated daily prior to the start 
of invasive site work. Individual sensors within each monitoring station (PIDs 
and particulate meters) will be calibrated daily according to the instrument 
manufacturer's recommendations. The calibration procedure for the PID 
consists of introducing non-VOC containing "zero air" to check the instrument 
baseline zero, followed by the introduction of a known concentration of 
calibration gas to verify correct instrument response. Particulate meters are 
calibrated using a zero air filter on the inlet to verify instrument baseline 











zero. The results of each calibration procedure are documented daily in a field 
notebook maintained by the air monitoring technician. 

M&E 2-25 

25. The Draft RAM Plan (GZA, 2015) states that "visual observations of both the 
Mystic River and the Coastal Bank outside of the sheet pile wall will be 
conducted on a daily basis during ISS implementation to assess for the breakout 
of remedial additives," (GZA, 2015). 

Please describe specifically how these visual observations will be able to assess 
breakout of remedial additives. Please describe why sampling and analysis of the 
nearby surface water (which would seem to be both prudent and necessary) was 
not included in the RAM Plan to assess breakout of remedial additives. 

Response: Visual observations indicating breakout would include observation of 
seeps of soil/Portland cement mixes, sloughing of soils, or cloudy/discolored 
plumes emanating from the shoreline. Field pH screening and the collection of 
surface water samples for laboratory analysis will be conducted as necessary 
based on any such visual observations. 

M&E 2-26 

26. The Health and Safety Plan (HASP) states that personal protective 
equipment, specifically respirators, will be reevaluated following initial exposure 
assessments with respect to respirable lead and arsenic. 

Please describe the basis for this requirement and how the evaluation will be 
performed. 

Response: The basis for this reauirement is the OSHA Lead Standard. Title 29 

Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1926.62, and the OSHA Arsenic Standard, Title 
29 CFR 1926.1118. The evaluation will be performed during RAM activities as 
directed by those two OSHA standards, and will be evaluated throughout the 
project based on both industrial hygiene air samples and real-time dust 
monitoring. See Appendix H. 








mccarter 

&ENGLISH 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW 


July 22, 2015 

VIA E-MAIL AND U S. MAIL 


Mr. David E. Leone 
Senior Project Manager 
GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc. 

249 Vanderbilt Avenue 
Norwood, MA 02062 

Re: Draft Release Abatement Measure (RAM) Plan Public Involvement Plan (PIP) 

1 Horizon Way/Former Everett Staging Yard, Everett, MA 
RTN 3-13341 

Dear Mr. Leone: 

On behalf of the Key Petitioner to the above-referenced PIP Petition (Evmorphia 
Stratis), we hereby submit the following comments to the draft RAM Plan dated 
June 2, 2015: 

1. Wynn and GZA have elected to perform the remedial actions at the Site via 
multiple MCP Preliminary Response Actions rather than via the MCPs 
Comprehensive Response Action process. Specifically, Wynn and GZA plan to 
implement multiple Release Abatement Measures (RAMs) rather than developing a 
comprehensive Phase IV Remedy Implementation Plan (RIP) in accordance with 
310 CMR 40.0870. As stated in the MCP (310 CMR 40.0405(3)), "the purposes of 
Release Abatement Measures are to remediate limited or localized releases, and/or 
to mitigate the impacts of larger releases until such time as more comprehensive 
remedial actions can be instituted at the disposal site, in accordance with 310 CMR 
40.0800." 

Please explain why a RAM Plan rather than a Phase IV RIP is being used to 
implement remedial actions at the Site and how Wynn and GZA see this approach 
as consistent with 310 CMR 40.0405(3). Please address specifically why a 
Preliminary Response Action approach has been selected when the Comprehensive 
Response Action process (i.e., completion of Phase II and Phase III evaluations) is 
already in progress for the Site, and the results of same are plainly being relied 
upon by GZA. This seems to be a significant distinction between the use of RAMs 
on other larger scale projects where comprehensive response actions have not yet 
commenced or been as far along. 

2. The most recent publicly documented Risk Characterization was conducted 
as part of the Phase III Remedial Action Plan (GEI, 2013). However, Wynn and GZA 
have collected additional soil and groundwater samples since that Risk 
Characterization was completed. 


ME1 20730705V. 1 













July 22, 2015 
Page 2 


Please explain how data for the samples collected since the 2013 Risk 
Characterization update and impact the findings and conclusions of the 2013 Risk 
Characterization. Specifically, please describe how exposure point concentrations 
and associated quantitative risk estimates are impacted by these additional data. 

3. The Stage I and II Environmental Risk Characterization prepared by Menzie- 
Cura & Associates, Inc. (MCA) (2006) stated that a condition of Substantial Hazard 
existed due to "continuing discharge of contaminated groundwater to surface water 
where the levels of oil or hazardous material attributable to the release already 
exceed Massachusetts Surface Water Standards” (MCA, 2006). A condition of 
Substantial Hazard has continued to exist almost 10 years after it was identified. 

Please explain how Wynn plans to address this Substantial Hazard. 

4. The Phase II Comprehensive Site Assessment (GEJ, 2012) concluded from 
MCA’s Stage II Ecological Risk Characterization (2006) that “[t]he sediments near 
the Site pose a significant risk of harm to the benthic (i.e. sediment-dwelling) 
invertebrate community at the Site. Concentrations of arsenic and copper in the soft- 
shell clam from the Site exceeded the levels associated with toxicological effects to 
benthic invertebrates. The results of the chronic sediment toxicity tests in four of the 
five samples showed significantly reduced survival, growth, or reproduction relative 
to "local conditions" samples,” (GEI, 2012). The Draft RAM Plan states that 
"remediation planned on the land-side portion of the Site js likely to change 
conditions on the water-side portion of the Site" (emphasis supplied). 

Please explain how the remediation of the land-side portion of the Site is expected 
to change conditions on the water-side portion of the Site. Additionally, please 
describe specifically what effect the remedial actions are expected to have on 
copper concentrations in surface water and sediment and the basis for these 
expectations in light of the fact that the leachate testing performed for the in-situ 
stabilization (ISS) mixture did not include copper. 

5. The Phase III Remedial Action Plan (GEI, 2013) indicates that a Temporary 
Solution may be achieved for the water-side portion of the Site. 

Please explain whether Wynn plans to achieve a Temporary Solution or a 
Permanent Solution for the water-side portion of the Site. 

6. The Phase III Remedial Action Plan (RAP) (GEI, 2013) included a post- 
remediation risk characterization to evaluate potential risks following implementation 
of the selected Remedial Action Alternative. This risk characterization identified 
Significant Risks after remediation for the following receptors: future hypothetical 
park visitor, future hypothetical resident, and future construction worker. 


ME1 20730705V. 1 





July 22, 2015 
Page 3 


Please describe possible remedial alternatives that could be implemented to 
address these identified significant risks, and please provide a comparison of the 
costs to eliminate these risks, without relying on an Activity and Use Limitation 
(AUL) to do so, relative to the cost of the planned remedy which leaves significant 
contamination (and associated risk) in place at the Site. 

7. The Phase III Remedial Action Plan (RAP) (GEI, 2013) did not include an 
evaluation of remedial alternatives that would achieve or approach background 
conditions. 

Please describe possible remedial alternatives that could be implemented to 
achieve or approach background conditions at the Site, and please provide a 
comparison of the costs to achieve background relative to the cost of the planned 
remedy. 

8. The Draft RAM Plan states that “the Phase III RAP identified three areas of 
concern to be addressed to reach a Permanent Solution under the MCP on the 
land-side portion of the Site” (GZA, 2015). The Phase III (RAP) also stipulates that 
an achievement of a Permanent Solution is dependent on an AUL. 

Please describe in detail what conditions will be included in the AUL (i.e., activities 
and uses that will be prohibited in order to maintain a condition of No Significant 
Risk and obligations and conditions that will be imposed by the AUL). 

9. The Draft RAM Plan (GZA, 2015) states the following remedial objectives: 


Location 

Remedial Objective Description 

Media 

Primary 
Constituents 
of Concern 

A-5 Area 

• Reduce soil concentrations below 
Upper Concentration Limits (UCLs) 

• Remove soil with arsenic and lead 
concentrations similar to sample A-5 

• Reduce risk for future construction 
workers 

Soil 

Arsenic 

Lead 

CES-2 Area 

• Remove potential source material 

• Reduce groundwater concentrations 
to below UCLs 

• Reduce risk for future construction 
workers 

Soil 

Groundwater 

Arsenic 

Lead 

Low pH Area 

• Treat potential source material 

• Reduce groundwater concentrations 
to below UCLs 

• Adjust pH to greater than 
approximately 4 

Soil 

Groundwater 

Arsenic 

Lead 

Low pH 


ME1 20730705V 1 












July 22, 2015 
Page 4 


Please explain how the proposed remedial actions will achieve the remedial 
objectives of reducing soil and groundwater concentrations below UCLs, removing 
potential source material, removing soil with arsenic and lead concentrations similar 
to sample A-5, and reducing risk for future construction works. 

Please explain how it will be demonstrated that the remedial objectives have been 
achieved following completion of the remedial activities. 

10. The Draft RAM Plan (GZA, 2015) states that “based on the analytical data 
developed as part of recent assessment activities, the A-5 Area has been expanded 
southerly to include exploration locations GZ101, GZ102 and GZ103, and is 
bounded by explorations A-5-2, A-5-3, A-5-4, A-5-5, A-5-6, GZ004, GZ006, GZ007, 
GZ008, and GZ009” (GZA, 2015). As a point of clarification, should samples GZ004, 
GZ006! GZ007, GZ008, and GZ009 be GZ104, GZ106, GZ107, GZ108, and 
GZ109? It appears that several of the samples bounding the A-5 Area excavation 
exceed UCLs for arsenic in soil, including A-5-3, GZ104, GZ106, and GZ109. 

Please explain the basis for leaving in place these soils that exceed UCLs and how 
achievement of the remedial objective of reducing soil concentrations to below 
UCLs will be demonstrated. 

These sample locations do not appear to be included in Figure 3 - Proposed Pre- 
Construction RAM Remediation Areas. Please add these locations to the figure so 
that reviewers and the public can confirm that the proposed areas shown are 
bounded as described in the text. 

11. Please explain how the boundaries of the proposed CES-2 Area excavation 
were determined. 

12. Please describe where concentrations above UCLs are expected to remain 
following the proposed remedial actions and a list of the samples used to 
characterize those areas. 

13. Please explain the basis for sidewall and bottom sampling frequency in the 
CES-2 and A-5 excavation areas. 

14. One of the stated remedial objectives for the CES-2 Area is to reduce 
groundwater concentrations to below UCLs; however, the Draft RAM Plan does not 
include proposed monitoring of the groundwater following the excavation, which 
would seem to be both prudent and necessary. 

Please explain how it will be demonstrated that this remedial objective has been 
achieved. 

15. The Draft RAM Plan (GZA, 2015) does not include excavation designs for 
the A-5 Area and CES-2 Area. 


ME1 20730705v. 1 



July 22, 2015 
Page 5 


Please provide these designs for public comment. 

16. Please describe how the boundaries of the Low pH Area were defined. 

17. Please describe how dust will be suppressed during ex-situ soil mixing 
activities. 

18. Please quantify and describe the human health risks associated with ex-situ 
mixing of soils containing lead concentrations that exceed the TCLP criterion. 

19. The Draft RAM Plan (GZA, 2015) states, "in order to meet effluent limits, the 
treatment train will likely include equalization, metals precipitation through 
clarification, filtration and sludge management, cyanide destruction through a two 
stage oxidation process, arsenic polishing by ion exchange or adsorbent resin, and 
neutralization," (GZA, 2015). 

Please provide the design of this treatment train for public comment. 

20. The Draft RAM Plan (GZA, 2015) states that hydraulic containment of 
groundwater will be maintained and the contractor will prepare a recharge area 
design. 

Please provide the hydraulic containment design for public comment. 

21. According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), 
"particles less than 2.5 micrometers in diameter (PM2.5) are referred to as "fine" 
particles and are believed to pose the greatest health risks,” (USEPA, 2015). 

Please describe the basis for monitoring for PM 10 dust particles instead of or in 
addition to PM2.5 and total suspended particulate. 

22. Please describe the basis for the total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs) 
action level of 1 parts per million (ppm) for the 15-minute time-weighted average, 
and please explain how this action level will maintain a condition of No Significant 
Risk in accordance with the MCP for nearby receptors during construction. 

23. The Draft RAM Plan (GZA, 2015) states that the PM10 dust action levels 
were selected based on National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) and 
Massachusetts Ambient Air Quality Standards (MAAQS) and that GZA developed 
soil-derived dust exposure point concentrations (EPCs) for each of the remediation 

areas. 

Please describe how these values were used to select the PM 10 action levels. 

24. Please describe the required calibration methodology and frequency for the 
air monitoring equipment and how calibration information will be documented. 


ME1 20730705v. 1 


July 22, 2015 
Page 6 


25. The Draft RAM Plan (GZA, 2015) states that “visual observations of both the 
Mystic River and the Coastal Bank outside of the sheet pile wall will be conducted 
on a daily basis during ISS implementation to assess for the breakout of remedial 
additives,” (GZA, 2015). 

Please describe specifically how these visual observations will be able to assess 
breakout of remedial additives. Please describe why sampling and analysis of the 
nearby surface water (which would seem to be both prudent and necessary) was 
not included in the RAM Plan to assess breakout of remedial additives. 

26. The Health and Safety Plan (HASP) states that personal protective 
equipment, specifically respirators, will be reevaluated following initial exposure 
assessments with respect to respirable lead and arsenic. 

Please describe the basis for this requirement and how the evaluation will be 
performed. 

We look forward to receiving a summary of ail comments received and responses 
thereto. Please let me know if you have any questions. 



LAG:cl 

cc: Laurence Feldman, LSP, GZA (by email) 

Ms. Evmorphia Stratis (by email) 

Douglas G. Larson, Ph.D., P.E., GeoSyntec Consultants (by email) 
Julianna B. Connolly, LSP, GeoSyntec Consultants (by email) 
Karen Stromberg, MA DEP (by email) 

Andrew Clark, MA DEP (by email) 


ME1 20730705V. 1 




Commenters 

Comment Code 

Entity or Individual 

Maharjan 

Buddha Maharjan, 7 Scott Place, Everett, MA 02149 

Levesque 

Lynn C. Levesque, Charlestown, MA 02129 

Somerville 

City of Somerville, Massachusetts (Joseph Curtatone, Mayor) 

Kelleher 

Ann Kelleher, joy02129@gmail.com 

M&E 

McCarter & English, 265 Franklin Street, Boston, MA 02110-3113, Leigh A. 

Gilligan, Partner 


Comments Received on Draft Public Involvement Plan and/or Release Abatement Measure Plan as of 

July 13, 2015 


Maharjan-1 

In meeting, you said the truck will not use the route 99, any city road, Sullivan 
square, and Costco road. 1 am curious, what roads are they using because there 
are no other roads than 1 mention above? Or are you making any skyway overfly 
ramp for the truck? We want to know about it in details before you start the 
work. 

Response: During the June 2, 2015 meeting, it was stated that local roads (e.g., 
Main Street, Bunker Hill Street and Medford Street in Charlestown) would not be 
used. The actual routes for trucks hauling soil will be dictated in part by the 
eventual disposal location for the soil; however, Wynn will limit the truck drivers 
to main roads, such as Route 99, as direct routes to Route 93. 

Maharjan-2 

We live just across the site. When they will dig the soil, how long do the bad 
smell spread on the air? In meeting, you didn't mention any range of distance. 

You just mentioned about the alarm. But we want to know the factual data that 
the harm air can harm the people. Before the work, we want to know the factual 
researched data that people are safe/unsafe in certain distance of the working 
site. 

Response: No significant odors are anticipated during the remediation described 
in the RAM Plan. The perimeter air monitoring system discussed during the June 

2, 2015, meeting, and described more fully in the RAM Plan, is designed to 
provide an alert before unacceptable levels of dust are generated, thereby 
allowing appropriate and timely dust mitigation measures. The dust action levels 
for the site were derived using a combination of site-specific soil analytical data 
and published National Ambient Air Quality Standards and Massachusetts 

Ambient Air Quality Standards. Details concerning the derivation of the action 
levels are further described and presented in the RAM Plan. 

Maharjan-3 

What hours will they work? We don't want any disturbance at night. 

Response: Hours of operation for the pre-construction remediation described in 
the RAM Plan are anticipated to be from 7:00 AM to 5:00 PM, Monday through 
Friday. 















Levesque-1 

1 note that one of the concerns voiced during your interviews with the 
petitioners was their ability to adequately understand the issues around Wynn's 
remediation of the Mystic River site. "Interviewees expressed an interest in 
having discussions about the remedial response action process expressed in 
layman's terms." 1 second this concern and request that you address this 
concern in the future. 1 attended the June 2 meeting and frankly did not find it 
all that helpful toward a better understanding of the issues around the site. Your 
plan also does not address that concern. Both the presentation and the plan 
shroud many of the issues in very technical jargon. Future communications 
should be in clear layman English to further everyone's full 
understanding. Perhaps an "executive summary" highlighting key points, dates, 
and contact information would be helpful? 

Response: Future technical MCP submittals will contain an executive summary 
or conclusions section. 

Levesque-2 

The PIP process opens up your planning process to the public for sharing 
information and garnering input. Since so much of the traffic transporting the 
contaminants out of the Mystic site will be going through Sullivan Square and 
thus impact Charlestown/Boston residents - as duly noted by Chris Gordon at 
the June 2 nd meeting, 1 would expect in the future that there would be much 
more communication to the Charlestown community regarding the documents 
available to them and dates of future meetings and comment periods. Notices in 
the Charlestown Patriot Bridge at least a week before a meeting would also be 
most appropriate. 

Response: As discussed at several meetings, Wynn will hold future meetings in 
various communities, including Charlestown, to keep the community informed 
about the project and remediation, and to answer questions. As has been done 
in the past, milestone public meetings will be publicly advertised to ensure 
proper notice. 

Levesque-3 

As part of this openness, 1 would suggest that in the future you provide 
information in advance (2-3 days at least) of a meeting so that attendees can 
digest the material prior to attending and thus be more conversant with the 
issues. 

Response: GZ A and Wynn will attempt to provide information for future 
meetings 3 days in advance. 

Levesque-4 

Also in the future, when deadlines have been extended, as they have in this case, 
emails to those signing up at the meeting would appear to be most 
appropriate. It is unclear to me why this extension was not widely 
communicated. 

Response: The decision to extend the public comment period was reached at 
the request of the attorney representing the PIP Petitioners. The noted 








deadlines were changed in the online repository, and notifications were made to 
those people who had signed up for the mailing list. Those who had requested 
correspondence via email received the notice electronically; those for whom we 
only have mailing addresses, or who had requested correspondence via USPS, 
received the information via the USPS. 

Levesque-5 

While 1 am not conversant with the technical aspects of the plan, 1 would like to 
know if there has been any sort of independent analysis of the site, by qualified 
experts not paid by Wynn, that confirms your plan for remediation. For example, 
you note that there are only three "hot spots" that need to be cleaned up prior 
to construction. Would an independent environmental engineering firm confirm 
that conclusion? 

Response: The remedial action alternatives outlined in the Phase III - Remedial 
Action Plan were first developed by GEI Consultants, Inc. for the prior owner of 
the Site. The selected alternatives were reviewed and supplemented by GZA. 
Wynn and GZA met with representatives of the MassDEP Bureau of Waste Site 
Cleanup to discuss the proposed landside remediation of the disposal site, and 
the draft RAM Plan addresses initial comments offered by MassDEP. In addition, 
the Gaming Commission has retained its own consultants to monitor activities at 
the site. Finally, we understand that an independent Licensed Site Professional 
has also been retained by the PIP petitioners to review GZA's work. 

Somerville-1 

Somerville officials, including the Mayor, the City Solicitor, and the Director of 
Sustainability and Environment, all at City Hall, 93 Highland Avenue, Somerville, 
MA 02143, should be added to the "site mailing list" and to the Notification to 
Local Officials and Residents of Major Milestones and Events list in the Public 
Involvement Plan. 

Response: The noted entities have been added to the mailing/notification lists. 

Somerville-2 

The Somerville Public Library, 79 Highland Avenue, Somerville, MA 02143, should 
be added as an additional Local Information Repository for all documents. 

Response: The Somerville Public Library will be added. 

Somerville-3 

Information about any planned response actions which may impact any portion 
of waters or land within Somerville's boundaries should be provided, and clearly 
demarcated on plans, to Somerville and the public. All information regarding 
proposed routing of contaminated soil or materials should be provided to 
Somerville officials. 

Response: No MCP response actions associated with the disposal site are 
anticipated to occur within the boundaries of Somerville; however, should 
response actions extend into Somerville, the requested information will be 
provided. Routing of contaminated soil or materials through Somerville, with the 
exception of potential transportation via a short section of Route 38 to Interstate 
93, is not anticipated. 













Somerville-4 

Somerville believes it is appropriate and necessary for an independent licensed 
site professional to review the remedial action plan (RAM Plan) and any further 
remediation plans. 

Response: See Levesque-5 

Somerville-5 

More than half of the land area containing over half the population of Somerville 
meets one or more of the Environmental Justice (EJ) population descriptors in 
the 2002 EJ Policy. Many of these block groups are within a mile of the Wynn 
Everett site, as are similar EJ populations in Everett and other surrounding 
communities. Whether or not required by the EJ Policy, enhanced public 
participation, as set forth in that policy, should have been met in the circulation 
and review of the Plan, the RAM Plan, and should be met for all steps going 
forward. Without this enhanced public participation, the public involvement 
plan falls short of the standard for true public involvement and will instead 
disenfranchise many of the residents most affected by the proposed activities, 
including the transport of contaminated soils. 

The EJ Policy indicates that: Enhanced public participation may include use of 
alternative media outlets such as community or ethnic newspapers, use of 
alternative information repositories, and translation of materials or 
interpretation services at public meetings where the relevant EJ Population uses 
a primary language other than English in the home. 

As many of these EJ populations are found along the 1-93 corridor and other 
major access routes to Wynn Everett, such outreach should be required. The 
Plan's distribution list should include alternative media outlets, placement in 
alternative information repositories, and announcements or summaries in 

Spanish, Greek, Haitian Creole, Italian, Portuguese, all of which are languages 
used by Somerville's EJ communities, as well as to SomerViva, 
http://somervillema.gov/somerviva, the City of Somerville's immigrant outreach 
program. 

Response: The PIP Plan was developed in accordance with applicable regulations 
(310 CMR 40.0000) and guidance (MassDEP Interim Policy WSC-800-90). As 
noted in the comment, the enhanced public participation components of the EJ 
Policy are not applicable to remediation sites. Furthermore, a review of 
published EJ maps indicates that the disposal site is not located within, or within 
approximately Vi mile of, any community exhibiting English isolation. As such, 
these enhanced public participation activities are not warranted for the planned 
MCP response actions. 

Somerville-6 

What method will be utilized to conduct the in-situ solidification and stabilization 

via Lightship 
Engineering, LLC 

("ISS") in the Low pH area? ISS is proposed to be conducted to 15 feet below 
grade. Does the soil mixing method/ISS result in the potential for the migration 
of "remedial additives" beneath the sheet pile wall (20 ft. below grade) to the 
Coastal Bank or into the Mystic River? If so, what monitoring will be conducted 








to assess if this is the case? 

Response: The specific method used to conduct ISS in the Low pH Area will be 
dependent on the selected remediation contractor; however, bucket mixing is 
anticipated. The sheet pile wall will extend to approximately 20 feet below 
grade, while ISS will extend to approximately 15 feet below grade, allowing for 
an approximately 5-foot buffer zone of soil, greatly limiting the potential for 
migration of remedial additives beneath the sheet pile wall. Visual monitoring 
will be conducted to assess the potential for migration of additives to the Coastal 
Bank or into the Mystic River. 

Somerville-7 

The RAM indicates that "visual observations of both the Mystic River and the 
Coastal Bank outside of the sheet pile wall will be conducted on a daily basis 

via Lightship 
Engineering, LLC 

during ISS implementation to assess for the breakout of remedial additives." 

How often will visual observations be made during the day? What visual 
observations will indicate breakout? In the event of visual evidence that is 
assumed to consist of water or fluid breakout at the Coastal Bank, what field 
monitoring and/or instruments will be utilized to assess pH, metals/oil and/or 
hazardous materials ("OHM") in the fluids discharged to the Coastal Bank or 
Mystic River? Is there a contingency plan to address breakout if it occurs? 

Response: Visual observations will be conducted as often as practical, but at a 
minimum at the start and end of each work day when ISS is being performed. 
Visual observations indicating breakout include seeps of soil/Portland cement 
mixes, sloughing of soils, or cloudy/discolored plumes emanating from the 
shoreline. It is expected that field monitoring in the event of breakout will be 
limited to visual observation; however, the use of a field pH meter and collection 
of surface water samples for laboratory analysis will be conducted as necessary. 

In the unlikely event of breakout, a silt curtain and/or other damming/isolation 
procedure will be utilized to limit impacts to the resource areas and assess the 
location from which such breakout is occurring. Procedures to isolate/block 
migration from inside of the sheet pile wall would also be implemented. 

Somerville-8 

The upper 4 feet of soils located within the Low pH area will be excavated and 
placed back into the Low pH Area upon completion of ISS. What is the pH and 

via Lightship 
Engineering, LLC 

concentration of metals/OHM in these soils (0 to 4 feet)? Will the placement of 
these soils back into this area result in a continued infiltration of metals/OHM to 
the subsurface soils or groundwater and/or the migration of metals/OHM 
particulates in surface water runoff to the Mystic River? 

Response: Concentrations of metals/OHM in these soils are generally lower than 
those encountered in deeper soils. Much of the upper 4 feet of soil in the Low 
pH area consists of tunnel muck from the Deer Island outfall project. The 
average arsenic concentration in soil from the upper 4 feet of this area is 19 
mg/kg, while the average lead concentration is 249 mg/kg; the measured pH of 
these soils is above the remedial target of pH 4. Given these conditions, the on¬ 
site reuse of these soils should not result in significant impacts to groundwater 
or surface water, nor is it expected to result in significant infiltration or migration 







of contaminants. 

Somerville-9 

The source of the metals in area A-5 is attributed to fill. The source of the metals 

via Lightship 
Engineering, LLC 

in soil and groundwater at CES-2 and the Low pH area was not identified in the 
reports reviewed by Lightship Engineering. What is the source of metals detected 
in soil and groundwater in areas CES-2 and the Low pH area, is it the fill or 
another source(s)? 

Response: The source of metals in soil and groundwater at the CES-2 and Low 
pH area is believed to be related to historic filling practices and/or releases from 
historic operations. 

Somerville-10 

The GEI Phase III Remedial Action Plan dated August 27, 2013 ("GEI Phase III") 
indicates groundwater mounding during high tide conditions (Figure 6), abutting 

via Lightship 
Engineering, LLC 

the Low pH Area. Why is there mounding of groundwater in this area and is the 
mounding still evident during low tide? Will the hydrogeologic impact of the ISS, 
when completed, combined with the mounding observed result in the migration 
of metals/OHM to other areas on and/or off site as a result in the change to 
hydrogeologic conditions. Will it exacerbate existing OHM conditions? 

Response: The source of the mounding depicted on Figure 6 of the GEI Phase III 
report is not readily apparent; however, groundwater elevation monitoring was 
conducted during a concurrent geotechnical evaluation of the Site using 
automated pressure transducers over a multi-day monitoring period. In general, 
shallow groundwater appears to be locally perched above the organic layer. This 
may account for the noted mounding. As the goal of the ISS program is to 
increase groundwater pH to a level above 4, and a relationship between elevated 
dissolved metal concentrations and groundwater with a pH below 4 has been 
observed, the successful completion of the ISS program is not anticipated to 
result in a significant migration of metals/OHM to another on- or off-site area. 

Somerville-11 

What is the hydrogeologic impact to surface water or groundwater with 
changing tidal elevations (low and high)? Have surface water and groundwater 

via Lightship 
Engineering, LLC 

elevations and samples been collected during both low and high tide to assess 
the change in hydraulic gradients or change in pH or concentration of 
metals/OHM detected? 

Response: Groundwater elevation monitoring was conducted during a 
concurrent geotechnical evaluation of the Site using automated pressure 
transducers over a multi-day monitoring period. In general, shallow 
groundwater appears to be locally perched above the organic layer, and does not 
appear to be significantly affected by the tides. Surface water samples and 
groundwater seep samples were obtained at low tide, as those samples 
represent groundwater that is discharging to the Mystic River, as well as "worst 
case" surface water conditions within the groundwater-to-surface water mixing 
zone. Further information will be presented in the forthcoming supplemental 
Phase II - Comprehensive Site Assessment for the water-side portion of the Site. 







Somerville-12 

At what depth were the sediment samples collected and submitted for 
laboratory analysis (0 to 1 ft., 1-3 ft.)? What is the spatial distribution and extent 

via Lightship 
Engineering, LLC 

of metals/OHM and pH if any in the seeps and surface water and sediment 
(vertically and horizontally) adjacent to the landward portion of the site, 
specifically areas CE-2 and Low pH area, as well as on the Coastal Bank or further 
into the Mystic River? 

Response: Additional surface water and sediment data will be presented in the 
forthcoming supplemental Phase II - Comprehensive Site Assessment for the 
water-side portion of the Site. The current RAM Plan does not include any 
response actions involving surface water or sediment. 

Somerville-13 

Does the new data change the opinions or conclusions set forth in the GEI Phase 

IH associated with surface water and sediment or other environmental media? 

via Lightship 
Engineering, LLC 

Does this change the scope or extent of the RAM or create a need to 
concurrently conduct response actions on the Coastal Bank or sediment in the 
Mystic River? 

Response: Details concerning the surface water and sediment data will be 
presented in the forthcoming supplemental Phase II - Comprehensive Site 
Assessment for the water-side portion of the Site. The Pre-Construction RAM 

Plan was developed as a risk-reduction measure to address contaminants on the 
landward side of the top of Coastal Bank prior to initiation of construction. 
Additional remedial activities related to the water-side of the top of Coastal Bank 
will be addressed as part of the construction-related RAM Plan. 

Somerville-14 

Are the impacts to sediment and/or surface water a result of the impacts from 
the landward portion of the site, local conditions or both? Does this change the 

via Lightship 
Engineering, LLC 

scope or extent of the RAM or need to concurrently conduct response actions on 
the Coastal Bank or sediment in the Mystic River? 

Response: See Somerville-13 

Somerville-15 

Acidic pH conditions were observed in groundwater that correspond to 
concentrations of metals exceeding Upper Concentration Limits spatially located 

via Lightship 
Engineering, LLC 

directly adjacent to the Coastal Bank as well as surface water and sediment in 
the Mystic River. Has an updated ecological Imminent Hazard ("IH") evaluation 
been conducted (40.0955(3)(a) or (b)) or a Risk to Safety (40.0960(3)(c)) 
evaluation based upon the results of the new GZA data that also includes the 
recent seep, surface water and sediment sampling and analysis that is yet to be 
provided to the public? An IH is not likely but Lightship Engineering has not 
reviewed data to determine if this is the case or any information indicating an IH 
evaluation has been conducted based upon the result of the new GZA data. 

Response: See Somerville-13 

Somerville-16 

There appears to be an ecological Substantial Hazard Condition (40.0956 (2)(d) 

and/or (e)). Is the purpose of the RAM to abate the Substantial Hazard 








via Lightship 
Engineering, LLC 

Condition? 

Response: See Somerville 13 

Somerville-17 

The GEI Phase III addressed many of the items noted above but considerable new 
data has been generated by GZA. Does the new data change the GEI Phase III 

via Lightship 
Engineering, LLC 

assumptions concerning the impact to surface water and sediment and 
associated MCP risk related conditions and conclusions? 

Response: See Somerville-13 

Kelleher-1 

In the Draft of the Public involvement plan, my concerns are related to the 
contaminants of the site, are they considered hazardous? 

Response: The contaminants being addressed by the RAM Plan are included on 
the Massachusetts Oil and Hazardous Material List in the Massachusetts 
Contingency Plan. 

Kelleher-2 

How will they be transported from the site? 

Response: Contaminated soil will be transported off-site via covered truck by 
licensed haulers under appropriate documentation and in accordance with all 
local, state and federal environmental regulations. 

Kelleher-3 

Will they be using roads in Charlestown? 

Response: See Maharjan-1 

Kelleher-4 

Also, who will be monitoring this process? An independent agency? 

Response: See Levesque-5. In addition, of course, MassDEP wil be monitoring 
response actions at the site, and has the right to inspect the site as it feels 
necessary. 

M&E-l 

DEP's proposed format appears to favor a cover page to be included with the PIP 
Plan including PREPARED FOR and PREPARED BY information and contact 
information for same. 

Response: The PIP Plan has been revised to include a cover page with the noted 
information. 

M&E-2 

When setting forth public comment period end or close dates on draft 
documents being made available for public comment in the future, please 
include the following language immediately after the public comment period end 
or close date: UNLESS EXTENDED AT THE REQUEST OF THEPUBLIC FOR A 

MINIMUM OF AN ADDITIONAL TWENTY (20) DAYS. 












Response: The requested language will be included in future references to public 
comment periods. 

M&E-3 

At Section 2.10, Site Description, please include the acreage of the so-called 
water-side portion of the Site. 

Response: The assessment of data to develop the extent of the water-side 
portion of the disposal site is ongoing. Details concerning these findings will be 
incorporated into the supplemental Phase II - Comprehensive Site Assessment 
for the water-side portion of the Site. 

M&E-4 

At Section 4.23 and Exhibit II, confirm that Wynn and GZA will hold meetings for 
all RAM plans and completion statements (currently says that it will do so for 

RAMs associated with "pre-construction remediation" and "construction related 
activities"). 

Response: Confirmed. The text at Section 4.23 and Exhibit II will be changed 
accordingly. 

M&E-5 

Establish a Public Information Station at an accessible and visible area at the 
perimeter of the Site and include real-time reporting of the perimeter air testing 
results that will be undertaken at the site during remediation activities, as well as 
emergency and non-emergency contact information. 

Response: The project information area to be created at the perimeter of the site 
will provide emergency contact information. The air quality monitoring (dust 
monitoring) results will be summarized on the project web site. Any air quality 
issues deemed as urgent should be reported to the project team by the 
emergency contact numbers provided. 

M&E-6 

At Section 4.23, confirm that Wynn/GZA will provide a minimum of fourteen (14) 
days advance notice prior to any public meeting. 

Response: GZA and Wynn will attempt to provide notice of future public 
meetings at least 14 days in advance. 

M&E-7 

When distributing draft documents for review in the PIP process, include upfront 
summaries using layperson's language, understandable to the general public. 

Response: See Levesque-1. 

M&E-8 

Circulate drafts of documents to be discussed at properly noticed PIP meetings at 

least 2 to 3 days prior to said meetings to enable more efficient review and 
discussion at meetings. 

Response: See Levesque-3. 
















Buddha 

David E. Leone 


From: 

To: 

Subject: Re: Questions 

Date: Wednesday, June 10, 2015 12:24:59 PM 


David, 

Thank you for your kind cooperation. 

I am Buddha Maharjan from 7 Scott place, Everett, MA02149 
Thanks 

With Best Regards 
Buddha 

> On Jun 10, 2015, at 12:10 PM, David E. Leone <davide.leone@gza.com> wrote: 

> 

> Buddha, 

> 

> Thank you for your questions. We will be compiling and responding to all questions/comments at the 
end of the comment period. Could you please provide your full name and address for our records? 

> 

> Thanks, 

> David Leone 

> 

> .Original Message- 

> From: Buddha [ mailto:bostonbuddha08@Qmail.com ] 

> Sent: Tuesday, June 09, 2015 6:16 PM 

> To: David E. Leone 

> Subject: Questions 

> 

> Hi Davide, 

> This is Buddha. I was in last meeting. I have some questions. 

> Ql. In meeting, you said the truck will not use the route 99, any city road, Sullivan square, and 
Costco road. I am curious, what roads are they using because there are no other roads than I mention 
above? Or are you making any skyway overfly ramp for the truck? We want to know about it in details 
before you start the work. 

> Q2. We live just across the site. When they will dig the soil, how long do the bad smell spread on the 
air? In meeting, you didn't mention any range of distance. You just mentioned about the alarm. But we 
want to know the factual data that the harm air can harm the people . Before the work, we want to 
know the factual researched data that people are safe/unsafe in certain distance of the working site. 

> Q3. What hours will they work? We don't want any disturbance at night. 

> 

> I hope you will answer my questions. 

> Thank you 

> 

> With Best Regards 

> Buddha 

> _ 

> This electronic message is intended to be viewed only by the individual or entity to which it is 
addressed and may 

> contain privileged and/or confidential information intended for the exclusive use of the addressee(s). 

If you are 

> not the intended recipient, please be aware that any disclosure, printing, copying, distribution or use 
of this 

> information is prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please notify the sender 
immediately and 

> destroy this message and its attachments from your system. 

> _ 

> For information about GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc. and its services, please visit our website at 










www.gza.com< http://www.Qza.com/ >. 



From: 

To: 

Cc: 


Lvnne Levesque 

David E. Leone 


"John Tocco" : Alexis.Tkachuk@ciWofboston.aov: "McHuah. James fMGCV': Sal.DiDomenico@masenate.aov: 
Salvatore LaMattina : "Rvan. Dan - Rep. HOU" 

Subject: Response to Draft PIP dated June 2, 2015 

Date: Sunday, June 21, 2015 9:32:24 AM 


Mr. David E. Leone 
Senior Project Manager 
GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc. 

249 Vanderbilt Avenue, Norwood, MA 02062 

Thank you for this opportunity to comment on your draft Public Involvement Plan. I am not familiar 
with the technical content of the plan so my comments are limited to the public involvement process 
itself: 

1. I note that one of the concerns voiced during your interviews with the petitioners was their 
ability to adequately understand the issues around Wynn’s remediation of the Mystic River 
site. “Interviewees expressed an interest in having discussions about the remedial response 
action process expressed in layman’s terms.” I second this concern and request that you 
address this concern in the future. I attended the June 2 meeting and frankly did not find it all 
that helpful toward a better understanding of the issues around the site. Your plan also does 
not address that concern. Both the presentation and the plan shroud many of the issues in 
very technical jargon. Future communications should be in clear layman English to further 
everyone’s full understanding. Perhaps an “executive summary” highlighting key points, dates, 
and contact information would be helpful? 

2. The PIP process opens up your planning process to the public for sharing information and 
garnering input. Since so much of the traffic transporting the contaminants out of the Mystic 
site will be going through Sullivan Square and thus impact Charlestown/Boston residents - as 

duly noted by Chris Gordon at the June 2 nd meeting, I would expect in the future that there 
would be much more communication to the Charlestown community regarding the documents 
available to them and dates of future meetings and comment periods. Notices in the 
Charlestown Patriot Bridge at least a week before a meeting would also be most appropriate. 

As part of this openness, I would suggest that in the future you provide information in advance 
(2-3 days at least) of a meeting so that attendees can digest the material prior to attending and 
thus be more conversant with the issues. 

Also in the future, when deadlines have been extended, as they have in this case, emails to 
those signing up at the meeting would appear to be most appropriate. It is unclear to me why 
this extension was not widely communicated. 

3. While I am not conversant with the technical aspects of the plan, I would like to know if there 
has been any sort of independent analysis of the site, by qualified experts not paid by Wynn, 
that confirms your plan for remediation. For example, you note that there are only three “hot 
spots” that need to be cleaned up prior to construction. Would an independent environmental 
engineering firm confirm that conclusion? 

I look forward to receiving a summary of the comments on this plan and your responses to my 
concerns and those of others prior to Wynn’s taking the remedial response action submitted for 
comment and prior to moving to the next MCP phase. 

Sincerely, 


Lynne C. Levesque 











Charlestown, MA 02129 



City of Somerville, Massachusetts 

JOSEPH A. CURTATONE 

Mayor 


June 22,2015 

David E. Leone 
GZA GeoEnvironmental 
249 Vanderbilt Avenue 
Norwood. Massachusetts 02062 

Re: Comments on Draft Public Involvement Plan and Draft Release Abatement Measure Plan Pre- 

Construction Remediation Activities 

(Former) Everett Staging Yard 
1 Horizon Way 
Everett, Massachusetts 
Release Tracking Number 3-13341 


Dear Mr. Leone: 

The City of Somerville has reviewed the above-referenced plans prepared on behalf of Wynn MA, LLC, and hereby 
provides the following comments. 

Provide Information to City of Somerville 


As a municipality directly adjacent to the land and water areas which are the subject of the both plans, the disclosure 
of information, and opportunity for public review and comment, must include the City of Somerville and its citizens. 
Somerville officials, including the Mayor, the City Solicitor, and the Director of Sustainability and Environment, all 
at City Hall, 93 Highland Avenue, Somerville, MA 02143, should be added to “site mailing list” and to the 
Notification to Local Officials and Residents of Major Milestones and Events list in the Public Involvement Plan. In 
addition, the Somerville Public Library, 79 Highland Avenue, Somerville, MA 02143, should be added as an 
additional Local Information Repository for all documents. 

Information about any planned response actions which may impact any portion of waters or land within 
Somerville’s boundaries should be provided, and clearly demarcated on plans, to Somerville and the public. All 
information regarding proposed routing of contaminated soil or materials should be provided to Somerville officials. 

Independent Review 

Somerville believes it is appropriate and necessary for an independent licensed site professional to review the 
remedial action plan (RAM Plan) and any further remediation plans. This should be done solely at Wynn MA, 
LLC’s cost. In the meantime, however, Somerville took it upon itself to request such a review by Lightship 
Engineering, LLC. Lightship’s several comments and questions are set forth in the attached memorandum. These 
comments and questions need to be addressed in detail by GZA before any remediation work is undertaken. 



City Hall • 93 Highland avenue • Somerville. Massachusetts 02143 
(617) 625-6600. EXT. 2100 • TTY: (866) 808-4851 • FAX: (617) 625 3434 • www.somervillema.gov 

E-mail: mayor@somervillema.gov 


One Call to City Hall 

SllElI] 


Citv of Somerville 







Page 2 

Environmental Justice 


More than half of the land area containing over half the population of Somerville meets one or more of the 
Environmental Justice (EJ) population descriptors in the 2002 EJ Policy. Many of these block groups are within a 
mile of the Wynn Everett site, as are similar EJ populations in Everett and other surrounding communities. Whether 
or not required by the EJ Policy, enhanced public participation, as set forth in that policy, should have been met in 
the circulation and review of the Plan, the RAM Plan, and should be met for all steps going forward. Without this 
enhanced public participation, the public involvement plan falls short of the standard for true public involvement 
and will instead disenfranchise many of the residents most affected by the proposed activities, including the 
transport of contaminated soils. 

The EJ Policy indicates that: 

Enhanced public participation may include use of alternative media outlets such 
as community or ethnic newspapers, use of alternative information repositories, 
and translation of materials or interpretation services at public meetings where 
the relevant EJ Population uses a primary language other than English in the 
home. 


As many of these EJ populations are found along the 1-93 corridor and other major access routes to Wynn Everett, 
such outreach should be required. The Plan’s distribution list should include alternative media outlets, placement in 
alternative information repositories, and announcements or summaries in Spanish, Greek, Haitian Creole, Italian, 
Portuguese, all of which are languages used by Somerville’s EJ communities, as well as to SomerViva, 
http: www.somervillema.gov somerviva , the City of Somerville’s immigrant outreach program. 



Enc. 

cc: DEP Northeast Regional Office, 205B Lowell Street, Wilmington, MA 01887 

Michael Galvin, OSPCD 

Oliver Sellers-Garcia, Dir. of Sustainability and Environment 





LIGHTSHIP 


ENGINEERING 



ASS I SSMf \ I \\|) Kl All DIAIinV • CIVII I NGIM I RISC, • I M ROY MAN AG I Ml M 


« W ATI R AND WAS H VVA I I R MANAGEMENT • PI R.M1TTING 


MEMORANDUM 


TO: File 

FRO>l: Michael J. Pierdinock, LSP, Principal Lightship Engineering, LLC 


SUBJECT: Comments to DRAFT Public Involvement Plan (‘ ,4 PIP , ‘ ! ) and Release 

Abatement .Measure Plan, Pre Construction Remediation Activities , (“RAM”) 
Former Everett Staging Yard, 1 Horizon Way, Everett, Massachusetts, R1N 
3-13341 dated June 2, 2015 prepared by GZA Geo Environmental, Inc. 
(“GZA”) 


DATE: June 19, 2015 


On behalf of the City of Somerville, Lightship Engineering, LLC (“Lightship Engineering") 
reviewed the PIP and RAM associated with the above referenced site. Lightship Engineering's 
questions or comments are set forth below. 

Low JEii Area 

• What method will be utilized to conduct the in-situ solidification and stabilization (“ISS") 
in the Low pH area? ISS is proposed to be conducted to 15 feet below grade. Does the 
soil mixing method/ISS result in the potential for the migration of “remedial additives" 
beneath the sheet pile wall (20 ft. below grade) to the Coastal Bank or into the Mystic 
River? If so, what monitoring will be conducted to assess if this is the case? 

• The RAM indicates that “visual observations of both the Mystic River and the Coastal 
Bank outside of the sheet pile wall will be conducted on a daily basis during ISS 
implementation to assess for the breakout of remedial additives." How often will visual 
observations be made during the day? What visual observations will indicate breakout? 

In the event of visual evidence that is assumed to consist of water or fluid breakout at the 
Coastal Bank, what field monitoring and/or instruments will be utilized to assess pH, 
metals/oil and/or hazardous materials (“OHM") in the fluids discharged to the Coastal 
Bank or Mystic River? Is there a contingency plan to address breakout if it occurs? 

• The upper 4 feet of soils located within the Low pH area will be excavated and placed 
back into the Low pH Area upon completion of ISS. What is the pH and concentration of 
metals/OHM in these soils (0 to 4 feet)? Will the placement of these soils back into this 
area result in a continued infiltration of metals/OHM to the subsurface soils or 
groundwater and or the migration of metals/OHM particulates in surface water runoff to 
the Mystic River? 

• The source of the metals in area A-5 is attributed to fill. The source of the metals in soil 
and groundwater at CE-2 and the Low pH area was not identified in the reports reviewed 


30 Industrial Park Road • Unit C • Plymouth, Massachusetts 02360 • (508) 830-3344 • (508) 830-3360 

www. LightshipEngineenng com 












LIGHTSHIP 


ENGINEERING 

ASS1 SSMt \ I AND R| Ml DIATION • fIVII I NiilNI I RIN’C. • I Nl RGY MANAG! Ml N I . WATf R AND WASTIU A I i R MAN AGkMFNT • PI KM 11 IINO 

Memorandum 
June 19, 2015 
Page 2 of3 

by Lightship Engineering. What is the source of metals detected in soil and groundwater 
in areas CE-2 and the Low pH area, is it the fill or another source(s)? 

• The GEI Phase III Remedial Action Plan dated August 27, 2013 (“GEI Phase III ) 
indicates groundwater mounding during high tide conditions (Figure 6), abutting the Low 
pH Area. Why is there mounding of groundwater in this area and is the mounding still 
evident during low tide? Will the hydrogeologic impact of the ISS, when completed, 
combined with the mounding observed result in the migration of mctals/OHM to other 
areas on and/or offsite as a result in the change to hydrogeologic conditions. Will it 
exacerbate existing OHM conditions? 

• What is the hydrogcologic impact to surface water or groundwater with changing tidal 
elevations (low and high)? Have surface water and groundwater elevations and samples 
been collected during both low and high tide to assess the change in hydraulic gradients 
or change in pH or concentration of metals/OHM detected? 

Surface Water and Sediment 



The PIP provided a conceptual overview of the sediment and surface water sampling conducted 
recently by GZA but the results were not included in the PIP. The PIP indicated that 1 to 2 teet 
of sediment removal will likely be conducted, the extent of which is yet to be determined and 
will be included in future submittals. The following questions are posed associated with the new 
surface water and sediment data that has not been provided to the public for review to date and 
that could have an impact on the proposed RAM or future response actions: 

e At what depth were the sediment samples collected and submitted for laboratory analysis 
(0 to 1 ft., 1-3 ft.)? What is the spatial distribution and extent of metals/OHM and pH if 
any in the seeps and surface water and sediment (vertically and horizontally) adjacent to 
the landw ard portion of the site, specifically areas CE-2 and Low pH area, as well as on 
the Coastal Bank or further into the Mystic River? 

• Does the new data change the opinions or conclusions set forth in the GEI Phase Ill 
associated with surface water and sediment or other environmental media? Does this 
change the scope or extent of the RAM or create a need to concurrently conduct response 
actions on the Coastal Bank or sediment in the Mystic River? 

• Are the impacts to sediment and/or surface water a result of the impacts from the 
landward portion of the site, local conditions or both? Does this change the scope or 
extent of the RAM or need to concurrently conduct response actions on the Coastal Bank 
or sediment in the Mystic River? 


39 Industrial Park Road • Unit C • Plymouth, Massachusetts 02360 • (508) 830-3344 • (508) 830-3360 

www. LightshipEngineering com 










LIGHTSHIP 


ENGINEERING I 

\SM SSMI S I AM) Rl Ml niMION * C l\ II I V.IM ! Kl\(. . i Nl Kt. N MWAi.l MIN! • 

Memorandum 
June 19, 2015 
Page 3 of 3 



® Acidic pH conditions were observed in groundwater that correspond to concentrations of 
metals exceeding Upper Concentration Limits spatially located directly adjacent to the 
Coastal Bank as well as surface water and sediment in the Mystic River. Has an updated 
ecological Imminent Hazard (‘ilf) evaluation been conducted (40.0955(3)(a) or (b)) or a 
Risk to Safety (40.0960(3 )(c)) evaluation based upon the results of the new GZA data that 
also includes the recent seep, surface water and sediment sampling and analysis that is yet 
to be provided to the public? An IH is not likely but Lightship Engineering has not 
reviewed data to detennine if this is the case or any information indicating an IH 
evaluation has been conducted based upon the result of the new GZA data. 

• There appears to be an ecological Substantial Hazard Condition (40.0956 (2)(d) and/or 
(e)). Is the purpose of the RAM to abate the Substantial Hazard Condition? 


The GE1 Phase III addressed many of the items noted above but considerable new data has been 
generated by GZA. Does the new data change the GEI Phase III assumptions concerning the 
impact to surface water and sediment and associated MCP risk related conditions and 
conclusions? 


39 Industrial Park Road * Unit C • Plymouth. Massachusetts 02360 • (508) 830-3344 • (508) 830-3360 

www. LightshipEngineering. com 









From: 

To: 

Cc: 

Subject: 

Date: 


iovQ2129@amail.com 

David E. Leone 
iov02129@amail.com 

Public comments 

Sunday, July 12, 2015 4:21:04 PM 


Mr. Leone, referring to section 2.20 environmental assessment history, 

In the Draft of the Public involvement plan, my concerns are related to the contaminants of the site, are 
they considered hazardous? how will they be transported from the site? Will they be using roads in 
Charlestown? Also, who will be monitoring this process? An independent agency? 

Please add my name to the mailing site, I appreciate the opportunity to submit questions, 
thank you, 

Ann Kelleher 
617 721 3833 

Sent from my iPad 






MCCARTER 

&ENGLISH 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW 


Leigh A. Gilligan 

Partner 

T 617-449-6520 

F. 617-326-3116 
!g illjgan@mccarter com 

July 13, 2015 

VIA E-MAIL AND U.S. MAIL 

Mr. David E. Leone 

Senior Project Manager 

GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc. 

249 Vanderbilt Avenue 

Norwood, MA 02062 

Re: Draft Public Involvement Plan (PIP) 

(Former Everett Staging Yard) 

1 Horizon Way 

Everett, MA 

RTN 3-13341 

Comments to Draft PIP 

McCarter & English, LLP 

265 Franklin Street 

Boston, MA 02110-3113 

T. 617 449.6500 

F. 617.607.9200 
www.mccarter com 

Dear Mr. Leone: 

On behalf of the Key Petitioner to the above-referenced PIP Petition (Evmporphia 
Stratis), we hereby submit the following comments to the draft PIP Plan dated 
June 2, 2015: 

• DEP’s proposed format appears to favor a cover page to be included with 
the PIP Plan including PREPARED FOR and PREPARED BY information 
and contact information for same. 

BOSTON 

• When setting forth public comment period end or close dates on draft 
documents being made available for public comment in the future, please 

HARTFORD 

include the following language immediately after the public comment period 
end or close date: UNLESS EXTENDED AT THE REQUEST OF THE 

STAMFORD 

PUBLIC FOR A MINIMUM OF AN ADDITIONAL TWENTY (20) DAYS. 

NEW YORK 

• At Section 2.10, Site Description, please include the acreage of the so-called 

NEWARK 

water-side portion of the Site. 

EAST BRUNSWICK 

• At Section 4.23 and Exhibit II, confirm that Wynn and GZA will hold meetings 
for all RAM plans and completion statements (currently says that it will do so 

PHILADELPHIA 

for RAMs associated with “pre-construction remediation” and “construction- 
related activities”). 

WILMINGTON 


WASHINGTON. DC 

• At Section 4.23, confirm that Wynn/GZA will provide a minimum of fourteen 
(14) days advance notice prior to any public meeting. 


ME1 20714600V.1 




July 13, 2015 
Page 2 


• Establish a Public Information Station at an accessible and visible area at 
the perimeter of the Site and include real-time reporting of the perimeter air 
testing results that will be undertaken at the site during remediation activities, 
as well as emergency and non-emergency contact information. 

• When distributing draft documents for review in the PIP process, include up¬ 
front summaries using layperson’s language, understandable to the general 
public. 

• Circulate drafts of documents to be discussed at properly noticed PIP 
meetings at least 2 to 3 days prior to said meetings to enable more efficient 
review and discussion at meetings. 

We look forward to receiving a summary of comments received and responses 
thereto. Please let me know if you have any questions or comments. 



LAG/tao 

cc: Lawrence Feldman, GZA 
Ms. Evmorphia Stratis 


ME1 20714600V.1 











































APPENDIX D 


MASSGIS MAP 





MassDEP - Bureau of Waste Site Cleanup 


Site Information: Ph3S6 1 Sit© Assessment M3p. 500 f66t 


FORMER EVERETT STAGING YARD 
1 HORIZON WAY EVERETT, MA 
3-000013341 
NAD 83 UTM Meters: 

4695723mN , 329609mE (Zone: 19) 
January 20, 2015 


The information shown is the best available at the 
date of printing However, it may be incomplete. The 
responsible party and LSP are ultimately responsible 
for ascertaining the true conditions surrounding the 
site. Metadata for data layers shown on this map can 
be found at: 

http://www.mass.gov/mqis/ . 


& 0.5 Mile Radii 



MassDEP 

Common*®^ a Mawoctvjwas 

Department of Environmental Protection 



wso**"**' 


I emery 


SAEWAU CIRCLE CONNECTOR 


COOPfR STREET 


NUE 


EARHART 
]AM T . 

Oompute^ed 


AMEL 


STREET 


NORMA* 


SullUWrf 


ERSONVILLE 








street 


y n/ 

Z/xZ 

Next Wave Jdmor 




e High ScV>’ 

MOUNT/ 

ENEDICT 


mystic 


KIM n 


500 m 


iooo ftr | 


IVTLLE 


Roads: Limited Access, Divided, Other Hwy, Major Road, Minor Road, Track, Trail PWS Protection Areas: Zone II, IWPA, Zone A. 

~ 1 1 1 .. Hydrography Open Water, PWS Reservoir, Tidal Flat.. 

Boundaries Town, County, DEP Reqion; Train; Powertine, Pipeline; Aqueduct 

-Wetlands: Freshwater, Saltwater, Cranberry Bog 


Fig r~ ) 


Basins Major,PWS; Streams: Perennial, Intermittent, Man Made Shore, Dam FEMA lOOyr Floodplain, Protected Open Space; ACEC .... 


Aquifers Medium Yield, High Yield, EPA Sole Source..1 

Non Potential Drinking Water Source Area Medium, High (Yield)... 


Est Rare Wetland Wildlife Hab, Vernal Pool . Cert., Potential 
Solid Waste Landfill; PWS Com GW,SW.Emerg,Non-Com 























































































































APPENDIX E 

BORING LOGS 







171521.10 100-300 SERIES WYNN EVERETT_EVERETT_MA.GPJ; STRATUM ONLY WYNN EVERETT; 1/23/2015 


TEST BORING LOG 

GZA 

GI\ GeoEnvironmental, Inc. 

Engineers and Scientists 

Wynn Everett 

Everett, Massachusetts 

BORING NO.: GZ-101 

SHEET: 1 of 1 

PROJECT NO: 171521.10 

REVIEWED BY: 

Drilling Co.: New Hampshire Boring 

Foreman: Carl Downing/Donnie Dunklee 

Logged By: Matt Dion/James Brown 

Type of Rig: Geoprobe 

Rig Model: 

Drilling Method: Direct Push 

Boring Location: A-5 Area 

Ground Surface Elev. (ft.): 

Final Boring Depth (ft.): 12 

Date Start - Finish: 10/31/2014 - 10/31/2014 

H. Datum: 

V. Datum: 

Auger/Casing Type: 

I.D/O.D.(in): 

Hammer Weight (lb.): 

Hammer Fall (in.): 

Other: 

Sampler Type: Macrocore Barrel 

I.D./O.D. (in.): 1-3/872" 

Sampler Hmr Wt (lb): 

Sampler Hmr Fall (in): 

Other: 

Groundwater Depth (ft.) 

Date 

Time 

Water Depth 

Casing 

Stab. Time 

















TS” 

05 

Field 

£ Stratum 

E 

Test 

§-« Description 

<D 

a: 

Data 

o 


Depth 

(ft) 


Blows/ 

Core 

-Bate 


No. 


Depth 

(ft-) 


Pen. 

(in) 


Rec. 

(in) 


Blows 
(per 6 in.) 


SPT 

Value 


Sample Description and Identification 
(Modified Burmister Procedure) 


> ^ 
0 ) 

LU ^ 


10 


S-1 

S-2 

S-3 

S-4 

S-5 

S-6 

S-7 

S-8 

S-9 
S-10 
S-11 
S-12 


0-4 


48 


48 


4-8 


48 


48 


8-12 


48 


48 


15 


S-1: Moist to wet, black/gray, GRAVEL, little medium to 
coarse Sand, trace Brick, slight organic odor. 

S-2: Damp, black, fine SAND, some medium to coarse 
Sand, trace Silt, trace Gravel, Wood, Brick. 

S-3: Damp, gray/brown, SILT and fine to medium SAND, 
little coarse Sand, trace Gravel, Wood, Glass, Asphalt. 
S-4: Damp, gray/brown, SILT and fine to medium SAND, 
little coarse Sand, trace Gravel, Seashells. 

S-5: Moist to damp, red/brown, fine to medium SAND, 
some (+) Silt, trace Gravel, Wood. 

S-6: Grayish/brown, WOOD, trace fine Sand. 

S-7: Top 6": Gray/brown, WOOD, trace fine Sand. 
Bottom 6": Moist, black, Fibrous PEAT, trace fine Sand, 
organic odor. 

S-8: Top 8”: Gray/brown, WOOD, trace fine Sand. 
Bottom 4”: Moist, light to dark gray, fine SAND, little Silt, 
trace medium Sand, Roots. 

S-9: Moist, gray, fine SAND, little Silt, trace Roots. 

S-10: Top 6": Moist, brown/gray, Silty CLAY, trace fine to 
medium Sand, slight organic odor. 

Bottom 6": Moist, gray, fine to coarse SAND, trace Silt, 
slight organic odor. 

S-11: Moist, very stiff, slightly brown/gray, Silty CLAY, 
trace fine Sand. 

S-12: Moist, very stiff, slightly brown/gray, Silty CLAY, 
trace fine Sand. 


ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 


FILL 


6.5' 


7.5' 

PEAT 


SAND 

9’ 

l 

12' 

SILTY CLAY 


20 


Bottom of boring at 12 feet. 


25 


30 


1 Field testing results represent total organic vapor levels, referenced to a benzene standard, measured in the headspace of sealed soil sample jars using a ThermoEnvironmental 580B organic vapor meter 

equipped with a photoionization detector (PID) and 10.6eV lamp. Results in parts per million by volume (ppmv). ND indicates nothing detected (<0.1 ppmv). 

2. Composite soil samples collected for arsenic and lead analysis. 


See Log Key for explanation of sample description and identification procedures. Stratification lines represent approximate boundaries between soil and bedrock 

types Actual transitions may be gradual. Water level readings have been made at the times and under the conditions stated. Fluctuations of groundwater may 
occur due to other factors than those present at the times the measurements were made.___ 


Boring No. 

GZ-101 













































171521 10 100-300 SERIES WYNN EVERETT EVERETT MA.GPJ; STRATUM ONLY WYNN EVERETT; 1/23/2015 


TEST BORING LOG 

GZA 

OZ\ GeoEnvironmental, Inc. 

Engineers and Scientists 

Wynn Everett 

Everett, Massachusetts 

BORING NO.: GZ-102 

SHEET: 1 of 1 

PROJECT NO: 171521.10 

REVIEWED BY: 


Drilling Co.: New Hampshire Boring 
Foreman: Carl Downing/Donnie Dunklee 

Logged By: Matt Dion/James Brown 


Type of Rig: Geoprobe 
Rig Model: 

Drilling Method: Direct Push 


Boring Location: A-5 Area 
Ground Surface Elev. (ft.): 

Final Boring Depth (ft.): 12 

Date Start - Finish: 10/31/2014 - 10/31/2014 


H. Datum: 
V. Datum: 


Auger/Casing Type: 
I.D/O.D.(in): 

Hammer Weight (lb.): 
Hammer Fall (in.): 
Other: 


Sampler Type: 
I.D./O.D. (in.): 
Sampler Hmr Wt (lb): 
Sampler Hmr Fall (in): 
Other: 


Macrocore Barrel 
1-3/872" 


Casing 

Blows/ 

Core 

Rate 


Date 


Groundwater Depth (ft.) 


Time 


Water Depth 


rz- 

k_ 

03 

E 

<u 

OH 


Casing 


Stab. Time 


Depth 
(ft) 


No. 


Samp 


Depth 

(ft.) 


Pen. 

(in) 


Rec. 

(in) 


Blows 
(per 6 in.) 


SPT 

Value 


Sample Description and Identification 
(Modified Burmister Procedure) 


Field 

Test 

Data 


£ ^ Stratum 
Description 
Q 


> ^ 
_g ^ 

LU ^ 


10 


S-1 

S-2 

S-3 

S-4 

S-5 

S-6 

S-7 

S-8 

S-9 
S-10 
S-11 
S-12 


0-4 


48 


36 


4-8 


48 


30 


8-12 


48 


48 


15 


S-1: Damp, brown, fine SAND, little medium to coarse 
Sand, little Gravel. 

S-2: Damp, brown, fine SAND, little medium to coarse 
Sand, little Gravel, trace Silt, Brick. 

S-3: Moist, brown, fine SAND, little medium to coarse 
Sand, little Gravel, trace Silt, trace Brick, Roots, Wood. 
S-4: Moist, brown, fine SAND, little (+) medium to coarse 
Sand, trace (+) Silt, Gravel, Roots, Wood. 

S-5: Moist, brown to gray to black, fine SAND, little 
medium to coarse Sand, trace Brick, Gravel. 

S-6: Moist, brown to gray to black, fine SAND, little 
medium to coarse Sand, trace Brick, Gravel. 

S-7: Damp, brownish/black, Fibrous PEAT, organic odor. 
S-8: Damp, brownish/black, Fibrous PEAT, organic odor, 
small bluish sheen on groundwater. 

S-9: Top 6": Damp, brown/black, Fibrous PEAT, organic 
odor, small bluish sheen on groundwater. 

Bottom 6": Moist, gray, fine to medium SAND, organic 
odor. 

S-10: Damp, green/gray, Silty CLAY, trace fine Sand, 
odor. 

S-11: Damp, very stiff, green/gray, Silty CLAY, trace fine 
Sand, odor. 

S-12: Moist, stiff, green/gray, Silty CLAY, trace fine Sand, 
odor. 


ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 


FILL 


6' 


8.5' 

m- 


PEAT 

SAND' 


SILTY CLAY 


12 ' 


20 


Bottom of boring at 12 feet. 


25 


30 


1. Field testing results represent total organic vapor levels, referenced to a benzene standard, measured in the headspace of sealed soil sample jars using a ThermoEnvironmental 580B organic vapor meter 
equipped with a photoionization detector (PID) and 10.6eV lamp. Results in parts per million by volume (ppmv). ND indicates nothing detected (<0.1 ppmv). 

2. Composite soil samples collected for arsenic and lead analysis. 

3. Fabric material and wood observed at top of Peat layer. 


See Log Key for explanation of sample description and identification procedures. Stratification lines represent approximate boundaries between soil and bedrock 
types Actual transitions may be gradual. Water level readings have been made at the times and under the conditions stated. Fluctuations of groundwater may 
occur due to other factors than those present at the times the measurements were made. 


Boring No. 
GZ-102 











































171521.10 100-300 SERIES WYNN EVERETT_EVERETT_MA.GPJ; STRATUM ONLY WYNN EVERETT; 1/23/2015 


TEST BORING LOG 


GZA 

ozv GeoEnvironmental, Inc. 

Engineers and Scientists 


Wynn Everett 
Everett, Massachusetts 


BORING NO.: GZ-103 
SHEET: 1 of 1 

PROJECT NO: 171521.10 
REVIEWED BY: 


Drilling Co.: New Hampshire Boring 
Foreman: Carl Downing/Donnie Dunklee 

Logged By: Matt Dion/James Brown 


Type of Rig: Geoprobe 
Rig Model: 

Drilling Method: Direct Push 


Boring Location: A-5 Area 
Ground Surface Elev. (ft.): 

Final Boring Depth (ft.): 12 
Date Start - Finish: 10/31/2014 


10/31/2014 


H. Datum: 
V. Datum: 


Auger/Casing Type: 
I.D/O.D.(in): 

Hammer Weight (lb.): 
Hammer Fall (in.): 
Other: 


Sampler Type: 
I.D./O.D. (in.): 

Sampler Hmr Wt (lb): 
Sampler Hmr Fall (in): 
Other: 


Macrocore Barrel 
1-3/872" 


Groundwater Depth (ft.) 


Date 

Time 

Water Depth 

Casing 

Stab. Time 

















Depth 

(ft) 


Casing 

Blows/ 

Core 

Rate 


No. 


Sample 


Depth 

(ft.) 


Pen. 

(in) 


Rec. 

(in) 


Blows 
(per 6 in.) 


SPT 

Value 


Sample Description and Identification 
(Modified Burmister Procedure) 

S-1: Damp, brown/black, SILT, little fine Sand, trace 

medium to coarse Sand, trace Gravel, Wood, faint organic 
and petroleum odor. 

S-2: Damp, brown/black, SILT, little fine to coarse Sand, 
trace Gravel, Wood, faint organic and petroleum odor. 

S-3: Damp, brown/black, SILT, little fine Sand, trace 
Gravel, Wood, faint organic and petroleum odor. 

S-4: Damp, brown/black, SILT, little fine to coarse Sand, 
trace Gravel, Wood, faint organic and petroleum odor. 

S-5: Brown/black SILT, little fine to coarse Sand, trace 
Gravel. 

S-6: Top 4": Brown/black SILT, little fine to coarse Sand, 
trace Gravel. 

Bottom 8": Moist, brown/black, Silty CLAY, trace fine to 
coarse Sand, faint organic odor. 

S-7: Moist, brown/black, Silty CLAY, trace fine to coarse 
Sand, faint organic odor. 

S-8: Moist, black, Fibrous PEAT, trace fine Sand, organic 
odor. 

S-9: Black/gray, Silty CLAY, trace fine to medium Sand, 
organic odor. 

S-10: Top 4": Blackish gray, Silty CLAY, trace fine to 
medium Sand, organic odor. 

Bottom 8”: Very stiff, Silty CLAY, trace fine to medium 
Sand. 

S-11: Very stiff, Silty CLAY, trace fine to medium Sand. 
S-12: Very stiff, brown, Silty CLAY, trace fine to medium 
Sand. 


JZ 

k— 

CD 

Field 

E 

Test 

03 

Cd 

Data 


£ „ Stratum 
g-d Description 
Q 


> -—■ 
03 

UJ " 


10 


S-1 

S-2 

S-3 

S-4 


S-5 

S-6 

S-7 

S-8 

S-9 
S-10 
S-11 
S-12 


0-4 


48 


48 


5-8 


48 


48 


9-12 


48 


48 


15 


20 


25 


ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 


FILL 


PEAT 


SILTY CLAY 


12 ' 


Bottom of boring at 12 feet. 


30 


2 . 


Fiolri tpstina results represent total organic vapor levels, referenced to a benzene standard, measured in the headspace of sealed soil sample jars using a ThermoEnvironmental 580B organic vapor meter 

equipped with a photoionization detector (PID) and 10.6eV lamp. Results in parts per million by volume (ppmv). ND indicates nothing detected (<0.1 ppmv). 

Composite soil samples collected for arsenic and lead analysis. 


' i ™ v ou for nxnlanation of sample description and identification procedures. Stratification lines represent approximate boundaries between soil and bedrock 

... t , transitions may be gradual. Water level readings have been made at the times and under the conditions stated. Fluctuations of groundwater may 


See |_ 

types. Actual transitions may be gradual, 
occur due to other factors than those present at the times the measurements were made 


Boring No. 

GZ-103 

















































171521 10 100-300 SERIES WYNN EVERETT EVERETT MA.GPJ; STRATUM ONLY WYNN EVERETT; 1/23/2015 


TEST BORING LOG 

"x GZA 

GZ\ GeoEnvironmental, Inc. 

Engineers and Scientists 

Wynn Everett 

Everett, Massachusetts 

BORING NO.: GZ-104 

SHEET: 1 of 1 

PROJECT NO: 171521.10 

REVIEWED BY: 


Drilling Co.: New Hampshire Boring 
Foreman: Carl Downing/Donnie Dunklee 

Logged By: Matt Dion/James Brown 


Type of Rig: Geoprobe 
Rig Model: 

Drilling Method: Direct Push 


Boring Location: A-5 Area 
Ground Surface Elev. (ft.): 

Final Boring Depth (ft.): 12 

Date Start - Finish: 10/31/2014 -10/31/2014 


H. Datum: 
V. Datum: 


Auger/Casing Type: 
I.D/O.D.(in): 

Hammer Weight (lb.): 
Hammer Fall (in.): 
Other: 

Casing 

Blows/ 

Core 
Rate 


Sampler Type: 
I.D./O.D. (in.): 
Sampler Hmr Wt (lb): 
Sampler Hmr Fall (in): 
Other: 


Macrocore Barrel 
1-3/872" 


Date 


Groundwater Depth (ft.) 


Time 


Water Depth 


Casing 


Stab. Time 


Depth 

(ft) 


No. 


Samp 


Depth 

(ft.) 


Pen 

(in) 


Rec. 

(in) 


Blows 
(per 6 in.) 


SPT 

Value 


Sample Description and Identification 
(Modified Burmister Procedure) 


CO 

E 
<u 
a: 


Field 

Test 

Data 


£ „ Stratum 
S'*; Description 
a 


> ^ 
£ 

LU 


10 


S-1 

S-2 

S-3 

S-4 

S-5 

S-6 

S-7 

S-8 

S-9 
S-10 
S-11 
S-12 


0-4 


48 


48 


4-8 


48 


43 


8-12 


48 


48 


15 


S-1: Dry, brown/red, fine to coarse SAND, trace Gravel, 
Silt. 

S-2: Moist, multi-colored, fine SAND, little medium to 
coarse Sand, little Silt, trace Gravel, Roots, Asphalt, Brick. 
S-3: Top 4": Damp, dark red, SILT and fine to coarse 
SAND, trace Gravel. 

Bottom 8”: Medium gray/tan, Clayey SILT, little Roots, 
trace fine to coarse Sand. 

S-4: Top 11": Moist, red/black, fine to coarse SAND, trace 
Silt, Gravel, Roots. 

Bottom 32”: Light tan, Clayey SILT. 

S-5: Light tan, Clayey SILT. 

S-6: Top 4”: Moist, black, WOOD. 

Middle 4": Moist, light tan, Clayey SILT. 

Bottom 4": Moist, black, Fibrous PEAT, organic odor. 

S-7: Moist, black, Fibrous PEAT, organic odor. 

S-8: Top 4": Moist, black, Fibrous PEAT, organic odor. 
Bottom 4": Wet, gray/brown, fine to coarse SAND. 

S-9: Moist, green/brown, Silty CLAY, trace fine to coarse 
Sand. 

S-10: Moist, green/brown, Silty CLAY, trace fine to coarse 
Sand. 

S-11: Moist, green/brown, Silty CLAY, trace fine to coarse 
Sand. 

S-12: Moist, greenish brown/gray, Silty CLAY, trace fine to 
coarse Sand. 


ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 


FILL 


7’ 


PEAT 


9’ 

U.JT SAND - 


SILTY CLAY 


12 ' 


20 


Bottom of boring at 12 feet. 


25 


30 


1. Field testing results represent total organic vapor levels, referenced to a benzene standard, measured in the headspace of sealed soil sample jars using a ThermoEnvironmental 580B organic vapor meter 
equipped with a photoionization detector (PID) and 10.6eV lamp. Results in parts per million by volume (ppmv). ND indicates nothing detected (<0.1 ppmv). 

2. Composite soil samples collected for arsenic and lead analysis. 


See Log Key for explanation of sample description and identification procedures. Stratification lines represent approximate boundaries between soil and bedrock 
types. Actual transitions may be gradual. Water level readings have been made at the times and under the conditions stated. Fluctuations of groundwater may 
occur due to other factors than those present at the times the measurements were made. 


Boring No. 
GZ-104 











































WYNN EVERETT EVERETT MA.GPJ; STRATUM ONLY WYNN EVERETT: 1/23/2015 


TEST BORING LOG 

X GZA 

OTA GeoEnvironmental, Inc. 

Engineers and Scientists 

Wynn Everett 

Everett, Massachusetts 

BORING NO.: GZ-105 

SHEET: 1 of 1 

PROJECT NO: 171521.10 

REVIEWED BY: 

Drilling Co.: New Hampshire Boring 

Foreman: Carl Downing/Donnie Dunklee 

Logged By: Matt Dion/James Brown 

Type of Rig: Geoprobe 

Rig Model: 

Drilling Method: Direct Push 

Boring Location: A-5 Area 

Ground Surface Elev. (ft.): 

Final Boring Depth (ft.): 12 

Date Start - Finish: 10/31/2014 -10/31/2014 

H. Datum: 

V. Datum: 

Auger/Casing Type: 

I.D/O.D.(in): 

Hammer Weight (lb.): 

Hammer Fall (in.): 

Other: 

Sampler Type: Macrocore Barrel 

I.D./O.D. (in.): 1-3/872" 

Sampler Hmr Wt (lb): 

Sampler Hmr Fall (in): 

Other: 

Groundwater Depth (ft.) 

Date 

Time 

Water Depth 

Casing 

Stab. Time 

















Depth 

(ft) 


Blows/ 

Core 

Rate 


No. 


Depth 

(ft.) 


en. 

(in) 


Rec. 

(in) 


Blows 
(per 6 in.) 


SPT 

Value 


(Modified Burmister Procedure) 

S-1: Damp, light to dark brown, fine to coarse SAND, trace 

Roots, Gravel, Silt, Asphalt. 

S-2: Damp, red/brown to dark brow, fine to coarse SAND, 
trace Asphalt, Gravel, Brick. 

S-3: Damp, black/tan fine to coarse SAND, trace Gravel, 
Asphalt. 

S-4: Top 4": Damp, black/ brown, fine to coarse SAND, 
trace Gravel. 

Bottom 32”: Whitish to reddish to greenish, fine Clayey 
SILT, trace fine to coarse Sand, Gravel. 

S-5: Moist, multi-colored, fine to coarse SAND, some Silt, 
trace Gravel, Roots, Wood. 

S-6: Moist, gray/black, fine SAND, little medium to coarse 
Sand, trace Silt, Gravel. 

S-7: Moist to wet, blue/black/green, fine to coarse SAND 
and SILT, trace Gravel. 

S-8: Moist, black, Fibrous PEAT, trace medium to coarse 
Sand. 

S-9: Moist, black, Fibrous PEAT, trace medium to coarse 
Sand. 

S-10: Moist, black, Fibrous PEAT, trace medium to coarse 
Sand. 

S-11: Top 6”: Moist, black, Fibrous PEAT, trace medium 
to coarse Sand. 

Middle 3”: Wet, gray, fine to medium SAND, little coarse 
Sand, trace Silt. 

Bottom 3": Moist, hard, gray/green, Clayey SILT, trace fine 
to coarse Sand. 

S-12: Moist, hard, gray/green, Clayey SILT, trace fine to 
coarse Sand. 


Test 

Data 


Description 


0) 

LU —' 


10 


S-1 

S-2 

S-3 

S-4 

S-5 

S-6 

S-7 

S-8 

S-9 
S-10 
S-11 
S-12 


0-4 


48 


48 


4-8 


48 


39 


8-12 


48 


48 


ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 


ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 


FILL 


8 ' 


10 ' 

prdB'' 


PEAT 

“ SAND~“ 
CLAYEY SILT 


15 


20 


12 ' 


25 


30 


Bottom of boring at 12 feet. 


1 Field test no results represent tot al organic vapor levels, referenced lo a benzene standard, measured in the headspace of sealed soil samplejars using a ThermoEnvironmental 580B organic vapor meter 

equipped vrith a photoionization detector (PID) and 10.6eV lamp. Results in parts per million by volume (ppmv). ND indicates nothing detected (<0.1 ppmv). 

2. Composite soil samples collected for arsenic and lead analysis. 

















































171521 10 100-300 SERIES WYNN EVERETT EVERETT MA GPJ; STRATUM ONLY WYNN EVERETT; 1/23/2015 


TEST BORING LOG 

GZA 

GZ\ GeoEnvironmental, Inc. 

Engineers and Scientists 

Wynn Everett 

Everett, Massachusetts 

BORING NO.: GZ-106 

SHEET: 1 of 1 

PROJECT NO: 171521.10 

REVIEWED BY: 


Drilling Co.: New Hampshire Boring 
Foreman: Carl Downing/Donnie Dunklee 

Logged By: Matt Dion/James Brown 


Type of Rig: Geoprobe 
Rig Model: 

Drilling Method: Direct Push 


Boring Location: A-5 Area 
Ground Surface Elev. (ft.): 

Final Boring Depth (ft.): 12 

Date Start - Finish: 11/3/2014 - 11/3/2014 


H. Datum: 
V. Datum: 


Auger/Casing Type: 
I.D/O.D.(in): 

Hammer Weight (lb.): 
Hammer Fall (in.): 
Other: 


Sampler Type: 
I.D./O.D. (in.): 
Sampler Hmr Wt (lb): 
Sampler Hmr Fall (in): 
Other: 


Macrocore Barrel 
1-3/872" 


Date- 


Groundwater Depth (ft.) 


Time 


Water Depth 


Casing 


Stab. Time 


Depth 

(ft) 


Casing 

Blows/ 

Core 

Rate 


No. 


Samp 


Depth 

(ft-) 


Pen 

(in) 


Rec. 

(in) 


Blows 
(per 6 in.) 


SPT 

Value 


Sample Description and Identification 
(Modified Burmister Procedure) 


CD 

E 
0 ) 
o: 


Field 

Test 

Data 


£ „ Stratum > „ 
§•« Description ^ c 


10 


S-1 

S-2 

S-3 

S-4 

S-5 

S-6 

S-7 

S-8 

S-9 
S-10 
S-11 
S-12 


0-4 


48 


36 


4-8 


48 


36 


8-12 


48 


48 


15 


S-1: Damp, brown, fine to coarse SAND, trace Gravel, 
Roots, Brick, Silt. 

S-2: Damp, brown, fine to coarse SAND, trace Gravel, 
Roots, Brick, Silt. 

S-3: Damp, dark brown, fine to coarse SAND, trace 
Gravel, Brick, Glass, Wood, Silt. 

S-4: Damp to moist, black/brown, fine to coarse SAND, 
little Silt, trace Gravel, slight petroleum-like odor. 

S-5: Moist, black/brownish, fine SAND, some Silt, trace 
medium to coarse Sand, trace Gravel, petroleum-like 
odor. 

S-6: Moist, black/brown, fine SAND, some Silt, trace 
medium to coarse Sand, trace Gravel, faint petroleum-like 
odor. 

S-7: Damp, black/brown, Fibrous PEAT, organic odor. 

S-8: Moist, black, Fibrous PEAT, trace medium to coarse 
Sand. 

S-9: Moist, black, Fibrous PEAT, trace medium to coarse 
Sand. 

S-10: Damp, stiff, gray/green, Silty CLAY, trace fine to 
medium Sand. 

S-11: Damp, stiff, gray/green, Silty CLAY, trace fine to 
medium Sand. 

S-12: Damp, stiff, gray/green, Silty CLAY, trace fine to 
medium Sand. 


ND 

ND 

4.7 

20.2 

1.2 


ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 


FILL 


6 ' 


PEAT 


9' 


SILTY CLAY 


12 ' 


20 


Bottom of boring at 12 feet. 


25 


30 


1. Field testing results represent total organic vapor levels, referenced to a benzene standard, measured in the headspace of sealed soil sample jars using a ThermoEnvironmental 580B organic vapor meter 
equipped with a photoionization detector (PID) and 10.6eV lamp. Results in parts per million by volume (ppmv). ND indicates nothing detected (<0.1 ppmv). 

2. Composite soil samples collected for arsenic and lead analysis. 


See Log Key for explanation of sample description and identification procedures. Stratification lines represent approximate boundaries between soil and bedrock 
types. Actual transitions may be gradual. Water level readings have been made at the times and under the conditions stated. Fluctuations of groundwater may 
occur due to other factors than those present at the times the measurements were made. 


Boring No. 
GZ-106 











































171521.10 100-300 SERIES WYNN EVERETTEVERETTMA.GPJ: STRATUM ONLY WYNN EVERETT; 1/23/2015 


TEST BORING LOG 

"\ GZA 

GZ\ GeoEnvironmental, Inc. 

Engineers and Scientists 

Wynn Everett 

Everett, Massachusetts 

BORING NO.: GZ-107 

SHEET: 1 of 1 

PROJECT NO: 171521.10 

REVIEWED BY: 

Drilling Co.: New Hampshire Boring 

Foreman: Carl Downing/Donnie Dunklee 

Logged By: Matt Dion/James Brown 

Type of Rig: Geoprobe 

Rig Model: 

Drilling Method: Direct Push 

Boring Location: A-5 Area 

Ground Surface Elev. (ft.): 

Final Boring Depth (ft.): 12 

Date Start - Finish: 10/31/2014 -10/31/2014 

H. Datum: 

V. Datum: 

Auger/Casing Type: 

I.D/O.D.(in): 

Hammer Weight (lb.): 

Hammer Fall (in.): 

Other: 

Sampler Type: Macrocore Barrel 

I.D./O.D. (in.): 1-3/872" 

Sampler Hmr Wt (lb): 

Sampler Hmr Fall (in): 

Other: 

Groundwater Depth (ft.) 

Date 

Time 

Water Depth 

Casing 

Stab. Time 

















Depth 

(ft) 


Blows/ 

Core 

Rate 


No. 


Sample 


Depth 

(ft.) 


en. 

(in) 


Rec 

(in) 


Blows 
(per 6 in.) 


SPT 

Value 


Sample Description and Identification 
(Modified Burmister Procedure) 

S-1: Moist, dark to light brown, fine to coarse SAND, trace 

Gravel, Silt. 

S-2: Moist, brown, fine to coarse SAND, little Wood, trace 
Brick, Gravel. 

S-3: Moist, red/black, fine to coarse SAND, little Wood, 
trace Brick, Gravel. 

S-4: Damp to moist, red/brown, fine to coarse SAND, 
some Silt, trace Brick, Gravel. 

S-5: Wet, gray/black, fine to coarse SAND, little Silt, 
possible Coal, trace Gravel. 

S-6: Top 8": Wet, black, fine to coarse SAND, little (-) Silt, 
trace Gravel. 

S-7: Top 6”: Wet, light tan, SILT, trace Fibrous Peat, fabric 
matter, organic odor. 

Bottom 6" Moist, black/brown, Fibrous PEAT. 

S-8: Moist, black to brown, Fibrous PEAT. 

S-9: Top 3": Moist, black/brown, Fibrous PEAT. 

Bottom 9": Wet, gray, fine to coarse SAND, trace Gravel, 
Silt. 

S-10: Top 6": Wet, green/gray, fine to coarse SAND, trace 
Gravel, Silt. 

Bottom 6": Moist, green/gray, Clayey SILT, trace (-) fine to 
coarse Sand. 

S-11: Moist, green/gray, Clayey SILT, trace (-) fine to 
coarse Sand. 

S-12: Moist, greenish/grayish/brown, Clayey SILT, trace (-) 
fine to coarse Sand. 


Test 

Data 


Stratum 

g-d Description 
O "" 


> 

.2? d 
hi 


10 


S-1 

S-2 

S-3 

S-4 

S-5 

S-6 

S-7 

S-8 

S-9 
S-10 
S-11 
S-12 


0-4 


48 


48 


4-8 


48 


48 


8-12 


48 


48 


ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 


ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 


FILL 


7.5' 


9.5' 

rr<r' 


PEAT 
SAND~ 
CLAYEY SILT 


12 ' 


15 


20 


25 


30 


Bottom of boring at 12 feet. 


1 Field test no results represent tota l organ,c vapor levels, referenced to a benzene standard, measured in the headspace ol sealed soil samplers usmg a ThermoEnvronmental 580B organic vapor meter 

equipped vrtha photoionization detector (PID) and 10.6eV lamp. Results in parts per million by volume (ppmv). ND indicates nothing detected (<0.1 ppmv). 

2. Composite soil samples collected for arsenic and lead analysis. 

3. Fine sand appears spherical (i.e. possibly unknown waste by-product) 
























































171521.10 100-300 SERIES WYNN EVERETTEVERETTMA.GPJ; STRATUM ONLY WYNN EVERETT; 1/23/2015 


TEST BORING LOG 

N GZA 

QZ\ GeoEnvironmental, Inc. 

Engineers and Scientists 

Wynn Everett 

Everett, Massachusetts 

BORING NO.: GZ-108 

SHEET: 1 of 1 

PROJECT NO: 171521.10 

REVIEWED BY: 


Drilling Co.: New Hampshire Boring 
Foreman: Carl Downing/Donnie Dunklee 

Logged By: Matt Dion/James Brown 


Type of Rig: Geoprobe 
Rig Model: 

Drilling Method: Direct Push 


Boring Location: A-5 Area 
Ground Surface Elev. (ft.): 

Final Boring Depth (ft.): 12 

Date Start - Finish: 10/31/2014 -10/31/2014 


H. Datum: 
V. Datum: 


Auger/Casing Type: 
I.D/O.D.(in): 

Hammer Weight (lb.): 
Hammer Fall (in.): 
Other: 


Sampler Type: 
I.D./O.D. (in.): 
Sampler Hmr Wt (lb): 
Sampler Hmr Fall (in): 
Other: 


Macrocore Barrel 
1-3/872" 


Casing 

Blows/ 

Core 

Rate 


Date, 


Groundwater Depth (ft.) 


Time 


Water Depth 


Casing 


Stab. Time 


Depth 

(ft) 


No. 


Samp 


Depth 

(ft-) 


Pen 

(in) 


Rec. 

(in) 


Blows 
(per 6 in.) 


SPT 

Value 


Sample Description and Identification 
(Modified Burmister Procedure) 


ca 

E 

<D 

or 


Field 

Test 

Data 


■B ^ Stratum > _ 

§■£, Description .2? c 


10 


S-1 

S-2 

S-3 

S-4 

S-5 

S-6 

S-7 

S-8 

S-9 
S-10 
S-11 
S-12 


0-4 


48 


36 


4-8 


48 


24 


8-12 


48 


48 


15 


S-1: Moist, brown, fine to coarse SAND, trace Gravel, 
Brick, Roots. 

S-2: Damp, light brown, fine to coarse SAND, trace 
Gravel, Asphalt, Brick. 

S-3: Top 6": Moist, dark brown, fine to coarse SAND, little 
Brick, trace Asphalt. 

Bottom 6": Dry, white/gray, GRAVEL, little fine to coarse 
Sand. 

S-4: Red/brown, Clayey SILT, little fine to coarse SAND, 
trace Brick, trace Glass, Wood. 

S-5: Wet, dark brown/dark red, fine SAND,little Slit, trace 
Gravel, odor. 

S-6: Red/black, fine to coarse SAND, trace Silt, Gravel, 
odor. 

S-7: Top 3": Wet, light tan, Clayey SILT, some Gravel, 
trace fine to coarse Sand, odor. 

Bottom 3” Black, fine to coarse SAND, little Wood, trace 
Silt, Gravel. 

S-8: Damp, black, Fibrous PEAT, organic odor. 

S-9: Damp, black, Fibrous PEAT, organic odor. Wet, small 
blue sheen globules on groundwater. 

S-10: Moist, black, Fibrous PEAT, organic odor. 

S-11: Moist, black, Fibrous PEAT, organic odor. 

S-12: Top 3": Moist, gray, fine Sand, little Silt. 

Bottom 9": Moist, stiff, Clayey SILT. 


ND 

ND 

ND 

11.1 

7.9 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 


FILL 


7' 


PEAT 


11 ' 

TITS' SAND 
12' CLAYEY SILT 


20 


Bottom of boring at 12 feet. 


25 


30 


Field testing results represent total organic vapor levels, referenced to a benzene standard, measured in the headspace of sealed soil sample jars using a ThermoEnvironmental 580B organic vapor meter 
equipped with a photoionization detector (PID) and 10.6eV lamp. Results in parts per million by volume (ppmv). ND indicates nothing detected (<0.1 ppmv). 

Composite soil samples collected for arsenic and lead analysis. 


See Log Key for explanation of sample description and identification procedures. Stratification lines represent approximate boundaries between soil and bedrock 
types. Actual transitions may be gradual. Water level readings have been made at the times and under the conditions stated. Fluctuations of groundwater may 
occur due to other factors than those present at the times the measurements were made 


Boring No. 
GZ-108 










































171521.10 100-300 SERIES WYNN EVERETT_EVERETT_MA GPJ; STRATUM ONLY WYNN EVERETT; 1/23/2015 


TEST BORING LOG 

GZA 

GZ\ GeoEnvironmental, Inc. 

Engineers and Scientists 

Wynn Everett 

Everett, Massachusetts 

BORING NO.: GZ-109 

SHEET: 1 of 1 

PROJECT NO: 171521.10 

REVIEWED BY: 

Drilling Co.: New Hampshire Boring 

Foreman: Carl Downing/Donnie Dunklee 

Logged By: Matt Dion/James Brown 

Type of Rig: Geoprobe 

Rig Model: 

Drilling Method: Direct Push 

Boring Location: A-5 Area 

Ground Surface Elev. (ft.): 

Final Boring Depth (ft.): 12 

Date Start - Finish: 11/3/2014 -11/3/2014 

H. Datum: 

V. Datum: 

Auger/Casing Type: 

I.D/O.D.(in): 

Hammer Weight (lb.): 

Hammer Fall (in.): 

Other: 

Sampler Type: Macrocore Barrel 

I.D./O.D. (in.): 1-3/872" 

Sampler Hmr Wt (lb): 

Sampler Hmr Fall (in): 

Other: 

Groundwater Depth (ft.) 

Date 

Time 

Water Depth 

Casing 

Stab. Time 

















Depth 

(ft) 


Blows/ 

Core 

Rate 


No. 


Sample 


Depth 

(ft.) 


Pen 

(in) 


Rec. 

(in) 


Blows 
(per 6 in.) 


SPT 

Value 


Sample Description and Identification 
(Modified Burmister Procedure) 


Test 

Data 


Stratum 
g-cc Description 
a 


> •—■ 
0 ) 

LU “ 


10 


S-1 

S-2 

S-3 

S-4 

S-5 

S-6 

S-7 

S-8 

S-9 
S-10 
S-11 
S-12 


0-4 


48 


36 


4-8 


48 


36 


8-12 


48 


48 


15 


20 


25 


30 


S-1: Damp, brown, fine to coarse SAND, trace Gravel, 

Brick, Roots, Silt. 

S-2: Damp, dark brown/gray, fine SAND, little Gravel, 
trace Silt, Brick. 

S-3: Moist, dark brown/red, fine to coarse SAND, trace 
Brick, Silt. 

S-4: Damp, red/green, Clayey SILT, trace medium to 
coarse SAND, trace Gravel. 

S-5: Damp, red to green, Clayey SILT, trace fine to coarse 
SAND, trace Gravel. 

S-6: Top 6": Damp, red/green, Clayey SILT, trace to 
coarse SAND, Gravel. 

Bottom 6": Damp, black/brown, fine SAND, trace Silt. 

S-7: Moist, black, Fibrous PEAT, organic odor. 

S-8: Moist, black, Fibrous PEAT, odor. 

S-9: Damp, stiff, green/grayish, Silty CLAY, trace fine to 
coarse Sand. 

S-10: Damp, stiff, green/gray, Silty CLAY, trace fine to 
coarse Sand. 

S-11: Damp, stiff, green/gray, Silty CLAY, trace fine to 
coarse Sand. 

S-12: Damp, stiff, greenish/grayish/brown, Silty CLAY, 
trace fine to coarse Sand. 


ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 


ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 


FILL 


4' 


CLAYEY SILT 


6 ' 


PEAT 


8 ' 


SILTY CLAY 


12 ' 


Bottom of boring at 12 feet. 


1 Field testing results represent total organic vapor levels, referenced to a benzene standard, measured in the headspace of sealed soil sample jars using a ThermoEnvironmental 580B organic vapor meter 

equipped with a photoionization detector (PID) and 10.6eV lamp. Results in parts per million by volume (ppmv). ND indicates nothing detected (<0.1 ppmv). 

2. Composite soil samples collected for arsenic and lead analysis. 





S< 

tyi 

OC 

Loq Key for explanation of sample description and identification procedures Stratification lines represent approximate boundaries between soil and bedrock 

^es Actual transitions may be gradual. Water level readings have been made at the times and under the conditions stated. Fluctuations of groundwater may 
n , r hup tn other factors than those present at the times the measurements were made. 

Boring No.: 

GZ-109 














































171521 10 100-300 SERIES WYNN EVERETTEVERETTMA.GPJ; STRATUM ONLY WYNN EVERETT; 1/23/2015 


TEST BORING LOG 

N GZA 

GZ\ GeoEnvironmental, Inc. 

Engineers and Scientists 

Wynn Everett 

Everett, Massachusetts 

BORING NO.: GZ-110 

SHEET: 1 of 1 

PROJECT NO: 171521.10 

REVIEWED BY: 


Drilling Co.: New Hampshire Boring 
Foreman: Carl Downing/Donnie Dunklee 

Logged By: Matt Dion/James Brown 


Type of Rig: Geoprobe 
Rig Model: 

Drilling Method: Direct Push 


Boring Location: A-5 Area 
Ground Surface Elev. (ft.): 

Final Boring Depth (ft.): 12 

Date Start • Finish: 10/31/2014 -10/31/2014 


H. Datum: 
V. Datum: 


Auger/Casing Type: 
I.D/O.D.(in): 

Hammer Weight (lb.): 
Hammer Fall (in.): 
Other: 

Casing 

Blows/ 

Core 
Rate 


Sampler Type: 
I.D./O.D. (in.): 
Sampler Hmr Wt (lb): 
Sampler Hmr Fall (in): 
Other: 


Macrocore Barrel 
1-3/872" 


Date 


Groundwater Depth (ft.) 


Time 


Water Depth 


Casing 


Stab. Time 


Depth 

(ft) 


No. 


Sample 


Depth 

(ft-) 


Pen. 

(in) 


Rec. 

(in) 


Blows 
(per 6 in.) 


SPT 

Value 


Sample Description and Identification 
(Modified Burmister Procedure) 


ro 

E 

CD 

a.: 


Field 

Test 

Data 


£ _ Stratum > „ 
§-£, Description .22 d 


10 


S-1 

S-2 

S-3 

S-4 

S-5 

S-6 

S-7 

S-8 

S-9 
S-10 
S-11 
S-12 


0-4 


48 


36 


4-8 


48 


48 


8-12 


48 


40 


15 


20 


S-1: Damp, brown/gray, fine to coarse SAND, trace 
Gravel, Silt, Brick, Roots, Asphalt. 

S-2: Damp, dark brown, fine to coarse SAND, some Silt, 
trace Gravel, trace Brick, Asphalt, Roots. 

S-3: Top 3”: Damp, brown, WOOD. 

Middle 6": Dry, gray/pink, Angular GRAVEL. 

Bottom 3”: Damp, red to black, WOOD and BRICK, little 
fine to coarse Sand, trace Silt. 

S-4: Damp, black/green, Clayey SILT, trace medium to 
coarse SAND, Brick. 

S-5: Damp, light gray/red, SILT, little fine to coarse Sand, 
trace Brick, Roots, Gravel. 

S-6: Wet, red/black, fine to coarse SAND, trace Gravel, 
Brick. 

S-7: Top 5": Wet, red/black, fine to coarse SAND,trace 
Gravel, Brick. 

Bottom 7": Moist, gray/red, Clayey SILT, little fine to 
coarse Sand, trace Brick. 

S-8: Top 6": Moist, gray/red, Clayey SILT, little fine to 
coarse Sand, trace Brick. 

Bottom 6": Damp to moist, Fibrous PEAT. 

S-9: Moist, gray/dark red, fine to coarse SAND, trace Silt, 
Gravel, Roots. 

S-10: Moist, gray/dark red, fine to coarse SAND, trace Silt, 
Gravel, Roots. 

S-11: Moist, stiff, green/gray, Silty CLAY, trace fine to 
coarse Sand. 

S-12: Moist, stiff, green/gray, Silty CLAY, trace fine to 
coarse Sand. 


ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 


ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 


FILL 


7.5' 


peat 

SAND 


10 ' 


SILTY CLAY 


12 ' 


Bottom of boring at 12 feet. 


25 


30 


1. Field testing results represent total organic vapor levels, referenced to a benzene standard, measured in the headspace of sealed soil sample jars using a ThermoEnvironmental 580B organic vapor meter 
equipped with a photoionization detector (RID) and 10.6eV lamp. Results in parts per million by volume (ppmv). ND indicates nothing detected (<0.1 ppmv). 

2. Composite soil samples collected for arsenic and lead analysis. 


See Log Key for explanation of sample description and identification procedures. Stratification lines represent approximate boundaries between soil and bedrock 
types Actual transitions may be gradual. Water level readings have been made at the times and under the conditions stated. Fluctuations of groundwater may 
occur due to other factors than those present at the times the measurements were made. 


Boring No. 
GZ-110 











































171521 10 100-300 SERIES WYNN EVERETTEVERETTMA.GPJ; STRATUM ONLY WYNN EVERETT; 1/23/2015 


TEST BORING LOG 

N GZA 

GI\ GeoEnvironmental, Inc. 

Engineers and Scientists 

Wynn Everett 

Everett, Massachusetts 

BORING NO.: GZ-111 

SHEET: 1 of 1 

PROJECT NO: 171521.10 

REVIEWED BY: 

Drilling Co.: New Hampshire Boring 

Foreman: Carl Downing/Donnie Dunklee 

Logged By: Matt Dion/James Brown 

Type of Rig: Geoprobe 

Rig Model: 

Drilling Method: Direct Push 

Boring Location: A-5 Area 

Ground Surface Elev. (ft.): 

Final Boring Depth (ft.): 12 

Date Start - Finish: 11/3/2014 - 11/3/2014 

H. Datum: 

V. Datum: 

Auger/Casing Type: 

I.D/O.D.(in): 

Hammer Weight (lb.): 

Hammer Fall (in.): 

Other: 

Sampler Type: Macrocore Barrel 

I.D./O.D. (in.): 1-3/872" 

Sampler Hmr Wt (lb): 

Sampler Hmr Fall (in): 

Other: 

Groundwater Depth (ft.) 

Date 

Time 

Water Depth 

Casing 

Stab. Time 

















Depth 

(ft) 


Blows/ 

Core 

Rate 


No. 


Samp 


Depth 

(ft.) 


Pen 

(in) 


Rec 

(in) 


Blows 
(per 6 in.) 


SPT 

Value 


Sample Description and Identification 
(Modified Burmister Procedure) 


k_ 

03 

Field 

C 

E 

Test 

Q. 

<D 

Q) 

cn 

Data 

o 


Stratum 


> •—- 

a> 

uj 


10 


S-1 

S-2 

S-3 

S-4 

S-5 

S-6 

S-7 

S-8 

S-9 
S-10 
S-11 
S-12 


0-4 


48 


36 


4-8 


48 


36 


8-12 


48 


48 


15 


20 


25 


30 


S-1: Dry, brown, fine to coarse SAND, little Gravel, trace 

Silt. 

S-2: Dark brown, fine to coarse SAND, trace Gravel, Brick. 
S-3: Damp, dark brown/black, SILT, little fine to coarse 
Sand, trace Gravel. 

S-4: Damp, dark brown/black, SILT, little fine to coarse 
Sand, trace Gravel. 

S-5: Damp, dark brown/black, SILT, little fine to coarse 
Sand, trace Gravel. 

S-6: Damp, brown/black, fine to coarse SAND, trace 
Gravel. 

S-7: Damp, tan/black, Clayey Silt. 

Middle 3": Moist, black, fine to medium SAND, trace Silt. 
S-8: Top 6": Moist, black, fine to medium SAND, trace Silt. 
Bottom 6": Damp, brown/black, Fibrous PEAT. 

S-9: Damp, brown/black, Fibrous PEAT. 

S-10: Moist, grayish, fine to coarse SAND. 

S-11: Moist, green/brown, Silty CLAY, trace fine to coarse 
Sand, Gravel. 


ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 


ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 


FILL 


SILT 


PEAT 


9’_ 

10 ’ 


SAND 


SILTY CLAY 


12 ' 


Bottom of boring at 12 feet. 


1 Field testing results represent total organic vapor levels, referenced to a benzene standard, measured in the headspace of sealed soil sample jars using a ThermoEnvironmental 580B organic vapor meter 

equipped with a photoionization detector (PID) and 10.6eV lamp. Results in parts per million by volume (ppmv). ND indicates nothing detected (<0.1 ppmv). 

2. Composite soil samples collected for arsenic and lead analysis. 


See Log Key for explanation of sample description and identification procedures. Stratification lines represent approximate boundaries between soil and bedrock 

types Actual transitions may be gradual. Water level readings have been made at the times and under the conditions stated. Fluctuations of groundwater may 
occur due to other factors than those present at the times the measurements were made.__ 


Boring No. 

GZ-111 















































171521 10 100-300 SERIES WYNN EVERETT EVERETT MA GPJ; STRATUM ONLY WYNN EVERETT: 1/23/2015 


TEST BORING LOG 

^ GZA 

OZ\ GeoEnvironmental, Inc. 

Engineers and Scientists 

Wynn Everett 

Everett, Massachusetts 

BORING NO.: GZ-112 

SHEET: 1 of 1 

PROJECT NO: 171521.10 

REVIEWED BY: 


Drilling Co.: New Hampshire Boring 
Foreman: Carl Downing/Donnie Dunklee 

Logged By: Matt Dion/James Brown 


Type of Rig: Geoprobe 
Rig Model: 

Drilling Method: Direct Push 


Boring Location: A-5 Area 
Ground Surface Elev. (ft.): 

Final Boring Depth (ft.): 12 

Date Start - Finish: 11/3/2014 - 11/3/2014 


H. Datum: 
V. Datum: 


Auger/Casing Type: 
I.D/O.D.(in): 

Hammer Weight (lb.): 
Hammer Fall (in.): 
Other: 


Sampler Type: 
I.D./O.D. (in.): 
Sampler Hmr Wt (lb): 
Sampler Hmr Fall (in): 
Other: 


Macrocore Barrel 
1-3/872" 


Casing 

Blows/ 

Core 

Rate 


Dale 


Groundwater Depth (ft.) 


Time 


Water Depth 


- 3 r 

L_ 

CD 

E 

Q) 

a: 


Casing 


Stab. Time 


Depth 

(ft) 


No. 


Samp 


Depth 

(ft.) 


Pen. 

(in) 


Rec. 

(in) 


Blows 
(per 6 in.) 


SPT 

Value 


Sample Description and Identification 
(Modified Burmister Procedure) 


Field 

Test 

Data 


£ ^ Stratum 
§-£. Description 
o 


> ^ 
O ctd 
LU ^ 


10 


S-1 

S-2 

S-3 

S-4 

S-5 

S-6 

S-7 

S-8 

S-9 
S-10 
S-11 
S-12 


0-4 


48 


36 


4-8 


48 


30 


8-12 


48 


48 


15 


S-1: Damp, brown/gray, fine to coarse SAND, some 
Gravel. 

S-2: Moist, gray/brown, fine to coarse SAND, trace Gravel, 
Silt, Brick. 

S-3: Damp, tan/black, fine to coarse SAND, trace Gravel, 
Silt, Brick, Asphalt. 

S-4: Damp, brown/red, fine to coarse SAND, trace Gravel, 
Silt, Wood. 

S-5: Damp, brown/red, fine to coarse SAND, trace Gravel, 
Silt, Wood, petroleum-like odor. 

S-6: Damp, brown/reddish/blackish, fine to coarse SAND, 
trace Gravel, Silt, Wood, petroleum-like odor. 

S-7: Damp, black, Fibrous PEAT, organic odor. 

S-8: Damp, black, Fibrous PEAT, organic odor. 

S-9: Damp, stiff, gray/green, Silty CLAY, trace fine to 
coarse Sand, Gravel. 

S-10: Damp, stiff, gray/green, Silty CLAY, trace fine to 
coarse Sand, Gravel. 

S-11: Damp, stiff, gray/green, Silty CLAY, trace fine to 
coarse Sand, Gravel. 

S-12: Damp, stiff, gray/greenish/reddish, Silty CLAY, trace 
fine to coarse Sand, trace Gravel. 


ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

0.9 


ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 


FILL 


6' 


PEAT 


8 ' 


SILTY CLAY 


12 ' 


Bottom of boring at 12 feet. 


20 


25 


30 


1. Field testing results represent total organic vapor levels, referenced to a benzene standard, measured in the headspace of sealed soil sample jars using a ThermoEnvironmental 580B organic vapor meter 
equipped with a photoionization detector (PID) and 10.6eV lamp. Results in parts per million by volume (ppmv). ND indicates nothing detected (<0.1 ppmv). 

2. Composite soil samples collected for arsenic and lead analysis. 


See Log Key for explanation of sample description and identification procedures. Stratification lines represent approximate boundaries between soil and bedrock 
types. Actual transitions may be gradual. Water level readings have been made at the times and under the conditions stated. Fluctuations of groundwater may 
occur due to other factors than those present at the times the measurements were made. 


Boring No. 
GZ-112 












































171521.10 100-300 SERIES WYNN EVERETTEVERETTMA.GPJ; STANDARD BORING EQUIP WYNN EVERETT; 1/23/2015 


TEST BORING LOG 

GZA 

GeoEnvironmental, Inc. 

Engineers and Scientists 

Wynn Everett 

Everett, Massachusetts 

BORING NO.: GZ-201 

SHEET: 1 of 1 

PROJECT NO: 171521.10 

REVIEWED BY: JR 

Drilling Co.: New England Boring 

Foreman: Donald Dunklee 

Logged By: James Roehrig 

Type of Rig: Truck 

Rig Model: Diedrich D-90 

Drilling Method:HSA 

Boring Location: 

Ground Surface Elev. (ft.): 

Final Boring Depth (ft.): 14 

Date Start - Finish: 11/6/2014 -11/6/2014 

H. Datum: 

V. Datum: 

Auger/Casing Type: 

I.D./O.D.: 4.2576.25" 

Hmr Weight (lb.): 140 lbs 

Hmr Fall (in.): 30" 

Other: Auto Hammer 

Sampler Type: Split Spoon 

I.D./O.D (in.): 1-3/872" 

Sampler Hmr Wt: 140 lbs 

Sampler Hmr Fall: 30" 

Other: 

Groundwater Dept 


ft.) 

Date 

Time 

Water Depth 

Casing 

Stab. Time 


















Depth 

(ft) 


Casing 

Blows/ 

Core 

Rate 


No. 


Samp 


Depth 

(ft.) 


Pen 

(in) 


Rec. 

(in) 


Blows 
(per 6 in.) 


SPT 

Value 


Sample Description 
Modified Burmister 


Field 

Test 

Data 


Stratum 
g Description 


Q) tz 


Equipment Installed 

- 3" Protective Steel 
Standpipe (Stickup 



S-1 


5-7 


24 


11 


7 7 
7 3 


14 


10 


S-2 


10-12 


24 


15 


20 


25 


30 


S-1; Dry, medium dense, fine SAND, 
some Silt, little Gravel, red staining 
throughout sample. 


ND 


FILL 


10 ' 


14.5 


2 1 
1 1 


S-2: Moist, soft, Organic Clayey SILT, 
some Shell fragments, red staining in 
top 4-inches of sample. 


ND 


ORGANIC CLAYEY SILT 


14' 


Bottom of boring at 14 feet. 


Concrete 0-1' 

Soil Cuttings 
1 - 2 ' 

Bentonite 2-3' 

-2" PVC Riser 
+2.5 - 4' 


-Sand 3-14' 


-2" PVC Screen 
4-14' 


Field testina results represent total organic vapor levels, referenced to a benzene standard, measured in the headspace of sealed soil sample jars using a ThermoEnvironmental 580B organic 

vapor meter equipped with a photoionization detector (PID) and 10.6eV lamp. Results in parts per million by volume (ppmv). ND indicates nothing detected (<0.1 ppmv). 

Auger refusal at 14 feet bgs. 


See loo kev for explanation of sample descriptions and identification procedures. Stratification lines represent approximate boundaries between soil and bedrock 

h-r^Ar-hial transitions may be gradual. Water level readings have been made at the times and under the conditions stated. Fluctuations of groundwater may 


types Actual transitions may be gradual, 
occur due to other factors than those present at the times the measurements were made. 


Boring No. 
GZ-201 









































































































171521 10 100-300 SERIES WYNN EVERETT EVERETT MA.GPJ; STANDARD BORING EQUIP WYNN EVERETT; 1/23/2015 








































































































171521.10 100-300 SERIES WYNN EVERETT_EVERETT MA GPJ; STANDARD BORING EQUIP WYNN EVERETT; 1/23/2015 


TEST BORING LOG 

GZA 

GeoEnvironmental, Inc. 

Engineers and Scientists 

Wynn Everett 

Everett, Massachusetts 

BORING NO.: GZ-203 

SHEET: 1 of 1 

PROJECT NO: 171521.10 
REVIEWED BY: JR 


Drilling Co.: New England Boring 

Foreman: Donald Dunklee 

Logged By: James Roehrig 

Type of Rig: Truck 

Rig Model: Diedrich D-90 

Drilling Method:HSA 

Boring Location: 

Ground Surface Elev. (ft.): 

Final Boring Depth (ft.): 15 

Date Start - Finish: 11/6/2014 -11/6/2014 

H. Datum: 

V. Datum: 

Auger/Casing Type: 

I.D./O.D.: 4.2576.25" 

Hmr Weight (lb.): 140 lbs 

Hmr Fall (in.): 30" 

Other: Auto Hammer 

Sampler Type: Split Spoon 

I.D./O.D (in.): 1-3/872" 

Sampler Hmr Wt: 140 lbs 

Sampler Hmr Fall: 30" 

Other: 

Groundwater Dept 

h i 

ft.) 

Date 

Time 

Water Depth 

Casing 

Stab. Time 


















Depth 

(ft) 


10 


15 


20 


Blows/ 

Core 

Rate, 


No. 


Sample 


Depth 

(ft.) 


en. 

(in) 


Rec. 

(in) 


Blows 
i’per 6 in.) 


SPT 

Value 


Sample Description 
Modified Burmister 


NO SAMPLES TAKEN 

SOIL CLASSIFIED FROM AUGER 
CUTTINGS 


Bottom of boring at 15 feet. 


Test 

Data 


Stratum 


g-g Description 
o 


FILL 



ORGANIC SILT 


15 ' 


3" Protective Steel 
Standpipe (Stickup 

Concrete 0-T 


Soil Cuttings 
1-3' 

Bentonite 3-4' 

-2" PVC Riser 
+2.5 - 5' 

-Sand 4-15' 


-2" PVC Screen 
5-15' 


25 


30 1 

i. 

cn 

x 

O' 

< 


Field testing results represent total organic vapor levels, referenced to a benzene standard, measured in the headspace of sealed soil sample jars using a ThermoEnvironmental 580B organic 

vapor meter equipped with a photoionization detector (PID) and 10.6eV lamp. Results in parts per million by volume (ppmv). ND indicates nothing detected (<0.1 ppmv). 


LLI 

O' 


See log key for explanation of sample descriptions and identification procedures. Stratification lines represent approximate boundaries between soil and bedrock 

types. Actual transitions may be gradual. Water level readings have been made at the times and under the conditions stated. Fluctuations of groundwater may 
occur due to other factors than those present at the times the measurements were made. __ 


Boring No.: 

GZ-203 













































































































































































































171521 10 100-300 SERIES WYNN EVERETT EVERETT MA.GPJ; STANDARD BORING EQUIP WYNN EVERETT; 1/23/2015 


TEST BORING LOG 

GZA 

GeoEnvironmental, Inc. 

Engineers and Scientists 

Wynn Everett 

Everett, Massachusetts 

BORING NO.: GZ-205 

SHEET: 1 of 1 

PROJECT NO: 171521.10 

REVIEWED BY: JR 

Drilling Co.: New England Boring 

Foreman: Donald Dunklee 

Logged By: James Roehrig 

Type of Rig: Truck 

Rig Model: Diedrich D-90 

Drilling Method:HSA 

Boring Location: 

Ground Surface Elev. (ft.): 

Final Boring Depth (ft.): 17 

Date Start - Finish: 11/6/2014 -11/6/2014 

H. Datum: 

V. Datum: 

Auger/Casing Type: 

I.D./O.D.: 4.2576.25" 

Hmr Weight (lb.): 140 lbs 

Hmr Fall (in.): 30” 

Other: Auto Hammer 

Sampler Type: Split Spoon 

I.D./O.D (in.): 1-3/872" 

Sampler Hmr Wt: 140 lbs 

Sampler Hmr Fall: 30" 

Other: 

Groundwater Dept 

h 

ft.) 

Date 

Time 

Water Depth 

Casing 

Stab. Time 

















Depth 

(ft) 


Casing 

Blows/ 

Core 

Rate 


No. 


Samp 


Depth 

(ft-) 


Pen. 

(in) 


Rec. 

(in) 


Blows 
(per 6 in.) 


SPT 

Value 


Sample Description 
Modified Burmister 


ro 

E 

03 

QL 


Field 

Test 

Data 


Stratum 


§•« Description >~ 
° £33'—' 


Equipment Installed 

- 3" Protective Steel 
Standpipe (Stickup 



S-1 


5-7 


24 


15 


13 13 

14 24 


27 


S-1: Moist, medium dense, dark 
brown, fine SAND, some (+) Silt, little 
(+) Gravel, trace Wood fragments. 


ND 


FILL 


10 


S-2 


10-12 


24 


13 4 
2 2 


S-2: No Recovery. 


ND 


IV 


15 


S-3 


15-17 


24 


19.5 


1 2 
2 2 


S-3: Wet, soft, gray, Organic Clayey 
SILT. 


ND 


ORGANIC CLAYEY SILT 


17 ’ 


Bottom of boring at 17 feet. 


20 


25 


30 


Concrete 0-T 


Soil Cuttings 
1-3’ 

Bentonite 3-4' 

-2" PVC Riser 
+2.5 - 5' 

-Sand 4-15’ 


-2" PVC Screen 
5-15' 


1. Field testing results represent total organic vapor levels, referenced to a benzene standard, measured in the headspace of sealed soil sample jars using a ThermoEnvironmental 580B organic 
vapor meter equipped with a photoionization detector (PID) and 10.6eV lamp. Results in parts per million by volume (ppmv). ND indicates nothing detected (<0.1 ppmv). 

2. Gravel in tip of spoon. 


See log key for explanation of sample descriptions and identification procedures. Stratification lines represent approximate boundaries between soil and bedrock 
types Actual transitions may be gradual. Water level readings have been made at the times and under the conditions stated. Fluctuations of groundwater may 
occur due to other factors than those present at the times the measurements were made. 


Boring No. 
GZ-205 








































































































171521 10 100-300 SERIES WYNN EVERETT EVERETT MA.GPJ; STANDARD BORING EQUIP WYNN EVERETT; 1/23/2015 








































































































171521 10 100-300 SERIES WYNN EVERETT EVERETT MA GPJ; STANDARD BORING EQUIP WYNN EVERETT; 1/23/2015 


TEST BORING LOG 

GZA 

Q2\ GeoEnvironmental, Inc. 

Engineers and Scientists 

Wynn Everett 

Everett, Massachusetts 

BORING NO.: GZ-207 

SHEET: 1 of 1 

PROJECT NO: 171521.10 

REVIEWED BY: JR 

Drilling Co.: New England Boring 

Foreman: Donald Dunklee 

Logged By: James Roehrig 

Type of Rig: Truck 

Rig Model: Diedrich D-90 

Drilling Method:HSA 

Boring Location: 

Ground Surface Elev. (ft.): 

Final Boring Depth (ft.): 17 

Date Start - Finish: 11/5/2014 - 11/5/2014 

H. Datum: 

V. Datum: 

Auger/Casing Type: 

I.D./O.D.: 4.2576.25" 

Hmr Weight (lb.): 140 lbs 

Hmr Fall (in.): 30” 

Other: Auto Hammer 

Sampler Type: Split Spoon 

I.D./O.D (in.): 1-3/872" 

Sampler Hmr Wt: 140 lbs 

Sampler Hmr Fall: 30" 

Other: 

Groundwater Dept 

h 

ft.) 

Date 

Time 

Water Depth 

Casing 

Stab. Time 

















Depth 

(ft) 


10 


15 


20 


25 


30 


Casing 
Blows/ 
Core 
Rate. 


No. 


S-1 


S-2 


S-3 


Sample 


Depth 

(ft.) 


Pen. 

(in) 


5-7 


10-12 


15-17 


Rec. 

(in) 


24 


24 


24 


17 


24 


Blows 
(per 6 in.) 


SPT 

Value 


7 4 
9 6 


2 1 
2 2 


2 3 
4 2 


13 


Sample Description 
Modified Burmister 


S-1: Dry, medium dense, brown, fine 
SAND, some (-) Silt, trace Brick. 


S-2: No Recovery. 


S-3: Wet, medium stiff, gray, Organic 
SILT. Shell fragments throughout 
sample. 


Bottom of boring at 17 feet. 


Field 

Test 

Data 


Stratum 


§-£. Description 
o 


ND 


ND 


ND 



FILL 


10 ' 


ORGANIC SILT 


17 


Equipment Installed 

- 3" Protective Steel 
Standpipe (Stickup 

Concrete 0-1' 


Soil Cuttings 
1-3’ 

Bentonite 3-4' 

-2” PVC Riser 
+2.5 - 5' 

-Sand 4-15' 


-2" PVC Screen 
5-15' 


1 Field testinq results represent total organic vapor levels, referenced to a benzene standard, measured in the headspace of sealed soil sample jars using a ThermoEnvironmental 580B organic 

’ vapor meter equipped with a photoionization detector (PID) and 10.6eV lamp. Results in parts per million by volume (ppmv). ND indicates nothing detected (<0.1 ppmv). 


See loq key for explanation of sample descriptions and identification procedures. Stratification lines represent approximate boundaries between soil and bedrock 

types Actual transitions may be gradual Water level readings have been made at the times and under the conditions stated. Fluctuations of groundwater may 
occur due to other factors than those present at the times the measurements were made. _ 


Boring No. 
GZ-207 




































































































171521 10 100-300 SERIES WYNN EVERETT EVERETT_MA.GPJ; STANDARD BORING EQUIP WYNN EVERETT; 1/23/2015 
















































































































171521.10 100-300 SERIES WYNN EVERETTEVERETTMA.GPJ; STANDARD BORING EQUIP WYNN EVERETT; 1/23/2015 


TEST BORING LOG 

GZA 

GeoEnvironmental, Inc. 

Engineers and Scientists 

Wynn Everett 

Everett, Massachusetts 

BORING NO.: GZ-209 

SHEET: 1 of 1 

PROJECT NO: 171521.10 

REVIEWED BY: JR 

Drilling Co.: New England Boring 

Foreman: Donald Dunklee 

Logged By: J. Roehrig/K. Kerigan 

Type of Rig: Truck 

Rig Model: Diedrich D-90 

Drilling Method:HSA 

Boring Location: 

Ground Surface Elev. (ft.): 

Final Boring Depth (ft.): 15 

Date Start - Finish: 11/6/2014 - 11/7/2014 

H. Datum: 

V. Datum: 

Auger/Casing Type: 

I.D./O.D.: 4.2576.25" 

Hmr Weight (lb.): 140 lbs 

Hmr Fall (in.): 30" 

Other: Auto Hammer 

Sampler Type: Split Spoon 

I.D./O.D (in.): 1-3/872" 

Sampler Hmr Wt: 140 lbs 

Sampler Hmr Fall: 30" 

Other: 

Groundwater Dept 

h 

ft.) 

Date 

Time 

Water Depth 

Casing 

Stab. Time 


















Depth 

(ft) 


10 


15 


20 


25 


30 


Blows/ 

Core 

Rate 


No. 


Sample 


Depth 

(ft.) 


en. 

(in) 


Rec. 

(in) 


Blows 
(per 6 in.) 


SPT 

Value 


Sample Description 
Modified Burmister 


NO SAMPLES TAKEN 

SOIL CLASSIFIED FROM AUGER 
CUTTINGS 


Bottom of boring at 15 feet. 


Test 

Data 


§•£. Description 

Q in' 



FILL 


15 ' 


3" Protective Steel 
Standpipe (Stickup 

Concrete 0-1' 


Soil Cuttings 
1-3' 

Bentonite 3-4' 

-2” PVC Riser 
+2.5 - 5' 

-Sand 4-15' 


-2” PVC Screen 
5-15' 


1. Suspected Wood from 6.5 to 8 feet bgs. 


See loo key for explanation of sample descriptions and identification procedures. Stratification lines represent approximate boundaries between soil and bedrock 

types Actual transitions may be gradual. Water level readings have been made at the times and under the conditions stated. Fluctuations of groundwater may 
occur due to other factors than those present at the times the measurements were made _____ 


Boring No. 

GZ-209 








































































































171521 10 100-300 SERIES WYNN EVERETTEVERETTMA.GPJ; STANDARD BORING EQUIP WYNN EVERETT; 1/23/2015 


TEST BORING LOG 


OZ\ 


GZA 

GeoEnvironmental, Inc. 

Engineers and Scientists 


Wynn Everett 
Everett, Massachusetts 


BORING NO.: GZ-210 
SHEET: 1 of 1 

PROJECT NO: 171521.10 
REVIEWED BY: JR 


Drilling Co.: 
Foreman: 
Logged By: 


New England Boring 

Donald Dunklee 
J. Roehrig/K. Kerigan 


Type of Rig: Truck 
Rig Model: Diedrich D-90 

Drilling Method:HSA 


Boring Location: 

Ground Surface Elev. (ft.): 

Final Boring Depth (ft.): 15 

Date Start - Finish: 11/7/2014 - 11/7/2014 


H. Datum: 
V. Datum: 


Auger/Casing Type: 
I.D./O.D.: 4.2578.25" 

Hmr Weight (lb.): 140 lbs 

Hmr Fall (in.): 30" 

Other: Auto Hammer 


Sampler Type: Split Spoon 

I.D./O.D (in.): 1-3/872" 

Sampler Hmr Wt: 140 lbs 
Sampler Hmr Fall: 30" 
Other: 


Groundwater Depth (ft.) 


Date 


Time 


Water Depth Casing Stab. Time 


Depth 

(ft) 


Casing 

Blows/ 

Core 

Rate 


No. 


Samp 


Depth 

(ft.) 


Pen 

(in) 


Rec. 

(in) 


Blows 


(per 6 in.) Value 


SPT 


Sample Description 
Modified Burmister 


co 

E 

Q) 

SL. 


Field 

Test 

Data 


Stratum 


§■£. Description >~ 
° [D 


Equipment Installed 

- 3” Protective Steel 
Standpipe (Stickup 



Concrete 0-0.5’ 


Soil Cuttings 
0.5-2.5’ 


Bentonite 2.5-4’ 


NO SAMPLES TAKEN 


FILL 


10 


15 


15 ’ 


Bottom of boring at 15 feet. 


20 


25 


30 


-2" PVC Riser 
+2.5 - 5’ 

-Sand 4-15’ 


-2” PVC Screen 
5-15’ 


See log key for explanation of sample descriptions and identification procedures. Stratification lines represent approximate boundaries between soil and bedrock 
types. Actual transitions may be gradual. Water level readings have been made at the times and under the conditions stated. Fluctuations of groundwater may 
occur due to other factors than those present at the times the measurements were made. 


Boring No. 
GZ-210 


































































































171521 10 100-300 SERIES WYNN EVERETTEVERETTMA.GPJ; STANDARD BORING EQUIP WYNN EVERETT; 1/23/2015 


TEST BORING LOG 


GZA 

GeoEnvironmental, Inc. 

Engineers and Scientists 

Wynn Everett 

Everett, Massachusetts 

BORING NO.: GZ-211 

SHEET: 1 of 1 

PROJECT NO: 171521.10 

REVIEWED BY: JR 

Drilling Co.: New England Boring 

Foreman: Donald Dunklee 

Logged By: J. Roehrig/K. Kerigan 

Type of Rig: Truck 

Rig Model: Diedrich D-90 

Drilling Method:HSA 

Boring Location: 

Ground Surface Elev. (ft.): 

Final Boring Depth (ft.): 15 

Date Start - Finish: 11/10/2014 - 11/10/2014 

H. Datum: 

V. Datum: 

Auger/Casing Type: 

I.D./O.D.: 4.2578.25" 

Hmr Weight (lb.): 140 lbs 

Hmr Fall (in.): 30" 

Other: Auto Hammer 

Sampler Type: Split Spoon 

I.D./O.D (in.): 1-3/872" 

Sampler Hmr Wt: 140 lbs 

Sampler Hmr Fall: 30" 

Other: 

Groundwater Dept 

h 

ft.) 

Date 

Time 

Water Depth 

Casing 

Stab. Time 

















Depth 

(ft) 


10 


15 


20 


25 


30 


Casing 

Blows/ 

Core 

Rate 


No. 


S-1 


S-2 


S-3 


Sample 


Depth 

(ft.) 


Pen 

(in) 


3-5 


8-10 


13-15 


Rec. 

(in) 


24 


24 


24 


13 


12 


10 


Blows 
(per 6 in.) 


SPT 

Value 


1. Sample rods stained purple at 12 feet. 

2. Top 1-inch of sample S-3 was purple. 

3. Slight petroleum-like odor 13 to 15 feet bgs. 


Sample Description 
Modified Burmister 


S-1: Top 2": Brown, fine SAND, trace 
Silt. 

Middle 2": White, Sandy 
CRYSTALINE Substance (firm) 

Middle 5": Red, BRICK. 

Bottom 4": Dark brown, Organic SILT, 
little Gravel, little possible Slag. 

S-2: Top 7": Moist, yellow, Sandy 
CRYSTALINE Substance (soft) 

Bottom 5" Moist, dark gray, SAND, 
little red Brick-like material (firm), trace 
Silt. 

S-3: Wet, dark brown, Organic SILT, 
little Decomposed Vegetation. 


Bottom of boring at 15 feet. 


Field 

Test 

Data 


£ Stratum 
g-g Description j- — 

^ LU 



FILL 


12 ' 


ORGANIC SILT 


15 ' 


Equipment Installed 

- 3" Protective Steel 
Standpipe (Stickup 

Concrete 0-1' 


Soil Cuttings 
1-3' 

Bentonite 3-4' 

-2” PVC Riser 
+3-5' 

-Sand 4-15' 


-2" PVC Screen 
5-15' 


loo kev for explanation of sample descriptor and identification procedures. Stratification lines represent approximate boundaries between soil and bedrock 

Actual transitions may be gradual. Water level readings have been made at the times and under the conditions stated. Fluctuations of groundwater may 


See I _ 

types. Actual transitions may be gradual, 
occur due to other factors than those present at the times the measurements were made. 


Boring No. 

GZ-211 






































































































171521 10 100-300 SERIES WYNN EVERETTEVERETTMA.GPJ; STANDARD BORING EQUIP WYNN EVERETT; 1/23/2015 






































































































171521.10 100-300 SERIES WYNN EVERETT_EVERETT_MA.GPJ: STANDARD BORING EQUIP WYNN EVERETT; 1/23/2015 


TEST BORING LOG 


GZA 


GZ\ 


GeoEnvironmental, Inc. 


Engineers and Scientists 


Wynn Everett 
Everett, Massachusetts 


BORING NO.: GZ-213 
SHEET: 1 of 1 

PROJECT NO: 171521.10 
REVIEWED BY: JR 


Drilling Co.: 
Foreman: 
Logged By: 


New England Boring 

Donald Dunklee 
J. Roehrig/K. Kerigan 


Type of Rig: Truck 
Rig Model: Diedrich D-90 
Drilling Method:HSA 


Boring Location: 

Ground Surface Elev. (ft.): 

Final Boring Depth (ft.): 15 

Date Start - Finish: 11/10/2014 - 11/10/2014 


H. Datum: 
V. Datum: 


Auger/Casing Type: 
I.D./O.D.: 4.2576.25" 

Hmr Weight (lb.): 140 lbs 

Hmr Fall (in.): 30" 

Other: Auto Hammer 


Sampler Type: Split Spoon 

I.D./O.D (in.): 1-3/872" 

Sampler Hmr Wt: 140 lbs 
Sampler Hmr Fall: 30" 
Other: 


Groundwater Depth (ft.) 

Date 

Time 

Water Depth 

Casing 

Stab. Time 

















Depth 
(ft) 


Casing 

Blows/ 

Core 

Rate.. 


10 


15 


20 


25 


30 


No. 


S-1 


S-2 


S-3 


Sample 


Depth 

(ft.) 


0-2 


4-6 


11-13 


en. 

(in) 


Rec 

(in) 


24 


24 


24 


12 


10 


12 


Blows 
(per 6 in.) 


SPT 

Value 


Sample Description 
Modified Burmister 


S-1: Moist, brown, fine SAND, some 

Gravel, trace Silt, trace roots, trace 
concrete. 


S-2: Black, Organic SILT, some 
Wood, trace Brick, trace Sand, trace 
Gravel. 


S-3: Wet, purple, fine to coarse 
SAND, little Gravel, trace Silt, trace 
Slag-like material. 


Bottom of boring at 15 feet. 


L_ 

CD 

Field 

£ 

E 

Test 

0 ^ 

CD 

a: 

Data 



Stratum 



FILL 


15 ' 


3" Protective Steel 
Standpipe (Stickup 

Concrete 0-1' 


Soil Cuttings 
1-3' 

Bentonite 3-4' 

-2" PVC Riser 
+2.5 - 5' 

-Sand 4-15' 


-2" PVC Screen 
5-15' 


1 Drill cuttings begin surfacing with purple coloring at 7.5 feet bgs. 
2. Purple coloring did not appear natural. 









































































































171521 10 100-300 SERIES WYNN EVERETT EVERETT M AGP J; STANDARD BORING EQUIP WYNN EVERETT; 1/23/2015 


TEST BORING LOG 

\ GZA 

GeoEnvironmental, Inc. 

Engineers and Scientists 

Wynn Everett 

Everett, Massachusetts 

BORING NO.: GZ-214 

SHEET: 1 of 1 

PROJECT NO: 171521.10 
REVIEWED BY: JR 


Drilling Co.: New England Boring 

Foreman: Donald Dunklee 

Logged By: J. Roehrig/K. Kerigan 

Type of Rig: Truck 

Rig Model: Diedrich D-90 

Drilling Method:HSA 

Boring Location: 

Ground Surface Elev. (ft.): 

Final Boring Depth (ft.): 15 

Date Start - Finish: 11/7/2014 -11/7/2014 

H. Datum: 

V. Datum: 

Auger/Casing Type: 

I.D./O.D.: 4.2576.25" 

Hmr Weight (lb.): 140 lbs 

Hmr Fall (in.): 30” 

Other: Auto Hammer 

Sampler Tvoe: SDlit SDOon 


Groundwater Dept 

h 

ft.) 

I.D./O.D (in.): 1-3/872" 

Sampler Hmr Wt: 140 lbs 

Sampler Hmr Fall: 30" 

Other: 

Date 

Time 

Water Depth 

Casing 

Stab. Time 


















Depth 

(ft) 


10 


15 


20 


25 


30 


Blows/ 

Core 

Rate. 


No. 


Sample 


Depth 

(ft-) 


Pen. 

(in) 


Rec. 

(in) 


Blows 
(per 6 in.) 


SPT 

Value 


Sample Description 
Modified Burmister 


NO SAMPLES TAKEN 

SOIL CLASSIFIED FROM AUGER 
CUTTINGS 


Bottom of boring at 15 feet. 


3" Protective Steel 
Standpipe (Stickup 



FILL 


15 ’ 


Soil Cuttings 
1-3' 

-Bentonite 3-4' 

-2“ PVC Riser 
+2.5 - 5’ 

-Sand 4-15' 


-2" PVC Screen 
5-15' 


See log key for explanation of sample descriptions and identification procedures Stratification lines represent approximate boundaries between soil and bedrock 
types Actual transitions may be gradual Water level readings have been made at the times and under the conditions stated Fluctuations of groundwater may 
occur due to other factors than those present at the times the measurements were made 


Boring No. 
GZ-214 












































































































APPENDIX F 


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APPENDIX G 


K TEST DATA 



HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY TESTING 
WYNN EVERETT 
JANUARY 23, 2015 


FIELD MEASUREMENTS 


Well # 

Static Water Level (ft) 

(equilibrium before purging) 

Stabilized Water Level (ft) 

(equilibrium during purging) 

Volume Purged (gal) 

Purging Time (min) 

Total Well Depth (ft) 

Screen Length (ft) 1 

Intake Length (ft) 

(screen exposed to water column) 

Screen Diameter (in) 

BOR-109-3 (1) 

10 54 

1060 

007 

1 

17.40 

10 

686 

2 

BQR-109-3 (2) 

1054 

1071 

0.15 

1 

1740 

10 

686 

2 

BQR-109-3 (3) 

1054 

10 82 

0.21 

1 

17 40 

10 

6.86 

2 

CES 2-1 (1) 

883 

15.54 

0.01 

1 

17.15 

10 

8.32 

2 

CES 2-1 (2) 

883 

16 02 

0.03 

1 

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10 

8.32 

2 

CES 2-1 (3) 

883 

1634 

004 

1 

17.15 

10 

8.32 

2 

CES 2-2(1) 

11.23 

13.32 

002 

1 

1695 

10 

5.72 

2 

CES 2-2 (2) 

11 23 

13 48 

004 

1 

16.95 

10 

5.72 

2 

Ices 2-2 (3) 

11 23 

13 68 

007 

1 

16 95 

10 

5.72 

2 


FIELD MEASUREMENTS CONVERTED TO METRIC UNITS (for k h calculation) 


IWell # 

Static Water Level (cm) 

(equilibrium before purging) 

Stabilized Water Level (cm) 

(equilibrium during purging) 

Volume Purged (cm A 3) 

Purging Time (sec) 

Intake Length (cm) 

Screen Diameter (cm) 

BOR-109-3 (1) 

321.3 

323 1 

2498 

60 

209 1 

5.08 

BOR-109-3 (2) 

321.3 

3264 

5489 

60 

209.1 

5.08 

BOR-109-3 (3) 

321.3 

3298 

798.7 

60 

209.1 

5.08 

Ices 2-1 (i) 

269 1 

473.7 

49.2 

60 

253.6 

508 

Ices 2-1 ( 2 > 

269 1 

488 3 

98.4 

60 

253.6 

5.08 

llcES 2-1 (3) 

269 1 

4980 

147.6 

60 

253.6 

5.08 

CES 2-2(1) 

342.3 

4060 

75.7 

60 

174.3 

5.08 

Ices 2-2 ( 2 ) 

342.3 

410 9 

151.4 

60 

174.3 

5.08 

Ices 2-2 (3) 

342.3 

417.0 

276.3 

60 

174.3 

508 



NOTES 

1 

2 

3 

4 


Intake Length = (Total Well Depth) - (Static Water Level), unless this value is greater than the length of the screen. 

Thl constart < head < equation for a well point-filter in uniform soil was used to calculate horizontal conductivity of ground: K h = [q * ln[(mL)/D + V(1 + [(mL)/D] A 2)]] / (2 * it * L * 
The constant head equation for a well point-filter in uniformsoil at an impervious boundary was used to calculate horizontal conductivity of ground: K h = [q * ln[(2mL)/D + \(1 


H c ). 

+ [(2mL)/D] A 2)]] / (2 


* TT * 


L * H c ) 














































































































































APPENDIX H 


SITE SPECIFIC HEALTH AND SAFETY PLAN 








GZA SITE-SPECIFIC HEALTH, SAFETY & ACCIDENT PREVENTION STANDARD-PLAN 


1. CLIENT/SITE/PROJECT INFORMATION 

Client: Wynn MA, LLC 

Site Address: 1 Horizon Way, Everett, Massachusetts 
Site Description, Work Environment: 

The Site includes approximately 25 acres of land within the City of Everett. The southern end of the Site (referred to as the peninsula) 
extends into the Mystic River; however, all activities under this HASP will be undertaken on land. The ground surface at the Site is generally 
bituminous pavement (center), unpaved, or compacted coarse gravel. The ground surface at the Site is generally flat with a gentle slope 
toward the southwest. Access to the Site is limited by the presence of a chain-link fence with two gates; one gate is in the eastern portion of 
the Site, along Horizon Way, while the second gate is located on the northern portion of the Site, across an extension of Horizon Way. 

Investigations conducted between 1995 and the present have identified several contaminants in soil, groundwater, and sediments at the 
Site, as further discussed below. The sources of contamination at the Site include past industrial operations, leakage from a former 
aboveground storage tank (AST), and the placement of contaminated fill. According to historic reports, the Site was occupied by the 
Cochran Chemical Company, the Merrimac Chemical Company and the Monsanto Chemical Company from the late 1800s until the late 
1960s. The buildings on the land-side portion of the Site were razed in the 1970s. The land-side portion of the Site has been used primarily 
as a material storage and staging yard since the mid-1990s, when rock and fine-grained sediment ("tunnel muck") from the construction of 
the Deer Island Outfall was stockpiled on it in a 1- to 7-foot thick layer. There are currently no buildings at the Site. 

This HASP applies to three areas where remediation will be undertaken: 

A-5 Area: The A-5 area is situated in the northern portion of the Site in the vicinity of previous exploration location A-5, where elevated 
concentrations of lead and arsenic were detected in soil. No specific source for the elevated arsenic and lead levels has been identified, and 
the impacts appear to be random and related to fill material. Groundwater samples collected from this area have not indicated 
concentrations of metals above the applicable MCP Standards. Soil from the top 8' of this area will be excavated, characterized, treated on¬ 
site as needed, and disposed of off-Site, and the excavation will be backfilled to existing grades. 

CES-2 Area : The CES-2 area is situated in the northern portion of the peninsula, in the vicinity of previous exploration CES-2. Arsenic has 
been detected in both soil and groundwater in this area. The highest concentration of arsenic in soil was observed in CES-2-3, while the 
maximum dissolved concentration of arsenic was detected in a groundwater sample from CES-2-2. Unlike the Low pH area (see below), soil 
and groundwater pH levels in the CES-2 area are relatively neutral. Soil from 6-15' below grade in this area will be excavated, characterized, 
treated on-site as needed, and disposed of off-Site, and the excavation will be backfilled to existing grades. The excavation will require the 
installation of sheeting, and will also require dewatering. 

Low pH Area : The Low pH Area includes the southern corner of the peninsula where the pH has been measured to be at or below 4, with the 
lowest levels detected at the southern end in SHORE-9 (pH of 1.63). Dissolved arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, nickel and zinc, along with 
total cyanide, have been detected above the applicable MCP Standard. As indicated in the Phase III RAP, a plot of dissolved lead 
concentrations against pH indicates a strong correlation between pH below 4 and dissolved lead concentrations above the UCL. 
Remediation in this area includes the installation of sheeting; the excavation and temporary stockpiling of overburden material; in-situ 
solidification/stabilization (ISS) of soils from approximately 4-15' below grade using Portland cement; and the restoration of existing grades. 

GZA has prepared this plan solely for the purpose of protecting the health and safety of GZA employees. Subcontractors, visitors, and others 
at the site must refer to their organization's health and safety program or site-specific HASP for their protection. Subcontractor employees 
may use this plan for general informational purposes only. Subcontractor firms are obligated to comply with safety regulations applicable to 
their work, and understand this plan covers GZA activities only. 


Job/Project#: 171521.10 

Estimated Start Date: 4/1/15 

Estimated Finish Date: 8/1/15 

Site is Covered by the Following Regulations: 

OSHA HAZWOPER Standard [X] 

Mine Safety and Health Administration Q 


OSHA Construction Regulations ^ 

None of these Q 


2. EMERGENCY INFORMATION 

Hospital Name: Massachusetts General Hospital 

Hospital#: 617-726-2000 

Hospital Address: 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114 

Directions and Street Map Attached: X Yes 

Local Fire #: 911 

Local Ambulance #: 911 

Local Police #: 911 

WorkCare Incident Intervention Services: 

For non-emergencies, if an employee becomes hurt or sick call 888-449-7787 

Other Emergency Contact(s): GZA 

GeoEnvironmental, Inc. 

Phone tf s: 781-278-3700 


Site Specific Health and Safety Plan (Revised 10/13) Page 1 

Project: 



























GZA SITE-SPECIFIC HEALTH, SAFETY & ACCIDENT PREVENTION STANDARD-PLAN 


Site-Specific Emergency Preparedness/Response Procedures/Concerns: 

The Site is fenced. Potential emergencies on-Site include physical injuries (particularly heavy-equipment/excavation related) and the potential 
for heart attacks and heat stroke (during hot weather) and hypothermia (during cold weather). In the case of an emergency call 911 or reference 
the attached map and directions to the hospital. Personnel on site will have current first aid and CPR training and will be able to respond to 
minor injuries and potential heart attacks while emergency response personnel are contacted for assistance. 


. All EHS Events (incidents, first aid, near misses, unsafe acts/conditions, fires, chemical spills, property damage, extraordinarily safe 
behaviors) must be reported immediately to the Project Manager, and within 24 hours to the EHS Event Reporting Portal at 
www.kelleronline.com/portal . Username gempll; Password 4lncidents!. 

. In the event of a chemical release greater than 5 gallons, site personnel will evacuate the affected area and relocate to an upwind location. 
The GZA Field Safety Officer and client site representative shall be contacted immediately. 

. Site work shall not be conducted during severe weather, including high winds, blizzard conditions, and lightning. In the event of severe 
weather, stop work, lower any equipment (drill rigs), and evacuate the affected area. 


3. SUB-SURFACE WORK, UNDERGROUND UTILITY LOCATION 


Will subsurface explorations be conducted as part of this work? ^ Yes Q No 


Site property ownership where underground explorations will be conducted: Wynn, 
MA LLC 


Public Access Property Q Yes ^ No 
Private Property ^ Yes Q No 


Have Necessary Underground Utility Notifications for Subsurface Work Been Made? 


] Yes [K] Yet to be conducted 


Specify Clearance Date & Time, Dig Safe Clearance I.D. #, And Other Relevant Information: TBD 


IMPORTANT! For subsurface work, prior to the initiation of ground penetrating activities, GZA personnel to assess whether the underground 
utility clearance (UUC) process has been completed in an manner that appears acceptable, based on participation/ confirmation by other 
responsible parties (utility companies, subcontractor, client, owner, etc.), for the following: 


Electric: 

□ 

Yes 

□ 

No 

□ 

NA 

□ 

Other 

Fuel (gas, petroleum, steam): 

□ 

Yes 

□ 

No 

□ 

NA 

□ 

Other 

Communication: 

□ 

Yes 

□ 

No 

□ 

NA 

□ 

Other 

Water: 

□ 

Yes 

□ 

No 

□ 

NA 

□ 

Other 

Sewer: 

□ 

Yes 

□ 

No 

□ 

NA 

□ 

Other 

Other: 

□ 

Yes 

□ 

No 

□ 

NA 

□ 

Other 


Comments: Subsurface utility notifications to be made by remediation contractor prior to mobilization. 


Site Specific Health and Safety Plan (Revised 10/13) 
Project: 


Page 2 





























GZA SITE-SPECIFIC HEALTH, SAFETY & ACCIDENT PREVENTION STANDARD-PLAN 


4. SCOPE OF WORK 

Any OSHA PERMIT-REQUIRED CONFINED SPACE entry? 

□ YES X N0 

If ves. use Site Specific H&S Plan/Confined Space Entrv Permit for that 
portion of the work 

Any INDOOR fieldwork? Q YES X N0 

If yes, explain: 

General project description, and phase(s) or work to 
which this H&S Plan applies. 

Remediation and supporting activities in three areas: A-5 (high arsenic and lead 
concentrations in soil slated for excavation/off-site disposal); CES-2 (high arsenic in 
soil and groundwater slated for excavation/off-site disposal); Low pH Area (low pH, 
high dissolved metals slated for in-situ solidfication/stablization (ISS) using Portland 
cement) 

Specific Tasks to be Performed by GZA: 

Observe and document work performed. 

Collect samples of ISS-treated material and preapare cylinder molds. 

Collect soil/groundwater samples for laboratory analysis. 

Coordinate Site activities with Owner, GZA staff and Subs. 

Perform air monitoring readings/calibrations. 

Concurrent Tasks to be Performed by GZA 
Subcontractors (List Subcontractors by Name): 

Subcontractors TBD. 

Establish field trailer, including necessary utilities and controls. 

Install erosion/sedimentation controls. 

Install sheet piling in CES-2 and Low pH Area. 

Establish equipment for dewatering CES-2 Area. 

Excavate and stockpile overburden soil and impacted soil from CES-2 Area and A-5 
Area. 

Characterize soil for off-Site disposal; treat soil for TCLP issues as necessary; and 
arrange/manage off-site disposal. 

Excavate and stockpile overburden soil from Low pH area; conduct ISS of impacted 
zone. 

Backfill remediation areas to existing grade. 

Demobilize. 

Concurrent Tasks to be Performed by Others: 

TBD 


5. SITE-SPECIFIC OVERVIEW OF H&S HAZARDS/MITIGATIONS (Note: Based on Hazard Assessment, Section 10) 

Describe the major hazards expected to be present at the jobsite, and describe the safety measures to be implemented for worker 
protection. Use brief abstract statements or more detailed narrative as may be appropriate. 

ON-SITE HAZARDS: 

HAZARD MITIGATIONS: 

Task Hazard Analyses 

Refer to the attached Task Hazard Analyses: 

04.02 - Excavation and Trenching (Heavy Equipment) 

06.01 - Sampling-Logging-Survey Test Pits and Excavations 

06.02 - Pile and Sheet Pile Installations 

20.11 - Field Sampling 

21.01 - General Outdoor Field Work 

Chemical Hazards 

High concentrations of metals, predominantly lead and arsenic, have been detected 
in soils at the Site. In addition, groundwater in the low pH area has been measured 
to have a pH below 4, with the lowest recorded pH of 1.63. GZA personnel will wear 
appropriate PPE for these conditions, including Tyvek and respirators, and will 
monitor ambient air for fugitive dust levels using a dust monitoring device. Refer to 


Site Specific Health and Safety Plan (Revised 10/13) 
Project: 


Page 3 




































GZA SITE-SPECIFIC HEALTH, SAFETY & ACCIDENT PREVENTION STANDARD-PLAN 



the attached Lead and Arsenic Compliance Plan. 

Handwashing will be required before leaving the site and before eating, drinking, 
applying cosmetics (e.g., lip balm), or smoking. Handwash and eye wash stations 
will be set up by the field trailer. 

Heavy Equipment Hazards 

Open excavations and moving machinery will be present at the work site and may 
be working in several areas of the site concurrently. Do not approach heavy 
equipment from the operator's blind spot, and do not approach unless visual 
confirmation of your presence has been made with the equipment operator and he 
has given you the go-ahead sign to approach. 

Field personnel will be required to wear a high-visibility vest at all times. Also, 
appropriate protective clothing will be worn (e.g., hard-hat, safety glasses, steel¬ 
toed boots, etc.). Personnel must be cognizant of slip, trip, and fall hazards while 
overseeing excavation work. Noise protection should be worn if ambient levels 
exceed 85 decibels. 

General Field Work Hazards 

There will be open excavations. Observer needs to be at the furthest end of the 
excavation from the operator and in line of sight with the operator. Stay clear of 
swing radius of equipment unless eye contact/coordination is made with equipment 
operator for personnel to enter swing radius area to make observations or collect 
samples. If possible, collect soil/water samples from the securely placed bucket of 
the excavator on the surface of the ground at a safe distance from the excavation. 
Do not enter the excavation unless it is properly sloped or shored. GZA personnel 
must abide by Health and Safety protocols established by the general contractor 
when working in or near areas with other construction-related hazards or should 
avoid these areas if possible. 

Fall Hazards 

Take care to look for open excavations on site. Do not enter trenches or excavations 
at the Site. 

Dust Hazards 

The earthwork process will disturb soil that could result in airborne dust exposure. 
Dust control is the responsibility of the site general contractor. However, prudent 
practices by GZA personnel must be employed to minimize the inhalation hazard of 
airborne dust (through the use of a dust masks or respirators when necessary) and 
the ingestion of dust (through the use of protective gloves and hand washing). 

SLIP/TRIP/FALL HAZARDS 

Uneven footing is anticipated when working near open excavations. Uneven 
footing is also anticipated on the banks of the river due to mud and/cobbles, 
which may be slippery. Caution, in the form of slow and precise movements, 
should be used when moving on or near the riverbank. 

Use care to prevent or minimize tripping/slipping hazards. Store hand tools in their 
proper storage location when not in use. Ensure ample space for each employee to 
work safely with sound footing. 

BITING/STINGING INSECTS HAZARDS 

Ticks carry the risk of Lyme and other insect-borne diseases; tuck pants into long 
socks and apply DEET (or permethrin pre-treatment) to clothing in season to 
control exposure to ticks, check clothing for ticks frequently, and check whole 
body immediately upon returning from field and shower. 

Be aware of intermittent seasonal reports of mosquito borne diseases, such as 
West Nile disease and Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE), and their locations 
relative to your field site. Use DEET or other mosquito repellant. 

Be aware of potential cavity, suspended or ground nesting bee/wasp/hornet nests. 
Avoid undue disturbance. 

Weather-Related Hazards 

Water, sunscreen, hardhat, tinted sunglasses, rain gear (if necessary) and periodic 
breaks. 

Assess weather conditions prior to on-site work and examine forecast for 
anticipated period of work. Dress appropriately for weather conditions (e.g., 
precipitation, temperature ranges over anticipated duration of field work). Be sure 
to consume plenty of liquids on hot summer days and avoid direct sunlight for 
extended periods of time to the extent possible given site conditions. Use protective 


Site Specific Health and Safety Plan (Revised 10/13) 
Project: 


Page 4 















GZA SITE-SPECIFIC HEALTH, SAFETY & ACCIDENT PREVENTION STANDARD-PLAN 

ointments such as sunscreen and chap stick, as appropriate to the field conditions. 

Be aware of the anticipated weather conditions prior to mobilization to the site. 
Unacceptable field work conditions are not precise, but may include site specific 
conditions, general location, extreme weather conditions (e.g., lightning, excessive 
cold, heat or wind), travel conditions, and other factors. Professional judgment is 
required. 


6. HEALTH AND SAFETY EQUIPMENT AND CONTROLS 


PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT 

X Respirator Type: Half-face negative pressure to be 

conformant with lead/asbestos control program document plan 

X Resp-CartridgeType: HEPA, organic vapor 
X Hardhat 
] Outer Gloves Type: 


AIR MONITORING INSTRUMENTS 

I I PIDType: Lamp Energy: eV 

□ FID Type: 

I | Carbon Monoxide Meter 
1X1 Hydrogen Sulfide Meter 

□ 0 2 /LEL Meter 

1X1 Particulate (Dust) Meter 
I I Calibration Gas Type 
I I Others: 

Note: Ensure instruments have been properly calibrated 

OTHER H&S EQUIPMENT & GEAR 

I I Fire Extinguisher 

□ Caution Tape 

IX Traffic Cones or Stanchions 
I | Warning Signs or Placards 

□ Decon Buckets, Brushes, etc. 

I | Portable Ground Fault Interrupter (GFI) 

I | Lockout/Tagout Equipment 
I | Ventilation Equipment 
I I Others: 


IX Inner Gloves Type: Nitrile 

X Steel-toed boots/shoes 
X Coveralls Type: 

□ Outer Boots Type: 

X Eye Protection with side shields 

□ Face Shield 
X Traffic Vest 

I | Personal Flotation Device (PFD) 

I | Fire Retardant Clothing 
I | EH (Electrical Hazard) Rated Boots, Gloves, etc. 

X Noise/Hearing Protection 
I I Others: 

Discuss/Clarify, as Appropriate: 

• Respirators will be cleaned daily using alcohol wipes 

• Boots and outer gloves (if used) will be decontaminated with 
soapy water and a boot brush in the appropriate 
decontamination area. 

• Disposable PPE (Tyvek suits and gloves) will be disposed at 
each break and at the end of the shift in the appropriate drum 
located in the decontamination area. 


7. AIR MONITORING ACTION LEVELS 

Is air monitoring to be performed for this project? Yes X No 

Make sure air monitoring instruments are in working order and have been calibrated prior to use. Depending on project-specific requirements, 
periodic field calibration checks may be necessary during the day of instrument use. 

Action levels for Oxygen Defic 

Applicable, See Below. 

iency and Explosive atmospheric hazards (Action levels apply to occupied work space in general work area) 

X Not Applicable 

Parameter 

Response Actions for Elevated Airborne Hazards 

Oxygen 

At 19.5% or below - Exit area, provide adequate ventilation, or proceed to Level B, or discontinue activities 
Verify presence of adequate oxygen (approx. 12% or more) before taking readings with LEL meter. 

Note: If oxygen levels are below 12%, LEL meter readings are not valid. 


Less than 10% LEL - Continue working, continue to monitor LEL levels 


Site Specific Health and Safety Plan (Revised 10/13) P a 8 e 5 

Project: 










































GZA SITE-SPECIFIC HEALTH, SAFETY & ACCIDENT PREVENTION STANDARD-PLAN 


LEL 

Greater than or Equal to 10% LEL — Discontinue work operations and immediately withdraw from area. 
Resume work activities ONLY after LEL readings have been reduced to less than 10% through passive 
dissipation, or through active vapor control measures. 


Acti 

X 

dn levels for inhalation of Toxic/Hazardous Substances (Action levels are for sustained breathing zone concentrations) 

Applicable, See Below. Not Applicable 

Air Quality Parameters 
(Check all that apply) 

Remain in Level D 
or Modified D 

Response Actions for Elevated Airborne Hazards 

VOCs 

0 to ppm 

From ppm to ppm: Proceed to Level C, or Ventilate, or Discontinue Activities 

If greater than ppm: Proceed to Level B, or, Ventilate, or Discontinue Activities 


□ 

Carbon Monoxide 

0 to 35 ppm 

At greater than 35 ppm, exit area, provide adequate ventilation, proceed to Level B, or 
discontinue activities. 


E 

Hydrogen Sulfide 

0 to 10 ppm 

At greater than 10 ppm, exit area, provide adequate ventilation, proceed to Level B, or 
discontinue activities 


□ 

Dust 

0 to mg/m 3 



E 

Lead 

Oto 30 ug/m 3 

Workers will be working in half face negative pressure respirators with HEPAP-100 filters as a 
precaution for lead exposure. PPE requirements may change after the initial exposure 
assessment purposes. GZA EHS staff will advise PPE levels required after evaluating initial 
exposure assessment results. 


E 

Arsenic 

Oto 5 ug/m 3 

Workers will be working in half face negative pressure respirators with HEPAP-100 filters as a 
precaution for arsenic exposure. PPE requirements may change after the initial exposure 
assessment purposes. GZA EHS staff will advise PPE levels required after evaluating initial 
exposure assessment results. 

Special Instructions/Comments regarding Air Monitoring (if applicable) 



8. H&S TRAINING/QUALIFICATIONS FOR FIELD PERSONNEL 

^Project-Specific H&S Orientation (Required for All Projects/Staff) 

1 1 Bloodborne Pathogen Training 

X OSHA 40-Hour HAZWOPER/8 Hour Refreshers 

1 1 Fall Protection Training 

X Hazard Communication (for project-specific chemical products) 

[X Trenching & Excavation 

X First Aid/CPR (at least one individual on site) 

1X1 Current Medical Clearance Letter 

[XI General Construction Safety Training 

□ 

1 | Lockout/Tagout Training 

□ 

1 1 Electrical Safety Training 

□ 

Discuss/Clarify, as needed: 


9. PROJECT PERSONNEL- 

ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES 


GZA On-Site Personnel: 

Name(s) 

Project Title/Assigned Role 

Telephone Numbers 

TBD 

Site Supervisor 

Work: 

Cell: 

TBD 

Field Safety Officer 

Work: 

Cell: 


Site Specific Health and Safety Plan (Revised 10/13) 
Project: 


Page 6 































































GZA SITE-SPECIFIC HEALTH, SAFETY & ACCIDENT PREVENTION STANDARD-PLAN 


TBD 

First Aid Personnel 

Work: 

Cell: 

TBD 

GZA Project Team Members 

Work: 

Cell: 

Site Supervisors and Project Managers (SS/PM): Responsibility for compliance with GZA Health and Safety programs, policies, procedures and 
applicable laws and regulations is shared by all GZA management and supervisory personnel. This includes the need for effective oversight and 
supervision of project staff necessary to control the Health and Safety aspects of GZA on-site activities. 

Site Safety Officer (SSO): The SSO is responsible for implementation of the Site Specific Health and Safety Plan. 

First Aid Personnel: At least one individual designated by GZA who has current training and certification in basic first aid and cardiopulmonary 
resuscitation (CPR) must be present during on-site activities involving multiple GZA personnel. 

GZA Project Team: Follow instructions relayed by the HASP and GZA manager on-site. 

Other Project Personnel: 

Name 

Project Title/Assigned Role 

Telephone Numbers 

Lawrence Feldman 

Principal-in-Charge 

Work: 781-278-3807 

Cell: 781-983-1675 

David E. Leone 

Project Manager 

Work: 781-278-5766 

Cell: 781-603-5073 

Melissa Kenerson 

Health and Safety Coordinator (HSC) 

Work: 781-278-3814 

Cell: 781-223-6517 


Richard Ecord GZA EHS Director Work: 781-278-3809 

Cell: 404-234-2834 


Principal-in-Charge: Responsible of overall project oversight, including responsibility for Health and Safety. 

Project Manager: Responsible for day-to-day project management, including Health and Safety. 

Health and Safety Coordinator: General Health and Safety guidance and assistance. 

GZA EHS Director: H &S technical and regulatory guidance, assistance regarding GZA H&S policies and procedures. 


Site Specific Health and Safety Plan (Revised 10/13) 
Project: 


Page 7 













GZA SITE-SPECIFIC HEALTH, SAFETY & ACCIDENT PREVENTION STANDARD-PLAN 

10. HAZARD ASSESSMENT (CHECK ALL THAT APPLY) 


A. General Fieldwork Hazards 


| | Confined Space Entry (STOP - Use Confined Space Entry HASP) 

] Abandoned or vacant building/Enclosed Spaces 
[X] Significant Slip/Trip/Fall Hazards 

Unsanitary/Infectious Hazards 
] Poisonous Plants 
[X] Biting/Stinging Insects 

X Feral Animal Hazards 
[X] Water/Wetlands Hazards 

] Remote Locations/Navigation/Orientation hazards 
] Heavy Traffic or Work Alongside a Roadway 
[X] Weather-Related Hazards 

X Motor vehicle operation Hazards 
[X] Heavy Equipment Hazards 

I | Structural Hazards (i.e. unsafe floors/stairways/roof) 

] Demolition/Renovation 

I | Presence of Pedestrians or the General Public 

[X] Overhead Hazards (i.e. falling objects, overhead power lines) 

Portable Hand Tools or Power Tools 

]] Significant Lifting or Ergonomic Hazards 

] Electrical Hazards (i.e. Equipment 120 Volts or Greater, Work 
Inside Electrical Panels, or Maintenance of Electrical Equipment) 

X Other Stored energy Hazards (i.e. Equipment with High Pressure 
or Stored Chemicals) 

]] Fire and/or Explosion Hazard 

E/*\] Elevated Noise Levels 

[>\| Excavations/Test Pits 

] Explosives or Unexploded Ordinance/MEC 

] Long Distance or Overnight Travel 

] Personal Security or High Crime Area Hazards 

]] Working Alone 

Ionizing Radiation or Non-Ionizing Radiation 

EX\1 Chemical/Exposure Hazards (See Part Bfor Details) 

| | Other: 

B. Chemical/Exposure Hazards 

I | No chemical hazards anticipated 
[X] Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) 

1/^1 Cyanides, Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN) 

J Carbon Monoxide 

1 | Herbicides, Pesticide, Fungicide, Animal Poisons 

|/*\1 Metals, Metal Compounds 

[X] Corrosives, Acids, Caustics, Strong Irritants 

I | Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) 

[X] Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) 

I | Compressed Gases 

I | Flammable/Combustible Liquids 

1 1 Radiation Hazards (i.e. radioactive sealed/open source, x-rays, 

ultra violet, infrared, radio-frequency, etc.) 

]] Methane 

[X] Chemicals Subject to OSHA Hazard Communication (Note: For 
commercial chemical products, attach MSDSs if applicable) 

1 1 Containerized Waste, Chemicals in Piping & Process Equipment 

EX] Emissions from Gasoline-, Diesel-, Propane-fired Engine, Heater, 
Similar Equipment 

[X] General Work Site Airborne Dust Hazards 

1 1 Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), BTEX 

1 1 Chlorinated Organic Compounds 

1 1 Fuel Oil, Gasoline, Petroleum Products, Waste Oil 

I | Asbestos 

1 1 Oxygen Deficiency, Asphyxiation Hazards 

I | Other: 



Site Specific Health and Safety Plan (Revised 10/13) 
Project: 


Page 8 





















GZA SITE-SPECIFIC HEALTH, SAFETY & ACCIDENT PREVENTION STANDARD-PLAN 


11. PLAN ACKNOWLEDGEMENT AND APPROVALS 

GZA Employee Plan Acknowledgement 

/ have read, understood, and agree to abide by the information set forth in this Safety and Accident Prevention Plan. 1 will follow guidance in 
this plan and in the GZA Health and Safety Program Manual. 1 understand the training and medical monitoring requirements covered by the 
work outlined in this plan and have met those requirements. 

GZA Employee Name 

GZA Employee Signature 

Date 
















Subcontractor Employee Plan Acknowledgement 

GZA has prepared this plan solely for the purpose of protecting the health and safety of GZA employees. Subcontractors, visitors, and others 
at the site must refer to their organization's health and safety program or site-specific HASP for their protection. Subcontractor employees 
may use this plan for general informational purposes only. Subcontractor firms are obligated to comply with safety regulations applicable to 
their work, and understand this plan covers GZA activities only. 

Subcontractor Employee Name 

Subcontractor Employee Signatures 

Date 
















GZA Site-Specific Health and Safety Plan Approval Signatures 

The following individuals indicate their acknowledgement and/or approval of the contents of this Site Specific H&S Plan based on their 
understanding of project work activities, associated hazards and the appropriateness of health and safety measures to be implemented. 

GZA Signatory 

Employee Name 

Employee Signature 

Date 

Preparer: 




EHS Reviewer: 




PIC Approval: 





Site Specific Health and Safety Plan (Revised 10/13) 
Project: 


Page 9 

























































TAILGATE SAFETY MEETING 


CHECK ONE: 

Initial H&S Orientation 

Periodic “Toolbox” Safety Meeting 

Project Site/Location 

Date 

Time 

Job No. 

PM 


PIC 


The undersigned have attended a Health and Safety briefing, consisting of a review of the provisions of the Site 
Specific H&S Plan, and/or appropriate prior H&S events or concerns, and/or review of anticipated H&S concerns 
and safety measures for the project. 


SUMMARY OF HEALTH AND SAFETY TOPICS COVERED 











NAME (printed) 

SIGNATURE 

COMPANY 


























Conducted by: 


Date: 


































Google Maps 


Page 1 of 3 


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https://www.google.eom/maps/dir/l+Horizon+Way,+Everett,+MA+02149/55+Fruit+St,+ 


10/8/2014 




Google Maps 


Page 2 of 3 


3.8 mi / 8 min 

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0.6 

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0.6 

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289 

10. Slight left onto Cambridge St 

o.i 

mi 

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499 ft / 30 s 

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St 

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https://www.google.com/maps/dir/!+Horizon+Way ,+Everett,+MA+02149/55+Fruit+St,+... 


10/8/2014 



Lead and Arsenic Exposure Compliance Program 


This program applies to work where a worker may be occupationally exposed to lead and/or arsenic. This 
program has been developed for portions of the former Everett Staging Area Disposal Site located at 1 Horizon 
Way in Everett Massachusetts, more specifically, the A-5 Area, CES-2 Area, and Low pH Area. All work 
related to the remedial actions being conducted in these areas is included. 

GZA has prepared this plan solely for the purpose of protecting the health and safety of GZA employees. 
Subcontractors, visitors, and others at the site must refer to their organization’s health and safety program or 
site-specific HASP for their protection. Subcontractor employees may use this plan for general informational 
purposes only. Subcontractor firms are obligated to comply with safety regulations applicable to their work, 
and understand this plan covers GZA activities only. 

The purpose of this program is to inform interested persons, including employees, that GZA GeoEnvironmental 
is complying with the OSHA Lead Standard, Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1926.62, and the 
OSHA Arsenic Standard, Title 29 CFR 1926.1118 by: 

• Assuring that no employee is exposed to lead at concentrations greater than 50 micrograms per cubic 
meter of air averaged over an eight-hour period. 

• Assuring that no employee is exposed to arsenic at concentrations greater than 10 micrograms per cubic 
meter of air averaged over an eight-hour period. 

• Providing that if an employee is exposed to lead for more than eight hours in any work day the 
employee's allowable exposure, as a time weighted average (TWA) for that day, must be reduced 
according to the following formula: Allowable employee exposure (in micrograms per cubic meter) = 
400 divided by hours worked in the day. 

• Confirming that when respirators are used to limit employee exposure as required by paragraph (c) of 
Section 1926.62, and all the requirements of paragraphs (e)(1) and (f) of Section 1926.62, have been 
met, employee exposure may be considered to be at the level provided by the protection factor of the 
respirator for those periods the respirator is worn. Those periods may be averaged with exposure levels 
during periods when respirators are not worn to determine the employee's daily TWA exposure. 

• Enacting portions of the lead and arsenic standards when the lead action level of 30 micrograms per 
cubic meter of air, or when the arsenic action level of 5 micrograms per cubic meter of air, is exceeded. 

Administrative Duties 

Richard Ecord, CIH, CSP is the GZA program coordinator/manager and is responsible for its implementation. 
Copies of the written program may be obtained at the established field trailer. 

Exposure Assessment 

Protection of Employees During Exposure Assessment 

When tasks are presumed to generate lead or arsenic exposures greater than their permissible exposure limits, 
we treat affected employees as if they were exposed above the PEL and implement procedures to protect 
workers until we perform an employee exposure assessment and document that an employee's exposures are not 
above the PEL. 

Tasks estimated to potentially expose employees above PELs include: 




Excavation and stockpiling of soils in areas A-5 and CES-2; 
Excavation and stockpiling of overburden soils in the Low pH area; 



• In-situ solidification/stabilization of soils in the Low pH area; and 

• Sampling of stockpiled soils. 

GZA personnel will be required to use the following controls to minimize exposure to airborne lead and/or 
arsenic: 

• Appropriate respiratory protection; 

• Proper personal protective clothing and equipment; 

• Hand washing facilities; and 

• Training. ' 

Initial Determination 

Other than an initial determination of which tasks may potentially expose employees above PELs, an initial 
determination will not be made for this project. The concentration of airborne lead and/or arsenic coming from 
contaminated soil is affected by site conditions, temperatures, methods used, and other site contaminants; 
therefore, experience at similar sites cannot be used to estimate exposure levels. Since any exposure would 
come from lead and/or arsenic-contaminated soils as they are disturbed, the exposure assessment cannot be 
made until soils are being disturbed. As a precaution, employees will work in half-face respirators using HEPA 
cartridges for all activities at the site that are anticipated to generate lead and/or arsenic-containing dust. 
Employees will also be required to wash their hands and faces prior to eating, drinking, applying cosmetics 
(e.g., lip balm) or smoking until initial exposure assessments have been completed. 

Initial Exposure Assessments 

Initial monitoring will consist of: 

• Employee exposure monitoring, and 

• Area exposure monitoring. 

Personal air samples will be collected when the tasks outlined above are started. Those samples will be 
analyzed in an accredited laboratory. If laboratory sample results indicate concentrations of airborne lead or 
arsenic above their respective action levels, employee monitoring will be continued. The program coordinator 
will advise project personnel of the types and frequency of additional air samples to be collected. 

Perimeter air samples will be collected during initial mobilization activities and prior to the start of the tasks 
outlined above. Perimeter air samples will also be collected when excavation work begins in the work zone. If 
laboratory sample results indicate concentrations of airborne lead or arsenic above their respective action levels, 
employee monitoring will be conducted for those with the greatest perceived exposure in the work zone. Area 
dust monitoring will also be conducted over the course of the project. 

Once initial exposure assessments have been completed, the use of real-time dust monitoring may be used 
instead of air samples at the discretion of the program coordinator. The program coordinator will advise project 
personnel on the suitability of using real-time dust monitoring after the initial exposure assessment has been 
completed. 

Additional Exposure Assessments 

This plan has been developed in anticipation of employee exposure to lead and arsenic during the tasks outlined 
above. The work zone has been pre-characterized to document concentrations of lead and arsenic anticipated to 
be encountered during excavation. Soil samples collected from depth within the proposed work areas were 
analyzed for lead and arsenic (as well as other known contaminants). 


Employee Notification 


We will notify in writing any employee whose personal air samples exceed the action level for either lead or 
arsenic within five working days of our receiving the results. A copy of the results will also be added to the 
employee’s training file database, currently maintained through Keller Online. 


Methods of Compliance 


This exposure control program is our written strategy and schedule for protecting our workers from lead and 
arsenic exposure. It incorporates all relevant information that relates to this goal, so that we can assess whether 
we have appropriately analyzed problems and solutions (including alternatives) relating to lead and arsenic 

exposure. 

To reduce and maintain employee exposure to lead and arsenic at or below the PEL, we have implemented 
respirator use, protective clothing, and good housekeeping procedures. Work practice programs are included in 
this compliance program under separate headings. 

This job is a multi-employer worksite. The procedure we use to cooperate with and inform other contractors of 
potential exposure to lead and arsenic is the development of a health and safety specification that references this 
compliance plan, and that contains lead and arsenic pre-characterization data for soils that will be excavated or 
disturbed as part of the work scope for this project. 

As an employer, we want to keep our employees informed of all aspects of this plan. The GZA Project Manager 
will make frequent and regular inspections of the jobsite, materials, and equipment, and confirm that a copy of 
this written plan is available at the worksite. 

Respiratory Protection 


During our initial exposure assessment, we treat employees performing certain operations as if they were 
exposed above the PEL. This means providing respiratory protection. Our respiratory protection program 
includes a copy of the requirements of 20 CFR 1926.62(f), 29 CFR 1926.62 App. B, and 29 CFR 1910.134 and 
is available upon request. 

Protective Work Clothing and Equipment 

We provide personal protective equipment as interim protection for employees during exposure assessment, 
since our employees may be exposed to lead and/or arsenic (1) above the PEL without regard to the use of 
respirators, or (2) to metal compounds which may cause skin or eye irritation. We provide protective clothing 
and equipment at no cost to our employees. 


The types of employee garments and equipment provided on this worksite will include Tyvek suits, nitrile 
gloves, and safety glasses. Disposable Tyvek suits and nitrile gloves will be used and will be disposed of at the 
end of the shift, whenever taken off to allow eating, or when required based on tasks being completed. Safety 
glasses will be cleaned as needed. Respirators will be cleaned at the end of every shift and visually inspected 
daily. Respirators found to be in need of replacement or repair, or those that have no visual defects but do not 
form a seal, will not be used. 

Housekeeping 

GZA believes that a rigorous housekeeping program is necessary in jobs where there is the potential for lead 
and/or arsenic exposure to keep airborne levels below permissible limits. This requires a regular housekeeping 


schedule adapted to exposure conditions on site. For this project, our procedure for housekeeping is to cover 
stockpiles of soil with high lead or arsenic concentrations to prevent windblown dust. If required, these soils 
shall be wetted to control dust generation. Heavy equipment will be cleaned as required to prevent the transport 
of heavily contaminated soils to other areas of the work zone or to areas outside of the project. 

Hygiene Facilities and Practices 

We provide hand washing stations for our workers. We prohibit smoking, eating, applying cosmetics, and the 
presence of tobacco products, foodstuffs, or cosmetics in all work areas where employees are exposed to lead 
and/or arsenic above the PEL. We monitor worker compliance with these practices by visual inspection and 
routine safety audits. Where projects may present these exposures, we require employees to wash their hands 
and face before eating, drinking, applying cosmetics, or smoking. 

Medical Surveillance 

GZA GeoEnvironmental supports the practices necessary for early detection of lead and/or arsenic exposure. 
The medical surveillance program supplements the primary goals of the lead and/or arsenic exposure control 
program of preventing disease through the elimination or reduction of airborne concentrations of lead and/or 
arsenic, and of sources of ingestion. The medical surveillance provisions incorporate both initial and ongoing 
medical surveillance. 

We provide initial medical surveillance to employees who are occupationally exposed to airborne lead and/or 
arsenic levels at or above the PEL. Monitoring for lead consists of sampling blood and analyzing it for lead and 
zinc protoporphyrin levels. Where this initial biological monitoring indicates that an employee's blood lead 
level is at or above 40 micrograms per deciliter of whole blood, we provide biological monitoring at least every 
two months. This frequency continues until two consecutive blood samples and analyses indicate that the 
employee's blood lead level is below 40 micrograms per deciliter of whole blood. Monitoring for arsenic 
consists of posterior-anterior chest x-rays and nasal and skin examinations. 

All medical examinations and procedures are performed by Occupational Healthcare Clinics arranged through 
WorkCare. Employees are required to be reevaluated for medical clearance every 2 years. 

Medical Removal Protection 

We remove employees from work who have exposures to lead or arsenic at or above the action level when a 
blood sample indicates that the blood lead levels are at or above 50 micrograms per deciliter of whole blood. 
We also remove employees from work who have exposures to lead and/or arsenic at or above the action level 
when a health care professional determines that they have medical conditions which, when exposed to lead 
and/or arsenic, places them at greater risk health problems. 

Employee Information and Training 

Employees can do much to protect themselves from the risks of occupational lead and arsenic exposure if they 
know about them. In our training program we inform each employee subject to exposure of the specific hazards 
associated with their work environment, protective measures that can be taken, and other important topics. A 
discussion of lead and arsenic exposure will be included in tailgate safety meetings that will be conducted at the 
start of each work day, and during the day if assignments and tasks change. In addition, information from the 
OSHA lead and arsenic standards is kept onsite and available to any employee wishing to read it. 


Signs 


Because exposure to lead and arsenic is a serious health hazard, GZA posts OSHA-compliant signs that warn 
employees of lead and arsenic hazards and prohibitions. Employees are also informed of hazards through 
training. 

Recordkeeping 

GZA maintains biological and environmental monitoring records of employee exposures to potentially toxic 
materials, including lead and arsenic. We allow employees access to their records. 

We include the following exposure monitoring records: 

• Exposure assessment; 

• Medical surveillance results; 

• Medical removals; 

• Procedures for making records available; and 

• Procedures for transfer of records. 

Observation of Monitoring 

We provide our employees or their representatives the opportunity to observe exposure monitoring of toxic 
materials or harmful physical agents. Our procedure for allowing observation includes: 

• Explaining the measurement procedure; 

• Allowing observation of all steps related to the measurement procedure; 

• Disseminating of the results when returned by the laboratory; 

• Providing an observer with proper personal protective devices; and 

• Assuring that observers comply with all applicable safety and health procedures. 


GZA GEOENVIRONMENTAL, INC. 

Q2AJ) JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS WORKSHEET 

|Job: General Outdoor Field Work 

Analysis By: Anthony Zemba, 
CHMM 

Reviewed By: Guy Dalton 

Approved By: Jayanti Chatterjee , CIH 

Date: June 25, 2012 

Date: June 25, 2012 

Date: July 12,2012 


Task 21.1 

General Outdoor Field Work 

HAZARD CONTROLS 

GZA Job Tasks 

Potential Hazards 

Controls 

Pre-work preparation 

Overlooking of potential 
hazards 

Become familiar with project area and job site by 
reviewing available on-line mapping (USGS 
Topographic, NWI Wetland, NRCS Soil, etc.; and 
aerial photographs before visiting site. Understand 
related hazards through review of this and other 
Task Hazard Analyses and participate in daily 
safety tailgate meetings (where applicable). 

Communicate Task Hazard Analysis and Lessons 
Learned information to operator(s) prior to initiating 
work and throughout the project as needed. 

Driving to site 

Vehicle 

accidents/collisions/injuries 

Perform pre-operation check of vehicle, verifying service 
brakes, parking brake, steering, lights, tires, horn, 
wipers mirrors and glass are in good condition, verify 
that the rig is roadworthy. 

Wear seat belts always when driving even on site. 

Secure loose materials in cab or bed of vehicle. 

Keep windshields, windows and lights cleans. 

Abide by safe driving procedures. 

Backing collisions 

If possible avoid backing by using a route that allows 

you to pull through. 

If backing up from a parked area do a quality 360 

walker. 

Working within transportation 

corridors or active construction 
sites 

Collisions injuries 

Job Hazard Analy 

Wear high visibility safety vest on site when out of 

personal or GZA vehicle. 

Park vehicle in designated parking locations, or 

select off-road area that is firm, and without 
hazards. Directly inspect parking location on foot if 
necessary. 

Use emergency flashers or other appropriate 

vehicle warning system as appropriate to local 
conditions when parking vehicle. 

Use emergency flashers or other appropriate 

vehicle warning system when parking outside of 
standard parking spaces, or to stop in right-of- 

Be alert at all times; never step outside traffic 

cones. 


Task 21.1 - General Outdoor Field Work 
Page 1 of 8 































GZA GEOENVIRONMENTAL, INC. 1 

OZ\j) JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS WORKSHEET | 

|Job: General Outdoor Field Work 

Analysis By: Anthony Zemba, 
CHMM 

Reviewed By: Guy Dalton 

Approved By: Jayanti Chatterjee , CIH 

Date: June 25, 2012 

Date: June 25, 2012 

Date: July 12,2012 

Task 21.1 

General Outdoor Field Work 

HAZARD CONTROLS 

GZA Job Tasks 

Potential Hazards 

Controls 



Stand clear of moving heavy equipment and away 

from any overhead utility lines until equipment is 
safely in position and parked properly and securely 
bv the contractor. 



Do not wear headphones or earbuds, or listen to music 

or talk on the phone, which may distract from work 
hazards. 

Crossing Automobile traffic 
lanes 

Wear high visibility safety vests at all times when 

out of vehicle and working within or adjacent to the 
roadway. 

Crossing Airport Movement 
Areas (e.g., Runways, taxiways, 
approaches) 

Learn, know, and conform to project site Airport’s, 

Airfield’s, or Airbase’s protocol for crossing 
movement areas (whether on foot or in vehicle). 

Work within airport movement areas or safety 

zones must be coordinated with the Air Traffic 
Control Tower. 

Vehicles to have blinking or flashing lights or 

beacons; pedestrians to wear high visibility safety 
vests. 

Using protocol, maintain communication with 

airport security and air traffic controllers. 

Crossing Railways 

Work within active railroad ROWs requires railroad 

safety training. No work can be done within the 
railroad traffic envelope without the permission of a 
railroad flagman. 

No equipment or vehicles can cross without the 

permission of a railroad flagman. 

Expect any train on any track coming from either 

direction at any time. 

Working in Natural or Remote 
Areas 

Slips, trips, fall 

Be aware of loose ground materials such as talus, 

unconsolidated rock, soil, sediment, ice and other 
media that could cause slips, trips or falls. 

Be careful when walking in heavily vegetated 

areas. Mind tangles of vines, thorny branches, and 
slippery logs and rock surfaces. Dense vegetation 
and especially entangled vines present trip 
hazards, or can mask voids, sharp objects, or 
other hazards beneath. 


Job Hazard Analysis 
Task 21.1 - General Outdoor Field Work 
Page 2 of 8 






























OZY 


GZA GEOENVIRONMENTAL, INC. 
JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS WORKSHEET 


|Job: General Outdoor Field Work 

Analysis By: Anthony Zemba, 
CHMM 

Reviewed By: Guy Dalton 

Approved By: Jayanti Chatterjee , CIH 

Date: June 25, 2012 

Date: June 25, 2012 

Date: July 12,2012 

Task 21.1 

General Outdoor Field Work 

HAZARD CONTROLS 

GZA Job Tasks 

Potential Hazards 

Controls 



Be vigilant for signs of cracking, shifting, fracturing, 
and evidence of past movement. 

Use wood mats or other stabilizing materials for 
equipment if soft ground conditions are present. 

Use walking stick, auger, or ski poles to steady 
yourself when traversing loose material or slopes. 


Job Hazard Analysis 
Task 21.1 - General Outdoor Field Work 
Page 3 of 8 




















GZA GEOENVIRONMENTAL, INC. 

GrZ\]) JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS WORKSHEET 

[Job: General Outdoor Field Work 

Analysis By: Anthony Zemba, 
CHMM 

Reviewed By: Guy Dalton 

Approved By: Jayanti Chatterjee , CIH 

Date: June 25, 2012 

Date: June 25, 2012 

Date: July 12,2012 

Task 21.1 

General Outdoor Field Work 

HAZARD CONTROLS 

GZA Job Tasks 

Potential Hazards 

Controls 



Wear proper footwear for conditions. 

Store tools in their proper storage location when 
not in use. 

Provide adequate lighting when necessary. 

Fails into excavations/ voids 

Stand away from edges of excavations and voids. 

Do not attempt access without proper equipment / 
training. Remember that some excavations or 
voids may constitute a confined space and may 
present structural stability issues. 

Cave-ins and engulfment 

DO NOT enter caves, sinkholes, excavations, and 

other voids or concavities that are not sloped or 
shored properly and have not been evaluated by a 
competent person to be safe. 

Stand away from edges of excavations, cliffs, dug 
wells, and other voids. 

Watch for cracks/fissures in the ground surface in 

the immediate vicinity of a pit or void, which 
indicate imminent sidewall failure/cave-in. 

Assess if confined space entry procedures need to 

be implemented. 

Before entering void (if required to do so and with 

proper training) be aware of any hazards at the 
surface (boulders, equipment) which may fall into 
the void. 

Working among hazardous 
biota 

Plant toxins Incidental contact 

Know the appearance of poison ivy and poison 

sumac in all seasons, and if sensitive to these 
toxins, carry and use special cleaning 
soaps/solutions when thought to be exposed. 
Stock first aid kit with poison ivy/sumac cleaning 
soaps/solutions. 

Ticks 

Ticks carry risk of Lyme’s and other Diseases. 

Tick season is basically any field day above 40 
deqrees F. 

Tuck pants into long socks. 

The application of DEET (or permethrin pre¬ 

treatment) to clothing in season to control 
exposure to ticks is recommended. 

Check clothing for ticks frequently. 


Job Hazard Analysis 
Task 21.1 - General Outdoor Field Work 
Page 4 of 8 































GZA GEOENVIRONMENTAL, INC. 

JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS WORKSHEET 

|Job: General Outdoor Field Work 

Analysis By: Anthony Zemba, 
CHMM 

Reviewed By: Guy Dalton 

Approved By: Jayanti Chatterjee , CIH 

Date: June 25, 2012 

Date: June 25, 2012 

Date: July 12,2012 

Task 21.1 

General Outdoor Field Work 

HAZARD CONTROLS 

GZA Job Tasks 

Potential Hazards 

Controls 



Check whole body immediately upon returning 
from field and shower. 

Mosquitoes 

Be aware of intermittent seasonal reports of 
mosquito borne diseases, such as West Nile 
disease and Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE), 
and their locations relative to your field site. Use of 
DEET or other mosquito repellant is 
recommended. 

Stinging bees and wasps 

Be aware of potential cavity, suspended or ground 
nesting bee/wasp/hornet nests. Avoid undue 
disturbance or approach with appropriate safety 
clothing, protection and netting. 

Take appropriate precautions if allergic to bees. 
Carry at least two epi-pens in first aid kit as well as 
anti-histamines (oral and inhalers). 

Avoid areas of heavy bee activity if allergic. Avoid 
perfumed soaps, shampoos, deodorants, 
colognes, etc. that may attract bees. 

Poisonous Snakes 

Be aware of terrain likelihood of harboring 
poisonous snakes in your work zone. Avoid 
reaching or stepping into hidden areas (such as 
into wood pile, rock pile, debris pile, stone wall, 
etc.) without pre-inspection. 

Coordinate with local hospitals to verify they have 

proper anti-venom in stock. 

Learn first aid procedures in case of poisonous 

snake bite. 

Devise an action plan and include in the site- 

specific HASP. 

Wild Animals 

Do NOT handle wildlife unless properly trained to 

do so. 

Beware of any wild animal that shows no sign of 

wariness of humans. 

Do NOT attempt to feed wild animals or to help 

apparently injured wild animals. 

Be aware of domestic animals that may also pose 

a threat such as dogs off leash, bulls out to 
pasture, etc. 


Job Hazard Analysis 
Task 21.1 - General Outdoor Field Work 
Page 5 of 8 






























GZA GEOENVIRONMENTAL, INC. 
JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS WORKSHEET 


|Job: General Outdoor Field Work 1 

Analysis By: Anthony Zemba, 
CHMM 

Reviewed By: Guy Dalton 

Approved By: Jayanti Chatterjee , CIH 

Date: June 25, 2012 

Date: June 25, 2012 

Date: July 12,2012 

Task 21.1 

General Outdoor Field Work 

HAZARD CONTROLS 

GZA Job Tasks 

Potential Hazards 

Controls 

Working in Adverse Weather 

Conditions 

Heat / cold stress and other 

weather related hazards 

Assess weather conditions prior to on-site work 

and examine forecast for anticipated period of 
work. 


Dress appropriately for weather conditions (e.g., 

precipitation, temperature ranges over anticipated 
duration of field work). Include clothing and the 
presence / absence of shade when calculating a 
heat index. 

Schedule work day to avoid working during hottest 

or coldest parts of the day, to the extent 
practicable. 

Keep exposed skin covered in extremely cold 

weather. 

Recognize signs of frostbite; use warming packs 

and layer clothing to maintain warmth. 

Use a wicking layer of clothing against your body to 

keep moisture away from skin. 

Wool clothing will continue to keep you warm after 

it becomes wet; cotton will not. 

Use protective ointments such as sunscreen and 

chap stick, as appropriate to the field conditions. 

Stay hydrated in hot weather; drink fluids regularly 

throughout the day, even if not thirsty. 

Recognize signs of heat stress; take frequent 

breaks in shade when working in direct sunlight for 
orolonqed periods. 

Be familiar with Heat index chart - add 20 degrees 

to chart if fully clothed and if working in direct 

NOTE: Unacceptable field work conditions are not 

precise, but may include site specific conditions, 
general location, extreme weather conditions (e g., 
icing, lightning, excessive cold or wind), travel 
conditions, and other factors. Professional 
judgment is required, and personal assessment of 
safetv must alwavs be individually assessed. 

Working on Ice 

Assess relative load bearing capacity of ice on 

lakes, ponds and other waterways. If unsure do not 


Job Hazard Analysis 

Task 21.1 - General Outdoor Field Work 
Page 6 of 8 





























GZA GEOENVIRONMENTAL, INC. 

JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS WORKSHEET 

|Job: General Outdoor Field Work 

Analysis By: Anthony Zemba, 
CHMM 

Reviewed By: Guy Dalton 

Approved By: Jayanti Chatterjee , CIH 

Date: June 25, 2012 

Date: June 25, 2012 

Date: July 12,2012 

Task 21.1 

General Outdoor Field Work 

HAZARD CONTROLS 

GZA Job Tasks 

Potential Hazards 

Controls 



Wear proper footwear modified for traction on ice. 

Electrical storms 

If lightning is observed during drilling activities, 
work shall be suspended immediately and 
employees shall find suitable shelter (building or 
vehicle at minimum). Work will commence no 
sooner than 30 minutes after the last indications of 
lightning have been observed 

Seek shelter inside a walled building or your 
vehicle. 

Open picnic pavilions and under trees are not 
adequate shelters. 

Assess vulnerability to lightning strikes as soon as 
thunder is heard on the horizon. Open areas and 
higher elevations are more susceptible to strikes. 

Tall objects such as metal towers and flag poles 
may attract lightning. 

Consult internet weather radar tracking devices to 
learn of impending storm patterns proximal to your 
work area. 

High Winds 

Avoid working at high elevations, elevated 
platforms, and other exposed areas during high 
wind conditions. 

Assess work area for equipment that may be blown 
down, over, or carried aloft bv hiah winds. 

Working in areas without 

sanitary facilities 

Hygiene related hazards 

Provide hand washing kits (e.g., baby wipes, hand 
sanitizers, paper towels, bottled water, etc.) to be 
used prior to eating and drinking. 

Have garbage bags handy to collect trash. 

Working in remote areas 

Emergency Conditions 

Be familiar with onsite emergency procedures and 

route to nearest hospital. 

Have a first aid kit available; know its contents and 

how to use them. 

Carry a cell phone during all field work for 

emergency purposes, and confirm the nearest 
location of cell phone signal on site prior to start of 
worksite. 

Disorientation 

Plan your route and anticipated progress prior to 

field work. 


Job Hazard Analysis 

Task 21.1 - General Outdoor Field Work 
Page 7 of 8 
































GZA GEOENVIRONMENTAL, INC. 

OX\j) JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS WORKSHEET 

Ijob: General Outdoor Field Work 

Analysis By: Anthony Zemba, 
CHMM 

Reviewed By: Guy Dalton 

Approved By: Jayanti Chatterjee , CIH 

Date: June 25, 2012 

Date: June 25, 2012 

Date: July 12,2012 

Task 21.1 

General Outdoor Field Work 

HAZARD CONTROLS 

GZA Job Tasks 

Potential Hazards 

Controls 



Have multiple navigation aids (e.g., USGS Map, 

compass, GPS, etc.) and know how to use them 
before entering field. Remember to have charged 
batteries and battery back-ups for electronic 
devices. 

Share your progress plan with office staff prior to 

enterinq the field. 

Check in with office personnel periodically to 

update progress. 

Review and comply with GZA’s Working Alone 

Policy 03-1009 in advance of working alone on a 
project site. 

Hunting 

Be familiar with the various game hunting seasons. 

Follow rules and guidelines for remaining visible to 

It ry to plan work around active hunting seasons or 

Idailv peak huntinq hours as warranted. 


Job Hazard Analysis 
Task 21.1 - General Outdoor Field Work 
Page 8 of 8 






















GZA GEOENVIRONMENTAL, INC. 
JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS WORKSHEET 


jJob: Field Sampling 

Analysis By: Christie Wagner 

Reviewed By: Jayanti 
Chatterjee, CIH 

Approved By: Jayanti Chatterjee, CIH 

Date: November 4, 2011 
Revised: July 12, 2012 

Date: July 12, 2012 

Date: July 12, 2012 


Task 20.11 

Field Sampling 

HAZARD CONTROLS 

GZA Job Tasks [Potential Hazards [Controls 

Review Related THA’s - 

21.1 General Outdoor Field Work 

Pre work task for site visit 

Adverse Weather Conditions 

Assess weather conditions prior to on-site work and 
examine forecast for anticipated period of work. 

Dress appropriately for weather conditions (eg., 
precipitation, temperature ranges over anticipated 
duration of field work). 

Use protective ointments such as sunscreen and chap 
stick, as appropriate to the field conditions. 

Be aware of the anticipated weather conditions prior to 
mobilization to the site. Unacceptable field work 
conditions are not precise, but may include site specific 
conditions, general location, extreme weather conditions 
(e.g., icing, lightening, excessive cold or wind), travel 
conditions, and other factors. Professional judgment is 
required, and personal assessment of safety must 
always be individually assessed. 

Conduct visual inspection of site 

Dangerous Terrain 

Be aware of the site terrain, watch for holes and rocks 

that can be tripping hazards 

Learn to identify and watch for plants such as thorn 

bushes and poision ivy that can either scratch you or 
give you a rash. 

Collecting sample 

Muscle strain from lifting heavy 

objects 

Use proper lifting techniques. Use appropriate 

mechanical assistance and tools when possible. 

Wear work gloves and steel toed boots. 

Exposure to unknown sample 

Be sure to treat effluent samples as unknowns and wear 

the proper PPE. 

If there are any unusual odors/fumes coming from a 

sample, especially those that cause reactions in the 
eyes or nose, leave the area and inform a supervisor 
immediately. 


Job Hazard Analysis 
20.11 Field Sampling 
Page 1 of 1 

























GZA GEOENVIRONMENTAL, INC. 

JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS WORKSHEET 

|Job: Pile and Sheet Pile Installations 


Analysis By: James Hurley 

Reviewed By: Mark Dalpe 

Approved By: Jayanti Chatterjee , CIH 

Date: September 30, 2011 
Revised: June 7, 2012 

Date: June 7, 2012 

Date: June 28, 2012 


Task 6.2 

Pile and Sheet Pile Installations 

HAZARD CONTROLS 

GZA Job Tasks [Potential Hazards [Controls 

Review Related THA’s - 

4.4.A Excavtion and Trenching (Heavy Equipment) 

21.1 General Outdoor Field Work 

Observation of pile installation by 
GZA 

Struck by, caught by, run over by 
equipment 

Maintain safe distance from pile installation equipment 
at all times. 

Wear appropriate personal protective equipment as 
required by the Site Specific Health and Safety Plan 
when near rig and in general work area (hard hat, steel 
toe boots, work clothes, high visibility vest, eye and 
hearing protection, etc.). 

Plan an exit route when working in limited access areas. 

Noise 

Wear hearing protection during pile driving. 

Exposure to Hazardous 

Substances 

Workers should be familiarized with hazards associated 
commercial products used in pile driving (fuels, 
hydraulic fluid, etc.). Safety Data Sheets (SDSs) should 
be available for such products, and that workers should 
wear appropriate personal protective equipment. 

Long sleeve shirts should be worn during evaluation of 
creosote treated timber piles being installed. 

Diesel hammers can bleed fuel onto the timber piles 
causing soluble creosote to spatter. 

Pile Damage or Breakage 

Pay attention during pile hoisting and watch for any 
damage or defects. Contractors need to be notified 
immediately when damage or defects are observed 

Maintain a safe distance from pile driving hammer 
during testing. 

Pile Driving Crane and Other 
Construction Equipment 

Do not enter swing radius of crane. Eye contact need to 
be established with the crane or heavy equipment 
operator prior to approaching. Maintain a clear line of 
sight with the equipment operators at all times. 

Do not use crane treads or out-riggers as a table. 


Job Hazard Anal> 

Be aware of crane and other equipment movements at 
all times and remain at a safe distance during re¬ 
positioning operations. 

Remain clear of pile driving leads when they are being 
jij&sitioned, picked up, or laid down. 


Task 6 z - Pile arid -Sheet Pile Inssiallailuns 

Page 1 of 2 
































GZA GEOENVIRONMENTAL, INC. 

JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS WORKSHEET 

|Job: Pile and Sheet Pile Installations 


Analysis By: James Hurley 

Reviewed By: Mark Dalpe 

Approved By: Jayanti Chatterjee , CIH 

Date: September 30, 2011 
Revised: June 7, 2012 

Date: June 7, 2012 

Date: June 28, 2012 


Task 6.2 

Pile and Sheet Pile Installations 

HAZARD CONTROLS 

GZA Job Tasks 

Potential Hazards 

Controls 


Pile Driving Hammer 

Maintain a safe distance from the hydraulic hammer 
hoses which can be under high pressure and heat. 

Work Over Open Water 

Review and become familiar with the requirements of 
GZA Policy 03-3005 Working Near Water. 

Wear a PFD at all times while over water. Use 
appropriate fall protection when necessary. 

Never step between barges or structures over open 
water. Use the appropriate access in place. 

Be aware of wet surfaces on barges and boats. 


Job Hazard Analysis 

Task 6.2 - Pile and Sheet Pile Installations 
Page 2 of 2 



















GZA GEOENVIRONMENTAL, INC. 

JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS WORKSHEET 

|Job: Pile and Sheet Pile Installations 


Analysis By: James Hurley 

Reviewed By: Mark Dalpe 

Approved By: Jayanti Chatterjee , CIH 

Date: September 30, 2011 
Revised: June 7, 2012 

Date: June 7, 2012 

Date: June 28, 2012 


Task 6.2 

Pile and Sheet Pile Installations 

HAZARD CONTROLS 

GZA Job Tasks 

[Potential Hazards [Controls 

Review Related THA’s - 

4.4.A Excavtion and Trenching (Heavy Equipment) 

21.1 General Outdoor Field Work 

Observation of pile installation by 

GZA 

Struck by, caught by, run over by 
equipment 

Maintain safe distance from pile installation equipment 
at all times. 

Wear appropriate personal protective equipment as 
required by the Site Specific Health and Safety Plan 
when near rig and in general work area (hard hat, steel 
toe boots, work clothes, high visibility vest, eye and 
hearing protection, etc.). 

Plan an exit route when working in limited access areas. 

Noise 

Wear hearing protection during pile driving. 

Exposure to Hazardous 

Substances 

Workers should be familiarized with hazards associated 
commercial products used in pile driving (fuels, 
hydraulic fluid, etc.). Safety Data Sheets (SDSs) should 
be available for such products, and that workers should 
wear appropriate personal protective equipment. 

Long sleeve shirts should be worn during evaluation of 
creosote treated timber piles being installed. 

Diesel hammers can bleed fuel onto the timber piles 
causing soluble creosote to spatter. 

Pile Damage or Breakage 

Pay attention during pile hoisting and watch for any 
damage or defects. Contractors need to be notified 
immediately when damage or defects are observed 

Maintain a safe distance from pile driving hammer 
during testing. 

Pile Driving Crane and Other 
Construction Equipment 

Do not enter swing radius of crane. Eye contact need to 
be established with the crane or heavy equipment 
operator prior to approaching. Maintain a clear line of 
sight with the equipment operators at all times. 

Do not use crane treads or out-riggers as a table. 


Job Hazard Anal^ 

Be aware of crane and other equipment movements at 
all times and remain at a safe distance during re¬ 
positioning operations. 

Remain clear of pile driving leads when they are being 
0&sitioned, picked up, or laid down. 


Task 6 2 - Pile and Sheet Pile IribLallcJiluMs 


Page 1 of 2 
































OZY 


GZA GEOENVIRONMENTAL, INC. 
JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS WORKSHEET 


|Job: Pile and Sheet Pile Installations 

Analysis By: James Hurley 

Reviewed By: Mark Dalpe 

Approved By: Jayanti Chatterjee , CIH 

Date: September 30, 2011 
Revised: June 7, 2012 

Date: June 7, 2012 

Date: June 28, 2012 


Task 6.2 

Pile and Sheet Pile Installations 

HAZARD CONTROLS 

GZA Job Tasks 

Potential Hazards 

Controls 


Pile Driving Hammer 

Maintain a safe distance from the hydraulic hammer 
hoses which can be under high pressure and heat. 

Work Over Open Water 

Review and become familiar with the requirements of 
GZA Policy 03-3005 Working Near Water. 

Wear a PFD at all times while over water. Use 
appropriate fall protection when necessary. 

Never step between barges or structures over open 
water. Use the appropriate access in place. 

Be aware of wet surfaces on barges and boats. 


Job Hazard Analysis 

Task 6.2 - Pile and Sheet Pile Installations 
Page 2 of 2 



















GZA GEOENVIRONMENTAL, INC. 
JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS WORKSHEET 


|Job: Groundwater Sampling 

Analysis By: Andrew Whitsitt 

Reviewed By: Guy Dalton 

Approved By: Jayanti Chatterjee , CIH 

Date: October 2, 2011 
Revised: June 15, 2012 

Date: June 15, 2012 

Date: June 26, 2012 


Task 4.2 

GROUNDWATER SAMPLING 

HAZARD CONTROLS 

GZA Job Tasks 

[Potential Hazards 

Controls 

Review Related THA’s - 

21.1 - General Outdoor Field Work 

Deploying Traffic Protection 
Equipment 

Personal injury due to vehicle 
traffic; Collisions, injuries 

GZA drivers shall be properly licensed and abide by 
driving safety procedures. Inspect vehicle to determine 
if it is in safe operating condition. 

Park in designated parking locations, or select off-road 
areas that are firm and without hazards. Directly 
observe parking location on foot if necessary. 

Use emergency flashers or other appropriate vehicle 
warning system as appropriate to local conditions. 

Utilize police detail (when necessary) to direct traffic 
while entering traffic safety zone, if applicable. 

Handling Flammable Liquids 

Fire Hazards 

Use only approved fuel containers for fuel, heavy duty 
metal cans with stable base and self closing nozzle is 
recommended. 

Store flammable liquids in an appropriate area when not 
in use. 

Provide working fire extinguisher with current inspection 
certificate with the sampling equipment. 

Observe GZA’s “no smoking” policy at all work sites. 

Mobilizing Equipment 

Collision; struck by 

Perform a pre-operation check of the vehicle, ensuring 
service brakes, parking brake, steering, lights, tires, 
horn, wipers mirrors, and glass are in good condition. 
Do not drive a vehicle that is not roadworthy. 

All vehicle occupants shall wear seat belts. 

Secure loose materials in the cab or bed of the vehicle. 

Keep the windows and lights clean. 

Do not operate the vehicle if it is in an unsafe condition. 

Abide by driving safety procedures and laws. 

Positioning vehicle at monitoring 
well 

Unstable, uneven terrain and 
ground obstacles 

Locate the vehicle on stable ground. 


Job Hazard Analysis 
Task 4.2 - Groundwater Sampling 
Page 1 of 3 































GZA GEOENVIRONMENTAL, INC. 
JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS WORKSHEET 


|Job: Groundwater Sampling 

Analysis By: Andrew Whitsitt 

Reviewed By: Guy Dalton 

Approved By: Jayanti Chatterjee , CIH 

Date: October 2, 2011 
Revised: June 15, 2012 

Date: June 15, 2012 

Date: June 26, 2012 


Task 4.2 

GROUNDWATER SAMPLING 

HAZARD CONTROLS 

GZA Job Tasks 

Potential Hazards 

Controls 


Backing Collisions 

Avoid wet areas/mud when possible. 

Assess the need for blocking/chocking wheels.. 

If possible, avoid backing by taking a route that allows 
you to pull straight through. 

If you must back, do a complete walk around the vehicle 
to look for objects that could be struck or run over by the 
vehicle. 

Use a spotter when available to help guide the backing 
safely. 

Look over shoulders and glance back to make sure 
fenders are clearing objects. Back out slowly. 

Well Sampling 

Hazardous material contact 

Identify wells with hazardous concentrations of 
contaminants. 

Sample wells in order from least to most impacted. 

Wear proper gloves specified in the project HASP when 

handling jars, preservatives could leak during shipment 
from the laboratory. 

Cuts and bruises from Sample jar 

Do not over-tighten glass jars (especially VOAs); they 

can break, causing a laceration. 

Exposure to Hazardous 

Substances 

Become familiar with the hazards associated with 

hazardous commercial products used while 
groundwater sampling (laboratory preservatives, 
decontamination solutions, etc.). Review Safety Data 
Sheets (SDS) for such products. 

Wear proper personal protective equipment (PPE) as 

specified in the Health and Safety Plan (HASP) to avoid 
direct contact with Site contaminants, calibration 
solutions, decontamination supplies, and laboratory 
preservatives. 

Respiratory protection as specified by the HASP must 

be available and used when necessary. 

Decontamination procedures as specified in the HASP 

must be followed. 

Sampling Equipment Operation 

Splashes, electrical shocks, fires, 

caught by 

Perform an equipment observation before use; pumps, 

flow meters, and water quality meters must be 
calibrated and in good working condition. 

Use GFCI with all electrical cords. 


Job Hazard Analysis 
Task 4.2 - Groundwater Sampling 
Page 2 of 3 































GZA GEOENVIRONMENTAL, INC. 

GE\j) JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS WORKSHEET 

|Job: Groundwater Sampling 

Analysis By: Andrew Whitsitt 

Reviewed By: Guy Dalton 

Approved By: Jayanti Chatterjee , CIH 

Date: October 2, 2011 
Revised: June 15, 2012 

Date: June 15, 2012 

Date: June 26, 2012 


Task 4.2 

GROUNDWATER SAMPLING 


HAZARD CONTROLS 


Potential Hazards 

Controls 


All equipment (especially generators) must be properly 
grounded. 

Completely shut down all equipment prior to conducting 
maintenance activities, fueling, servicing or repairs. 
Follow lock-out/tag-out procedures as needed. 

Manual lifting, equipment handling 

Use proper lifting techniques when lifting equipment 
(generators, pumps, air compressors, tubing, etc.) Seek 
assistance with heavy loads. 


Use work gloves where appropriate to prevent hand 
injuries. 

Wear steel toed boots. 

When containerizing water, do not try to carry more than 
you can safely carry. It is better to make multiple trips. 

Noise 

Wear appropriate hearing protection during activities 
that produce noise (running generators, pumps, air 
compressors, etc.) 

Slips, trips and falls 

Maintain a clean and sanitary work area free of 
tripping/slipping hazards. 

Store hand tools in their proper storage location when 
not in use. 

Provide adequate space for each employee to work 
safely with sound footing. 

Provide adequate lighting. 

Tool-related hazards 

Do not use electrical tools with damaged cords or other 
electrical components. 

Observe proper electrical safety practices. 

Properly maintain tools; do not use damaged tools. 

Wear eye protection. 

Store and carry tools correctly. 

Use the correct tool for the job. 

Protect from gouges, hammer blows, cutting tools, etc. 
Position your hands to prevent injury in case the tool 
slips while in use. 


GZA Job Tasks 


Job Hazard Analysis 
Task 4.2 - Groundwater Sampling 
Page 3 of 3 



























































































































































APPENDIX I 


EXCAVATED MATERIALS MANAGEMENT PLAN 








EXCAVATED MATERIAL MANAGEMENT PLAN 


1.00 INTRODUCTION 

This Excavated Material Management Plan (EMMP) specifies the procedures for the 
management of materials excavated during the implementation of remedial actions at the former 
Everett Staging Area Disposal Site (the Site). For the purpose of this EMMP, materials 
management is defined as the excavation, handling, transporting, stockpiling, testing, and 
backfilling of subsurface materials on the Site within the contaminated areas defined as A-5 and 
CES-2. 


As described in the RAM, existing subsurface materials contain arsenic and lead as a result of 
historic industrial activities at the Site. The materials to be managed pursuant to this EMMP are: 

1. CES-2 Area: Material present from approximately 6 to 15 feet below the existing ground 
surface, identified herein as “Contaminated Soils”. 

2. A-5 Area: Material present from the existing ground surface to approximately 8 feet 
below the ground surface, also identified herein as “Contaminated Soils.” 


3. CES-2 Area and Low pH Area: Material present from the ground surface to the top of 
underlying Contaminated Soils is identified herein as “Overburden Soils.” 


2.00 GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF EMMP 


In general, the EMMP consists of the following major components: 
Material Classification Procedures 


Material to be excavated during remedial actions will be classified by depth based on the results 
of existing environmental testing data. Surface soils classified as Overburden Soils will be reused 
as backfill on-Site. Soils in the CES-2 Area from approximately 6 to 15 feet below the ground 
surface, and in the A-5 Area from ground surface to approximately 8 feet below ground surface, 
will be classified as Contaminated Soils and will be removed from the Site for off-Site disposal. 
Soils in the Low pH Area from approximately 4 to 15 feet below the ground surface will be 
treated in-place using in-situ solidification/stabilization (ISS) procedures and are therefore not 
included as part of this EMMP. 

Large-diameter debris encountered during the excavation and handling of Overburden Soils will 
be segregated from excavated soils and placed in a “clean” large diameter debris stockpile for off- 
Site recycling or disposal. Large-diameter debris encountered during the excavation and handling 
of Contaminated Soils will be placed in a “contaminated” large diameter debris stockpile within 
the CES-2 or A-5 Materials Management Areas (MMAs). This contaminated large diameter 
debris will be cleaned to remove soil from the surface of the debris and, after cleaning, moved to 
the “clean” large diameter debris stockpile for off-Site recycling or disposal. 


1 



The goal of this EMMP is to provide for the proper classification and handling of these materials. 
Excavated material will be segregated and either reused in appropriate on-Site areas or removed 
from the Site, depending on the results of pre-classification and/or laboratory analyses. 
Excavation. Transport, and Stockpiling Procedures 

Specific procedures will be employed while managing excavated materials to limit potential 
impacts to human health and the environment. This will be accomplished by appropriate security 
measures, housekeeping techniques, stockpile management, equipment decontamination, 
monitoring, and dust control. 

Specific requirements for these components of the EMMP are presented in Section 3.00. 


3.00 EXCAVATION, STOCKPILING, AND TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURES 


To reduce potential impacts to human health and the environment during the performance of 
remedial actions, specific procedures will be employed during the excavation, stockpiling, and 
transportation of materials from the Site. These procedures include security measures, stockpile 
management, equipment decontamination, monitoring, and dust control. 

Air monitoring for airborne particulates (dust) will be conducted prior to excavation to provide a 
baseline assessment and will continue throughout all phases of work, including while excavations 
are open and/or soil is stockpiled on-Site. Dust monitoring, dust suppression, and covering of 
stockpiles with polyethylene tarps will continue during all remedial actions which disturb soil at 
the Site. These procedures will also be in practice when dealing with clean materials and off-Site 
fill (if necessary) to help alleviate potential community concerns during construction. 

3.10 SITE SECURITY 


Temporary chain-link fencing will be provided along the entire project area perimeter prior to the 
commencement of intrusive activities on the property. Chain-link fencing will be a minimum of 
6 feet high. Access gates will be equipped with keyed locks. Gates will remain closed 
throughout the duration of the work except when equipment is entering or exiting the property, 
and will be locked at the end of each workday. Only authorized vehicles will be permitted access 
to the Site. 

Exclusion Zones (EZ) and Support/Contamination Reduction Zones will be established to control 
exposures of unprotected personnel and the migration of contamination due to tracking by 
personnel and/or equipment. Access to the Exclusion Zones and Support/Contamination 
Reduction Zones will be controlled by Site personnel and will be delineated using caution tape, 
orange pylons, and/or other markers designated for easy visibility in a construction zone. A 
Standard Operating Procedure for vehicle contamination is provided in Attachment 1. 

3.20 STOCKPILE MANAGEMENT 


Overburden Soils and Contaminated Soils will be segregated and placed within the MMAs. 
Stockpiles of Contaminated Soil will be placed on 20-mil reinforced polyethylene sheeting and 
covered with 10-mil reinforced polyethylene sheeting when not in use. Stockpiles of Overburden 
Soils will be placed directly on existing surface soils but will be covered with 10-mil reinforced 
polyethylene sheeting. 


2 





Stockpiled large diameter debris from Overburden Soils will be stockpiled outside of the MMA 
on the existing ground surface. 

Stockpiled large diameter debris from Contaminated Soils will be initially stockpiled within the 
MMA on 20-mil reinforced polyethylene sheeting and covered with 10-mil reinforced 
polyethylene sheeting when not in use. The large diameter debris will be brush-cleaned free of 
loose and adhering soil material. Following cleaning, the large diameter debris will be moved to 
the “clean" large diameter debris stockpile. 

Minimum stockpile handling criteria are as follows: 

1. No material will be removed from the stockpile staging area without suitable segregation, 
stockpiling, classification, and completion of a Materials Tracking Record. 

2. Excavation, material handling, and stockpiling will be performed in a manner which 
prevents the mixing of Overburden Soils and Contaminated Soils, including mixing of 
large diameter debris segregated from those soil materials. 

3. The transfer of materials from the excavations to the MMAs will be conducted in such a 
manner as to limit the spread of contaminated or potentially contaminated materials 
across the Site or the MMAs. 

4. The MMAs will be secured with orange fencing to limit unauthorized entry and to limit 
the contact of workmen and other passers-by with stockpiled materials. The MMAs will 
be visibly marked with appropriate signs warning of potential hazards. No stockpile shall 
exceed 10 feet in height, and no Contaminated Soil stockpile shall exceed 500 cubic 
yards in volume. Overburden Soil stockpiles will not be limited in height or size but will 
require covering. 

Requirements for stockpiling and maintaining potentially contaminated soil in the MMAs 
include: 

1. Contaminated Soil will be placed on 20-mil-thick liner over existing soil. Stockpiles of 
Contaminated Soil will be segregated and surrounded by straw bales to delineate 500 
cubic yard cells. Liners and covers will be placed so as to provide a 1-foot overlap. 

2. The Contaminated Soil stockpiles will be covered prior to inclement weather and at the 
end of each workday with a minimum 10-mil-thick reinforced black polyethylene cover. 
The cover will be weighted with sand bags for ballast. The cover will be inspected daily 
during construction workdays and maintained throughout the stockpile period to control 
water entering the stockpiled materials and to limit dust generation. 

3. Overburden Soils will be placed directly on existing soil within the MMA. The 
Overburden Soil stockpiles will be covered prior to inclement weather and at the end of 
each workday with a minimum 10-mil-thick reinforced black polyethylene cover. The 
cover will be weighted with sand bags for ballast. The cover will be inspected daily 
during construction workdays and maintained throughout the stockpile period to control 
water entering the stockpiled materials and to limit dust generation. 


3 


4. Contaminated large diameter debris will be placed on 20-mil-thick liner over existing 
soil. Stockpiles of Contaminated large diameter debris will be segregated by straw bales 
to delineate 100 cubic yard cells. Liners and covers will be placed so as to provide a 1- 
foot overlap. These stockpiles will be required to be covered with a minimum 10-mil- 
thick reinforced black polyethylene cover. The cover will be inspected daily during 
construction workdays and maintained throughout the stockpile period to control water 
entering the stockpiled materials and to limit dust generation. 

5. Non-contaminated large diameter debris will be placed on the existing ground surface 
outside of the MMA. If dust propagation from this material is observed, then the 
placement of a minimum 10-mil-thick reinforced black polyethylene cover will be 
required. 

6. Stockpile areas will be graded to shed water, and stormwater runoff will be diverted away 
from stockpiled material. 

7. Any breach in the integrity of the stockpile pad or cover system will be promptly 
repaired. Soil that erodes from the stockpile will be collected and the area screened at a 
frequency of 1 sample per 2,500 square feet to confirm that the residual levels of 
contaminants are below the relevant Site Cleanup Levels for the area. Soil which does 
not meet the relevant Cleanup Level (Method 1 S-2/GW-2 and S-2/GW-3 Risk 
Standards) will be excavated and relocated to the Contaminated Soil Stockpiles. 

In addition. Contaminated Soils that require stabilization for off-Site disposal as non¬ 
characteristic hazardous waste due to one or more exceedances of toxicity characteristic 
leaching procedure (TCLP) testing will be stabilized within the MMA as described in Section 
4.00 below. 


4.00 CONTAMINATED SOIL STABILIZATION 


If pre-characterization environmental testing indicates that concentrations of leachable 
(TCLP) arsenic and/or lead above Characteristic Hazardous Waste levels are present within 
Contaminated Soils, then stabilization to reduce the leachability of those metals will be 
performed. 

Stabilization of Contaminated Soils will consist of mixing stockpiled soils with a stabilizing 
reagent (Maectite© or approved equivalent). Mixing will include application of the reagent 
solution (fluid) in 500-cubic yard cells of the stockpiled Contaminated Soil in the MMA. 
Mixing will be performed using excavators and front end loaders within the MMA. 
Following mixing, the material will be allowed to “cure” for the period recommended by the 
reagent manufacturer (typically three days). Following curing, the material will be re¬ 
sampled to measure concentrations of leachable arsenic and/or lead. If measured 
concentrations are below Characteristic Hazardous Waste levels, the material will be 
designated for off-Site disposal. If measured concentrations are above Characteristic 
Hazardous Waste levels, additional reagent and mixing will occur, followed by the same 
curing and sampling procedures. 


4 


5.00 EXCAVATED MATERIAL OFF-SITE DISPOSAL 


Excavated materials designated for off-Site disposal will include Contaminated Soils excavated 
from the A-5 and CES-2 areas. This includes both stabilized and non-stabilized Contaminated 
Soils. 

Contaminated Soils will be loaded into tractor trailer vehicles within the MMA using excavators 
and front end loaders. Filling of trailers will be performed up to the legal weight limit for 
transport on roads and highways along the Traffic Management Plan traffic route. 

Prior to loading, vehicles will be observed to confirm the trailers are equipped with the following 
equipment/materials in good condition and good working order. 

1. Trailer bed liner material consisting of 20-mil reinforced polyethylene sheeting with 
overlapping cover that drapes over the exterior sides of the trailer during loading and then 
is used as an initial cover over the Contaminated Soil within the trailer. 

2. An accordion-style retractable vinyl trailer cover (Mountain Tarp N Go Anti Pollution 
Cable System Cover or approved equivalent) capable of covering the full length and 
width of the trailer over the folded bedliner. The cover shall be in good repair without 
tears, holes, gaps, or any other openings that may allow dust/particulates to leave the 
trailer during transport. 

3. A locking tailgate in good working order that is firmly secured both during loading and 
after the loading of the trailer is completed. 

Prior to departure, the LSP or his designated representative will confirm that the operator of the 
transport vehicle has been briefed on the appropriate traffic/travel route from the Site to the 
disposal facility and is equipped with the appropriate soil transport and disposal tracking 
paperwork. 

Soil disposal transport vehicles, after being loaded and checked for security, will then proceed to 
the vehicle decontamination area for decontamination. Refer to Attachment 1 to this EMMP for 
additional information regarding vehicle decontamination procedures. 


5 


ATTACHMENT 1 


VEHICLE DECONTAMINATION 
STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES 


Construction vehicles that work within the Exclusion Zones (EZ) of the Site will be cleaned of 
soil and Site material at the Site vehicle decontamination pad (VDP) within the Contamination 
Reduction/Support Zone prior to leaving the EZ. 

Decontamination Pad 

One VDP will be constructed on Site in each of the areas depicted on Figure 3 of the RAM Plan. 
The VDP will be approximately 15 feet wide by 50 feet long and will consist of a 30-mil HDPE 
liner bedded on sand gently sloped to one comer, with 6 inches of %-inch crushed stone placed 
across the entire surface. The extended sides of the liner will be positioned upwards, supported by 
parallel rows of hay bales, to facilitate the containment and collection of wash water at the VDP. 
Clean water for decontamination activities will be supplied by an approved municipal hydrant 
tap. Water from the VDP will be gravity directed to a 300-gallon holding sump that will be 
positioned in the ground at one comer of the VDP. 

Vehicle Decontamination Procedure 

Prior to departing the EZ, vehicles will be shovel scraped and broomed/brushed free of accessible 
soil and Site material. Particular emphasis will be placed on ground contact portions of vehicles 
such as buckets, wheels, tracks and booms. Vehicles will then be positioned on the VDP and 
decontaminated using a high pressure water sprayer to remove visible soil and Site material. 
Longer vehicles will be decontaminated in segments as they are advanced through the VDP. * 
During periods of non-use the VDP will be covered with a polyethylene tarp to minimize the 
accumulation of precipitation in the sump. 

Disposal 

Water collected in the VDP sump will be pumped to either a temporary on-Site treatment system 
used for construction dewatering, or a licensed waste hauler for proper off-Site disposal. 
Following the completion of Site earthwork activities, the VDP liner and crushed stone, along 
with any trapped sediment, will be tested according to the EMMP protocol, and then disposed of 
at an approved off-site facility or, if possible, reused on Site. 

The primary purpose of the VDP is to decontaminate earthwork and construction equipment prior 
to leaving the Site. To the extent possible, equipment will be committed to the respective EZs to 
minimize the use of the VDP and the generation of waste. 


J:\170,000-179,999\171521\171521-10.DELARAM Plan - Pre-Construction\App H - EMMP\Excavated Material Management Plan 
draft Wynn Everett 2015-02-26.doc 


6 





OZVj) 

Proactive by Design 


APPENDIX J 


PM10 RISK EVALUATION TABLES 



Analyte 


Sample Location 
Sample ID 
Sample Depth (ft bgs) 
Laboratory 
Laboratory ID 
Sample Date 
Consultant 


TABLE 1-1 

SOIL ANALYTICAL RESULTS 
Everett Staging Yard 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 1 of 16 


Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) 

Acetone 
Benzene 

Butanone, 2- (MEK) 

Carbon disulfide 
Chloroform 
Ethylbenzene 
Isopropyltoluene, p- 
Methylene Chloride 
Naphthalene 
Styrene 
Toluene 

T richloroethytene 
Trimethylbenzene, 1,2,4- 
Trimethylbenzene, t,3,5- 
Xylene, Total 

Volatile Petroleum Hydrocarbons (VPH) 

Cs-C 8 Aliphatics 
C 9 -C 12 Aliphatics 
C g -C 10 Aromatics 
Semi-Volatile Organic Compounds (SVOC 
Acenaphthene 
Acenaphthylene 
Anthracene 
Benzo(a)anthracene 
Benzo(a)pyrene 
Benzo(b)fluoranthene 
Benzo(e)pyrene 
Benzo(ghi)perylene 
Benzo(k)fluoranthene 
Bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate 
Chrysene 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 
Dibenzofuran 
Fluoranthene 
Fluorene 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene 
Methylnaphthalene, 1- 
Methylnaphthalene, 2- 
Naphthalene 
Phenanthrene 
Pyrene 

Extractable Petroleum Hydrocarbons (EPI 

Cg-C 18 Aliphatics 
Cig-Cag Aliphatics 
C 11 -C 22 Aromatics 
Acenaphthene 
Acenaphthylene 
Anthracene 
Benzo(a)anthracene 
Benzo(a)pyrene 
Benzo(b)fluoranthene 
Benzo(e)pyrene 
Benzo(ghi)perylene 
Benzo(k)fluoranthene 
Chrysene 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 
Fluoranthene 
Fluorene 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene 
Methylnaphthalene, 1- 
Methylnaphthalene, 2- 
Naphthalene 
Phenanthrene 
Pyrene 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) 

Fuels, diesel, no 2 
Fuel oil no 6 
Gasoline 

Kerosene/Jet Fuel 
Unknown Hydrocarbons 
Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 


Method 


8260 


Units 


mg/kg 


MAVPH 


8270 


MAE PH 


mg/kg 


mg/kg 


mg/kg 


mg/kg 


B225 

B225-S1(0-3) 
0-3 
Accutest 
MCI 7003-24 
12/18/2012 
GEI 

B221 

B221-S2(6-8) 
6-8 
Accutest 
MCI 7003-16 
12/18/2012 
GEI 

B221 

B500 

6-8 

Accutest 

MC17003-35 

12/18/2012 

GEI 

B222 

B222-S2(6-8) 
6-8 
Accutest 
MCI 7003-18 
12/18/2012 
GEI 

B223 

B223-S2(6-8) 
6-8 
Accutest 
MCI 7003-20 
12/18/2012 
GEI 

B224 

B224-S2(6-8) 
6-8 
Accutest 
MCI 7003-22 
12/18/2012 
GEI 

B225 

B225-S2(6-8) 
6-8 
Accutest 
MCI 7003-25 
12/18/2012 
GEI 

tverett, Massachi 

B226 

B226-S2(6-8) 
6-8 
Accutest 
MCI 7003-27 
12/18/2012 
GEI 

jsetts 

B227 

B227-S2(6-8) 
6-8 
Accutest 
MCI 7003-29 
12/18/2012 
GEI 

B228 

B228-S2(6-8) 
6-8 
Accutest 
MCI 7003-31 
12/18/2012 
GEI 

B229 

B229-S2(6-8) 
6-8 
Accutest 
MCI 7003-33 
12/18/2012 
GEI 

A-5-4 

A-5-4(6-8) 

6-8 

Accutest 

3/19/2013 

GEI 

A- 5-5 

A-5-5(6-8) 

6-8 

Accutest 

3/19/2013 

GEI 

B221 

B221-S2(8-10) 
8-10 
Accutest 
MCI 7003-17 
12/18/2012 
GEI 

B222 

B222-S2(8-10) 
8-10 
Accutest 
MCI 7003-19 
12/18/2012 
GEI 

B223 

B223-S2(8-10) 

8-10 

Accutest 

MC17003-21 

12/18/2012 

GEI 

B224 

B224-S2(8-10) 
8-10 
Accutest 
MCI 7003-23 
12/18/2012 
GEI 

B225 

B225-S2(8-10) 
8-10 
Accutest 
MCI 7003-26 
12/18/2012 
GEI 

B226 

B226-S2(8-10 
8-10 
Accutest 
MCI 7003-28 
12/18/2012 
GEI 


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:\ 170 , 000 - 179 ,999\171521\171521-00.DEL\2016 PM10 Denvation\Soil Data HighlighttSorf Data 



QA: CL Date: 4/15/15 

















































































































Analyte 


Sample Location 
Sample ID 
Sample Depth (ft bgs) 
Laboratory 
Laboratory ID 
Sample Date 
Consultant 


Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) 

Aroclor 1248 
Arodor 1254 
Arodor 1260 
Arodor 1262 
Arodor 1016 
Arodor 1221 
Arodor 1232 
Arodor 1242 
Arodor 1268 
Total PCBs 
Pesticides 

Total Pestiddes 
Herbicides 

Total Herbicides 
Metals, Total 
Antimony 
Arsenic 
Barium 
Beryllium 
Cadmium 
Chromium 
Copper 
Iron 
Lead 

Manganese 
Mercury 
Nickel 
Selenium 
Silver 
Thallium 
Vanadium 
Zinc 
Other 

Cyanide, total 
Cyanide, reactive 
Analytes Reported with Multiple MethodsA 
Acenaphthene 
Acenaphthylene 
Anthracene 
Benzo(a)anthracene 
Benzo(a)pyrene 
Benzo(b)fluoranthene 
Benzo(e)pyrene 
Benzo(ghi)perylene 
Benzo(k)fluoranthene 
Chrysene 

Dibenzo(a ,h)anthracene 
Fluoranthene 
Fluorene 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene 
Methylnaphthalene, 1- 
Methytnaphthalene, 2- 
Naphthalene 
Phenanthrene 
Pyrene 


Method 


8082 


8081 

8151 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

7471 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 


Units 


mg/kg 


B225 
B225-S1(0-3) 
0-3 
Accutest 
MCI 7003-24 
12/18/2012 
GEI 


mg/kg 

mg/kg 

mg/kg 


mg/kg 

mg/kg 

mg/kg 


B221 
B221-S2(6-8) 
6-8 
Accutest 
MCI 7003-16 
12/18/2012 
GEI 


412 


9310 


B221 

B500 
6-8 
Accutest 
MCI 7003-35 
12/18/2012 
GEI 


B222 

B222-S2(S-8) 
6-8 
Accutest 
MCI 7003-18 
12/18/2012 
GEI 


783 


1150 


981 


522 


396 


B223 

B223-S2(6-8) 
6-8 
Accutest 
MCI 7003-20 
12/18/2012 
GEI 


18.1 


79.1 


B224 
B224-S2(6-8) 
6-8 
Accutest 
MCI 7003-22 
12/18/2012 
GEI 


114 


17.5 


SOIL ANALYTICAL RESULTS 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 2 of 16 
4/15/2015 


B225 

B225-S2(6-8) 
6-8 
Accutest 
MCI 7003-25 
12/18/2012 
GEI 


B226 
B226-S2(6-8) 
6-8 

Accutest 
MCI 7003-27 
12/18/2012 
GEI 


23.9 


288 


211 


814 


B227 

B227-S2(6-8) 
6-8 
Accutest 
MCI 7003-29 
12/18/2012 
GEI 


462 


225 


B228 

B228-S2(6-8) 
6-8 
Accutest 
MCI 7003-31 
12/18/2012 
GEI 


8.9 


48.9 


B229 

B229-S2(6-8) 
6-8 
Accutest 
MCI 7003-33 
12/18/2012 
GEI 


896 


43300 


A-5-4 

A-5-5 

B221 

B222 

B223 

B224 

B225 

B226 


A-5-4(6-8) 

A-5-5(6-8) 

B221-S2(8-10) 

B222-S2(8-10) 

B223-S2(8-10) 

B224-S2(8-10) 

B225-S2(8-10) 

B226-S2(8-10) 


6-8 

6-8 

8-10 

8-10 

8-10 

8-10 

8-10 

8-10 


Accutest 

Accutest 

Accutest 

Accutest 

Accutest 

Accutest 

Accutest 

Accutest 




MC17003-17 

MCI 7003-19 

MCI 7003-21 

MCI 7003-23 

MCI 7003-26 

MCI 7003-28 


3/19/2013 

3/19/2013 

12/18/2012 

12/18/2012 

12/18/2012 

12/18/2012 

12/18/2012 

12/18/2012 


GEI 

GEI 

GEI 

GEI 

GEI 

GEI 

GEI 

GEI 


_ 

_ 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 


- 

— 

- 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 


— 



— 

— 

— 


— 


— 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

__ 

_ 



15.9 

73.6 

43.2 

8 

236 

4.3 

72.9 

107 


— 

- 

- 

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- 

- 

— 

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— 

_ 

_ 


93.6 

1180 

5.3 

89.1 

117 

9.4 

112 

43.9 



— 

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— 

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- 




Notes: 

1. In general, analytes deteded in at least one sample are reported here. For the 2015 data, only selected VOCs and SVOCs are listed. Other not deteded. For a complete list of analytes see the laboratory data sheets. 

2. ■'<" = The analyte was not detected at a concentration above the specified laboratory reporting limit. 

3. ND = The analyte was not detected above the laboratory reporting limit; 

4. = The sample was not tested for this analyte. 

5. ft bgs = feet below ground surface 

6. mg/kg = milligrams per kilogram 

7. Highlights indicate the proposed remediation areas from which the samples were colleded. 

A-5 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Low pH Area Proposed Remediation Area 
CES-2 Area Proposed Remediation Area 

A. The analyte was analyzed by multiple analytical methods. If the analyte was detected via at least one method, the maximum deteded 
concentration is listed to represent the sample result. If the analyte was not detected via either method, the minimum RL is listed as the RL for the nondeteded sample result. 


J:\170,000-179,999\171521\171521-00.DEL\2015 PM10 DeiivationVSoil Data Highlight\Soil Data 


QA: CL Date: 4/15/15 






































































table 1-1 

SOIL ANALYTICAL RESULTS 
Everett Staging Yard 


Sample Location 

Sample ID 
Sample Depth (ft bgs) 
Laboratory 
Laboratory ID 
Sample Date 
Consultant 


MAVPH 


8270 


Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) 8260 

Acetone 
Benzene 

Butanone, 2- (MEK) 

Carbon disulfide 
Chloroform 
Ethylbenzene 
Isopropyltoluene, p- 
Methylene Chloride 
Naphthalene 
Styrene 
Toluene 

T richloroethylene 
Trimethylbenzene, 1,2,4- 
Trimethylbenzene, 1,3,5- 
Xylene, Total 

Volatile Petroleum Hydrocarbons (VPH) 

Cs-Ce Aliphatics 
C 9 -C 12 Aliphatics 
Cg-C-io Aromatics 

Semi-Volatile Organic Compounds (SVOC 
Acenaphthene 
Acenaphthylene 
Anthracene 
Benzo(a)anthracene 
Benzo(a)pyrene 
Benzo(b)fluoranthene 
Benzo(e)pyrene 
Benzo(ghi)perylene 
Benzo(k)fluoranthene 
Bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate 
Chrysene 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 
Dibenzofuran 
Fluoranthene 
Fluorene 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene 
Methylnaphthalene, 1- 
Methylnaphthalene, 2- 
Naphthalene 
Phenanthrene 
Pyrene 

Extractable Petroleum Hydrocarbons (EPij MAEPH 
Cg-C! 8 Aliphatics 
Cig-Cgg Aliphatics 
C-n-C^ Aromatics 
Acenaphthene 
Acenaphthylene 

I Anthracene 

Benzo(a)anthracene 
Benzo(a)pyrene 
Benzo(b)f!uoranthene 
Benzo(e)pyrene 
Benzo(ghi)perylene 
Benzo(k)fluoranthene 
Chrysene 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 
Fluoranthene 
Fluorene 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene 
Methylnaphthalene, 1- 
Methylnaphthalene, 2- 
Naphthalene 
Phenanthrene 
Pyrene 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) 

Fuels, diesel, no 2 
Fuel oil no 6 
Gasoline 

Kerosene/Jet Fuel 

I Unknown Hydrocarbons 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons _ 


Method 


Units 


mg/kg 


mg/kg 


mg/kg 


mg/kg 


mg/kg 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 3 of 16 
4/15/2015 


B227 

QOOQ 




Everett, Massachusetts 

B227-S2(8-10) 

8-10 

Accutest 

MC17003-30 

12/18/2012 

GEI 

B228-S2(8-10) 

8-10 

Accutest 

MCI 7003-32 
12/18/2012 
GEI 

B229 

B229-S2(8-10) 

8-10 

Accutest 

MCI 7003-34 
12/18/2012 
GEI 

A-5-4 

A-5-4(8-10) 

8-10 

Accutest 

3/19/2013 

GEI 

A-5-5 

A-5-5(8-10) 

8-10 

Accutest 

3/19/2013 

GEI 

A-5-4 

A-5-4(10-12) 

10-12 

Accutest 

3/19/2013 

GEI 

S-15 

S-15 

0-0.5 

Alpha 

L0407197-15 

6/29/2004 

W&C 

S-16 

S-16 

0-0.5 

Alpha 

L0407197-16 

6/29/2004 

w&c 

S-17 

S-17 

0-0.5 

Alpha 

L0407197-17 

6/29/2004 

W&C 

S-19 

S-19 

0-0.5 

Alpha 

L0407197-19 

6/29/2004 

W&C 

S-26 

S-26 

0-0.5 

Alpha 

L0407197-26 
6/29/2004 
W&C 

S-26 

S-26 Dup 
0-0.5 

Alpha 

L0407197-27 
6/29/2004 
W&C 

B217 

B217-SI 
0-2 
Accutest 
MCI 7003-10 
12/17/2012 
GEI 

BOR-11 
BOR11-050301 
0-3 

ALPHA 

L0104072-17 
5/3/2001 

TTR 

BOR-12 
BOR 12-050301 
0-3 

ALPHA 

L0104072-18 
5/3/2001 

TTR 

CES-2-1 

CES-2-1(0-3) 

0-3 

Accutest 

3/15/2013 

GEI 

SHORE-3 

SHORE-3(0-3) 

0-3 

Accutest 

3/15/2013 

GEI 

SHORE-4 

SHORE-4(0-3) 

0-3 

Accutest 

3/14/2013 

GEI 

SHORE-8 

SHORE-8(0-3) 

0-3 

Accutest 

3/14/2013 

GEI 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

_ 

_ 

_. 

_ 



__ . 

<0.46 

<0.51 










— 

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- 

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- 

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— 

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- 

- 

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- 





— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

<0.46 

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- 

- 

- 

- 





— 



- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

< 0.070 

< 0.076 

- 

- 

- 

- 





— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<0.046 

< 0.051 

- 

- 

- 

- 





— 


— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

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- 

- 

- 

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— 

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— 

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- 

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— 

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— 

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- 

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— 

~ 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

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<0.23 

0.28 

- 

- 

- 

- 



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- 

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— 


~ 

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- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

< 0.070 

< 0.076 

— 

- 

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- 




— 

— 



- 

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< 0.051 

- 

- 

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- 




— 

— 


- 

- 

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- 

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- 

- 

<0.23 

<0.25 

- 

- 

- 

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- 


— 


— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<0.23 

<0.25 

- 

- 

- 

- 




“ 


— 

— 


— 


- 

- 

- 

<0.046 

0.075 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

<1.86 

<2.03 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 


- 

-- 

- 

-- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

< 1.86 

<2.03 

- 

- 

- 

- 



— 





- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<1.86 

<2.03 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

— 

— 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 


- 

- 

-- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 


- 


— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

— 

— 




— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

: 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

: 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 


_ 

_ 

_ 

__ 

— 

118 

<8.33 

< 15.2 

15.4 

313 

< 13.9 

— 

< 10.6 

<11.1 

_ 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

— 

— 

- 

- 

477 

104 

27.1 

1670 

1790 

137 

- 

39.1 

117 

- 

— 

— 

— 


_ 

_ 

— 

— 

— 

117 

52.4 

35 

252 

456 

< 13.9 

- 

19.9 

208 

— 

— 

— 

— 



_ 

_ 

__ 

— 

<2.11 

<0.417 

< 0.758 

< 0.758 

< 1.79 

< 0.694 

- 

<0.53 

<5.6 

— 

— 

— 

— 


_ 

_ 

_ 

—■ 

— 

<2.11 

<0.417 

< 0.758 

< 0.758 

< 1.79 

< 0.694 

- 

<0.53 

<5.6 

— 

— 

— 

— 



_ 

_ 

— 

— 

<2.11 

<0.417 

< 0.758 

< 0.758 

< 1.79 

< 0.694 

- 

<0.53 

<5.6 

— 

— 

— 

— 



_ 

__ 

_ 

— 

<2.11 

<0.417 

< 0.758 

< 0.758 

< 1.79 

< 0.694 

- 

<0.53 

<5.6 

— 


— 

— 



_ 

_ 

__ 

— 

<2.11 

<0.417 

< 0.758 

< 0.758 

< 1.79 

< 0.694 

- 

<0.53 

<5.6 

— 

— 

— 

— 




_ 

_ 

_ 

<2.11 

<0.417 

<0.758 

< 0.758 

<1.79 

< 0.694 

- 

<0.53 

<5.6 

— 

— 

— 

— 




_ 

_ 

__ 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

<0.53 

<5.6 

— 

— 

— 

_ 




_ 

_ 

_ 

<2.11 

<0.417 

< 0.758 

< 0.758 

< 1.79 

< 0.694 

- 

<0.53 

<5.6 

— 

— 

— 

— 




_ 

_ 

__ 

<2.11 

<0.417 

< 0.758 

< 0.758 

<1.79 

< 0.694 

- 

<0.53 

<5.6 

— 

— 

— 

— 




_ 

_ 

_ 

<2.11 

0.438 

< 0.758 

< 0.758 

<1.79 

< 0.694 

- 

<0.53 

<5.6 

— 

— 

— 

— 





_ 

_ 

<2.11 

<0.417 

< 0.758 

< 0.758 

<1.79 

< 0.694 

- 

<0.53 

<5.6 

— 

— 

— 

— 





_ 

_ 

<2.11 

0.548 

< 0.758 

< 0.758 

2.19 

< 0.694 

- 

<0.53 

<5.6 

— 

— 

— 

— 





_ 

_ 

<2.11 

<0.417 

< 0.758 

< 0.758 

<1.79 

< 0.694 

- 

<0.53 

<5.6 

— 

— 

— 

— 






_ 

<2.11 

<0.417 

< 0.758 

< 0.758 

< 1.79 

< 0.694 

- 

<0.53 

<5.6 


— 

— 

— 






_ 

_ 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

<0.53 

<5.6 

— 

— 

— 

_ 






_ 

<2.11 

<0.417 

< 0.758 

< 0.758 

<1.79 

< 0.694 

- 

<0.53 

<5.6 

— 

— 

— 

— 






_ 

<2.11 

<0.417 

< 0.758 

< 0.758 

<1.79 

< 0.694 

- 

<0.53 

<5.6 

— 

— 

— 

— 






_ 

<2.11 

<0.417 

< 0.758 

< 0.758 

< 1.79 

< 0.694 

- 

<0.53 

<5.6 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<2.11 

0.524 

< 0.758 

< 0.758 

1.94 

< 0.694 

— 

<0.53 

<5.6 

— 

- 

- 

- 




_ 

_ 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 


_ 

— 

— 

- 

- 


— 







~ 




—* 


_ 

— 

— 

- 

— 

— 

— 











- 


_ 

— 

— 

- 

- 

— 

— 





" 


~ 



— 



_ 

— 

— 

- 

- 

— 


— 



~ 








- 

- 

- 


— 

““ 















J:\170,000-179, 999\171521\171521-00 DEL\2015 PM10 Denvation\Soil Data Highlight\Sotl Data 


QA: GL Date: 4/15/15 






























































































SOIL ANALYTICAL RESULTS 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 4 of 16 


Sample Location 

Sample ID 
Sample Depth (ft bgs) 
Laboratory 
Laboratory ID 
Sample Date 

B227 

B227-S2(8-10) 

8-10 

Accutest 

MC17003-30 

12/18/2012 

GEI 

B228 

B228-S2(8-10) 

8-10 

Accutest 

MCI 7003-32 
12/18/2012 
GEI 

B229 

B229-S2(8-10) 

8-10 

Accutest 

MCI 7003-34 
12/18/2012 
GEI 

A-5-4 

A-5-4(8-10) 

8-10 

Accutest 

3/19/2013 

GEI 

A-5-5 

A-5-5(8-10) 

8-10 

Accutest 

3/19/2013 

GEI 

A-5-4 

A-5-4(10-12) 

10-12 

Accutest 

3/19/2013 

GEI 

S-15 

S-15 

0-0.5 

Alpha 

L0407197-15 

6/29/2004 

W&C 

Everett, Massachu 

S-16 

S-16 

0-0.5 

Alpha 

L0407197-16 

6/29/2004 

W&C 

setts 

S-17 

S-17 

0-0.5 

Alpha 

L0407197-17 

6/29/2004 

W&C 

S-19 

S-19 

0-0.5 

Alpha 

L0407197-19 

6/29/2004 

W&C 

S-26 

S-26 

0-0.5 

Alpha 

L0407197-26 
6/29/2004 
W&C 

S-26 

S-26 Dup 
0-0.5 

Alpha 

L0407197-27 
6/29/2004 
W&C 

B217 

B217-SI 
0-2 
Accutest 
MCI 7003-10 
12/17/2012 
GEI 

BOR-11 
BOR 11-050301 
0-3 

ALPHA 

L0104072-17 

5/3/2001 

TTR 

BOR-12 
BOR 12-050301 
0-3 

ALPHA 

L0104072-18 

5/3/2001 

TTR 

CES-2-1 
CES-2-1(0-3) 
0-3 

Accutest 

3/15/2013 

GEI 

SHORE-3 

SHORE-3(0-3) 

0-3 

Accutest 

3/15/2013 

GEI 

SHORE-4 

SHORE-4(0-3) 

0-3 

Accutest 

3/14/2013 

GEI 

4/1 

SHORE-8 

SHORE-8(0-3) 

0-3 

Accutest 

3/14/2013 

GEI 

Analyt^^ 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) 

Method 

Units 

Aroclor 1248 


mg/kg 





















Aroclor 1254 





— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

_ 










Aroclor 1260 





~ 

— 

— 

- 

- 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 










Aroclor 1262 






— 


- 

- 

- 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 








Aroclor 1016 






— 


~ 

- 

- 

— 

— 

_ 


1 








Aroclor 1221 






— 

— 


- 

- 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 








Aroclor 1232 






— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

| - 

— 

__ 

_ 

_ 

_ 


_ 

_ 




Aroclor 1242 







— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

, 

_ 

_ 

_ 


_ 


Aroclor 1268 








— 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

__ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

__ 

_ 


Total PCBs 








“ 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 


_ 

_ 

_ 


Pesticides 

8081 

mg/kg 




— 


— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 


Total Pesticides 











- 

— 









Herbicides 

8151 

mg/kg 









- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 


Total Herbicides 













“ 









Metals, Total 

6010 

mg/kg 






~~ 

— 



— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 


Antimony 

6010 











— 










Arsenic 

Barium 

6010 

6010 


11 

<0.97 

13.9 

Ill 

18.5 

9.9 

<2.5 

3.9 

<2.5 

3.6 

<2.3 

4.8 

<2.2 

3.3 

2.9 

14 

<2.1 

3.7 

18.6 

3.2 

19 

— 

8.1 

39.6 

5.7 


Beryllium 

6010 







— 

18 

33 

33 

19 

170 

33 

- 

19 

68 

- 

— 

— 

— 


Cadmium 

6010 







— 

0.26 

0.26 

0.23 

0.24 

0.4 

0.26 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 


Chromium 

6010 






~~ 


< 0.50 

<0.50 

<0.45 

<0.44 

6.2 

<0.42 

- 

<0.42 

<0.44 

- 

~ 

— 

— 


Copper 

6010 







~ 

7.8 

16 

40 

10 

76 

19 

- 

20 

18 

- 

- 

- 

- 


Iron 

6010 


_ 

_ 

_ 









~ 




— 

— 

— 

— 


Lead 

Manganese 

6010 

6010 


59.2 

8.2 

363 

30.9 

30.2 

49.3 

18 

22 

240 

16 

590 

15 

118 

<2.1 

490 

50.4 

- 

- 

- 


Mercury 

Nickel 

Selenium 

7471 

6010 

6010 


- 

- 


— 

— 

- 

<0.1 

7.1 

<2.5 

<0.10 

14 

<2.5 

<0.08 

26 

<2.3 

0.09 

9.7 

<2.2 

0.36 

61 

<2.1 

<0.08 

16 

<2.1 

- 

<0.24 

<4.2 

0.29 

<44 

- 

- 

- 

- 


Silver 

6010 


- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

<0.50 

<0.50 

<0.45 

<0.44 

<0.43 

<0.42 


<0.42 

1.4 






Thallium 

6010 


- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

<2.5 

<2.5 

<11 

<2 2 

<11 

<2.1 









Vanadium 

6010 


- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

22 

33 

35 

23 

44 

39 









Zinc 

Other 

6010 


— 

— 





38 

94 

350 

50 

430 

530 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 


Cyanide, total 


mg/kg 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 


, 











Cyanide, reactive 


mg/kg 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 








Analytes Reported with Multiple MethodsA 

mg/kg 





















Acenaphthene 



- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<2.11 

<0.417 

<0.758 

<0.758 

<1.79 

<0.694 

— 

<0.53 

<5.6 

_ 

_ 




Acenaphthylene 



- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<2.11 

<0.417 

<0.758 

<0.758 

<1.79 

<0.694 

— 

<0.53 

<5.6 

_ 

. 




Anthracene 



- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<2.11 

<0.417 

<0.758 

<0.758 

<1.79 

<0.694 

— 

<0.53 

<5.6 

_ 

_ 

_ 



Benzo(a)anthracene 



- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<2.11 

<0.417 

<0.758 

<0.758 

<1.79 

<0.694 

— 

<0.53 

<5.6 

_ 

_ 

_ 



Benzo(a)pyrene 



- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<2.11 

<0.417 

<0.758 

<0.758 

<1.79 

<0.694 

— 

<0.53 

<5.6 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 


Benzo(b)fluoranthene 



- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<2.11 

<0.417 

<0.758 

<0.758 

<1.79 

<0.694 

- 

<0.53 

<5.6 

— 

_ 

... 

__ 


Benzo(e)pyrene 



- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

• - 

- 

<0.53 

<5.6 

— 

_ 

_ 



Benzo(ghi)perylene 



- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<2.11 

<0.417 

<0.758 

<0.758 

<1.79 

<0.694 

- 

<0.53 

<5.6 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 


Benzo(k)fluoranthene 



- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<2.11 

<0.417 

<0.758 

<0.758 

<1.79 

<0.694 

- 

<0.53 

<5.6 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 


Chrysene 



— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<2.11 

0.438 

<0.758 

<0.758 

<1.79 

<0.694 

- 

<0.53 

<5.6 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 


Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 



— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<2.11 

<0.417 

<0.758 

<0.758 

<1.79 

<0.694 

- 

<0.53 

<5.6 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 


Fluoranthene 



— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<2.11 

0.548 

<0.758 

<0.758 . 

2.19 

<0.694 

- 

<0.53 

<5.6 

_ 

— 

_ 

__ 


Fluorene 



— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

<2.11 

<0.417 

<0.758 

<0.758 

<1.79 

<0.694 

- 

<0.53 

<5.6 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 


lndeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene 



- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<2.11 

<0.417 

<0.758 

<0.758 

<1.79 

<0.694 

- 

<0.53 

<5.6 

- 

— 

— * 

— 


Methylnaphthalene, 1- 



- 

- 

— 




— 


— 




— 

<0.53 

<5.6 

- 

- 

— 

— 


Methylnaphthalene. 2- 



- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

“ 

<2.11 

<0.417 

<0.758 

<0.758 

<1.79 

<0.694 

- 

<0.53 

<5.6 

- 

— 

— 

— 


Naphthalene 

Phpnpnthrpnp 



_ 

— 

— 

— 

— 


<2.11 

<0.417 

<0.758 

<0.758 

<1.79 

<0.694 

- 

<0.23 

0.28 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 




_ 

_ 

_ 

— 

— 

— 

<2.11 

<0.417 

<0.758 

<0.758 

<1.79 

<0.694 

- 

<0.53 

<5.6 

_ 

_ 

_ 



Pyrene 



- 

- 

- 

- 



<2.11 

0.524 

<0.758 

<0.758 

1.94 

<0.694 

~ 

<0.53 

<5.6 

- 

- 

- 

- 



Notes: 

1 In general, analytes detected in at least one sample are reported here. For the 2015 data, only selected VOCs and SVOCs are listed. Other not detected. For a complete list of analytes see the laboratory data sheets. 

2. "<" = The analyte was not detected at a concentration above the specified laboratory reporting limit. 

3. ND = The analyte was not detected above the laboratory reporting limit; 

4 = The sample was not tested for this analyte. 

5. ft bgs = feet below ground surface 

6. mg/kg = milligrams per kilogram 

7. Highlights indicate the proposed remediation areas from which the samples were collected. 

A-5 Area Proposed Remediation Area 

Low pH Area Proposed Remediation Area 
CES-2 Area Proposed Remediation Area 

A. The analyte was analyzed by multiple analytical methods. If the analyte was detected via at least one method, the maximum detected 
concentration is listed to represent the sample result. If the analyte was not detected via either method, the minimum RL is listed as the RL for the nondetected sample result. 


J:\170,000-179,999VI71521 \171521-00.DEL\2015 PM10 DerivationYSoil Data Highlight\Soil Data 


QA: CL Date: 4/15/15 




















































































SOIL ANALYTICAL RESULTS 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 5 of 16 


Sample Location 
Sample ID 
Sample Depth (ft bgs) 
Laboratory 
Laboratory ID 
Sample Date 
Consultant 


Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) 

Acetone 
Benzene 

Butanone, 2- (MEK) 

Carbon disulfide 
Chloroform 
Ethylbenzene 
Isopropyltoluene, p- 
Methylene Chloride 
Naphthalene 
Styrene 
Toluene 

T richloroethylene 
Tnmethylbenzene, 1,2,4- 
Trimethylbenzene, 1,3,5- 
Xylene, Total 

Volatile Petroleum Hydrocarbons (VPH) 

Cs-Cg Aliphatics 
Cg-C -12 Aliphatics 
Cg-C-jQ Aromatics 
Semi-Volatile Organic Compounds (SVOC 
Acenaphthene 
Acenaphthylene 
Anthracene 
Benzo(a)anthracene 
Benzo(a)pyrene 
Benzo(b)fluoranthene 
Benzo(e)pyrene 
Benzo(ghi)perylene 
Benzo(k)fluoranthene 
Bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate 
Chrysene 

Dibenzo(a ,h)anthracene 
Dibenzofuran 
Fluoranthene 
Fluorene 

lndeno( 1,2,3-cd)pyrene 
Methylnaphthalene, 1- 
Methylnaphthalene, 2- 
Naphthalene 
Phenanthrene 
Pyrene 

Extractable Petroleum Hydrocarbons (EPI 

Cg-C 18 Aliphatics 
C-ig-Cgg Aliphatics 
CH-C 22 Aromatics 
Acenaphthene 
Acenaphthylene 
Anthracene 
Benzo(a)anthracene 
Benzo(a)pyrene 
Benzo(b)fluoranthene 
Benzo(e)pyrene 
Benzo(ghi)perylene 
Benzo(k)fluoranthene 
Chrysene 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 
Fluoranthene 
Fluorene 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene 
Methylnaphthalene, 1- 
Methylnaphthalene, 2- 
Naphthalene 
Phenanthrene 
Pyrene 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) 

Fuels, diesel, no 2 
Fuel oil no 6 
Gasoline 

Kerosene/Jet Fuel 
Unknown Hydrocarbons 
Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 


Method 


8260 


Units 


mg/kg 


MAVPH 


8270 


MAEPH 


SHORE-9 
SHORE-9(0-3) 
0-3 

Accutest 

3/14/2013 

GEI 


mg/kg 


mg/kg 


mg/kg 


mg/kg 


CES-2-A 

TFQ.O.R 





Everett, Massachu 

setts 

4/' 

CES02A0-4 

0-4 

Con-test 

05B47827 

12/7/2005 

TTR 

CES 02B 0-4 
0-4 

Con-test 

05B47829 

12/7/2005 

TTR 

Cfcb-2-0 
CES 02C 0-4 
0-4 

Con-test 

05B47833 

12/7/2005 

TTR 

CES-2-D 
CES 02D 0-4 
0-4 

Con-test 

05B47831 

12/7/2005 

TTR 

TP301 

TP301-A 

0-5 

4/19/2013 

GEI 

C-14 

C-14 @ 4' 

4 

R.l. Analytical 

5/31/2007 

Williams 

CES-2-A 
CES 02A 4-8 
4-8 

Con-test 

05B47828 

12/7/2005 

TTR 

CES-2-B 

CES 02B 4-8 
4-8 

Con-test 

05B47830 

12/7/2005 

TTR 

CES-2-C 

CES 02C 4-8 
4-8 

Con-test 

05B47834 

12/7/2005 

TTR 

CES-2-D 
CES 02D 4-8 
4-8 

Con-test 

05B47832 

12/7/2005 

TTR 

CES-4 

CES-4 / 5-7 
5-7 

ALPHA 

L9609510-07 

12/18/1996 

CES 

RIZ-1 

RIZ1 - 032601 
5-7 

ALPHA 

L0102800-01 
3/26/2001 
TTR 

B215 
B215-S2 
5-7 
Accutest 
MCI 7003-8 
12/17/2012 
GEI 

CES-TP-4 

TP-4 

5-8 

Inchcape 

30878-4 

8/25/1995 

CES 

SHORE-3 

SHORE-3(5-10) 

5-10 

Accutest 

3/15/2013 

GEI 

SHORE-4 

SHORE-4(5-10) 

5-10 

Accutest 

3/14/2013 

GEI 

SHORE-8 

SHORE-8(5-10) 

5-10 

Accutest 

3/14/2013 

GEI 

SHORE-9 

SHORE-9(5-10) 

5-10 

Accutest 

3/14/2013 

GEI 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 



0.1 





_ 








" 

- 

- 

- 

— 

0.002 

- 

— 

— 

— 






~ 

— 

— 


- 

- 

- 

— 

0.025 

— 

— 

— 

— 

_ 







— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

0.8 

— 

— 

— 

— 

_ 






— 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

< 0.007 

— 

— 

— 

— 

_ 








— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

0.014 

— 

- 

— 

— 







— 

— 


- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 





~~ 




- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

0.022 

— 

— 

— 

— 







— 

— 


- 

- 

- 


— 

— 

— 

— 

_ 






— 


— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

0.002 

— 

— 

— 







— 



— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

0.003 

— 

— 

— 

— 









— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

< 0.007 

— 

— 

— 

— 




~ 


— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

. 

_ 




“ 

— 



- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 







—* 

~ 

— 


- 

- 

- 

0.002 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

_ 


I 








— 

— 

~ 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 



_ 

_ 

_ 



" 

— 

— 

“ 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<0.19 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

<0.19 







— 

— 


— 

" 

“ 

<0.19 

- 

- 

- 

— 

<0.19 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 






— 

“ 

— 

<0.19 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<0.19 

_ 

_ 

_ 

. 






— 



<0.19 

-- 

- 

- 

- 

<0.19 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 






— 

" 

" 

<0.19 

- 

- 

- 

— 

<0.19 

— 

_ 

__ 









— 

<0.19 

— 

— 

- 

- 

<0.19 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<0.19 

— 

— 


_ 

<0.19 









— 


— 

— 

<0.19 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<0.19 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

, 





— 


- 

<0.37 

- 

- 

- 

— 

<0.37 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 





— 


- 

<0.19 

- 

- 

- 

— 

<0.19 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 





- 

- 

- 

<0.19 

- 

- 

- 

— 

<0.19 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 






- 

- 

<0.37 

- 

- 

- 

— 

<0.37 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 





- 

- 

- 

<0.19 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<0.19 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 




- 

- 

- 

<0.19 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<0.19 

— 

— 

_ 


_ 

_ 





— 


<0.19 

— 

- 

-- 

- 

<0.19 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

<0.19 

— 

— 

— 

— 

<0.19 

_ 

_ 

I 







- 

- 

- 

<0.19 

- 

- 

- 

— 

<0.19 

— 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 




- 

- 

- 

<0.19 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<0.19 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 




~ 



<0.19 

— 


— 

- 

<0.19 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<22 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

I 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

110 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

99 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

- 

- 

- 

- 

" 

<0.4 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<0.4 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

__ 

- 

- 

- 

— 


0.4 

— 


— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

- 




— 

1.7 


— 



- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

- 





1.1 



— 

— 


- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

-- 

- 

— 

1.7 

— 

— 

“ 

— 


- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

_ 

- 

- 

- 

“ 


— 




— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

0.7 




— 


- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

_ 

- 

- 

- 

- 


1.4 


— 

— 

— 

“ 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

_ 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1.8 



— 

- 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

0.4 


— 


— 

- 

- • 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

- 

-- 

- 

- 

4.2 


— 


— 


— 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

<0.4 

— 

~ 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

_ 

— 

- 

- 

~ 

- 

0.5 



— 

- 


- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 



— 



- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

<0.4 

— 


~ 


— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

<0.4 

— 

— 


— 


- 

“ 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

2.1 

— 



— 

~ 


— 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

3.4 


“ ; 




- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 





— 







- 


— 

— 

— 

_ 




_ 


— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

<210 

< 180 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

__ 





_ 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

<210 

< 180 

- 

— 

— 

_ 

__ 





_ 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

<210 

< 180 

- 

— 

— 


_ 






— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

<210 

< 180 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 




_ 

_ 

_ 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

360 

280 

— 

— 

— 

_ 



- 

- 


- 

- 

- 

“ 

- 

— 

- I - 

360 

280 


30 


- 




J:\170,000-179,999\171521\171521-00.DEL\2015 PM10 DenvationVSoil Data Highlight\Soil Data 


QA: CL Date: 4/15/15 



















































































































Sample Location 

Sample ID 
Sample Depth (ft bgs) 
Laboratory 
Laboratory ID 
Sample Date 
Consultant 

Analyte 

Method 

Units 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) 

Aroclor 1248 

Aroclor 1254 

Aroclor 1260 

Aroclor 1262 

Arodor 1016 

Arodor 1221 

Arodor 1232 

Arodor 1242 

Arodor 1268 

Total PCBs 

8082 

mg/kg 

Pesticides 

Total Pestiddes 

8081 

mg/kg 

Herbicides 

Total Herbicides 

8151 

mg/kg 

Metals, Total 

6010 

mg/kg 

Antimony 

6010 


Arsenic 

6010 


Barium 

6010 


Beryllium 

6010 


Cadmium 

6010 


Chromium 

6010 


Copper 

6010 


Iron 

6010 


Lead 

6010 


Manganese 

6010 


Mercury 

7471 


Nickel 

6010 


Selenium 

6010 


Silver 

6010 


Thallium 

6010 


Vanadium 

6010 


Zinc 

Other 

6010 


Cyanide, total 


mg/kg 

Cyanide, reactive 


mg/kg 

Analytes Reported with Multiple Methods/ 

Acenaphthene 

Acenaphthylene 

Anthracene 

Benzo(a)anthracene 

Benzo(a)pyrene 

Benzo(b)fluoranthene 


mg/kg 

Benzo(e)pyrene 

Benzo(ghi)perylene 

Benzo(k)fluoranthene 

Chrysene 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

Fluoranthene 

Fluorene 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene 
Methylnaphthalene, 1- 
Methylnaphthalene, 2- 
Naphthalene 

Phenanthrene 

Pyrene 




table 1-1 

SOIL ANALYTICAL RESULTS 
Everett Staging Yard 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 6 of 16 
4/15/2015 





Everett, Massachusetts 

oMUKh-y 

CES-2-A 

CES-2-B 

CES-2-C 

CES-2-D 

TP301 

C-14 

CES-2-A 

CES-2-B 

CES-2-C 

CES-2-D 

CES-4 

RIZ-1 

B215 

CES-TP-4 

SHORE-3 

SHORE-4 

SHORE-8 

SHORE-9 

oHUKt-y(U-o) 
n ^ 

CES 02A0-4 

CES 02B 0-4 

CES 02C 0-4 

CES 02D 0-4 

TP301-A 

C-14 @ 4’ 

CES 02A 4-8 

CES 02B 4-8 

CES 02C 4-8 

CES02D4-8 

CES-4/5-7 

RIZ1 - 032601 

B215-S2 

TP-4 

SHORE-3(5-10) 

SHORE-4(5-10) 

SHORE-8(5-10) 

SHORE-9(5-10) 

U-O 

0-4 

0-4 

0-4 

0-4 

0-5 

4 

4-8 

4-8 

4-8 

4-8 

5-7 

5-7 

5-7 

5-8 

5-10 

5-10 

5-10 

5-10 

Accutest 

Con-test 

Con-test 

Con-test 

Con-test 


R.l. Analytical 

Con-test 

Con-test 

Con-test 

Con-test 

ALPHA 

ALPHA 

Accutest 

Inchcape 

Accutest 

Accutest 

Accutest 

Accutest 


05B47827 

05B47829 

05B47833 

05B47831 



05B47828 

05B47830 

05B47834 

05B47832 

L9609510-07 

L0102800-01 

MCI 7003-8 

30878-4 





o/14/zUlo 

12/7/2005 

12/7/2005 

12/7/2005 

12/7/2005 

4/19/2013 

5/31/2007 

12/7/2005 

12/7/2005 

12/7/2005 

12/7/2005 

12/18/1996 

3/26/2001 

12/17/2012 

8/25/1995 

3/15/2013 

3/14/2013 

3/14/2013 

3/14/2013 

otl 

TTR 

TTR 

TTR 

TTR 

GEI 

Williams 

TTR 

TTR 

TTR 

TTR 

CES 

TTR 

GEI 

CES 

GEI 

GEI 

GEI 

GEI 






— 

— 





_ 

__ 


_ 

— 

— 

- 

- 

~ 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

<0.12 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 



— 


- 

- 

- 

— 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

0.339 

- 

- 

- 

- 

“ 


— 



- 

- 

- 

— 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

0.203 

- 

- 

- 

- 



— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

<0.12 

— 

- 

- 

- 





- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

— 

_ 

_ 


— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

— 

~ 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

__ 

— 

_ 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

~ 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

— 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

0.662 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 






— 

— 





— 

— 


- 

- 


— 


— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

ND 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 






- 

— 





— 

— 


- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

ND 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 






- 

- 





— 

— 


- 

- 

- 

- 

~ 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

13.8 

150 

135 

270 

38.9 

101 

24 

77.1 

26.2 

10.1 

73.5 

9.4 

6.7 

— 

- 

52.4 

95.4 

186 

464 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

100 

- 

- 

- 

- 

30 

16 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 



— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 


— 

<0.26 

— 

— 

~ 

— 

<0.85 

<0.70 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

21 

— 

— 

— 

— 

24 

18 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

29.7 

- 

— 

“ 

— 

— 

- 

1120 

307 

3520 

67.8 

949 

380 

176 

36.4 

32.7 

541 

130 

31 

- 

- 

- 

5490 

1620 

108 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

14.2 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<0.53 

<0.44 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

I 

I 

_ 

, 

_ 

I 

29 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

<11 

<8.8 

_ 


— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

— 

< 1.1 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<0.85 

<0.70 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

~ 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 



— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 



— 

— 






_ 

— 





— 

- 

— 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

0.23 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- ' 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

-- 

- 

— 

— 

" 

— 

— 


— 

— 

— 

— 





<0.19 


<0.4 

— 

— 

<0.19 

— 

— 

- 

— 

- 

— 

- 

- 

- 

_ 

_ 

_ 

— 

<0.19 

— 

<0.4 

— 

- 

<0.19 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

<0.19 

— 

0.4 

- 

- 

<0.19 

- 

- 

- 

-- 

- 

- 

“ 

— 




_ 

— 

<0.19 

— 

1.7 

- 

- 

<0.19 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

- 

“ 


_ 

_ 

— 

<0.19 

— 

1.1 

- 

- 

<0.19 

- 

- 

- 


— 


— 



_ 

_ 

— 

— 

<0.19 

- 

1.7 

- 

- 

<0.19 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 



_ 

_ 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

“ 

— 

— 

— 

— 



_ 

_ 

_ 

<0.19 

— 

0.7 

- 

- 

<0.19 

- 

— 



— 

— 

— 

— 



_ 

_ 

— 

<0.19 

— 

1.4 

- 

- 

<0.19 

- 

” 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 





. 

_ 

<0.19 

— 

1.8 

- 

- 

<0.19 

- 

— 

“ 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 



_ 

_ 

<0.19 

— 

0.4 

- 

- 

<0.19 

- 

— 



— 

— 

— 





_ 

_ 

<0.19 

— 

4.2 

- 

- 

<0.19 




— 

— 



— 

— 



_ 

_ 

<0.19 

— 

<0.4 

- 

- 

<0.19 

~ 

“ 

— 


— 

~ 


~ 

— 



_ 

_ 

<0.19 

- 

0.5 

- 

- 

<0.19 

~ 

— 

— 


— 


”” 

— 

— 


_ 

_ 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 


— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 




_ 

_ 

<0.19 

— 

<0.4 

- 

- 

<0.19 

— 


— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 





_ 

<0.19 

— 

<0.4 

- 

- 

<0.19 

— 


— 


— 

— 


— 

— 




_ 

<0.19 

— 

2.1 

- 

- 

<0.19 

— 


“ 


— 

— 


— 

~ 





<0.19 

— 

3.4 

- 

- 

<0.19 

— 


— 


— 

— 

— 

— 

— 


^general, analyte s detected in at least one sample are reported here. For the 2015 data, only selected VOCs and SVOCs are listed. Other not detected. For a complete list of analytes see the laboratory data sheets. 
2 -<" = The analyte was not detected at a concentration above the specified laboratory reporting limit. 

3. ND = The analyte was not detected above the laboratory reporting limit; 

4 = The sample was not tested for this analyte. 

5 . ft bgs = feet below ground surface 

6 . mg/kg = milligrams per kilogram 

7. Highlights indicate the proposed remediation areas from which the samples were collected. 

A-5 Area Proposed Remediation Area 

Low pH Area Proposed Remediation Area 

CES-2 Area Proposed Remediation Area . , . . 

a ThPanalvte was analyzed by multiple analytical methods. If the analyte was detected via at least one method, the maximum detected 

concentration is listedTo represent the sample result. If the analyte was not detected via either method, the minimum RL is listed as the RL for the nondetected sample result. 


J:\170,000-179,999\171 521 \ 1 71521-00.DEL\2015 PM10 Denvation\Soil Data HighlighUSoil Data 


QA: CL Date: 4/15/15 



































































































TABLE 1-1 

SOIL ANALYTICAL RESULTS 
Everett Staging Yard 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 7 of 16 
4/15/2015 


Analyte 


Sample Location 

Sample ID 
Sample Depth (ft bgs) 
Laboratory 
Laboratory ID 
Sample Date 
Consultant 


8260 


MAVPH 


8270 


Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) 

Acetone 
Benzene 

Butanone, 2- (MEK) 

Carbon disulfide 
Chloroform 
Ethylbenzene 
Isopropyltoluene, p- 
Methytene Chloride 
Naphthalene 
Styrene 
Toluene 

Trichloroethylene 
Trimethylbenzene, 1,2,4- 
Trimethylbenzene, 1,3,5- 
Xylene, Total 

Volatile Petroleum Hydrocarbons (VPH) 

Cs-Ce Aliphatics 
C 9 -C 12 Aliphatics 
C g -C 10 Aromatics 

Semi-Volatile Organic Compounds (SVOC 
Acenaphthene 
Acenaphthylene 
Anthracene 
Benzo(a)anthracene 
Benzo(a)pyrene 
Benzo(b)fluoranthene 
Bertzo(e)pyrene 
Benzo(ghi)perylene 
Benzo(k)fluoranthene 
Bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate 
Chrysene 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 
Dibenzofuran 
Fluoranthene 
Fluorene 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene 
Methylnaphthalene, 1- 
Methylnaphthalene, 2- 
Naphthalene 
Phenanthrene 
Pyrene 

Extractable Petroleum Hydrocarbons (EPF| MAEPH 
Cg-C-ie Aliphatics 
Cig-C* Aliphatics 
Ci!-C22 Aromatics 
Acenaphthene 
Acenaphthylene 
Anthracene 
Benzo(a)anthracene 
Benzo(a)pyrene 
Benzo(b)fluoranthene 
Benzo(e)pyrene 
Benzo(ghi)perylene 
Benzo(k)fluoranthene 
Chrysene 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 
Fluoranthene 
Fluorene 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene 
Methylnaphthalene, 1- 
Methylnaphthalene, 2- 
Naphthalene 
Phenanthrene 
Pyrene 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) 

Fuels, diesel, no 2 
Fuel oil no 6 
Gasoline 

Kerosene/Jet Fuel 
Unknown Hydrocarbons 
Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 


Method 


Units 


mg/kg 


mg/kg 


mg/kg 


mg/kg 


mg/kg 





Everett, Massachusetts 

1 roUl 

TP^ni r 

TP302 

C-22 

C-22 

CES-2-1 

CES-2-2 

B217 

CES-2 

c-21 

C-21 

CES-2-1 

CES-2-2 

CES-2-3 

BOR-103 

MW301D 

MW302D 

CES-2 

MW301D 

MW302D 

5-10 

1P302-B 

C-22 @ 6' 

TP C-22 6' 

CES-2-1(6-8) 

CES-2-2(6-8) 

B217-S2 

CES-2/7-9 

C-21 @ 8’ 

TP C-21 8’ 

CES-2-1 (8-10) 

CES-2-2(8-12) 

CES-2-3(8-12) 

BOR 103 9' 

MW30 IDS 1(0-5) 

MW302DS 1(0-7) 

CES-2/9-11 

MW301DS1(5-16) 

MW302DS1(7-14) 

%>~1 U 

6 

6 

6-8 

6-8 

6-9 

7-9 

8 

8 

8-10 

8-12 

8-12 

9 

9-9.5 

9-9.5 

9-11 

9.5-11 

9.5-11 



R.l. Analytical 

Spectrum 

Accutest 

Accutest 

Accutest 

ALPHA 

R.l. Analytical 

Spectrum 

Accutest 

Accutest 

Accutest 

Con-test 

Accutest 

Accutest 

ALPHA 

Accutest 

Accutest 

4/19/2013 



SA63689-05 



MCI 7003-11 

L9609510-03 


SA63689-04 




06B01605 

MC21667-1 

MC21667-14 

L9609510-04 

MC21667-2 

MC21667-15 

4/19/2013 

5/31/2007 

5/31/2007 

3/15/2013 

3/15/2013 

12/17/2012 

12/17/1996 

5/31/2007 

5/31/2007 

3/15/2013 

3/15/2013 

3/20/2013 

1/13/2006 

6/7/2013 

6/10/2013 

12/17/1996 

6/7/2013 

6/10/2013 

GEI 

GEI 

Williams 

TTR 

GEI 

GEI 

GEI 

CES 

Williams 

TTR 

GEI 

GEI 

GEI 

TTR 

GEI 

GEI 

CES 

GEI 

GEI 

- 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 














_ 


— 

- 

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ND 

= ==== 

- 


J:\170,000-179, 999 \ 171 521V171521-00.DEL\2015 PM10 Denvation\Soil Data HighlighttSoil Data 


QA: CL Date: 4/15/15 



















































































































Sample Location 

TP301 1 

TP302~~ 


Sample ID 

TP301-B 

TP302-B 

Sample Depth (ft bgs) 

5-10 

5-10 


Laboratory 
Laboratory ID 




Sample Date 

4/19/2013 

4/19/2013 

GFI 


Consultant 

GEI 

Analyte 

Method 

Units 


Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) 

Aroclor 1248 

8082 

mg/kg 

- 


Aroclor 1254 





Aroclor 1260 





Aroclor 1262 




~ 

Aroclor 1016 





Aroclor 1221 





Aroclor 1232 





Aroclor 1242 





Aroclor 1268 





Total PCBs 





Pesticides 

8081 

mg/kg 

_ 


Total Pesticides 




Herbicides 

8151 

mg/kg 

_ 


Total Herbicides 





Metals, Total 

6010 

mg/kg 

_ 


Antimony 

6010 

_ 


Arsenic 

6010 


1050 

1490 

Barium 

6010 


_ 


Beryllium 

6010 


_ 


Cadmium 

6010 


_ 


Chromium 

6010 


_ 


Copper 

6010 


_ 

_ 

Iron 

6010 


_ 

_ 

Lead 

6010 


1730 

169 

Manganese 

6010 


— 

_ 

Mercury 

7471 


— 

_ 

Nickel 

6010 


— 

_ 

Selenium 

6010 


_ 

_ 

Silver 

6010 


— 

_ 

Thallium 

6010 


— 

_ 

Vanadium 

6010 


— 

_ 

Zinc 

6010 


— 

_ 

Other 



— 


Cyanide, total 


mg/kg 

— 

— 

Cyanide, reactive 


mg/kg 

- 

- 

Analytes Reported with Multiple MethodsA 

mg/kg 



Acenaphthene 



- 

- 

Acenaphthylene 



- 

- 

Anthracene 



- 

- 

Benzo(a)anthracene 



- 

- 

Benzo(a)pyrene 



- 

- 

Benzo(b)fluoranthene 



- 

- 

Benzo(e)pyrene 



- 

- 

Benzo(ghi)perylene 



- 

- 

Benzo(k)fluoranthene 



- 

- 

Chrysene 



- 

— 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 



— 

— 

Fluoranthene 



- 

— 

Fluorene 



- 

- 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene 



- 

— 

Methylnaphthalene, 1- 



— 

— 

Methylnaphthalene, 2- 



— 

— 

Naphthalene 



— 

— 

Phenanthrene 



— 

— 

Pyrene 



— 



C-22 
C-22 @ 6' 

6 

R.l. Analytical 

5/31/2007 

Williams 


C-22 
TP C-22 6' 
6 

Spectrum 

SA63689-05 

5/31/2007 

TTR 


570 

650 

2.1 

4.2 


17000 

8.41 

110 

18 


712 


24700 


SOIL ANALYTICAL RESULTS 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 8 of 16 
4/15/2015 


CES-2-1 
CES-2-1(6-8) 
6-8 

Accutest 

3/15/2013 

GEI 


457 


CES-2-2 

B217 

CES-2 

C 21 

C-21 

CES-2-1 

CES-2-2 

CES-2-3 

BOR-103 

MW301D 

MW302D 

CES-2 

MW301D 

MW302D 

CES-2-2(6-8) 

B217-S2 

CES-2 / 7-9 

C-21 @ 8' 

TP C-21 8 ' 

CES-2-1(8-10) 

CES-2-2(8-12) 

CES-2-3(8-12) 

BOR 103 9’ 

MW301DS 1(0-5) 

MW302DS1(0-7) 

CES-2/9-11 

MW301DS1(5-16) 

MW302DS1(7-14) 

6-8 

6 - 9 

7-9 

8 

8 

8-10 

8-12 

8-12 

9 

9-9.5 

9-9.5 

9-11 

9.5-11 

9.5-11 

Accutest 

Accutest 

ALPHA 

R.l. Analytical 

Spectrum 

Accutest 

Accutest 

Accutest 

Con-test 

Accutest 

Accutest 

ALPHA 

Accutest 

Accutest 

3/15/2013 

MCI 7003-11 

L9609510-03 


SA63689-04 




06B01605 

MC21667-1 

MC21667-14 

L9609510-04 

MC21667-2 

MC21667-15 

12/17/2012 

12/17/1996 

5/31/2007 

5/31/2007 

3/15/2013 

3/15/2013 

3/20/2013 

1/13/2006 

6/7/2013 

6/10/2013 

12/17/1996 

6/7/2013 

6/10/2013 

GEI 

GEI 

CES 

Williams 

TTR 

GEI 

GEI 

GEI 

TTR 

GEI 

GEI 

CES 

GEI 

GEI 


- 

- 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 



_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

- 

<0.14 

- 

3.9 

< 0.0346 

— 


_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 


<0.14 

- 

<0.1 

< 0.0346 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

__ 


_ 

_ 

_ 

- 

<0.14 

- 

<0.1 

< 0.0346 

__ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 


<0.14 

- 

<0.1 

0.33 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

— 

_ 

— 

— 

_ 

— 


- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 



— 

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_ 

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“ 

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- 

4.05 

0.3819 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 



- 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

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- 

ND 

-- 

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— 

— 

— 

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— 

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ND 

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— 

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— 

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“ 


- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

— 

— 

_ 

— 

— 

166 

- 

180 

630 

- 

1950 

1040 

3170 

185 

7660 

246 

380 

6800 

474 

— 

- 

390 

150 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— ! 

— 

— 

6.8 

— 

— 


- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

__ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

— 

- 

18 

<0.29 

- 

— 

— 

_ 

— 

_ 

_ 

2.9 

_ 

_ 

- 

- 

13 

7.1 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 


11 

_ 

_ 

- 

294 

- 

- 

- 

- 

~ 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 


- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 


9.8 

- 

5500 

1700 

- 

- 

- 

- 

3770 

2790 

20.2 

110 

797 

29.3 

— 


- 

- 


— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

— 

_ 

- 

- 

1.3 

64.8 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

~ 

— 

1.2 

— 

_ 




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— 

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„ 


- 

- 

42 

80 

- 

— 

— 

— 

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— 

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_ 



- 

<0.4 

2.4 

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- 

- 

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<0.58 

— 

— 

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- 

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— 



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0.27 

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1 

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0.6 

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1.8 

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2.1 

- 

~ 

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1.8 

- 

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— 

— 

— 

— 

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1.2 

- 


- 

— 

1.1 

— 

— 

— 

— 

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— 


- 

2.8 

- 

- 

- 

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1.3 

- 

- 

- 

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- 

— 

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— 

0.9 

- 

— 

— 

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<0.7 

— 

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: 


- 

— 

3 



- 

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1.5 

— 

— 

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_ 

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— 

2.6 

- 

- 

— 

— 

1.8 

— 

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— 


_ 

- 

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— 

1.1 

- 

- 

— 

— 

<0.7 

— 

— 

— 

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— 

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— 

4.4 

- 

- 

— 

- 

3.2 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

— 

- 

— 

<0.5 

- 

- 

- 

— 

<0.7 

— 

— 

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_ 

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- 

- 

- 

1.1 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<0.7 

- 

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— 

— 

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— 

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- 

— 

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— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

— 

- 

- 

0.6 

- 

- 

— 

— 

<0.7 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

— 

— 

— 

3.4 

- 

- 

— 

— 

1.8 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 


- 


3.7 

“ 




2.8 


- 

- 

- 

- 


Notes: 

1 In general, analytes detected in at least one sample are reported here. For the 2015 data, only selected VOCs and SVOCs are listed. Other not detected. For a complete list of analytes see the laboratory data sheets. 

2. ”<" = The analyte was not detected at a concentration above the specified laboratory reporting limit. 

3. ND = The analyte was not detected above the laboratory reporting limit; 

4. = The sample was not tested for this analyte. 

5. ft bgs = feet below ground surface 

6. mg/kg = milligrams per kilogram 

7. Highlights indicate the proposed remediation areas from which the samples were collected. 

A-5 Area Proposed Remediation Area 

Low pH Area Proposed Remediation Area 
CES-2 Area Proposed Remediation Area 

A The analyte was analyzed by multiple analytical methods. If the analyte was detected via at least one method, the maximum detected 
concentration is listed to represent the sample result. If the analyte was not detected via either method, the minimum RL is listed as the RL for the nondetected sample result. 


J:\170,000-179,999\171521\171521-00.DEL\2015 PM10 Derivation\Soil Data HighlighUSoil Data 


QA: CL Date: 4/15/15 











































































































Sample Location 

BOR-101 

CES-2-1 


Sample ID 

BOR101 10' 

CES-2-1(10-15) 

Sample Depth (ft bgs) 

10 

10-15 


Laboratory 

Con-test 

Accutest 


Laboratory ID 

06B01607 


Sample Date 

1/13/2006 

3/15/2013 

GEI 


Consultant 

TTR 

Anal^t^ 

Method 

Units 



Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) 

8260 

mg/kg 



Acetone 




Benzene 





Butanone, 2- (MEK) 





Carbon disulfide 





Chloroform 





Ethylbenzene 





Isopropyltoluene, p- 





Methylene Chloride 





Naphthalene 





Styrene 





Toluene 





Trichloroethylene 





Trimethylbenzene, 1,2,4- 





Trimethytbenzene, 1,3,5- 



_ 


Xylene, Total 



__ 


Volatile Petroleum Hydrocarbons (VPH) 

MAVPH 

mg/kg 

_ 

_ 

C5-C 8 Aliphatics 


_ 


C g -C 12 Aliphatics 



_ 


Cg-C-io Aromatics 



_ 


Semi-Volatile Organic Compounds (SVOC 

8270 

mg/kg 

_ 

_ 

Acenaphthene 



— 

_ 

Acenaphthylene 



— 

_ 

Anthracene 



_ 

_ 

Benzo(a)anthracene 



_ 

_ 

Benzo(a)pyrene 



— 

— 

Benzo(b)fluoranthene 



— 

— 

Benzo(e)pyrene 



— 

— 

Benzo(ghi)perylene 



— 

— 

Benzo(k)fluoranthene 



- 

— 

Bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate 



— 

— 

Chrysene 



- 

— 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 



- 

- 

Dibenzofuran 



- 

— 

Fluoranthene 



— 

— 

Fiuorene 



— 

— 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene 



- 

- 

Methylnaphthalene, 1- 



- 

- 

Methylnaphthalene, 2- 



- 

- 

Naphthalene 



- 

- 

Phenanthrene 



- 

- 

Pyrene 



- 

- 

Extractable Petroleum Hydrocarbons (EPh 

MAEPH 

mg/kg 

- 

— 

Cg-C 18 Aliphatics 



- 

- 

Cig-C^ Aliphatics 



- 

- 

C11-C22 Aromatics 



- 

- 

Acenaphthene 



- 

- 

Acenaphthylene 



— 


Anthracene 



— 

— 

Benzo(a)anthracene 



— 


Benzo(a)pyrene 



— 

— 

Benzo(b)fluoranthene 



— 

— 

Benzo(e)pyrene 



— 

— 

Benzo(ghi)perylene 



— 

— 

Benzo(k)fluoranthene 



— 


Chrysene 



— 


Dibenzo(a ,h)anthracene 



— 


Fluoranthene 



— 


Fiuorene 





lndeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene 



— 


Methylnaphthalene, 1- 



— 

~ 

Methylnaphthalene, 2- 





Naphthalene 





Phenanthrene 



— 


Pyrene 


mg/kg 

— 


Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) 


— 


Fuels, diesel, no 2 



— 


Fuel oil no 6 



— 


Gasoline 



— 


Kerosene/Jet Fuel 



— 


Unknown Hydrocarbons 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 



- 



SOIL ANALYTICAL RESULTS 
Everett Staging Yard 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 9 of 16 
4/15/2015 


SHORE-8 
SHORE-8(10-15) 
10-15 
Accutest 

3/14/2013 
GEI 


TP301 

TP301-C 

10-15 


4/19/2013 

GEI 


TP302 

TP302-C 

10-15 

4/19/2013 

GEI 

MW301D 
MW301DS2 
11-13 
Accutest 
MC21667-3 
6/7/2013 

GEI 

MW302D 

MW302DS2 

11-13 

Accutest 
MC21667-16 
6/10/2013 

GEI 

BOR-103 
BOR103 12' 

12 

Con-test 

06B01606 

1/13/2006 

TTR 

CES-2-2 

CES-2-2(12-14) 

12-14 

Accutest 

3/15/2013 

GEI 

CES-2-3 

CES-2-3(12-14) 

12-14 

Accutest 

3/20/2013 

GEI 

SHORE-9 

SHORE-9(12.5-15) 

12.5-15 

Accutest 

3/14/2013 

GEI 

MW301D 

MW301DS3(0-5) 

13-13.5 

Accutest 

MC21667-4 
6/7/2013 

GEI 

SHORE-8 

SHORE-8(S3B) 

13-15 

Accutest 

3/14/2013 

GEI 

MW302D 

MW302DS3 

13-15 

Accutest 

MC21667-17 

6/10/2013 

GEI 

MW301D 
MW301 DS3(5-23) 
13.5-15 
Accutest 

MC21667-5 
6/7/2013 

GEI 

CES-2-3 

CES-2-3(14-15) 

14-15 

Accutest 

3/20/2013 

GEI 

SHORE-4 

SHORE-4(S3B) 

14-15 

Accutest 

3/14/2013 

GEI 

MW301D 

MW301DS4 
15-17 
Accutest 
MC21667-6 
6/7/2013 

GEI 

MW302D 

MW302DS4 

15-17 

Accutest 

MC21667-18 

6/10/2013 

GEI 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 


— 

— 

— 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

__ 

__ 

_ 


_ 

_ 

_ 


— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 


— 

- 

-- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 



- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 



- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 


— 

- 

-- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

-- 

— 

— 

— 

- 

— 

— 

— 


- 

-- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

— 

- 

— 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

— 



- 

-- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 


— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

- 

- 

— 

- 

- 

— 

— 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 


~ 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

-- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

<0.30 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

— 

- 

- 

- 

<0.30 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

— 

- 

- 

- 

<0.30 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

- 

- 

- 

<0.30 

- 

- 

- 

~ 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

<0.30 

~ 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

<0.30 

<0.30 

<0.30 

<0.60 

<0.30 

<0.30 

<0.60 

<0.30 

— 

- 

_ 

- 

- 

_ 

- 

- 

_ 

- 

- 

— 

- 

- 

_ 


- 

- 

= 

- 

_ 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

-- 

- 

<0.30 

<0.30 

<0.30 

<0.30 

<0.30 

<0.30 

- 

- 

- 

- 

: 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 


- 

— 

- 

- 


- 

- 

- 

_ 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 


- 


- 

-- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

-- 

- 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

- 

-- 

- 

- 


— 

— 

— 


- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 


— 



“ 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

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— 

— 

— 

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- 

- 




_ 

_ 

_ 

— 

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__ 



: 

_ 


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— 

— 

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_ 

— 

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- 

- 

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- 

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— 

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- 

- 

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- 


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— 

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— 

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“ 



— 

— 



— 

— 


— 

— 


J:\170.000-179.999\171521\171521-00 DEL\2015 PM10 DenvationVSoil Data HighlighUSoil Data 


QA: CL Date: 4/15/15 













































































































Everett Staging Yard 
^Everett, Massachusetts 

mmr~ 

BOR 103 12' 

12 

Con-test 
06B01606 
1/13/2006 
TTR 


Sample Location 
Sample ID 
Sample Depth (ft bgs) 
Laboratory 
Laboratory ID 
Sample Date 
Consultant 


Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) 

Aroclor 1248 
Aroclor 1254 
Aroclor 1260 
Aroclor 1262 
Aroclor 1016 
Aroclor 1221 
Aroclor 1232 
Aroclor 1242 
Aroclor 1268 
Total PCBs 
Pesticides 

Total Pesticides 
Herbicides 

Total Herbicides 
Metals, Total 
Antimony 
Arsenic 
Barium 
Beryllium 
Cadmium 
Chromium 
Copper 
Iron 
Lead 

Manganese 
Mercury 
Nickel 
Selenium 
Silver 
Thallium 
Vanadium 
Zinc 
Other 

Cyanide, total 
Cyanide, reactive 
Analytes Reported with Multiple MethodsA 
Acenaphthene 
Acenaphthylene 
Anthracene 
Benzo(a)anthracene 
Benzo(a)pyrene 
Benzo(b)fluoranthene 
Benzo(e)pyrene 
Benzo(ghi)perylene 
Benzo(k)fluoranthene 
Chrysene 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 
Fluoranthene 
Fluorene 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene 
Methylnaphthalene, 1- 
Methylnaphthaiene, 2- 
Naphthalene 
Phenanthrene 
Pyrene 


Method 


8082 


8081 

8151 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

7471 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 


BOR-101 
BOR101 10’ 
10 

Con-test 

06B01607 

1/13/2006 

TTR 


^njt^ 

mg/kg 


mg/kg 

mg/kg 

mg/kg 


mg/kg 

mg/kg 

mg/kg 


51.9 


79.3 


CES-2-1 
CES-2-1(10-15) 
10-15 
Accutest 

3/15/2013 
GEI 


669 


SHORE-8 

SHORE-8(10-15) 
10-15 
Accutest 

3/14/2013 
GEI 


TP301 

TP301-C 

10-15 


4/19/2013 

GEI 


282 


124 


13.6 


TP302 

TP302-C 

10-15 


4/19/2013 

GEI 


1010 


1150 


MW301D 
MW301DS2 
11-13 
Accutest 
MC21667-3 
6/7/2013 
GEI 


800 


335 


178 


38.4 


15.7 

56.7 
202 
0.49 
0.14 
11.1 


598 

0.619 

13.4 

<8.89 

4.05 

<4.45 

19.2 

67.3 


<0.3 

<0.3 

<0.3 

<0.3 

<0.3 

<0.3 

<0.3 

<0.3 

<0.3 

<0.3 

<0.3 

<0.3 

<0.3 

<0.3 

<0.3 

<0.3 

<0.3 


MW302D 
MW302DS2 
11-13 
Accutest 
MC21667-16 
6/10/2013 
GEI 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 10 of 16 
4/15/2015 


CES-2-2 

CES-2-2(12-14) 
12-14 
Accutest 

3/15/2013 
GEI 


1250 


CES-2-3 

CES-2-3(12-14) 
12-14 
Accutest 

3/20/2013 
GEI 


9470 


SHORE-9 

MW301D 

SHORE-8 

MW302D 

MW301D 

CES-2-3 

SHORE-4 

MW301D 

MW302D 

SHORE-9(12.5-15) 

MW301DS3(0-5) 

SHORE-8(S3B) 

MW302DS3 

MW301 DS3(5-23) 

CES-2-3(14-15) 

SHORE-4(S3B) 

MW301DS4 

MW302DS4 

12.5-15 

13-13.5 

13-15 

13-15 

13.5-15 

14-15 

14-15 

15-17 

15-17 

Accutest 

Accutest 

Accutest 

Accutest 

Accutest 

Accutest 

Accutest 

Accutest 

Accutest 


MC21667-4 


MC21667-17 

MC21667-5 



MC21667-6 

MC21667-18 

3/14/2013 

6/7/2013 

3/14/2013 

6/10/2013 

6/7/2013 

3/20/2013 

3/14/2013 

6/7/2013 

6/10/2013 

GEI 

GEI 

GEI 

GEI 

GEI 

GEI 

GEI 

GEI 

GEI 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

_ 


- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

- 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

- 

-- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 


- 

- 

- 

— 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

- 

— 

~ 

— 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 


-- 

- 

- 

— 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 


— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 


- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 


- 

- 

- 

- 


- 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 


- 

- 

- 

— 

~ 

— 

— 

_ 

4.5 

312 

659 

33.6 

96.5 

726 

25.9 

74.6 

4.2 

— 

“ 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

“ 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

" 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

— 

204 

38 

39.2 

56.3 

- 

21.4 

3.6 

3.1 

- 

- 

- 

— j 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

— 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

_ 


— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 



- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 




- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

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— 

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- 

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— 


~ 

- 

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— 



- 

- 

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- 

— 

— 



— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 










— 

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— 

— 

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- 

— 

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" 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

— 



- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

_ 

— 



- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

_ 

— 

— 


- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

_ 

— 


“ 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

_ 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

_ 


— 


- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 


— 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

_ 

— 



- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

_ 


~ 

— 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

_ 

“ 


— 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

_ 




~ 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 


— 



- 

- 

- 

— 

__ 





- 

- 

- 

— 

— 



— 

— 

- 

- 

— 

— 

_ 

— 

— 



- 

- 

— 

— 

_ 



— 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

_ 


==========J 





- 

- 

- 


Notes: 

1. In general, analytes detected in at least one sample are reported here For the 2015 data, only selected VOCs and SVOCs are listed. Other not detected. For a complete list of analytes see the laboratory data sheets. 

2. "<" = The analyte was not detected at a concentration above the specified laboratory reporting limit. 

3. ND = The analyte was not detected above the laboratory reporting limit; 

4 = The sample was not tested for this analyte. 

5. ft bgs = feet below ground surface 

6. mg/kg = milligrams per kilogram 

7. Highlights indicate the proposed remediation areas from which the samples were collected. 

A-5 Area Proposed Remediation Area 

Low pH Area Proposed Remediation Area 
CES-2 Area Proposed Remediation Area 

A. The analyte was analyzed by multiple analytical methods. If the analyte was detected via at least one method, the maximum detected 
concentration is listed to represent the sample result. If the analyte was not detected via either method, the minimum RL is listed as the RL for the nondetected sample result. 


J:\170,000-179,999\171521\171521-00,DEL\2015 PM10 Denvation\Soil Data HighlighUSoil Data 


QA: CL Date: 4/15/15 





































































































File No. 171521.10 
Page 11 of 16 
4/15/2015 


TABLE 1-1 

SOIL ANALYTICAL RESULTS 
Everett Staging Yard 


Sample Location 

Sample ID 
Sample Depth (ft bgs) 
Laboratory 
Laboratory ID 
Sample Date 
Consultant 




Analyte 

Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) 

Acetone 

Benzene 

Butanone, 2- (MEK) 

Carbon disulfide 
Chloroform 
Ethylbenzene 
Isopropyltoluene, p- 
Methylene Chloride 
Naphthalene 
Styrene 
Toluene 

Trichloroethylene 
Trimethylbenzene, 1,2,4- 
Trimethylbenzene, 1,3,5- 
Xylene, Total 

Volatile Petroleum Hydrocarbons (VPH) 

Cs-C 8 Aliphatics 
C 9 -C 12 Aliphatics 
Cg-C -,0 Aromatics 


Method 


8260 


MAVPH 


Units 


mg/kg 


mg/kg 


Semi-Volatile Organic Compounds (SVOC 8270 
Acenaphthene 
Acenaphthylene 
Anthracene 
Benzo(a)anthracene 
Benzo(a)pyrene 
Benzo(b)fluoranthene 
Benzo(e)pyrene 
Benzo(ghi)perylene 
Benzo(k)fluoranthene 
Bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate 

I Chrysene 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

Dibenzofuran 

Fluoranthene 

Fluorene 

lndeno( 1,2,3-cd)pyrene 
Methylnaphthalene, 1- 
Methylnaphthalene, 2- 
Naphthalene 
Phenanthrene 
Pyrene 

Extractable Petroleum Hydrocarbons (EPI MAEPH 
Cg-Cis Aliphatics 
C ig -C 36 Aliphatics 


mg/kg 


mg/kg 


C-n-C 22 Aromatics 


Acenaphthene 

Acenaphthylene 

Anthracene 

Benzo(a)anthracene 

Benzo(a)pyrene 

Benzo(b)fluoranthene 

Benzo(e)pyrene 

Benzo(ghi)perylene 

Benzo(k)fluoranthene 

Chrysene 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

Fluoranthene 

Fluorene 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene 
Methylnaphthalene, 1- 
Methylnaphthalene, 2- 
Naphthalene 
Phenanthrene 
Pyrene 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) 

Fuels, diesel, no 2 
Fuel oil no 6 
Gasoline 

Kerosene/Jet Fuel 

Unknown Hydrocarbons 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 1 


mg/kg 




Everett, Massachusetts 



MW301D 

MW301DS5 

MW302D 

MW301D 

MW301D 

MW302D 

MW302D 

MW301D 

MW302D 

MW301D 

MW302D 

MW301D 

MW301D 








MW302DS5 

MW301DS6 

MW301DS7 

MW302DS7 

MW302DS8 

MW301DS9 

MW302DS9 

MW301DS10 

MW302DS10 

MW301DS11 

MW301DS12 

GZ101S01S02 

GZ101S03S04 

GZ101S05S06 

GZ101S07S08 

GZ101S09S10 

GZ101S11S12 

GZ102S01S02 

i /- iy 

17-19 

19-21 

21-23 

21-23 

23-25 

25-27 

25-27 

27-29 

27-29 

29-31 

31-33 

0-2 

2-4 

4-6 

6-8 

8-10 

10-12 

0-2 

Accutest 

Accutest 

Accutest 

Accutest 

Accutest 

Accutest 

Accutest 

Accutest 

Accutest 

Accutest 

Accutest 

Accutest 








MC21667-7 

MC21667-19 

MC21667-8 

MC21667-9 

MC21667-20 

MC21667-21 

MC21667-10 

MC21667-22 

MC21667-11 

MC21667-23 

MC21667-12 

MC21667-13 








6/7/2013 

6/10/2013 

6/7/2013 

6/7/2013 

6/10/2013 

6/10/2013 

6/7/2013 

6/10/2013 

6/7/2013 

6/10/2013 

6/7/2013 

6/7/2013 








GEI 

GEI 

GEI 

GEI 

GEI 

GEI 

GEI 

GEI 

GEI 

GEI 

GEI 

GEI 








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J:\170.000-179.999\171521\171521-00.DEL\2015 PM10 Denvation\Soil Data Highlight\Soil Data 


QA: CL Date: 4/15/15 






























































































































table 1-1 

SOIL ANALYTICAL RESULTS 
Everett Staging Yard 


Sample Location 

Sample ID 
Sample Depth (ft bgs) 
Laboratory 
Laboratory ID 
Sample Date 
Consultant 


Analyte 


Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) 

Arocior 1248 
Aroclor 1254 
Arocior 1260 
Aroclor 1262 
Arocior 1016 
Aroclor 1221 
Aroclor 1232 
Aroclor 1242 
Aroclor 1268 
Total PCBs 
Pesticides 

Total Pesticides 
Herbicides 

Total Herbicides 
Metals, Total 
Antimony 
Arsenic 
Barium 
Beryllium 
Cadmium 
Chromium 
Copper 
Iron 
Lead 

Manganese 
Mercury 
Nickel 
Selenium 
Silver 
Thallium 
Vanadium 
Zinc 
Other 

Cyanide, total 
Cyanide, reactive 
Analytes Reported with Multiple MethodsA 
Acenaphthene 
Acenaphthylene 
Anthracene 
Benzo(a)anthracene 
Benzo(a)pyrene 
Benzo(b)fluoranthene 
Benzo(e)pyrene 
Benzo(ghi)perylene 
Benzo(k)fluoranthene 
Chrysene 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 
Fluoranthene 
Fluorene 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene 
Methylnaphthalene, 1- 
Methylnaphthalene, 2- 
Naphthalene 
Phenanthrene 
Pyrene 


Method 


8082 


8081 

8151 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

7471 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 


Units 


mg/kg 


mg/kg 

mg/kg 

mg/kg 


mg/kg 

mg/kg 

mgykg 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 12 of 16 
4/15/2015 


MW301D 

MW301DS5 
17-19 
Accutest 
MC21667-7 
6/7/2013 

GEI 

MW302D 

MW302DS5 

17-19 

Accutest 

MC21667-19 

6/10/2013 

GEI 

MW301D 

MW301DS6 

19-21 

Accutest 

MC21667-8 

6/7/2013 

GEI 

MW301D 

MW301DS7 

21-23 

Accutest 

MC21667-9 
6/7/2013 

GEI 

MW302D 

MW302DS7 
21-23 
Accutest 
MC21667-20 
6/10/2013 

GEI 

MW302D 
MW302DS8 
23-25 
Accutest 
MC21667-21 
6/10/2013 

GEI 

MW301D 

MW301DS9 

25-27 

Accutest 

MC21667-10 

6/7/2013 

GEI 

MW302D 
MW302DS9 
25-27 
Accutest 
MC21667-22 
6/10/2013 

GEI 

MW301D 

MW301DS10 
27-29 
Accutest 
MC21667-11 
6/7/2013 

GEI 

MW302D 

MW302DS10 
27-29 
Accutest 
MC21667-23 
6/10/2013 

GEI 

MW301D 

MW301DS11 

29-31 

Accutest 

MC21667-12 

6/7/2013 

GEI 

MW301D 
MW301DS12 
31-33 
Accutest 
MC21667-13 
6/7/2013 

GEI 

GZ101S01S02 

0-2 

GZ101S03S04 

2-4 

GZ101S05S06 

4-6 

GZ101S07S08 

6-8 

GZ101S09S10 

8-10 

GZ101S11S12 
10-12 

GZ102S01S02 

0-2 

- 

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3.7 

8.3 

4.4 

4.7 

7.1 

3.4 

6.8 

6.5 

6.0 

4.2 

3.5 

151 

10.8 

4750 

133 

6.08 

9.12 

697 


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10.9 

2.6 

4.6 

2.8 

6.2 

8.9 

3.1 

7.3 

4.9 

6.0 

3.4 

2.8 

1170 

153 

4640 

112 

7.74 

13.7 

631 

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1 in general, analytes detected in at least one sample are reported here. For the 2015 data, only selected VOCs and SVOCs are listed. Other not detected. For a complete list of analytes see the laboratory data sheets. 

2 . "<" = The analyte was not detected at a concentration above the specified laboratory reporting limit. 

3. ND = The analyte was not detected above the laboratory reporting limit; 

4 . «_• = The sample was not tested for this analyte. 

5. ft bgs = feet below ground surface 

6. mg/kg = milligrams per kilogram 

7. Highlights indicate the proposed remediation areas from which the samples were collected. 

A-5 Area Proposed Remediation Area 

Low pH Area Proposed Remediation Area 

CES-2 Area Proposed Remediation Area _ . 

A. The analyte was analyzed by multiple analytical methods. If the analyte was detected via at least one method, the maximum detected 

concentration is listed to represent the sample result. If the analyte was not detected via either method, the minimum RL is listed as the RL for the nondetected sample result. 


J:\170,000-179,999\171521\171521-00.DEL\2015 PM10 DenvationlSoil Data Highlight\Soil Data 


QA: CL Date: 4/15/15 




































































































TABLE 1-1 

SOIL ANALYTICAL RESULTS 
Everett Staging Yard 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 13 of 16 
4/15/2015 


Sample Location 

Sample ID 
Sample Depth (ft bgs) 
Laboratory 
Laboratory ID 
Sample Date 
Consultant 


Anjyyte 


MAVPH 


8270 


Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) 

Acetone 
Benzene 

Butanone, 2- (MEK) 

Carbon disulfide 
Chloroform 
Ethylbenzene 
Isopropyttoluene, p- 
Methylene Chloride 
Naphthalene 
Styrene 
Toluene 

T richloroethylene 
Trimethylbenzene, 1,2,4- 
Trimethylbenzene, 1,3,5- 
Xylene, Total 

Volatile Petroleum Hydrocarbons (VPH) 

Cs-Cs Aliphatics 
C 9 -C 12 Aliphatics 
Cg-C -,0 Aromatics 

Semi-Volatile Organic Compounds (SVOC 
Acenaphthene 
Acenaphthylene 
Anthracene 
Benzo(a)anthracene 
Benzo(a)pyrene 
Benzo(b)fluoranthene 
Benzo(e)pyrene 
Benzo(ghi)perylene 
Benzo(k)fluoranthene 
Bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate 
Chrysene 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 
Dibenzofuran 
Fluoranthene 
Fluorene 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene 
Methylnaphthalene, 1- 
Methylnaphthalene, 2- 
Naphthalene 
Phenanthrene 
Pyrene 

Extractable Petroleum Hydrocarbons (EPK| MAEPH 
Cg-C 18 Aliphatics 
Cig-Cgg Aliphatics 
CH-C 22 Aromatics 
Acenaphthene 
Acenaphthylene 
Anthracene 
Benzo(a)anthracene 
Benzo(a)pyrene 
Benzo(b)fluoranthene 
Benzo(e)pyrene 
Benzo(ghi)perylene 
Benzo(k)fluoranthene 
Chrysene 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 
Fluoranthene 
Fluorene 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene 
Methylnaphthalene, 1- 
Methylnaphthalene, 2- 
Naphthalene 
Phenanthrene 
Pyrene 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) 

Fuels, diesel, no 2 
Fuel oil no 6 
Gasoline 

Kerosene/Jet Fuel 
Unknown Hydrocarbons 
Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons_ 


Method 

8260 


_Units_ 

mg/kg 


mg/kg 


mg/kg 


mg/kg 


mg/kg 



Everett, Massachusetts 

GZ102S03S04 










GZ-307 6ft-10ft 

GZ-307 10ft-15ft 

GZ-308 6ft-10ft 

GZ-308 10ft-15ft 

GZ-309 6ft-1 Oft 

GZ-309 10ft-15ft 

GZ-310 6ft-10ft 

GZ-310 10ft-15ft 

GZ-301 6ft-10ft 

GZ102S05S06 

GZ102S07S08 

GZ102S09S10 

GZ103S01S02 

GZ103S03S04 

GZ103S05S06 

GZ103S06S07 

GZ103S08S09 

GZ103S10S11 

GZ-307 6ft-10ft 

GZ-307 10ft-15ft 

GZ-308 6ft-10ft 

GZ-308 10ft-15ft 

GZ-309 6ft-1 Oft 

GZ-309 10ft-15ft 

GZ-310 6ft-10ft 

GZ-310 10ft-15ft 

GZ-301 6ft-10ft 

2-4 

4-6 

6-8 

8-10 

0-2 

2-4 

4-6 

6-8 

8-10 

10-11 

6-10 

10-15 

6-10 

10-15 

6-10 

10-15 

6-10 

10-15 

6-10 











1502404-01 

1502404-02 

1502404-03 

1502404-04 

1502404-05 

1502404-06 

1502404-07 

1502404-08 

1502331-01 











02/27/2015 

02/27/2015 

02/27/2015 

02/27/2015 

02/27/2015 

02/27/2015 

02/27/2015 

02/27/2015 

02/23/2015 

— 

_ 


_ 







<0.0034 

0.0305 

0.0045 

0.0287 

0.0201 

0.101 

0.0044 

0.143 

<0.0029 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

<0.0017 

<0.0022 

<0.0014 

<0.0021 

<0.0016 

<0.0040 

<0.0021 

<0.0047 

<0.0015 

— 

— 

-- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

<0.0034 

<0.0045 

<0.0029 

<0.0041 

<0.0032 

0.0126 

<0.0043 

0.0223 

<0.0029 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

<0.0017 

<0.0022 

<0.0014 

0.0025 

<0.0016 

0.0103 

<0.0021 

0.0114 

<0.0015 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

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— 

— 

— 

<0.0017 

<0.0022 

<0.0014 

<0.0021 

<0.0016 

<0.0040 

<0.0021 

<0.0047 

<0.0015 

— 

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<0.0017 

<0.0022 

<0.0014 

<0.0021 

<0.0016 

<0.0040 

<0.0021 

<0.0047 

<0.0015 


- 

- 

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— 

— 

— 

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<0.0017 

<0.0022 

<0.0014 

<0.0021 

<0.0016 

<0.0040 

<0.0021 

<0.0047 

<0.0015 

~ 

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<0.0034 

<0.0045 

<0.0029 

<0.0041 

<0.0032 

<0.0080 

<0.0043 

<0.0094 

<0.0029 


- 

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— 

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— 

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<0.0017 

<0.0022 

0.0358 

<0.0021 

0.006 

0.0163 

0.0023 

0.0048 

<0.0015 

— 

- 

- 

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— 

— 

— 

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— 

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<0.0017 

<0.0022 

<0.0014 

<0.0021 

<0.0016 

<0.0040 

<0.0021 

<0.0047 

<0.0015 

— 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

<0.0017 

<0.0022 

<0.0014 

<0.0021 

<0.0016 

<0.0040 

<0.0021 

<0.0047 

<0.0015 

- 

- 

- 

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— 

— 

— 

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— 

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<0.0017 

<0.0022 

<0.0014 

<0.0021 

<0.0016 

<0.0040 

<0.0021 

<0.0047 

<0.0015 

- 

- 

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— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

<0.0017 

<0.0022 

<0.0014 

<0.0021 

<0.0016 

<0.0040 

<0.0021 

<0.0047 

<0.0015 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

<0.0017 

<0.0022 

<0.0014 

<0.0021 

<0.0016 

<0.0040 

<0.0021 

<0.0047 

<0.0015 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

~~ 

- 

= 

<0.0034 

<0.0045 

<0.0029 

<0.0041 

<0.0032 

<0.0080 

<0.0043 

<0.0094 

<0.0029 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1 1 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

_ 

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I 

_ 

<1.04 

<1.10 

<0.958 

<1.12 

4.38 

<1.18 

<1.01 

<1.29 

<0.944 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

<1.04 

<1.10 

<0.958 

<1.12 

10.7 

<1.18 

<1.01 

<1.29 

<0.944 

— 

— 

_ 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

— 

<1.04 

<1.10 

<0.958 

1.57 

23.2 

<1.18 

<1.01 

<1.29 

<0.944 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 


_ 

— 

— 

— 

<1.04 

<1.10 

<0.958 

12.4 

41.8 

1.35 

<1.01 

<1.29 

<0.944 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

— 

— 

— 

<0.522 

<0.550 

<0.481 

7.76 

21.9 

1.03 

<0.508 

0.712 

<0.473 











<1.04 

<1.10 

<0.958 

6.06 

19.7 

1.22 

<1.01 

<1.29 

<0.944 




















— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 


— 






_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

__ 

_ 

_ 

<1.04 

<1.10 

<0.958 

2.6 

3.28 

<1.18 

<1.01 

<1.29 

<0.944 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

— 

<1.04 

<1.10 

<0.958 

7.93 

27 

<1.18 

<1.01 

<1.29 

<0.944 

_ 

_ 

__ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

__ 

— 

_ 

— 

<1.04 

<1.10 

<0.958 

<1.12 

<1.03 

<1.18 

<1.01 

<1.29 

<0.944 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

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__ 

_ 

_ 

<0.522 

<0.550 

<0.481 

9.97 

32.4 

1.4 

<0.508 

0.798 

<0.473 


_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

<0.522 

<0.550 

<0.481 

1.84 

3.03 

<0.591 

<0.508 

<0.647 

<0.473 


_ 

_ 

_ 

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<1.04 

<1.10 

<0.958 

<1.12 

8.89 

<1.18 

<1.01 

<1.29 

<0.944 




_ 

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_ 

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<1.04 

<1.10 

1.09 

14 

91.3 

3.24 

<1.01 

1.58 

<0.944 




_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

__ 

_ 

— 

<1.04 

<1.10 

<0.958 

<1.12 

13.7 

<1.18 

<1.01 

<1.29 

<0.944 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<1.04 

<1.10 

<0.958 

3.28 

4.42 

<1.18 

<1.01 

<1.29 

<0.944 

— 

— 









<1.04 

<1.10 

<0.958 

<1.12 

7.49 

<1.18 

<1.01 

<1.29 

<0.944 





_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

__ 

— 

<1.04 

<1.10 

<0.958 

1.8 

7.72 

<1.18 

2.65 

<1.29 

<0.944 






_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

— 

<1.04 

<1.10 

<0.958 

1.69 

107 

3.35 

<1.01 

<1.29 

<0.944 




_ 

_ 

_ 

— 

— 

— 

- 

<1.04 

<1.10 

<0.958 

11.3 

61.4 

2.19 

<1.01 

<1.29 

<0.944 

— 

— 

- 

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71.1 

164 

464 

1410 

407 

94.3 

164 

<43.7 


J. \ 170 , 000 - 179 ,999\171521\171521-00 DEL\2015 PM10 DerivationVSoil Data Highlight\Soil Data 


QA: CL Date: 4/15/15 














































































































TABLE 1-1 

SOIL ANALYTICAL RESULTS 
Everett Staging Yard 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 14 of 16 
4/15/2015 


Sample Location 

Sample ID 
Sample Depth (ft bgs) 
Laboratory 
Laboratory ID 
Sample Date 
Consultant 


Analyte 


Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) 

Aroclor 1248 
Aroclor 1254 
Aroclor 1260 
Aroclor 1262 
Aroclor 1016 
Aroclor 1221 
Aroclor 1232 
Aroclor 1242 
Aroclor 1268 
Total PCBs 
Pesticides 

Total Pesticides 
Herbicides 

Total Herbicides 
Metals, Total 
Antimony 
Arsenic 
Barium 
Beryllium 
Cadmium 
Chromium 
Copper 
Iron 
Lead 

Manganese 
Mercury 
Nickel 
Selenium 
Silver 
Thallium 
Vanadium 
Zinc 
Other 

Cyanide, total 
Cyanide, reactive 
Analytes Reported with Multiple MethodsA 
Acenaphthene 
Acenaphthylene 
Anthracene 
Benzo(a)anthracene 

I Benzo(a)pyrene 

Benzo(b)fluoranthene 
Benzo(e)pyrene 
Benzo(ghi)perylene 
Benzo(k)fluoranthene 
Chrysene 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 
Fluoranthene 
Fluorene 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene 
Methylnaphthalene, 1- 
Methylnaphthalene, 2- 
Naphthalene 
Phenanthrene 
Pyrene 


Method 


8082 


8081 

8151 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

7471 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 


Units 


mg/kg 


mg/kg 

mg/kg 

mg/kg 


mg/kg 

mg/kg 

mg/kg 


"^general. analytes detected in at least one sample are reported here. For the 2015 data, only selected VOCs and SVOCs are listed. Other not detected. For a complete list of analytes see the laboratory data sheets. 
2 "<" = The analyte was not detected at a concentration above the specified laboratory reporting limit. 

3. ND = The analyte was not detected above the laboratory reporting limit; 

4 = The sample was not tested for this analyte. 

5 . ft bgs = feet below ground surface 

6 . mg/kg = milligrams per kilogram 

7. Highlights indicate the proposed remediation areas from which the samples were collected. 

A-5 Area Proposed Remediation Area 

Low pH Area Proposed Remediation Area 



Everett, Massachusetts 

GZ102S03S04 










GZ-307 6ft-10ft 

GZ-307 10ft-15ft 

GZ-308 6ft-10ft 

GZ-308 10ft-15ft 

GZ-309 6ft-10ft 

GZ-309 10ft-15ft 

GZ-310 6ft-10ft 

GZ-310 10ft-15ft 

GZ-301 6ft-10ft 

GZ102S05S06 

GZ102S07S08 

GZ102S09S10 

GZ103S01S02 

GZ103S03S04 

GZ103S05S06 

GZ103S06S07 

GZ103S08S09 

GZ103S10S11 

GZ-307 6ft-10ft 

GZ-307 10ft-15ft 

GZ-308 6ft-10ft 

GZ-308 10ft-15ft 

GZ-309 6ft-10ft 

GZ-309 10ft-15ft 

GZ-310 6ft-10ft 

GZ-310 10ft-15ft 

GZ-301 6ft-10ft 

2-4 

4-6 

6-8 

8-10 

0-2 

2-4 

4-6 

6-8 

8-10 

10-11 

6-10 

10-15 

6-10 

10-15 

6-10 

10-15 

6-10 

10-15 

6-10 











1502404-01 

1502404-02 

1502404-03 

1502404-04 

1502404-05 

1502404-06 

1502404-07 

1502404-08 

1502331-01 











02/27/2015 

02/27/2015 

02/27/2015 

02/27/2015 

02/27/2015 

02/27/2015 

02/27/2015 

02/27/2015 

02/23/2015 

— 

— 


— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<0.153 

<0.168 

<0.141 

<0.176 

<0.158 

<0.179 

<0.155 

<0.205 

<0.132 

— 

- 

— 

— 

_ 

— 

— 

_ 

__ 

_ 

<0.153 

<0.168 

<0.141 

<0.176 

<0.158 

<0.179 

<0.155 

<0.205 

<0.132 


- 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

<0.153 

<0.168 

<0.141 

<0.176 

<0.158 

<0.179 

<0.155 

<0.205 

<0.132 


- 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

<0.153 

<0.168 

<0.141 

<0.176 

<0.158 

<0.179 

<0.155 

<0.205 

<0.132 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

<0.153 

<0.168 

<0.141 

<0.176 

<0.158 

<0.179 

<0.155 

<0.205 

<0.132 

- 

- 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

<0.153 

0.354 

<0.141 

0.347 

<0.158 

<0.179 

<0.155 

<0.205 

<0.132 

- 

- 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

<0.153 

<0.168 

<0.141 

<0.176 

<0.158 

<0.179 

<0.155 

<0.205 

<0.132 

- 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

<0.153 

<0.168 

<0.141 

. <0.176 

<0.158 

<0.179 

<0.155 

<0.205 

<0.132 

- 

- 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

<0.153 

<0.168 

<0.141 

<0.176 

<0.158 

<0.179 

<0.155 

<0.205 

<0.132 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<0.153 

1.026 

<0.141 

1.051 

<0.158 

<0.179 

<0.155 

<0.205 

<0.132 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

13500 

10400 

6470 

39.5 

17.5 

280 

74.1 

317 

2420 

11.4 

65.9 

72.1 

138 

326 

2720 

4910 

14800 

408 

19.6 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

-- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

41.3 

71.8 

220 

505 

195 

194 

165 

50.9 

46.4 











<1.53 

28.6 

<3.90 

9.7 

<36.2 

<47.6 

<415 

<15.6 

<1.93 

— 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

__ 

— 

_ 

— 

— 

11.8 

29.4 

11 

12.6 

10.9 

35.5 

13.5 

37.1 

9.2 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 


_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

— 

_ 

_ 

_ 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

21900 

14900 

5110 

62.1 

197 

2590 

620 

777 

70.4 

13.8 

347 

6270 

158 

1020 

2980 

11200 

13300 

445 

35 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

0.695 

0.327 

1.68 

1.67 

11.1 

166 

205 

8.24 

0.23 











<7.65 

<7.33 

<7.80 

9.71 

13 

279 

166 

<10.4 

<9.63 


- 


- 

- 

: 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<1.53 

10.4 

<1.56 

21.4 

7.32 

8.55 

12.3 

<2.09 

<1.93 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<2.0 

<2.0 

<2.0 

<2.0 

<2.0 

<2.0 

<2.0 

<2.0 

<2.0 











<1.04 

<1.1 

<0.958 

<1.12 

4.38 

<1.18 

<1.01 

<1.29 

<0.944 








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<1.04 

<1.1 

<0.958 

<1.12 

10.7 

<1.18 

<1.01 

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_ 

_ 

<1.04 

<1.1 

<0.958 

1.57 

23.2 

<1.18 

<1.01 

<1.29 

<0.944 








_ 

_ 

_ 

<1.04 

<1.1 

<0.958 

12.4 

41.8 

1.35 

<1.01 

<1.29 

<0.944 








_ 

_ 

_ 

<0.522 

<0.55 

<0.481 

7.76 

21.9 

1.03 

<0.508 

0.712 

<0.473 

_ 

— 

— 

— 

- 

-- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<1.04 

<1.1 

<0.958 

6.06 

19.7 

1.22 

<1.01 

<1.29 

<0.944 

- 

- 



— 

— 





<1.04 

<1.1 

<0.958 

2.6 

3.28 

<1.18 

<1.01 

<1.29 

<0.944 








_ 

_ 

_ 

<1.04 

<1.1 

<0.958 

7.93 

27 

<1.18 

<1.01 

<1.29 

<0.944 








_ 

__ 

_ 

<0.522 

<0.55 

<0.481 

9.97 

32.4 

1.4 

<0.508 

0.798 

<0.473 








_ 

_ 

_ 

<0.522 

<0.55 

<0.481 

1.84 

3.03 

<0.591 

<0.508 

<0.647 

<0.473 








_ 

_ 

_ 

<1.04 

<1.1 

1.09 

14 

91.3 

3.24 

<1.01 

1.58 

<0.944 








_ 

_ 

_ 

<1.04 

<1.1 

<0.958 

<1.12 

13.7 

<1.18 

<1.01 

<1.29 

<0.944 



... 

_ 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<1.04 

<1.1 

<0.958 

3.28 

4.42 

<1.18 

<1.01 

<1.29 

<0.944 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 




<1.04 

<1.1 

<0.958 

<1.12 

7.49 

<1.18 

<1.01 

<1.29 

<0.944 

— 

— 






_ 

_ 

_ 

<0.0017 

<0.0022 

0.0358 

1.8 

7.72 

0.0163 

2.65 

0.0048 

<0.0015 

— 

— 

- 







_ 

<1.04 

<1.1 

<0.958 

1.69 

107 

3.35 

<1.01 

<1.29 

<0.944 

- ~ 



_ 

_ 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

<1.04 

<1.1 

<0.958 

11.3 

61.4 

2.19 

<1.01 

<1.29 

<0.944 


J:\170.000-179.999\171521\171521-00 DEL\2015 PM10 DenvationVSoil Data HighlighUSoil Data 


QA: CL Date: 4/15/15 













































































































Sample Location 

GZ-301 10ft-15ft 

GZ-302 6ft- 10ft 


Sample ID 

GZ-301 10ft-15ft 

GZ-302 6ft-10ft 

Sample Depth (ft bgs) 

10-15 

6-10 


Laboratory 



Laboratory ID 

1502331-02 

1502331-03 


Sample Date 

02/23/2015 

02/23/2015 


Consultant 


Analyte 

Method 

Units 



Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) 

Acetone 

8260 

mg/kg 

0.0168 

0 476 

Benzene 



<0.0018 

<0 0018 

Butanone, 2- (MEK) 



<0.0036 

<0 0036 

Carbon disulfide 



<0.0018 

<0 0018 

Chloroform 



<0.0018 

<0 0018 

Ethylbenzene 



<0.0018 

<0 0018 

Isopropyltoluene, p- 



<0.0018 

<0 0018 

Methylene Chloride 



<0.0036 

<0.0036 

Naphthalene 



<0.0018 

<0.0018 

Styrene 



<0.0018 

<0.0018 

Toluene 



<0.0018 

<0.0018 

Trichloroethylene 



<0.0018 

<0.0018 

Trimethylbenzene, 1,2,4- 



<0.0018 

<0.0018 

Trimethylbenzene, 1,3,5- 



<0.0018 

<0.0018 

Xylene, Total 



<0.0036 

<0.0036 

Volatile Petroleum Hydrocarbons (VPH) 

MAVPH 

mg/kg 



C 5 -C 8 Aliphatics 


_ 


Cg-C 12 Aliphatics 





CgrC-jo Aromatics 

Semi-Volatile Organic Compounds (SVOC 

8270 

mg/kg 

- 

- 

Acenaphthene 


<4.21 

<1.05 

Acenaphthylene 



<4.21 

<1.05 

Anthracene 



<4.21 

<1.05 

Benzo(a)anthracene 



<4.21 

<1.05 

Benzo(a)pyrene 



<2.11 

<0.526 

Benzo(b)fluoranthene 



<4.21 

<1.05 

Benzo(e)pyrene 



— 

— 

Benzo(ghi)perylene 



<4.21 

<1.05 

Benzo(k)fiuoranthene 



<421 

<1.05 

Bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate 



<4.21 

<1.05 

Chrysene 



<2.11 

<0.526 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 



<2.11 

<0.526 

Dibenzofuran 



<4.21 

<1.05 

Fluoranthene 



<4.21 

<1.05 

Fluorene 



<4.21 

<1.05 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene 



<4.21 

<1.05 

Methylnaphthalene, 1- 



- 

- 

Methylnaphthalene, 2- 



<4.21 

<1.05 

Naphthalene 



<4.21 

<1.05 

Phenanthrene 



<4.21 

<1.05 

Pyrene 

Extractable Petroleum Hydrocarbons (EPI 

MAEPH 

mg/kg 

<4.21 

<1.05 

Cg-Ci e Aliphatics 



- 

- 

C 19 -C 36 Aliphatics 



- 

- 

C 11 -C 2 2 Aromatics 



- 

- 

Acenaphthene 



- 

- 

Acenaphthylene 



— 

— 

Anthracene 



- 

- 

Benzo(a)anthracene 



- 

- 

Benzo(a)pyrene 



— 

— 

Benzo(b)fiuoranthene 





Benzo(e)pyrene 




— 

Benzo(ghi)perylene 





Benzo(k)fluoranthene 





Chrysene 





Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 



— 

— 

Fluoranthene 



— 


Fluorene 



- 

“ 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene 



— 


Methylnaphthalene, 1- 




— 

Methylnaphthalene, 2- 




— 

Naphthalene 



— 

— 

Phenanthrene 



— 

— 

Pyrene 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) 


mg/kg 



Fuels, diesel, no 2 



— 

— 

Fuel oil no 6 




— 

Gasoline 




— 

Kerosene/Jet Fuel 



— 


Unknown Hydrocarbons 



— 

— 

Totai Petroleum Hydrocarbons 



<50.7 

<44.3 


table 1-1 

SOIL ANALYTICAL RESULTS 
Everett Staging Yard 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 15 of 16 
4/15/2015 


GZ-302 10ft-15ft 
GZ-302 10ft-15ft 
10-15 

1502331-04 

02/23/2015 


0.023 

< 0.0020 

<0.0041 

< 0.0020 

< 0.0020 

< 0.0020 

< 0.0020 

<0.0041 

< 0.0020 

< 0.0020 

< 0.0020 

< 0.0020 

< 0.0020 

< 0.0020 

<0.0041 


<1.05 

<1.05 

<1.05 

<1.05 

<0.526 

<1.05 

<1.05 

<1.05 

<1.05 

<0.526 

<0.526 

<1.05 

<1.05 

<1.05 

<1.05 

<1.05 

<1.05 

<1.05 

<1.05 


<49.3 


GZ-303 6ft-10ft 
GZ-303 6ft-10ft 
6-10 

1502331-05 

02/23/2015 


0.0403 

<0.0025 

<0.0050 

<0.0025 

<0.0025 

<0.0025 

<0.0025 

<0.0050 

<0.0025 

<0.0025 

<0.0025 

<0.0025 

<0.0025 

<0.0025 

<0.0050 


<0.978 

<0.978 

<0.978 

<0.978 

<0.491 

<0.978 

<0.978 

<0.978 

<0.978 

<0.491 

<0.491 

<0.978 

<0.978 

<0.978 

<0.978 

<0.978 

<0.978 

<0.978 

<0.978 


GZ-303 10ft- 15ft 
10-15 

1502331-06 

02/23/2015 


0.0894 

<0.0059 

0.0126 

<0.0059 

<0.0059 

<0.0059 

<0.0059 

<0.0117 

<0.0059 

<0.0059 

<0.0059 

<0.0059 

<0.0059 

<0.0059 

<0.0117 


<1.25 

<1.25 

<1.25 

<1.25 

<0.626 

<1.25 

<1.25 

<1.25 

<1.25 

<0.626 

<0.626 

<1.25 

<1.25 

<1.25 

<1.25 

<1.25 

<1.25 

<1.25 

<1.25 


181 


133 


GZ-304 6ft- 10ft 
6-10 

1502331-07 

02/23/2015 


0.0866 

<0.0053 

0.0108 

<0.0053 

<0.0053 

<0.0053 

<0.0053 

<0.0106 

<0.0053 

<0.0053 

<0.0053 

<0.0053 

<0.0053 

<0.0053 

<0.0106 


<0.957 

<0.957 

<0.957 

<0.957 

<0.480 

<0.957 

<0.957 

<0.957 

<0.957 

<0.480 

<0.480 

<0.957 

<0.957 

<0.957 

<0.957 

<0.957 

<0.957 

<0.957 

<0.957 


2410 


GZ-304 10ft- 15ft 

GZ-304 10ft-15ft 
10-15 

1502331-08 

02/23/2015 

GZ-305 6ft-10ft 

GZ-305 6ft-10ft 
6-10 

1502331-09 

02/23/2015 

GZ-305 10ft-15ft 

GZ-305 10ft-15ft 
10-15 

1502331-10 

02/23/2015 

GZ-306 6ft-10ft 

GZ-306 6ft-10ft 
6-10 

1502331-11 

02/23/2015 

GZ-306 10ft-15ft 
GZ-306 10ft-15ft 
10-15 

1502331-12 

02/23/2015 

D02S01S02A 

0.0-3.3 

D02S02BS04A 

3.3-66 

D02S04BS05 

6.6-10.0 

D03S01S02A 

0.0-3.3 

D03S02BS03 

3.3-6.0 

D03S05 

8.0-10.0 

E02S01S02A 

0.0-3.3 

E02S02BS03 

3.3-6.0 

0.139 

0.0701 

0.0725 

0.114 

0.035 

0.0358 

<0.0126 

0.0382 

<0.0092 

<0.0080 

<0.0076 

0.0271 

0.0415 

<0.0050 

<0.0062 

<0.0042 

<0.0039 

<0.0046 

<0.0052 

<0.0063 

<0.0044 

<0.0046 

<0.0040 

<0.0038 

<0.0057 

<0.0043 

0.0147 

<0.0124 

0.01 

0.0104 

<0.0092 

<0.0104 

<0.0126 

<0.0088 

<0.0092 

<0.0080 

<0.0076 

<0.0114 

<0.0085 

<0.0050 

<0.0062 

<0.0042 

<0.0039 

<0.0046 

<0.0052 

<0.0063 

<0.0044 

<0.0046 

<0.0040 

<0.0038 

<0.0057 

<0.0043 

<0.0050 

<0.0062 

<0.0042 

<0.0039 

<0.0046 

<0.0052 

<0.0063 

<0.0044 

<0.0046 

<0.0040 

<0.0038 

<0.0057 

<0.0043 

<0.0050 

<0.0062 

<0.0042 

<0.0039 

<0.0046 

<0.0052 

<0.0063 

<0.0044 

<0.0046 

<0.0040 

<0.0038 

<0.0057 

<0.0043 

<0.0050 

<0.0062 

<0.0042 

<0.0039 

<0.0046 

<0.0052 

<0.0063 

<0.0044 

<0.0046 

<0.0040 

<0.0038 

<0.0057 

<0.0043 

<0.0101 

<0.0124 

<0.0085 

<0.0079 

<0.0092 

<0.0104 

<0.0126 

<0.0088 

<0.0092 

<0.0080 

<0.0076 

<0.0114 

<0.0085 

<0.0050 

<0.0062 

<0.0042 

<0.0039 

0.0261 

0.0235 

0.0065 

<0.0044 

<0.0046 

0.0089 

<0.0038 

<0.0057 

<0.0043 

<0.0050 

<0.0062 

<0.0042 

<0.0039 

<0.0046 

<0.0052 

<0.0063 

<0.0044 

<0.0046 

<0.0040 

<0.0038 

<0.0057 

<0.0043 

<0.0050 

<0.0062 

<0.0042 

<0.0039 

<0.0046 

<0.0052 

<0.0063 

<0.0044 

<0.0046 

<0.0040 

<0.0038 

<0.0057 

<0.0043 

<0.0050 

<0.0062 

<0.0042 

<0.0039 

<0.0046 

<0.0052 

<0.0063 

0.0053 

<0.0046 

<0.0040 

<0.0038 

<0.0057 

<0.0043 

<0.0050 

<0.0062 

<0.0042 

<0.0039 

<0.0046 

<0.0052 

<0.0063 

<0.0044 

<0.0046 

<0.0040 

<0.0038 

<0.0057 

<0.0043 

<0.0050 

<0.0062 

<0.0042 

<0.0039 

<0.0046 

<0.0052 

<0.0063 

<0.0044 

<0.0046 

<0.0040 

<0.0038 

<0.0057 

<0.0043 

<0.0101 

<0.0124 

<0.0085 

<0.0079 

<0.0092 

<0.0104 

<0.0126 

<0.0088 

<0.0092 

<0.0080 

<0.0076 

<0.0114 

<0.0085 

<1.35 

<1.01 

<1.33 

<0.997 

<1.16 

1.02 

<0.991 

<1.01 

<0.906 

3.02 

<0.975 

<3.63 

<3.62 

<1.35 

<1.01 

<1.33 

<0.997 

<1.16 

1.34 

<0.991 

<1.01 

<0.906 

<0.870 

<0.975 

<3.63 

<3.62 

<1.35 

<1.01 

<1.33 

<0.997 

<1.16 

4.19 

1.78 

<1.01 

1.69 

6.44 

<0.975 

<3.63 

6.09 

<1.35 

<1.01 

<1.33 

<0.997 

<1.16 

18.9 

4.93 

<1.01 

3.85 

13.2 

<0.975 

<3.63 

13.5 

<0.675 

<0.506 

<0.668 

<0.500 

<0.580 

15.3 

5.16 

<0.505 

3.15 

10.1 

<0.489 

2.65 

11.7 

<1.35 

<1.01 

<1.33 

<0.997 

<1.16 

21.6 

7 

<1.01 

3.04 

11.6 

<0.975 

<3.63 

15 

<1.35 

<1.01 

<1.33 

<0.997 

<1.16 

2.3 

1.42 

<1.01 

0.933 

4.33 

<0.975 

<3.63 

<3.62 

<1.35 

<1.01 

<1.33 

<0.997 

<1.16 

7.61 

2 

<1.01 

3.28 

4.8 

<0.975 

<3.63 

8.05 

<1.35 

<1.01 

<1.33 

<0.997 

<1.16 

<0.910 

<0.991 

<1.01 

<0.906 

1.8 

<0.975 

<3.63 

<3.62 

<0.675 

<0.506 

<0.668 

<0.500 

<0.580 

15.4 

4.77 

<0.505 

3.33 

12 

<0.489 

3.35 

13.5 

<0.675 

<0.506 

<0.668 

<0.500 

<0.580 

<0.456 

<0.497 

<0.505 

0.531 

<0.436 

<0.489 

<1.82 

<1.81 

<1.35 

<1.01 

<1.33 

<0.997 

<1.16 

1.07 

<0.991 

<1.01 

<0.906 

1.7 

<0.975 

<3.63 

<3.62 

<1.35 

<1.01 

<1.33 

<0.997 

<1.16 

27.8 

9.1 

<1.01 

8.65 

29.9 

<0.975 

6.35 

29.2 

<1.35 

<1.01 

<1.33 

<0.997 

<1.16 

1.4 

<0.991 

<1.01 

0.94 

2.88 

<0.975 

<3.63 

4.17 

<1.35 

<1.01 

<1.33 

<0.997 

<1.16 

2.72 

1.49 

<1.01 

0.972 

4.44 

<0.975 

<3.63 

<3.62 

<1.35 

<1.01 

<1.33 

<0.997 

<1.16 

<0.910 

<0.991 

<1.01 

<0.906 

<0.870 

<0.975 

<3.63 

<3.62 

<1.35 

<1.01 

<1.33 

<0.997 

<1.16 

1.64 

<0.991 

<1.01 

<0.906 

1.1 

<0.975 

<3.63 

<3.62 

<1.35 

<1.01 

<1.33 

<0.997 

<1.16 

12.6 

6.94 

<1.01 

6.01 

21.2 

<0.975 

4.69 

20.9 

<1.35 

<1.01 

<1.33 

<0.997 

<1.16 

20 

7.68 

<1.01 

4.78 

20.4 

<0.975 

4.97 

21.6 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

-- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

” 





— 

— 

— 

n 


mm 

;; 

— 

- 

- 

- 


— 

-- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

-- 

- 

-- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

- 

- 

— 



— 


- 

- 

- 

- 

« 

— 

- 

- 

— 



-- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

.. 

— 

— 

— 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

— 

— 

.. 

_ 

.. 

117 

<48.2 

<64.9 

<47.2 

76.4 

761 

210 

71.4 

310 

885 

<46.5 

933 

966 


J:\170,000-179,999\171521\171521-00.DEL\2015 PM10 Denvation\Soil Data HighlighttSoil Data 


QA: CL Date: 4/15/15 








































































































































‘ 

























































































































Analyte 


Sample Location 

Sample ID 
Sample Depth (ft bgs) 
Laboratory 
Laboratory ID 
Sample Date 
Consultant 


Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) 

Aroclor 1248 
Aroclor 1254 
Aroclor 1260 
Aroclor 1262 
Aroclor 1016 
Aroclor 1221 
Aroclor 1232 
Aroclor 1242 
Aroclor 1268 
Total PCBs 
Pesticides 

Total Pesticides 
Herbicides 

Total Herbicides 
Metals, Total 
Antimony 
Arsenic 
Barium 
Beryllium 
Cadmium 
Chromium 
Copper 
Iron 
Lead 

Manganese 
Mercury 
Nickel 
Selenium 
Silver 
Thallium 
Vanadium 
Zinc 
lOther 

Cyanide, total 
Cyanide, reactive 
Analytes Reported with Multiple MethodsA 
Acenaphthene 
Acenaphthylene 
Anthracene 
Benzo(a)anthracene 
Benzo(a)pyrene 
Benzo(b)fluoranthene 
Benzo(e)pyrene 
Benzo(ghi)perylene 
Benzo(k)fluoranthene 
Chrysene 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 
Fluoranthene 
Fluorene 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene 
Methylnaphthalene, 1- 
Methylnaphthalene, 2- 
Naphthalene 
Phenanthrene 
Pyrene 


Method 


8082 


8081 

8151 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

7471 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 

6010 


Units 


mg/kg 


mg/kg 

mg/kg 

mg/kg 


mg/kg 

mg/kg 

mg/kg 


TABLE 1-1 

SOIL ANALYTICAL RESULTS 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 16 of 16 
4/15/2015 


lun-iort 

GZ-301 10ft-15ft 
10-15 

1502331-02 

02/23/2015 

GZ-302 6ft-10ft 
GZ-302 6ft-10ft 
6-10 

1502331-03 

02/23/2015 

GZ-302 10ft- 15ft 
GZ-302 10ft-15ft 
10-15 

1502331-04 

02/23/2015 

GZ-303 6ft-10ft 
GZ-303 6ft-10ft 
6-10 

1502331-05 

02/23/2015 

GZ-303 10ft-15ft 

GZ-303 10ft-15ft 
10-15 

1502331-06 

02/23/2015 

GZ-304 6ft-10ft 
GZ-304 6ft- 10ft 
6-10 

1502331-07 

02/23/2015 

GZ-304 10ft- 15ft 
GZ-304 10ft-15ft 
10-15 

1502331-08 

02/23/2015 

GZ-305 6ft-10ft 
GZ-305 6ft-10ft 
6-10 

1502331-09 

02/23/2015 

GZ-305 10ft-15ft 

GZ-305 10ft- 15ft 
10-15 

1502331-10 

02/23/2015 

GZ-306 6ft-10ft 

GZ-306 6ft-10ft 
6-10 

1502331-11 

02/23/2015 

GZ-306 10ft- 
GZ-306 10ft 
10-15 

1502331-1 

02/23/201 

<0.146 

<0.158 

<0.146 

<0.148 

<0.185 

<0.143 

<0.205 

<0.157 

<0.203 

<0.149 

<0.187 

<0.146 

<0.158 

<0.146 

<0.148 

<0.185 

<0.143 

<0.205 

<0.157 

<0.203 

<0.149 

<0.187 

<0.146 

<0.158 

<0.146 

<0.148 

<0.185 

<0.143 

<0.205 

<0.157 

<0.203 

<0.149 

<0.187 

<0.146 

<0.158 

<0.146 

<0.148 

<0.185 

<0.143 

<0.205 

<0.157 

<0.203 

<0.149 

<0.187 

<0.148 

<0.158 

<0.146 

<0.148 

<0.185 

<0.143 

<0.205 

<0.157 

<0.203 

<0.149 

<0.187 

<0.146 

<0.158 

<0.146 

<0.148 

<0.185 

<0.143 

<0.205 

<0.157 

<0.203 

<0.149 

<0.187 

<0.146 

<0.158 

<0.146 

<0.148 

<0.185 

<0.143 

<0.205 

<0.157 

<0.203 

<0.149 

<0.187 

<0.146 

<0.158 

<0.146 

<0.148 

<0.185 

<0.143 

<0.205 

<0.157 

<0.203 

<0.149 

<0.187 

<0.146 

<0.158 

<0.146 

<0.148 

<0.185 

<0.143 

<0.205 

<0.157 

<0.203 

<0.149 

<0.187 

<0.146 

<0.158 

<0.146 

<0.148 

<0.185 

<0.143 

<0.205 

<0.157 

<0.203 

<0.149 

<0.187 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

166 

907 

707 

169 

2820 

746 

269 

439 

1000 

3930 

1990 

18.7 

111 

59.6 

56.7 

740 

13.1 

25.9 

33.3 

20.1 

42.3 

448 

<2.14 

<13.9 

<8.77 

<4.78 

<13.0 

<18.0 

<7.65 

<5.63 

<10.1 

130 

<11.0 

16.9 

7.61 

18 

41.3 

25.7 

31.2 

24.1 

19.3 

19.4 

12.7 

25.1 

104 

121 

155 

926 

3070 

41.6 

43.1 

415 

120 

100 

1600 

0.21 

0.779 

0.382 

2.53 

1.69 

3.41 

0.126 

16.4 

0.279 

0.298 

1.11 

<10.7 

<11.1 

<8.77 

<9.57 

<13.0 

<12.0 

<15.3 

<11.3 

<13.5 

<11.5 

<14.7 

<2.14 

<2.23 

<1.75 

<1.91 

12.3 

<2.39 

<3.06 

<2.25 

<2.69 

<2.30 

3.15 

<2.0 

<2.0 

<2.0 

<2.0 

<2.0 

<2.0 

<2.0 

<2.0 

<2.0 

<2.0 

<2.0 

<4.21 

<1.05 

<1.05 

<0.978 

<1.25 

<0.957 

<1.35 

<1.01 

<1.33 

<0.997 

<1.16 

<4.21 

<1.05 

<1.05 

<0.978 

<1.25 

<0.957 

<1.35 

<1.01 

<1.33 

<0.997 

<1.16 

<4.21 

<1.05 

<1.05 

<0.978 

<1.25 

<0.957 

<1.35 

<1.01 

<1.33 

<0.997 

<1.16 

<4.21 

<1.05 

<1.05 

<0.978 

<1.25 

<0.957 

<1.35 

<1.01 

<1.33 

<0.997 

<1.16 

<2.11 

<0.526 

<0.526 

<0.491 

<0.626 

<0.48 

<0.675 

<0.506 

<0.668 

<0.5 

<0.58 

<4.21 

<1.05 

<1.05 

<0.978 

<1.25 

<0.957 

<1.35 

<1.01 

<1.33 

<0.997 

<1.16 

<4.21 

<1.05 

<1.05 

<0.978 

<1.25 

<0.957 

<1.35 

<1.01 

<1.33 

<0.997 

<1.16 

<4.21 

<1.05 

<1.05 

<0.978 

<1.25 

<0.957 

<1.35 

<1.01 

<1.33 

<0.997 

<1.16 

<2.11 

<0.526 

<0.526 

<0.491 

<0.626 

<0.48 

<0.675 

<0.506 

<0.668 

<0.5 

<0.58 

<2.11 

<0.526 

<0.526 

<0.491 

<0.626 

<0.48 

<0.675 

<0.506 

<0.668 

<0.5 

<0.58 

<4.21 

<1.05 

<1.05 

<0.978 

<1.25 

<0.957 

<1.35 

<1.01 

<1.33 

<0.997 

<1.16 

<4.21 

<1.05 

<1.05 

<0.978 

<1.25 

<0.957 

<1.35 

<1.01 

<1.33 

<0.997 

<1.16 

<4.21 

<1.05 

<1.05 

<0.978 

<1.25 

<0.957 

<1.35 

<1.01 

<1.33 

<0.997 

<1.16 

<4.21 

<1.05 

<1.05 

<0.978 

<1.25 

<0.957 

<1.35 

<1.01 

<1.33 

<0.997 

<1.16 

<0.0018 

<0.0018 

<0.002 

<0.0025 

<0.0059 

<0.0053 

<0.005 

<0.0062 

<0.0042 

<0.0039 

0.0261 

<4.21 

<1.05 

<1.05 

<0.978 

<1.25 

<0.957 

<1.35 

<1.01 

<1.33 

<0.997 

<1.16 

<4.21 

<1.05 

<1.05 

<0.978 

<1.25 

<0.957 

<1.35 

<1.01 

<1.33 

<0.997 

<1.16 


J2S01S02A 

D02S02BS04A 

D02S04BS05 

D03S01S02A 

D03S02BS03 

D03S05 

E02S01S02A 

E02S02BS03 

0.0-3.3 

3.3-6.6 

6.6-10.0 

0.0-3.3 

3.3-6.0 

8.0-10.0 

0.0-3.3 

3.3-6.0 

<0.132 

<7.32 

<0.146 

<0.134 

<0.130 

<0.146 

1.94 

16.5 

<0.132 

<7.32 

<0.146 

0.152 

0.975 

<0.146 

<0.138 

<0.146 

<0.132 

<7.32 

<0.146 

<0.134 

0.249 

<0.146 

<0.138 

8.54 

<0.132 

<7.32 

<0.146 

<0.134 

<0.130 

<0.146 

<0.138 

<0.146 

<0.132 

<7.32 

<0.146 

<0.134 

<0.130 

<0.146 

<0.138 

<0.146 

<0.132 

<7.32 

<0.146 

<0.134 

<0.130 

<0.146 

<0.138 

<0.146 

<0.132 

<7.32 

<0.146 

<0.134 

<0.130 

<0.146 

<0.138 

<0.146 

<0.132 

59.2 

1.76 

<0.134 

<0.130 

<0.146 

<0.138 

<0.146 

<0.132 

<7.32 

<0.146 

<0.134 

<0.130 

<0.146 

<0.138 

<0.146 

<0.132 

88.48 

2.344 

0.688 

1.679 

<0.146 

2.492 

25.551 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

ND 

<5.73 

95.1 

29.7 

15 

32.7 

12.4 

32.1 

67.3 

33.3 

165 

10.2 

45.6 

148 

74.2 

89.1 

143 

<1.15 

<1.48 

<1.32 

<1.42 

7.66 

<1.54 

<1.35 

<1.49 

17.5 

78.1 

7.04 

40.8 

25.4 

46.9 

19.9 

21.4 

<11.5 

1860 

84.4 

170 

651 

41.9 

341 

606 

0.299 

30.9 

0.494 

1.15 

4.39 

14 

2.49 

4.72 

<5.73 

14 

<6.60 

<7.09 

<6.70 

<7.70 

<6.75 

<7.47 

<1.15 

1.9 

<1.32 

<1.42 

<1.34 

<1.54 

<1.35 

<1.49 

<2.0 

<2.0 

- 

<2.0 

<2.0 

- 

<2.0 

<2.0 

1.02 

<0.991 

<1.01 

<0.906 

3.02 

<0.975 

<3.63 

<3.62 

1.34 

<0.991 

<1.01 

<0.906 

<0.87 

<0.975 

<3.63 

<3.62 

4.19 

1.78 

<1.01 

1.69 

6.44 

<0.975 

<3.63 

6.09 

18.9 

4.93 

<1.01 

3.85 

13.2 

<0.975 

<3.63 

13.5 

15.3 

5.16 

<0.505 

3.15 

10.1 

<0.489 

2.65 

11.7 

21.6 

7 

<1.01 

3.04 

11.6 

<0.975 

<3.63 

15 

2.3 

1.42 

<1.01 

0.933 

4.33 

<0.975 

<3.63 

<3.62 

7.61 

2 

<1.01 

3.28 

4.8 

<0.975 

<3.63 

8.05 

15.4 

4.77 

<0.505 

3.33 

12 

<0.489 

3.35 

13.5 

<0.456 

<0.497 

<0.505 

0.531 

<0.436 

<0.489 

<1.82 

<1.81 

27.8 

9.1 

<1.01 

8.65 

29.9 

<0.975 

6.35 

29.2 

1.4 

<0.991 

<1.01 

0.94 

2.88 

<0.975 

<3.63 

4.17 

2.72 

1.49 

<1.01 

0.972 

4.44 

<0.975 

<3.63 

<3.62 

<0.91 

<0.991 

<1.01 

<0.906 

<0.87 

<0.975 

<3.63 

<3.62 

1.64 

0.0065 

<0.0044 

<0.0046 

1.1 

<0.0038 

<0.0057 

<0.0043 

12.6 

6.94 

<1.01 

6.01 

21.2 

<0.975 

4.69 

20.9 

20 

7.68 

<1.01 

4.78 

20.4 

<0.975 

4.97 

21.6 


Notes: 

1 In general, analytes detected in at least one sample are reported here. For the 2015 data, only selected VOCs and SVOCs are listed. Other not detected. For a complete list of analytes see the laboratory data sheets. 

2. "<" = The analyte was not detected at a concentration above the specified laboratory reporting limit. 

3. ND = The analyte was not detected above the laboratory reporting limit; 

4 = The sample was not tested for this analyte. 

5. ft bgs = feet below ground surface 

6. mg/kg = milligrams per kilogram 

7. Highlights indicate the proposed remediation areas from which the samples were collected. 

A-5 Area Proposed Remediation Area 

Low pH Area Proposed Remediation Area 
CES-2 Area Proposed Remediation Area 

A The analyte was analyzed by multiple analytical methods. If the analyte was detected via at least one method, the maximum detected 

concentration is listed to represent the sample result. If the analyte was not detected via either method, the minimum RL is listed as the RL for the nondetected sample result. 


J:\170.000-179.999\171521\171521-00.DEL\2015 PM10 DenvationtSoil Data HighlighttSoil Data 


QA: CL Date: 4/15/15 


















































































































































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J:\170.000-179.999\171521V171521-00 DELV2015 PM10 DerivationVDust MonitoringWea 5M71521 10 Risk Summary A-5\SUM_RISK 


































TABLE I-3A File No. 171521.10 

SUMMARY OF ANALYTICAL DATA FOR SOIL SAMPLES Pa 9 e 1 of 1 

A-5 Area Proposed Remediation Area 4/15/2015 

Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


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File No. 171521.10 
Page 1 of 1 
4/15/2015 


TABLE I-4A 

SUMMARY OF EXPOSURE POINT CONCENTRATIONS 
A-5 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 



EPC1 

EPC3 

COC 

Arithmetic 

Mean 

Concentration 

in Soil - Area 5 a 
(mg/kg) 

Estimated 
Concentration 
in Fugitive 

Dust b 

(mg/m 3 ) 

Acetone 

0.020 

3.02E-09 

Trichloroethene 

0.0028 

4.17E-10 

Acenaphthene 

1.2 

1.80E-07 

Acenaphthylene 

0.92 

1.38E-07 

Anthracene 

2.9 

4.31 E-07 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

7.1 

1.07E-06 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

6.1 

9.10E-07 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

7.6 

1.14E-06 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

1.7 

2.55E-07 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

3.6 

5.35E-07 

Bis(2-Ethylhexyl)phthalate 

0.98 

1.47E-07 

Chrysene 

6.6 

9.91 E-07 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

0.44 

6.63E-08 

Dibenzofuran 

1.0 

1.56E-07 

Fluoranthene 

14 

2.10E-06 

Fluorene 

1.6 

2.38E-07 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

1.8 

2.67E-07 

Naphthalene 

0.34 

5.17E-08 

Phenanthrene 

9.2 

1.37E-06 

Pyrene 

10 

1.51E-06 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

520 

7.80E-05 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

15 

2.28E-06 

Arsenic 

951 

1.43E-04 

Barium 

89 

1.33E-05 

Cadmium 

1.6 

2.35E-07 

Chromium (total) 

32 

4.82E-06 

Lead 

2488 

3.73E-04 

Mercury 

7.3 

1.10E-06 

Selenium 

4.8 

7.13E-07 

Silver 

0.84 

1.26E-07 


Notes: 

a. The soil exposure point concentration is based on the arithmetic mean concentration from all soil samples obtained from the A-5 Area 
Proposed Remediation Area. 

b. The soil-borne fugitive dust exposure point concentrations were estimated from the soil exposure point concentration according to the 
following equation: 


EPC dust = EPC soil * PM 10 * Cl 

Calculated 
Calculated 
0.15 
IE-06 

Abbreviations: 

COC = constituent of concern. 


EPC dust Exposure Point Concentration in Fugitive Dust (mg/m 3 ) 

EPCsoii Exposure Point Concentration in Soil (mg/kg) 

PM 10 Respirable Particle Concentration - Commercial/Industrial Workers & Residents (kg/mg) 

Cl Unit Conversion Factor 


J:\170.000-179,999\171521\171521-00.DEL\2015 PM10 Derivation\Dust MonitoringVArea 5\171521.10 Exp ConVEPC 


QA: CL Date: 4/15/15 














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TABLE I-6A File No. 171521.10 

RESIDENT EXPOSURE PROFILE Pa 9 e 2 of 2 

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Everett Staging Yard 
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J:\170.000-179,999\171521 \171521-00.DEL\2015 PM10 Denvabon\Dust Monitonng\Area 5\171521.10 Risk (Resident)\Parameters QA: CL Date: 4/15/15 





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TABLE 1-1OA 

RELATIVE ABSORPTION FACTORS 
A-5 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 1 of 1 
4/15/2015 


COC 

Exposure Pathways 

Oral Soil 

Carcinogen Non-Carcinogen 

Acetone 


1 a 

Trichloroethene 

1 a 

1 a 

Acenaphthene 


0.3 a 

Acenaphthylene 


0.3 a 

Anthracene 


0.3 a 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

0.3 a 

0.3 a 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

0.3 a 

0.3 a 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

0.3 a 

0.3 a 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 


0.3 a 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

0.3 a 

0.3 a 

Bis(2-Ethylhexyl)phthalate 

1 a 

1 a 

Chrysene 

0.3 a 

0.3 a 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

0.3 a 

0.3 a 

Dibenzofuran 



Fluoranthene 


0.3 a 

Fluorene 


0.3 a 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

0.28 a 

0.28 a 

Naphthalene 


0.3 a 

Phenanthrene 


0.3 a 

Pyrene 


0.3 a 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 


0.3 f 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

1 a 

1 a 

Arsenic 

0.5 a 

0.5 a 

Barium 


1 a 

Cadmium 


1 a 

Chromium (total) 


1 a 

Lead 


0.3 c 

Mercury 


0.5 a 

Selenium 


1 a 

Silver 


1 a 


Notes: 

a. MassDEP 2014 ShortForm (v0414.xlsx). 

c. USEPA 2007. User’s Guide for the Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic Model for 
Lead in Children (IEUBK) Windows. 

f. Value for C11-C22 aromatic hydrocarbons used for total petreleum hydrocarbon (TPH). 
Notes: 

1. A blank space indicates no data found. 

2. Where data are lacking, a default value of 1 is used in subsequent risk calculations. 
Abbreviations: 

COC = Constituent of Concern; RAF = Relative Absorption Factors. 

J:\170,000-179,999\171521 \171521 -00.DEL\2015 PM10 Derivation\Dust Monitoring\Area 5M71521.10 Chem InfcARAF 


QA: CL Date: 4/15/15 











TABLE I-11A 

CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY DOSES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR EXPOSURE TO DUST VIA GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT 
A-5 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 1 of 2 
4/15/2015 


RECEPTOR: Commercial/Industrial Workers 
SUBCHRONIC NON-CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-5A for Exposure Variables 
and Rationale 

See TABLE I-4A for Exposure Point 
Concentration Derivation 

ADD SO j|-oral 

HQsoil-oral “ 

Exposure to Dust via Gastrointestinal Tract 

EPCsoil * IRsoil * EF * ED * EP * RAF oraklc * Cl 

BW * AP nc 

ADDgoii.orai j_j| _ 

n, soil-oral 

RfD 

S HQ sol |_ ora | 

COC 

EPC S0ll 

RAF ora |_ nc 

ADD S0 j|_ 0ra i 

RfD 

HQsoil-oral 


EPC1 



SubChronic 



(mg/kg) 

(unitless) 

(mg/kg-day) 

(mg/kg-day) 

(unitless) 

Acetone 

0.020 

1 

2.7E-10 

2.7E+00 

1.0E-10 

Trichloroethene 

0.0028 

1 

3.7E-11 

5.0E-04 

7.5E-08 

Acenaphthene 

1.2 

0.3 

4.9E-09 

2.0E-01 

2.4E-08 

Acenaphthylene 

0.92 

0.3 

3.7E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.2E-08 

Anthracene 

2.9 

0.3 

1.2E-08 

1.0E+00 

1.2E-08 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

7.1 

0.3 

2.9E-08 

3.0E-01 

9.6E-08 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

6.1 

0.3 

2.5E-08 

3.0E-01 

8.2E-08 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

7.6 

0.3 

3. IE-08 

3.0E-01 

1.0E-07 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

1.7 

0.3 

6.9E-09 

3.0E-01 

2.3E-08 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

3.6 

0.3 

1.4E-08 

3.0E-01 

4.8E-08 

Bis(2-Ethylhexyl)phthalate 

0.98 

1 

1.3E-08 

2.0E-02 

6.6E-07 

Chrysene 

6.6 

0.3 

2.7E-08 

3.0E-01 

8.9E-08 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

0.44 

0.3 

1.8E-09 

3.0E-01 

6.0E-09 

Dibenzofuran 

1.0 

1 

1.4E-08 

4.0E-03 

3.5E-06 

Fluoranthene 

14 

0.3 

5.7E-08 

4.0E-01 

1.4E-07 

Fluorene 

1.6 

0.3 

6.4E-09 

4.0E-01 

1.6E-08 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

1.8 

0.28 

6.7E-09 

3.0E-01 

2.2E-08 

Naphthalene 

0.34 

0.3 

1 4E-09 

2.0E-01 

7.0E-09 

Phenanthrene 

9.2 

0.3 

3.7E-08 

3.0E-01 

1.2E-07 

Pyrene 

10 

0.3 

4.1E-08 

3.0E-01 

1.4E-07 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

520 

0.3 

2.1E-06 

3.0E-01 

7.0E-06 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

15 

1 

2.0E-07 

5.0E-05 

4. IE-03 

Arsenic 

951 

0.5 

6.4E-06 

3.0E-04 

2. IE-02 

Barium 

89 

1 

1.2E-06 

7.0E-02 

1.7E-05 

Cadmium 

1.6 

1 

2.1E-08 

1.0E-03 

2. IE-05 

Chromium (total) 

32 

1 

4.3E-07 

2.0E-02 

2.2E-05 

Lead 

2488 

0.3 

1.0E-05 

7.5E-04 

1.3E-02 

Mercury 

7.3 

0.5 

4.9E-08 

3.0E-04 

1.6E-04 

Selenium 

4.8 

1 

6.4E-08 

5.0E-03 

1.3E-05 

Silver 

0.84 

1 

1. IE-08 

5.0E-03 

2.3E-06 





HI soil-oral ~ 

3.9E-02 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern. 

3. A default value of 1 is used when an RAF is otherwise unavailable 


J:\170,000-179,999\171521\171521-00DEL\2015 PM10 Derivation\Dust Monitoring\Area 5M71521.10 Risk (FW-DEP parameters)Soil Ingest (Non-Cancer) 


QA: CL Date: 4/15/15 









TABLE I-11A (Continued) 

CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY DOSES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR EXPOSURE TO DUST VIA GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT 
A-5 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 2 of 2 
4/15/2015 


RECEPTOR: Commercial/Industrial Workers 
CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-5A for Exposure Variables 
and Rationale 

See TABLE I-4A for Exposure Point 
Concentration Derivation 

LADD S0 ||-o ra i 

ELCR S oil-oral — 

Exposure to Dust via Gastrointestinal Tract 

EPCsoii * IRsoi, * EF * ED * EP * RAF oral _c * Cl 


LADD so n_ ora i * CSF 

BW * AP C 

Total ELCR soi |_o ra i = 

^ ELCR S0 ||^ ra | 

COC 

EPC soi i 

RAF ora |_c 

LADD SO j|-oral 

CSF 

ELCR soik)ra i 


EPC1 






(mg/kg) 

(unitless) 

(mg/kg-day) 

(mg/kg-day) -1 

(unitless) 

Acetone 

0.020 

1 

1.94E-12 

NA 

NC 

Trichloroethene 

0.0028 

1 

2.68E-13 

4.6E-02 

1.2E-14 

Acenaphthene 

1.2 

1 

1.16E-10 

NA 

NC 

Acenaphthylene 

0.92 

1 

8.83E-11 

NA 

NC 

Anthracene 

2.9 

1 

2.77E-10 

NA 

NC 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

7.1 

0.3 

2.06E-10 

7.3E-01 

1.5E-10 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

6.1 

0.3 

1.75E-10 

7.3E+00 

1.3E-09 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

7.6 

0.3 

2.20E-10 

7.3E-01 

1.6E-10 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

1.7 

1 

1.64E-10 

NA 

NC 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

3.6 

0.3 

1.03E-10 

7.3E-02 

7.5E-12 

Bis(2-Ethylhexyl)phthalate 

0.98 

1 

9.40E-11 

1.4E-02 

1.3E-12 

Chrysene 

6.6 

0.3 

1.91E-10 

7.3E-02 

1.4E-11 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

0.44 

0.3 

1.28E-11 

7.3E+00 

9.3E-11 

Dibenzofuran 

1.0 

1 

1.00E-10 

NA 

NC 

Fluoranthene 

14 

1 

1.35E-09 

NA 

NC 

Fluorene 

1.6 

1 

1.53E-10 

NA 

NC 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

1.8 

0.28 

4.79E-11 

7.3E-01 

3.5E-11 

Naphthalene 

0.34 

1 

3.32E-11 

NA 

NC 

Phenanthrene 

9.2 

1 

8.82E-10 

NA 

NC 

Pyrene 

10 

1 

9.67E-10 

NA 

NC 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

520 

1 

5.00E-08 

NA 

NC 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

15 

1 

1.46E-09 

2.0E+00 

2.9E-09 

Arsenic 

951 

0.5 

4.57E-08 

1.5E+00 

6.9E-08 

Barium 

89 

1 

8.52E-09 

NA 

NC 

Cadmium 

1.6 

1 

1.51E-10 

NA 

NC 

Chromium (total) 

32 

1 

3.09E-09 

NA 

NC 

Lead 

2488 

1 

2.39E-07 

NA 

NC 

Mercury 

7.3 

1 

7.03E-10 

NA 

NC 

Selenium 

4.8 

1 

4.57E-10 

NA 

NC 

Silver 

0.84 

1 

8.06E-11 

NA 

NC 





Totsl ELCR SO j|-oral 

7.3E-08 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern; NA = Not Applicable/Not Available; NC = Not Calculated. 

3. A default value of 1 is used when an RAF is otherwise unavailable 


\ 170 , 000 - 1 79,99911715211171521-00 DEL12015 PM10 DerivationlDust MonitoringlArea 51171521.10 Risk (FW-DEP paramelers)Soil Ingest (Cancer) 


QA: CL Date: 4/15/15 




















File No. 171521.10 
Page 1 of 2 
4/15/2015 


TABLE 1-12A 

CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY EXPOSURES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR INHALATION OF FUGITIVE DUST 


A-5 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


RECEPTOR: Commercial/Industrial Workers 
SUBCHRONIC NON-CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-5A for Exposure Variables and 
Rationale. See TABLE I-4A for Exposure 
Point Concentration Derivation 

ADE dust = 

HQdust = 

Inhalation of Soil-derived Fugitive Dust 

EPC dust * EF * ED * EP * C2 

Z HQ dust 

ADEdust 

AP n c 

HI, = 

RfC 


COC 

EPC dust 

EPC3 

(mg/m 3 ) 

ADE dust 

(mg/m 3 ) 

RfC 

SubChronic 

(mg/m 3 ) 

HQdust 

(unitless) 

Acetone 

3.0E-09 

5.8E-10 

8.0E-01 

7.2E-10 

Trichloroethene 

4.2E-10 

7.9E-11 

2.0E-03 

4.0E-08 

Acenaphthene 

1.8E-07 

3.4E-08 

5.0E-01 

6.9E-08 

Acenaphthylene 

1.4E-07 

2.6E-08 

5.0E-01 

5.2E-08 

Anthracene 

4.3E-07 

8.2E-08 

5.0E-01 

1.6E-07 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

1. IE-06 

2.0E-07 

5.0E-01 

4. IE-07 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

9. IE-07 

1.7E-07 

5.0E-01 

3.5E-07 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

1. IE-06 

2.2E-07 

5.0E-01 

4.4E-07 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

2.6E-07 

4.9E-08 

5.0E-01 

9.7E-08 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

5.4E-07 

1.0E-07 

5.0E-01 

2.0E-07 

Bis(2-Ethylhexyl)phthalate 

1.5E-07 

2.8E-08 

7.0E-03 

4.0E-06 

Chrysene 

9.9E-07 

1.9E-07 

5.0E-01 

3.8E-07 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

6.6E-08 

1.3E-08 

5.0E-01 

2.5E-08 

Dibenzofuran 

1.6E-07 

3.0E-08 

NA 

NC 

Fluoranthene 

2.1E-06 

4.0E-07 

5.0E-01 

8.0E-07 

Fluorene 

2.4E-07 

4.5E-08 

5.0E-01 

9. IE-08 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

2.7E-07 

5. IE-08 

5.0E-01 

1.0E-07 

Naphthalene 

5.2E-08 

9.8E-09 

3.0E-03 

3.3E-06 

Phenanthrene 

1.4E-06 

2.6E-07 

5.0E-01 

5.2E-07 

Pyrene 

1.5E-06 

2.9E-07 

5.0E-01 

5.7E-07 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

7.8E-05 

1.5E-05 

5.0E-01 

3.0E-05 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

2.3E-06 

4.3E-07 

2.0E-05 

2.2E-02 

Arsenic 

1.4E-04 

2.7E-05 

2.0E-05 

1.4E+00 

Barium 

1.3E-05 

2.5E-06 

5.0E-03 

5. IE-04 

Cadmium 

2.4E-07 

4.5E-08 

2.0E-05 

2.2E-03 

Chromium (total) 

4.8E-06 

9.2E-07 

3.0E-04 

3. IE-03 

Lead 

3.7E-04 

7. IE-05 

1.0E-03 

7. IE-02 

Mercury 

1. IE-06 

2.1E-07 

3.0E-04 

7.0E-04 

Selenium 

7.1E-07 

1.4E-07 

3.0E-03 

4.5E-05 

Silver 

1.3E-07 

2.4E-08 

1.4E-04 

1.7E-04 




Hldust| 

1E+00 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern; NA = Not Applicable/Not Available; NC = Not Calculated. 


J:\170.000-179.999\171521\171521-00 DEL\2015 PM10 Denvation\Dusl MonitoringtArea 5M71521.10 Risk (FW-DEP para meters) Fugitive Dust (Non-Cancer) 


QA CL Date: 4/15/15 









TABLE 1-12A (Continued) 

CALCULATION OF LIFETIME AVERAGE DAILY EXPOSURES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR INHALATION OF FUGITIVE DUST 
A-5 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 2 of 2 
4/15/2015 


RECEPTOR: Commercial/Industrial Workers 


CANCER EFFECTS 


j 


Inhalation of Soil-derived Fugitive Dust 


See TABLE I-5A for Exposure Variables and 


EPCdust * EF 

* ED * EP * C2 *C3 


Rationale and TABLE I-4A for Exposure 





Point Concentration Derivation 



AP C 



ELCRd US t = 

LADEdust * UR 

Total ELCRdust = 

S ELCRdust 

COC 

EPCdust 

LADE dust 

UR 

ELCRdust 


EPC3 





(mg/m 3 ) 

(pg/m 3 ) 

(pg/m 3 )' 1 

(unitless) 

Acetone 

3.0E-09 

4.1E-09 

NA 

NC 

Trichloroethene 

4.2E-10 

5.7E-10 

5.0E-06 

2.8E-15 

Acenaphthene 

1.8E-07 

2.5E-07 

NA 

NC 

Acenaphthylene 

1.4E-07 

1.9E-07 

NA 

NC 

Anthracene 

4.3E-07 

5.9E-07 

NA 

NC 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

1. IE-06 

1.5E-06 

2.1E-04 

3.0E-10 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

9. IE-07 

1.2E-06 

2.1E-03 

2.6E-09 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

1. IE-06 

1.6E-06 

2.1E-04 

3.2E-10 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

2.6E-07 

3.5E-07 

NA 

NC 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

5.4E-07 

7.3E-07 

2.1E-05 

1.5E-11 

Bis(2-Ethylhexyl)phthalate 

1.5E-07 

2.0E-07 

1.3E-06 

2.6E-13 

Chrysene 

9.9E-07 

1.3E-06 

2.1E-05 

2.8E-11 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

6.6E-08 

9.0E-08 

2.1E-03 

1.9E-10 

Dibenzofuran 

1.6E-07 

2.1E-07 

NA 

NC 

Fluoranthene 

2.1E-06 

2.9E-06 

NA 

NC 

Fluorene 

2.4E-07 

3.2E-07 

NA 

NC 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

2.7E-07 

3.6E-07 

2.1E-04 

7.6E-11 

Naphthalene 

5.2E-08 

7.0E-08 

NA 

NC 

Phenanthrene 

1.4E-06 

1.9E-06 

NA 

NC 

Pyrene 

1.5E-06 

2.1E-06 

NA 

NC 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

7.8E-05 

1. IE-04 

NA 

NC 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

2.3E-06 

3. IE-06 

1.0E-04 

3.IE-10 

Arsenic 

1.4E-04 

1.9E-04 

3.0E-03 

5.8E-07 

Barium 

1.3E-05 

1.8E-05 

NA 

NC 

Cadmium 

2.4E-07 

3.2E-07 

1.8E-03 

5.8E-10 

Chromium (total) 

4.8E-06 

6.6E-06 

1.2E-02 

7.9E-08 

Lead 

3.7E-04 

5.1E-04 

NA 

NC 

Mercury 

1. IE-06 

1.5E-06 

NA 

NC 

Selenium 

7. IE-07 

9.7E-07 

NA 

NC 

Silver 

1.3E-07 

1.7E-07 

NA 

NC 



Total ELCRdust:) 

6.7E-07 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern; NA = Not Applicable/Not Available; NC = Not Calculated. 


J \170.000-179,999M71521\171521-00 DEL\2015 PM10 Derivation\Dust MomtoringlArea 5\17152110 Risk (FW-DEP parameters)Fugitive Dust (Cancer) 


QA. CL Date 4/15/15 



















TABLE 1-13A 

CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY DOSES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR EXPOSURE TO DUST VIA GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT 
A-5 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No, 171521.10 
Page 1 of 4 
4/15/2015 


RECEPTOR: Resident (Young Child, age 1<2) 
SUBCHRONIC NON-CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-6A for Exposure Variables 
and Rationale 

See TABLE I-4A for Exposure Point 
Concentration Derivation 

ADD SO j|-oral 

RQsoil-oral ” 

Exposure to Dust via Gastrointestinal Tract 

EPC S01| * IR soil * EF * ED * EP * RAF 

BW * AP nc 

ADD SO j|_o ral 

RfD 

* PI 

oral-nc w 1 

^soil-oral " 

^ HQsoil-oral i 

COC 

EPCsoh 

RAF ora i_ nc 

ADD SO j|_Q ra | 

RfD 

RQsoil-oral 


EPC1 



Subchronic 



(mg/kg) 

(unitless) 

(mg/kg-day) 

(mg/kg-day) 

(unitless) 

Acetone 

0.020 

1 

4.4E-11 

2.7E+00 

1.6E-11 

Trichloroethene 

0.0028 

1 

6.0E-12 

5.0E-04 

1.2E-08 

Acenaphthene 

1.2 

0.3 

7.8E-10 

2.0E-01 

3.9E-09 

Acenaphthylene 

0.92 

0.3 

6.0E-10 

3.0E-01 

2.0E-09 

Anthracene 

2.9 

0.3 

1.9E-09 

1.0E+00 

1.9E-09 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

7.1 

0.3 

4.6E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.5E-08 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

6.1 

0.3 

3.9E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.3E-08 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

7.6 

0.3 

5.0E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.7E-08 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

1.7 

0.3 

1. IE-09 

3.0E-01 

3.7E-09 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

3.6 

0.3 

2.3E-09 

3.0E-01 

7.7E-09 

Bis(2-Ethylhexyl)phthalate 

0.98 

1 

2. IE-09 

2.0E-02 

1.1E-07 

Chrysene 

6.6 

0.3 

4.3E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.4E-08 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

0.44 

0.3 

2.9E-10 

3.0E-01 

9.6E-10 

Dibenzofuran 

1.0 

1 

2.3E-09 

4.0E-03 

5.6E-07 

Fluoranthene 

14 

0.3 

9. IE-09 

4.0E-01 

2.3E-08 

Fluorene 

1.6 

0.3 

1.0E-09 

4.0E-01 

2.6E-09 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

1.8 

0.28 

1. IE-09 

3.0E-01 

3.6E-09 

Naphthalene 

0.34 

0.3 

2.2E-10 

2.0E-01 

1. IE-09 

Phenanthrene 

9.2 

0.3 

5.9E-09 

3.0E-01 

2.0E-08 

Pyrene 

10 

0.3 

6.5E-09 

3.0E-01 

2.2E-08 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

520 

0.3 

3.4E-07 

3.0E-01 

1. IE-06 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

15 

1 

3.3E-08 

5.0E-05 

6.6E-04 

Arsenic 

951 

0.5 

1.0E-06 

3.0E-04 

3.4E-03 

Barium 

89 

1 

1.9E-07 

7.0E-02 

2.7E-06 

Cadmium 

1.6 

1 

3.4E-09 

1.0E-03 

3.4E-06 

Chromium (total) 

32 

1 

6.9E-08 

2.0E-02 

3.5E-06 

Lead 

2488 

0.3 

1.6E-06 

7.5E-04 

2.2E-03 

Mercury 

7.3 

0.5 

7.9E-09 

3.0E-04 

2.6E-05 

Selenium 

4.8 

1 

1.0E-08 

5.0E-03 

2. IE-06 

Silver 

0.84 

1 

1.8E-09 

5.0E-03 

3.6E-07 





Hloral = 

6.3E-03 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern. 

3. A default value of 1 is used when a RAF is otherwise unavailable. 


J:\170,000-179,999M71521M71521-00 DEL12015 PM10 Denvation\Dust MonitoringlArea 51171521.10 Risk (Resident)Soil Ingest (1<2) 


QA: CL Date: 4/15/15 











TABLE 1-13A (Continued) 

CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY DOSES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR EXPOSURE TO DUST VIA GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT 
A-5 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No. 171521 10 
Page 2 of 4 
4/15/2015 


RECEPTOR: Resident (Child, age 7<8) 
SUBCHRONIC NON-CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-6A for Exposure Variables 
and Rationale 

See TABLE I-4A for Exposure Point 
Concentration Derivation 


ADDgoii.orai 

HQsoil-oral ” 

Exposure to Dust 

EPC soil * 

via Gastrointestinal Tract 

IR SO ii * EF * ED * EP * RAF ora i nc * Cl 

X HQ S0 ||_ 0ra i 

ADD SO j|o ra i 

BW * AP nc 

^soil-oral ” 

RfD 


EPC soi i 

RAF oral-nc 

ADD soi |_o ra i 

RfD 

HQsoil-oral 

EPC1 



SubChronic 


(mg/kg) 

^unitless) 

(mg/kg-day) 

(mg/kg-day) 

(unitless) 

0.020 

1 

1.9E-10 

2.7E+00 

6.9E-11 

0.0028 

1 

2.6E-11 

5.0E-04 

5. IE-08 

1.2 

0.3 

3.3E-09 

2.0E-01 

1.7E-08 

0.92 

0.3 

2.5E-09 

3.0E-01 

8.5E-09 

2.9 

0.3 

8.0E-09 

1.0E+00 

8.0E-09 

7.1 

0.3 

2.0E-08 

3.0E-01 

6.6E-08 

6.1 

0.3 

1.7E-08 

3.0E-01 

5.6E-08 

7.6 

0.3 

2. IE-08 

3.0E-01 

7.0E-08 

1.7 

0.3 

4.7E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.6E-08 

3.6 

0.3 

9.9E-09 

3.0E-01 

3.3E-08 

0.98 

1 

9.0E-09 

2.0E-02 

4.5E-07 

6.6 

0.3 

1.8E-08 

3.0E-01 

6.1E-08 

0.44 

0.3 

1.2E-09 

3.0E-01 

4.1E-09 

1.0 

1 

9.6E-09 

4.0E-03 

2.4E-06 

14 

0.3 

3.9E-08 

4.0E-01 

9.7E-08 

1.6 

0.3 

4.4E-09 

4.0E-01 

1. IE-08 

1.8 

0.28 

4.6E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.5E-08 

0.34 

0.3 

9.6E-10 

2.0E-01 

4.8E-09 

9.2 

0.3 

2.5E-08 

3.0E-01 

8.5E-08 

10 

0.3 

2.8E-08 

3.0E-01 

9.3E-08 

520 

0.3 

1.4E-06 

3.0E-01 

4.8E-06 

15 

1 

1.4E-07 

5.0E-05 

2.8E-03 

951 

0.5 

4.4E-06 

3.0E-04 

1.5E-02 

89 

1 

8.2E-07 

7.0E-02 

1.2E-05 

1.6 

1 

1.4E-08 

1.0E-03 

1.4E-05 

32 

1 

3.0E-07 

2.0E-02 

1.5E-05 

2488 

0.3 

6.9E-06 

7.5E-04 

9.2E-03 

7.3 

0.5 

3.4E-08 

3.0E-04 

1. IE-04 

4.8 

1 

4.4E-08 

5.0E-03 

8.8E-06 

0.84 

1 

7.7E-09 

5.0E-03 

1.5E-06 




HI oral — 

2.7E-02 


COC 


Acetone 

T richloroethene 

Acenaphthene 

Acenaphthylene 

Anthracene 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

Bis(2-Ethylhexyl)phthalate 

Chrysene 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

Dibenzofuran 

Fluoranthene 

Fluorene 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 
Naphthalene 
Phenanthrene 
Pyrene 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

Arsenic 

Barium 

Cadmium 

Chromium (total) 

Lead 

Mercury 

Selenium 

Silver 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern. 

3. A default value of 1 is used when a RAF is otherwise unavailable. 


000-179,99911715211171521-00 DEL12015 PM10 Derivation\Dust MonitoringlArea 51171521.10 Risk (Resident)Soil Ingest (7<8) 


QA CL Date 4/15/15 




















TABLE 1-13A (Continued) 

CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY DOSES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR EXPOSURE TO DUST VIA GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT 
A-5 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 3 of 4 
4/15/2015 


RECEPTOR: Resident (Adut, age 65) 
SUBCHRONIC NON-CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-6A for Exposure Variables 
and Rationale 

See TABLE I-4A for Exposure Point 
Concentration Derivation 

ADD SO j|-oral 

RQsoil-oral “ 

Exposure to Dust via Gastrointestinal Tract 

EPC SO ji * IRson * EF * ED * EP * RAF 

* PI 

oral-nc ° 1 

S HQ so ,|. ora i 

ADDsoji^jrai 

BW * AP nc 

^soil-oral — 

RfD 

COC 

EPC S oii 

RAF or ai- n c 

ADDsoji.Qrai 

RfD 

HQsoj|-oral 


EPC1 



SubChronic 

(unitless) 


(mg/kg) 

^unitless^) 

(mg/kg-day) 

(mg/kg-day) 

Acetone 

0.020 

1 

3.5E-10 

2.7E+00 

1.3E-10 

Trichloroethene 

0.0028 

1 

4.8E-11 

5.0E-04 

9.7E-08 

Acenaphthene 

1.2 

0.3 

6.3E-09 

2.0E-01 

3.1E-08 

Acenaphthylene 

0.92 

0.3 

4.8E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.6E-08 

Anthracene 

2.9 

0.3 

1.5E-08 

1.0E+00 

1.5E-08 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

7.1 

0.3 

3.7E-08 

3.0E-01 

1 2E-07 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

6.1 

0.3 

3.2E-08 

3.0E-01 

1. IE-07 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

7.6 

0.3 

4.0E-08 

3.0E-01 

1 3E-07 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

1.7 

0.3 

8.9E-09 

3.0E-01 

3.0E-08 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

3.6 

0.3 

1.9E-08 

3.0E-01 

6.2E-08 

Bis(2-Ethylhexyl)phthalate 

0.98 

1 

1.7E-08 

2.0E-02 

8.5E-07 

Chrysene 

6.6 

0.3 

3.4E-08 

3.0E-01 

1. IE-07 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

044 

0.3 

2.3E-09 

3.0E-01 

7.7E-09 

Dibenzofuran 

1.0 

1 

1.8E-08 

4.0E-03 

4.5E-06 

Fluoranthene 

14 

0.3 

7.3E-08 

4.0E-01 

1.8E-07 

Fluorene 

1.6 

0.3 

8.3E-09 

4.0E-01 

2.1E-08 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

1.8 

0.28 

8.7E-09 

3.0E-01 

2.9E-08 

Naphthalene 

0.34 

0.3 

1.8E-09 

2.0E-01 

9.0E-09 

Phenanthrene 

9.2 

0.3 

4.8E-08 

3.0E-01 

1 6E-07 

Pyrene 

10 

0.3 

5.2E-08 

3.0E-01 

1.7E-07 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

520 

0.3 

2.7E-06 

3.0E-01 

9.0E-06 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

15 

1 

2.6E-07 

5.0E-05 

5.3E-03 

Arsenic 

951 

0.5 

8.3E-06 

3.0E-04 

2.8E-02 

Barium 

89 

1 

1.5E-06 

7.0E-02 

2.2E-05 

Cadmium 

1.6 

1 

2.7E-08 

1.0E-03 

2.7E-05 

Chromium (total) 

32 

1 

5.6E-07 

2.0E-02 

2.8E-05 

Lead 

2488 

0.3 

1.3E-05 

7.5E-04 

1.7E-02 

Mercury 

7.3 

0.5 

6.4E-08 

3.0E-04 

2.1E-04 

Selenium 

4.8 

1 

8.3E-08 

5.0E-03 

1.7E-05 

Silver 

0.84 

1 

1.5E-08 

5.0E-03 

2.9E-06 





Hloral = 

5.0E-02 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern. 

3. A default value of 1 is used when a RAF is otherwise unavailable. 


J:\170,000-179,999\171521\171521-00 DEL12015 PM10 Denvation\Dust MonitonnglArea 51171521.10 Risk (Resident)Soil Ingest (65) 


QA: CL Date 4/15/15 












TABLE 1-13A (Continued) 

CALCULATION OF LIFETIME AVERAGE DAILY DOSES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR EXPOSURE TO DUST VIA GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT 
A-5 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 4 of 4 
4/15/2015 


RECEPTOR: Resident (Adut, age 65) 
CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-6A for Exposure Variables 
and Rationale 

See TABLE l-4Afor Exposure Point 
Concentration Derivation 


COC 


LADDsoji-orai 

ELCR S0 |i_o ra i ~ 

Exposure to Dust via Gastrointestinal Tract 

EPC soi i * IRsoii * EF * ED * EP * RAF oral _ c * Cl 

ELCR SO ||_ ora i 

LADD soil _o ral * CSF 

BW * AP C 

Total ELCRgoji^rai 

EPC soil 

RAF ora i^ 

LADD so ii-oral 

CSF 

ELCR SO j|_ ra i 

EPC1 





(mg/kg) 

(unitless) 

(mg/kg-day) 

(mg/kg-day)' 1 

(unitless) 

0.020 

1 

2.5E-12 

NA 

NC 

0.0028 

1 

3.5E-13 

4.6E-02 

1.59E-14 

1.2 

1 

1.5E-10 

NA 

NC 

0.92 

1 

1.IE-10 

NA 

NC 

2.9 

1 

3.6E-10 

NA 

NC 

7.1 

0.3 

2.7E-10 

7.3E-01 

1.95E-10 

6.1 

0.3 

2.3E-10 

7.3E+00 

1.65E-09 

7.6 

0.3 

2.8E-10 

7.3E-01 

2.08E-10 

1.7 

1 

2.IE-10 

NA 

NC 

3.6 

0.3 

1.3E-10 

7.3E-02 

9.71E-12 

0.98 

1 

1.2E-10 

1.4E-02 

1.70E-12 

6.6 

0.3 

2.5E-10 

7.3E-02 

1.80E-11 

0.44 

0.3 

1.6E-11 

7.3E+00 

1.20E-10 

1.0 

1 

1.3E-10 

NA 

NC 

14 

1 

1.7E-09 

NA 

NC 

1.6 

1 

2.0E-10 

NA 

NC 

1.8 

0.28 

6.2E-11 

7.3E-01 

4.52E-11 

0.34 

1 

4.3E-11 

NA 

NC 

9.2 

1 

1. IE-09 

NA 

NC 

10 

1 

1.2E-09 

NA 

NC 

520 

1 

6.5E-08 

NA 

NC 

15 

1 

1.9E-09 

2.0E+00 

3.77E-09 

951 

0.5 

5.9E-08 

1.5E+00 

8.86E-08 

89 

1 

1. IE-08 

NA 

NC 

1.6 

1 

1.9E-10 

NA 

NC 

32 

1 

4.0E-09 

NA 

NC 

2488 

1 

3.1E-07 

NA 

NC 

7.3 

1 

9.IE-10 

NA 

NC 

4.8 

1 

5.9E-10 

NA 

NC 

0.84 

1 

1.0E-10 

NA 

NC 




Total ELCRorar 

9.5E-08 


Acetone 

T richloroethene 

Acenaphthene 

Acenaphthylene 

Anthracene 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

Bis(2-Ethylhexyl)phthalate 

Chrysene 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

Dibenzofuran 

Fluoranthene 

Fluorene 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 
Naphthalene 
Phenanthrene 
Pyrene 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

Arsenic 

Barium 

Cadmium 

Chromium (total) 

Lead 

Mercury 

Selenium 

Silver 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern; NA = Not Applicable/Not Available; NC = Not Calculated. 

3. A default value of 1 is used when a RAF is otherwise unavailable. 


J A170 000-179,99911715211171521-00 DEL12015 PM10 DenvationVDust MomtoringlArea 51171521.10 Risk (Resident)Soil Ingest (Lifetime) 


QA CL Date 4/15/15 


















TABLE 1-14A 

CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY EXPOSURES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR INHALATION OF FUGITIVE DUST 


A-5 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No 171521.10 
Page 1 of 4 
4/15/2015 


RECEPTOR: Resident (Young Child, age 1<2) 
SUBCHRONIC NON-CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-6A for Exposure Variables and 
Rationale 

See TABLE I-4A for Exposure Point 
Concentration Derivation 

ADEEinh-dust 

HQinh-dust — 

Inhalation of Fugitive Dust 

EPC dust * EF * ED * EP * C2 


A^^inh-dust 

AP nc 

Ml = 

^ ^Qinh-dust 

RfC 


COC 

EPC(j us t 

A^^inh-dust 

RfC 

HQinh-dust 


EPC3 


Subchronic 



(mg/m 3 ) 

(mg/m 3 ) 

(mg/m 3 ) 

(unitless) 

Acetone 

3.0E-09 

5.4E-11 

8.0E-01 

6.8E-11 

Trichloroethene 

4.2E-10 

7.4E-12 

2.0E-03 

3.7E-09 

Acenaphthene 

1 8E-07 

3.2E-09 

5.0E-01 

6.4E-09 

Acenaphthylene 

1 4E-07 

2.5E-09 

5.0E-01 

4.9E-09 

Anthracene 

4.3E-07 

7.7E-09 

5.0E-01 

1.5E-08 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

1. IE-06 

1.9E-08 

5.0E-01 

3.8E-08 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

9. IE-07 

1.6E-08 

5.0E-01 

3.3E-08 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

1. IE-06 

2.0E-08 

5.0E-01 

4. IE-08 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

2.6E-07 

4.6E-09 

5.0E-01 

9. IE-09 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

5.4E-07 

9.6E-09 

5.0E-01 

1.9E-08 

Bis(2-Ethylhexyl)phthalate 

1.5E-07 

2.6E-09 

7.0E-03 

3.7E-07 

Chrysene 

9.9E-07 

1.8E-08 

5.0E-01 

3.5E-08 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

6.6E-08 

1.2E-09 

5.0E-01 

2.4E-09 

Dibenzofuran 

1.6E-07 

2.8E-09 

NA 

NC 

Fluoranthene 

2. IE-06 

3.7E-08 

5.0E-01 

7.5E-08 

Fluorene 

2.4E-07 

4.2E-09 

5.0E-01 

8.5E-09 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

2.7E-07 

4.8E-09 

5.0E-01 

9.5E-09 

Naphthalene 

5.2E-08 

9.2E-10 

3.0E-03 

3. IE-07 

Phenanthrene 

1.4E-06 

2.5E-08 

5.0E-01 

4.9E-08 

Pyrene 

1.5E-06 

2.7E-08 

5.0E-01 

5.4E-08 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

7.8E-05 

1.4E-06 

5.0E-01 

2.8E-06 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

2.3E-06 

4.1E-08 

2.0E-05 

2.0E-03 

Arsenic 

1.4E-04 

2.5E-06 

2.0E-05 

1.3E-01 

Barium 

1.3E-05 

2.4E-07 

5.0E-03 

4.7E-05 

Cadmium 

2.4E-07 

4.2E-09 

2.0E-05 

2. IE-04 

Chromium (total) 

4.8E-06 

8.6E-08 

3.0E-04 

2.9E-04 

Lead 

3.7E-04 

6.7E-06 

1.0E-03 

6.7E-03 

Mercury 

1. IE-06 

2.0E-08 

3.0E-04 

6.5E-05 

Selenium 

7.1E-07 

1.3E-08 

3.0E-03 

4.2E-06 

Silver 

1.3E-07 

2.2E-09 

1.4E-04 

1.6E-05 




Ulmh-dust 

1.4E-01 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern; NA = Not Applicable/Not Available; NC = Not Calculated. 


J:\170,000-179,99911715211171521-00 DEL12015 PM10 DenvatiorADust MonitoringlArea 5117152110 Risk (Residenl)Fug Dust (1<2) 


QA CL Date 4/15/15 















File No. 171521.10 
Page 2 of 4 
4/15/2015 


TABLE 1-14A (Continued) 

CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY EXPOSURES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR INHALATION OF FUGITIVE DUST 
A-5 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


RECEPTOR: Resident (Child, age 7<8) 
SUBCHRONIC NON-CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-6A for Exposure Variables and 
Rationale 

See TABLE I-4A for Exposure Point 
Concentration Derivation 


Inhalation of Fugitive Dust 

EPC dus , * EF * ED * EP * C2 

^ ^Qinh-dust 

^ L ' t inh-dust 

HO . , = 

ADEjnh^ust 

AP nc 


RfC 


COC 

EPCdust 

ADEj n h^just 

RfC 

HQjnh-dust 


EPC3 


SubChronic 



(mg/m 3 ) 

(mg/m 3 ) 

(mg/m 3 ) 

(unitless) 

Acetone 

3.0E-09 

2.0E-10 

8.0E-01 

2.5E-10 

Trichloroethene 

4.2E-10 

2.7E-11 

2.0E-03 

1.4E-08 

Acenaphthene 

1.8E-07 

1.2E-08 

5.0E-01 

2.4E-08 

Acenaphthylene 

1.4E-07 

9.0E-09 

5.0E-01 

1.8E-08 

Anthracene 

4.3E-07 

2.8E-08 

5.0E-01 

5.6E-08 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

1. IE-06 

7.0E-08 

5.0E-01 

1.4E-07 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

9.1E-07 

6.0E-08 

5.0E-01 

1.2E-07 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

1. IE-06 

7.5E-08 

5.0E-01 

1 t)t-U/ 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

2.6E-07 

1.7E-08 

5.0E-01 

3.3E-08 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

5.4E-07 

3.5E-08 

5.0E-01 

7.0E-08 

Bis(2-Ethylhexyl)phthalate 

1.5E-07 

9.6E-09 

7.0E-03 

1 4t-06 

Chrysene 

9.9E-07 

6.5E-08 

5.0E-01 

1.3E-07 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

6.6E-08 

4.3E-09 

5.0E-01 

8.7E-09 

Dibenzofuran 

1.6E-07 

1.0E-08 

NA 

NC 

Fluoranthene 

2.1E-06 

1.4E-07 

5.0E-01 

2.7E-07 

Fluorene 

2.4E-07 

1 6E-08 

5.0E-01 

3. IE-08 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

2.7E-07 

1.7E-08 

5.0E-01 

3.5E-08 

Naphthalene 

5.2E-08 

3.4E-09 

3.0E-03 

1. IE-06 

Phenanthrene 

1.4E-06 

9.0E-08 

5.0E-01 

1.8E-07 

Pyrene 

1.5E-06 

9.9E-08 

5.0E-01 

2.0E-07 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

7.8E-05 

5.1E-06 

5.0E-01 

1.0E-05 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

2.3E-06 

1.5E-07 

2.0E-05 

7.5E-03 

Arsenic 

1.4E-04 

9.3E-06 

2.0E-05 

4.7E-01 

Barium 

1.3E-05 

8.7E-07 

5.0E-03 

1.7E-04 

Cadmium 

2 4E-07 

1.5E-08 

2.0E-05 

7.7E-04 

Chromium (total) 

4.8E-06 

3.2E-07 

3.0E-04 

1. IE-03 

Lead 

3.7E-04 

2.4E-05 

1.0E-03 

2.4E-02 

Mercury 

1. IE-06 

7.2E-08 

3.0E-04 

2.4E-04 

Selenium 

7.1E-07 

4.7E-08 

3.0E-03 

1.6E-05 

Silver 

1.3E-07 

8.2E-09 

1.4E-04 

5.9E-05 




minh-dustj 

5.0E-01 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern; NA = Not Applicable/Not Available; NC = Not Calculated. 


J:\170.000-179.999\171521\171521-00 DEL\2015 PM10 DerivationtDust MonitoringtArea 5\17152110 Risk (Resident)Fug Dust (7<8) 


QA: CL Date 4/15/15 



















TABLE I-14A (Continued) 

CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY EXPOSURES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR INHALATION OF FUGITIVE DUST 
A-5 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No 171521.10 
Page 3 of 4 
4/15/2015 


RECEPTOR: Resident (Adult, age 65) 
SUBCHRONIC NON-CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-6A for Exposure Variables and 
Rationale 

See TABLE I-4A for Exposure Point 
Concentration Derivation 

ADEmh.tfyst 

HQinh-dust “ 

Inhalation of Fugitive Dust 

EPC dust * EF * ED * EP * C2 

^ ^Qinh-dust 

AD^inh-dust 

AP nc 

Hlinh-dust 

RfC 


COC 

EPCdust 

EPC3 

(mg/m 3 ) 

AD^inh-dust 

(mg/m 3 ) 

RfC 

SubChronic 

(mg/m 3 ) 

^Qinh-dust 

(unitless) 

Acetone 

3.0E-09 

4.5E-10 


8.0E-01 

5.6E-10 

Trichloroethene 

4.2E-10 

6.2E-11 


2.0E-03 

3.1E-08 

Acenaphthene 

1 8E-07 

2.7E-08 


5.0E-01 

5.3E-08 

Acenaphthylene 

1.4E-07 

2.0E-08 


5.0E-01 

4. IE-08 

Anthracene 

4.3E-07 

6.4E-08 


5.0E-01 

1.3E-07 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

1. IE-06 

1.6E-07 


5.0E-01 

3.2E-07 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

9.1E-07 

1.3E-07 


5.0E-01 

2.7E-07 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

1. IE-06 

1.7E-07 


5.0E-01 

3.4E-07 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

2.6E-07 

3.8E-08 


5.0E-01 

7.5E-08 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

5.4E-07 

7.9E-08 


5.0E-01 

1.6E-07 

Bis(2-Ethylhexyl)phthalate 

1.5E-07 

2.2E-08 


7.0E-03 

3. IE-06 

Chrysene 

9.9E-07 

1.5E-07 


5.0E-01 

2.9E-07 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

6.6E-08 

9.8E-09 


5.0E-01 

2.0E-08 

Dibenzofuran 

1.6E-07 

2.3E-08 


NA 

NC 

Fluoranthene 

2.1E-06 

3.1E-07 


5.0E-01 

6.2E-07 

Fluorene 

2.4E-07 

3.5E-08 


5.0E-01 

7.0E-08 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

2.7E-07 

3.9E-08 


5.0E-01 

7.9E-08 

Naphthalene 

5.2E-08 

7.6E-09 


3.0E-03 

2.5E-06 

Phenanthrene 

1.4E-06 

2.0E-07 


5.0E-01 

4. IE-07 

Pyrene 

1.5E-06 

2.2E-07 


5.0E-01 

4.5E-07 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

7.8E-05 

1.2E-05 


5.0E-01 

2.3E-05 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

2.3E-06 

3.4E-07 


2.0E-05 

1.7E-02 

Arsenic 

1.4E-04 

2.1E-05 


2.0E-05 

1.1E+00 

Barium 

1.3E-05 

2.0E-06 


5.0E-03 

3.9E-04 

Cadmium 

2.4E-07 

3.5E-08 


2.0E-05 

1.7E-03 

Chromium (total) 

4.8E-06 

7.1E-07 


3.0E-04 

2.4E-03 

Lead 

3.7E-04 

5.5E-05 


1.0E-03 

5.5E-02 

Mercury 

1. IE-06 

1.6E-07 


3.0E-04 

5.4E-04 

Selenium 

7. IE-07 

1. IE-07 


3.0E-03 

3.5E-05 

Silver 

1.3E-07 

1.9E-08 


1 4E-04 

1.3E-04 





^^inh-dust* 

1E+00 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern; NA = Not Applicable/Not Available; NC = Not Calculated. 


J:\170.000-179.999\171521\171521-00 DEL12015 PM10 Derivation\Dust MonitoringVArea 5\171521 10 Risk (Resident)Fug Dust (65) 


QA: CL Date 4/15/15 





















TABLE 1-14A (Continued) 

CALCULATION OF LIFETIME AVERAGE DAILY EXPOSURES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR INHALATION OF FUGITIVE DUST 
A-5 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No. 171521 10 
Page 4 of 4 
4/15/2015 


RECEPTOR: Resident (Adut, age 65) 
CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-6A for Exposure Variables and 
Rationale 

See TABLE I-4A for Exposure Point 
Concentration Derivation 

LAD^inh-<just 

ELCRmh-dust — 

Inhalation of Fugitive Dust 

EPC dust * EF * ED * EP * C2 * C4 

AP C 

LADE, nh _dust * UR Total ELCR m h-dust = 

2 ELCR mh _ dU st 

COC 

EF’Cdust 

UADEj n h-dust 

UR 

ELCRj n h-dust 


EPC3 





(mg/m 3 ) 

(pg/m 3 ) 

(Mg/m 3 )" 1 

(unitless) 

Acetone 

3 0E-09 

3.2E-09 

NA 

NC 

Trichloroethene 

4.2E-10 

4.4E-10 

5.0E-06 

2.2E-15 

Acenaphthene 

1.8E-07 

1.9E-07 

NA 

NC 

Acenaphthylene 

1.4E-07 

1.5E-07 

NA 

NC 

Anthracene 

4.3E-07 

4.6E-07 

NA 

NC 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

1. IE-06 

1. IE-06 

2.1E-04 

2.4E-10 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

9.1E-07 

9.6E-07 

2.1E-03 

2.0E-09 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

1. IE-06 

1.2E-06 

2.1E-04 

2.5E-10 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

2.6E-07 

2.7E-07 

NA 

NC 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

5.4E-07 

5.7E-07 

2. IE-05 

1.2E-11 

Bis(2-Ethylhexyl)phthalate 

1.5E-07 

1.5E-07 

1.3E-06 

2.0E-13 

Chrysene 

9.9E-07 

1.0E-06 

2.1E-05 

2.2E-11 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

6.6E-08 

7.0E-08 

2.1E-03 

1.5E-10 

Dibenzofuran 

1.6E-07 

1.7E-07 

NA 

NC 

Fluoranthene 

2.1E-06 

2.2E-06 

NA 

NC 

Fluorene 

2.4E-07 

2.5E-07 

NA 

NC 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

2.7E-07 

2.8E-07 

2.1E-04 

5.9E-11 

Naphthalene 

5.2E-08 

5.5E-08 

NA 

NC 

Phenanthrene 

1.4E-06 

1.5E-06 

NA 

NC 

Pyrene 

1.5E-06 

1.6E-06 

NA 

NC 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

7.8E-05 

8.2E-05 

NA 

NC 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

2.3E-06 

2.4E-06 

1.0E-04 

2.4E-10 

Arsenic 

1 4E-04 

1.5E-04 

3.0E-03 

4.5E-07 

Barium 

1.3E-05 

1.4E-05 

NA 

NC 

Cadmium 

2.4E-07 

2.5E-07 

1.8E-03 

4.5E-10 

Chromium (total) 

4.8E-06 

5. IE-06 

1.2E-02 

6.IE-08 

Lead 

3.7E-04 

3.9E-04 

NA 

NC 

Mercury 

1. IE-06 

1.2E-06 

NA 

NC 

Selenium 

7.1E-07 

7.5E-07 

NA 

NC 

Silver 

1.3E-07 

1.3E-07 

NA 

NC 




Total ELCR, nh _dust- 

5.2E-07 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern; NA = Not Applicable/Not Available; NC = Not Calculated. 


J:\170.000-179.999\171521\171521-00.DEL\2015 PM10 DenvationVDust MonitohngtArea 5\171521.10 Risk (Resident)Fug Dust (Lifetime) 


QA CL Date: 4/15/15 




































CES-2 AREA 






TABLE I-2B File No. 171521 10 

SUMMARY OF TOTAL HAZARD INDICES AND RISK ESTIMATES Page 1 °' 1 

CES-2 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 



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File No 171521.10 
Page 1 of 1 
4/17/2015 


TABLE I-3B 

SUMMARY OF ANALYTICAL DATA FOR SOIL SAMPLES (CES-2 Area) 
CES-2 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


Analytical Parameter' 

All Soil 1 2 

Background 5 * 7 8 

■Z-Tl 

Concentration for 
Human Health Risk 
Characterization 246 

Frequency of 
Detection 3 

Range Detected 3 

Median 

Concentration 4 

Arithmetic Mean 
Concentration 4 

Maximum Detected Concentration 

Location 

Depth 

(feet) 

Volatile Oraanic Compounds (VOCs) 











Acetone 

18 / 21 

0.0044 

- 

0.48 

0.040 

0 083 

GZ-302 6ft-10ft 

6-10 

NA 

0.083 

Butanone, 2- (MEK) 

7 / 21 

0.0100 

- 

0 022 

0.0025 

0.018 

GZ-310 10ft-15ft 

10-15 

NA 

0.018 

Carbon disulfide 

3 / 21 

0.0025 

- 

0.011 

0.0020 

0 015 

GZ-310 10ft-15ft 

10-15 

NA 

0.015 

Xylene, Total 

1 / 21 


0.075 


0.0025 

0.0067 

BOR-12 

0-3 

NA 

0.0067 

Semi-Volatile Oraanic Compounds (SVOCs) 











Dibenzofuran 

1 / 22 


8.9 


0 53 

0 97 

GZ-309 6ft-1 Oft 

6-10 

NA 

0.97 

Extractable Petroleum Hvdrocarbons (EPH) 











C9-C18 Aliphatics 

1 / 3 


313 


7.0 

109 

S-26 

0-0.5 

NA 

313 

C19-C36 Aliphatics 

3 / 3 

117 

- 

1790 

137 

681 

S-26 

0-0.5 

NA 

1790 

C11-C22 Aromatics 

2 / 3 

208 

- 

456 

208 

224 

S-26 

0-0.5 

NA 

456 

Total Petroleum Hvdrocarbons (TPH) 











Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

12 / 21 

71 

- 

2410 

85 

295 

GZ-304 6ft-1 Oft 

6-10 

NA 

295 

Polvchlorinated Biphenvls (PCBs) 











Aroclor 1254 

1 / 21 


0.34 


0.079 

0.095 

B215 

5-7 

NA 

NCC 

Aroclor 1260 

1 / 21 


0.20 


0.079 

0.088 

B215 

5-7 

NA 

NCC 

Aroclor 1221 

2 / 20 

0.35 

- 

0.35 

0.079 

0 11 

GZ-307 10ft-15ft 

10-15 

NA 

NCC 

Total PCBs 

3 / 21 

0.66 

- 

1.1 

0.079 

0 20 

GZ-308 10ft-15ft 

10-15 

NA 

0.20 

Metals. Total 











Antimony 

1 / 2 


2.9 


2.0 

2.0 

S-26 

0-0.5 

1 

2.9 

Arsenic 

49 / 49 

3.7 

- 

14800 

408 

1532 

GZ-310 6ft-1 Oft 

6-10 

20 

1532 

Barium 

25 / 25 

6 8 

- 

740 

60 

149 

GZ-303 10ft-15ft 

10-15 

50 

149 

* Beryllium 

2 / 2 

0.26 

- 

0 40 

0.33 

0,33 

S-26 

0-0.5 

0.4 

0.33 

Cadmium 

6 / 25 

2.9 

- 

130 

5.5 

20 

GZ-306 6ft-1 Oft 

6-10 

2 

20 

Chromium 

25 / 25 

7.6 

- 

76 

18 

22 

S-26 

0-0.5 

30 

22 

* Copper 

1 / 1 


30 


30 

30 

B215 

5-7 

40 

30 

Lead 

42 / 42 

9.8 

- 

13300 

256 

1437 

GZ-310 6ft-1 Oft 

6-10 

100 

1437 

Mercury 

24 / 25 

0.13 

- 

205 

1.1 

17 

GZ-310 6ft-1 Oft 

6-10 

0.3 

17 

Nickel 

2 / 2 

16 

- 

61 

39 

39 

S-26 

0-0.5 

20 

61 

Selenium 

5 / 25 

9.7 

• 

279 

5.6 

24 

GZ-309 10ft-15ft 

10-15 

0.5 

24 

Silver 

8 / 25 

1.4 

- 

21 

1.1 

3.7 

GZ-308 10ft-15ft 

10-15 

0.6 

3.7 

Vanadium 

2 / 2 

39 

- 

44 

42 

42 

S-26 

0-0.5 

30.0 

44 

Zinc 

2 / 2 

430 


530 

480 

480 

S-26 

0-0.5 

100.0 

530 

Other 











Cyanide, total 

1 / 1 


0.23 


0.23 

0.23 

B215 

5-7 

NA 

0.23 

Analvtes Reported with Multiple Methods A 











Acenaphthene 

1 / 25 


4.4 


0 53 

0.82 

GZ-309 6ft-1 Oft 

6-10 

0.5 

0.82 

Acenaphthylene 

1 / 25 


11 


0.53 

1.1 

GZ-309 6ft-10ft 

6-10 

0.5 

1.1 

Anthracene 

2 / 25 

1.6 

- 

23 

0.53 

1.6 

GZ-309 6ft-1 Oft 

6-10 

1 

1.6 

Benzo(a)anthracene 

3 / 25 

1.4 

- 

42 

0.53 

2.8 

GZ-309 6ft-10ft 

6-10 

2 

2.8 

Benzo(a)pyrene 

4 / 25 

0.71 

- 

22 

0.28 

1.6 

GZ-309 6ft-1 Oft 

6-10 

2 

1.6 

Benzo(b)fluoranthene 

3 / 25 

1.2 

- 

20 

0.53 

1.7 

GZ-309 6ft-1 Oft 

6-10 

2 

1.7 

Benzo(ghi)perylene 

2 / 25 

2.6 

- 

3.3 

0.53 

0 86 

GZ-309 6ft-1 Oft 

6-10 

1 

0.86 

Benzo(k)fluoranthene 

2 / 25 

7.9 

- 

27 

0.53 

2.0 

GZ-309 6ft-1 Oft 

6-10 

1 

2.0 

Chrysene 

4 / 25 

0.80 

- 

32 

0.28 

2.2 

GZ-309 6ft-10ft 

6-10 

2 

2.2 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

2 / 25 

1.8 

- 

3.0 

0.28 

0.59 

GZ-309 6ft-1 Oft 

6-10 

0.5 

0.59 

Fluoranthene 

6 / 25 

1.1 

- 

91 

0.55 

5.1 

GZ-309 6ft-1 Oft 

6-10 

4 

5.1 

Fluorene 

1 / 25 


14 


0.53 

1.2 

GZ-309 6ft-1 Oft 

6-10 

1 

1.2 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene 

2 / 25 

3.3 

- 

4.4 

0.53 

0.93 

GZ-309 6ft-1 Oft 

6-10 

1 

0.93 

Methylnaphthalene, 2- 

1 / 25 


7.5 


0.53 

0.95 

GZ-309 6ft-1 Oft 

6-10 

0.5 

0.95 

Naphthalene 

8 / 25 

0.0048 

- 

7.7 

0.0031 

0.56 

GZ-309 6ft-1 Oft 

6-10 

0.5 

0 56 

Phenanthrene 

3 / 25 

1.7 

- 

107 

0.53 

5.1 

GZ-309 6ft-1 Oft 

6-10 

3 

5-1 

Pyrene 

4 / 25 

1.9 

_ 

61 

0.53 

3.6 

GZ-309 6ft-1 Oft 

6-10 

4 

36 I 


Notes: 


1. Only detected analytes are listed. 

2 All data collected within the top 15 feet soil from the CES-2 Area Proposed Remediation Area are included in the statistics. 

3 These statistics only include analytical results for constituents detected above the laboratory reporting limit (RL). 

4. These statistics include all detected constituent concentrations and one-half the RL for constituents not detected above the RL. 

5 Background concentration from MassDEP, 2002. Technical Update: Background Levels of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Metals in Soil. May. 

Values for natural soil were used. * indicates the maximum detected concentration is below the MassDEP-identified background concentration. 

6 EPCs for human health risk characterization were based on the arithmetic means of all soil samples collected within the top 15 feet soil from the CES-2 Area Proposed Remediation Area. 

The maximum detected concentrations were used as the EPCs for the three EPH fractions, antimony, beryllium, nickel, vanasium, and zinc as a conservative approach due to the relatively limited sample size. 

7. Total polychlorinated biphenyl was calculated as sum of all arodors analyzed. 

8. Concentrations reported in milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg). 

A These analytes were analyzed by multiple analytical methods. If the analyte was detected via at least one method, the maximum detected concentration is listed to represent the sample result. 

If the analyte was not detected via any analytical method, the minimum RL is listed as the RL for the non-detected sample result. 

NCC = Not a Constitute of Concern; EPC = Exposure Point Concentration; EPH = Extractable Petroleum Hydrocarbon. 


JA170,000-179,999\171521\171521-00 DEL\2015 PM10 DerrvationVSoil Data HighlighttSoil Summary_High As 


QA CL Date 4/15/15 































TABLE I-4B 

SUMMARY OF EXPOSURE POINT CONCENTRATIONS 
CES-2 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No 



EPC1 

EPC3 


Arithmetic 

Estimated 

COC 

Mean 

Concentration 


Concentration 

in Fugitive 


in Soil - CES-2Area 5 a 

Dust b 


(mg/kg) 

(mg/m 3 ) 

2-Butanone 

0.018 

1.36E-09 

Acetone 

0.083 

6.26E-09 

Carbon Disulfide 

0.015 

1.09E-09 

Xylene (Total) 

0.0067 

4.99E-10 

2-Methylnaphthalene 

0.95 

7.1 IE-08 

Acenaphthene 

0.82 

6.18E-08 

Acenaphthylene 

1.1 

8 08E-08 

Anthracene 

1.6 

1.21E-07 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

2.8 

2.12E-07 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

1.6 

1.22E-07 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

1.7 

1.26E-07 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

0.86 

6 46E-08 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

2.0 

1 52E-07 

Chrysene 

2.2 

1.62E-07 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

0.59 

4.45E-08 

Dibenzofuran 

0.97 

7.25E-08 

Fluoranthene 

5.1 

3.79E-07 

Fluorene 

1.2 

8.98E-08 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

0.93 

7.01 E-08 

Naphthalene 

0.56 

4.20E-08 

Phenanthrene 

5.1 

3.81 E-07 

Pyrene 

3.6 

2.73E-07 

Cl 1-C22 Aromatic Fraction 

456 

3.42E-05 

C19-C36 Aliphatic Fraction 

1790 

1.34E-04 

C9-C18 Aliphatic Fraction 

313 

2.35E-05 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

295 

2.21 E-05 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

0.20 

1.51 E-08 

Antimony 

2.9 

2.18E-07 

Arsenic 

1532 

1.15E-04 

Barium 

149 

1.12E-05 

Beryllium 

0.33 

2.48E-08 

Cadmium 

20 

1.51E-06 

Chromium (total) 

22 

1.65E-06 

Copper 

30 

2.23E-06 

Cyanide 

0.23 

1.73E-08 

Lead 

1437 

1.08E-04 

Mercury 

17 

1.28E-06 

Nickel 

61 

4.58E-06 

Selenium 

24 

1.81E-06 

Silver 

3.7 

2.75E-07 

Vanadium 

44 

3.30E-06 

Zinc 

530 

3.98E-05 


Notes: 

a. The soil exposure point concentration is based on the arithmetic mean concentration from all soil samples obtained from within the CES- 
2 Area Proposed Remediation Area. 

The maximum detected concentrations were used as the EPCs for the three EPH fractions, antimony, beryllium, nickel, vanasium, and 
zinc as a conservative approach due to the relatively limited sample size. 

Although the maximum detected concentrations of beryllium and copper were within the MassDEP (2002) established background; all 
detected analytes were included as COCs in the risk evaluation. 

b The soil-bome fugitive dust exposure point concentrations were estimated from the soil exposure point concentration according to the 
following equation: 

EPC du5t = EPCso.i * PM 10 * Cl 


EPC dus i 

Exposure Point Concentration in Fugitive Dust (mg/m 3 ) 

Calculated 

EPCsoii 

Exposure Point Concentration in Soil (mg/kg) 

Calculated 

PMio 

Respirable Particle Concentration - Commercial/Industrial Workers and Residents (mg/m 3 ; 

0.075 

Cl 

Unit Conversion Factor (kg/mg) 

IE-06 


Abbreviations: 

COC = constituent of concern; EPH = extractable petroleum hydrocarbon. 


. 171521.10 
Page 1 of 1 
4/17/2015 


J:\170.000-179.999\171521\171521-00 DEL\2015 PM10 Derivation\Dust Monitonng\High As Area\171521 10 Exp Con\EPC 


QA: CL Dale 4/15/15 
















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TABLE MOB 

RELATIVE ABSORPTION FACTORS 
CES-2 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 1 of 1 
4/17/2015 


COC 

Exposure Pathways 

Carcinogen 

Oral Soil 

Non-Carcinogen 

2-Butanone 


1 a 

Acetone 


1 a 

Carbon Disulfide 


1 b 

Xylene (Total) 


1 a 

2-Methylnaphthalene 


0.3 a 

Acenaphthene 


0.3 a 

Acenaphthylene 


0.3 a 

Anthracene 


0.3 a 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

0.3 a 

0.3 a 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

0.3 a 

0.3 a 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

0.3 a 

0.3 a 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 


0.3 a 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

0.3 a 

0.3 a 

Chrysene 

0.3 a 

0.3 a 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

0.3 a 

0.3 a 

Dibenzofuran 



Fluoranthene 


0.3 a 

Fluorene 


0.3 a 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

0.28 a 

0.28 a 

Naphthalene 


0.3 a 

Phenanthrene 


0.3 a 

Pyrene 


0.3 a 

C11-C22 Aromatic Fraction 


0.3 a 

C19-C36 Aliphatic Fraction 


1 a 

C9-C18 Aliphatic Fraction 


1 a 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 


0.3 f 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

1 a 

1 a 

Antimony 


1 a 

Arsenic 

0.5 a 

0.5 a 

Barium 


1 a 

Beryllium 


1 a 

Cadmium 


1 a 

Chromium (total) 


1 a 

Copper 


0.7 b 

Cyanide 


1 a 

Lead 


0.3 c 

Mercury 


0.5 a 

Nickel 


1 a 

Selenium 


1 a 

Silver 


1 a 

Vanadium 


1 a 

Zinc 


1 a 


Notes: 

a. MassDEP 2014 ShortForm (v0414.xlsx). 

b. RAF calculated from Table B-11 Default Absorption Efficencies presented in 
MassDEP Guidance for Disposal Site Risk Characterization (1995). 

c. USEPA 2007. User’s Guide for the Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic 
Model for Lead in Children (IEUBK) Windows. 

f. Value for Cl 1-C22 aromatic hydrocarbons used for total petreleum 
hydrocarbon (TPH). 

Notes: 

1. A blank space indicates no data found. 

2. Where data are lacking, a default value of 1 is used in subsequent risk calcul; 
Abbreviations. 

COC = Constituent of Concern; FtAF = Relative Absorption Factors. 


J \ 170 , 000-179 999\171521\171521-O0 DELV2015PM10 DerivationVDust Momtoring\High As Area\171521.10 Chem IrrfoVRAF 


QA CL Date 4/15/15 







TABLE 1-1 IB 

CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY DOSES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR EXPOSURE TO DUST VIA GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT 
CES-2 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 1 of 2 
4/17/2015 


RECEPTOR: Commercial/Industrial Workers 
SUBCHRONIC NON-CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-5B for Exposure Variables 
and Rationale 

See TABLE I-4B for Exposure Point 
Concentration Derivation 

ADD SO j|-oral 

^Qsoil-oral 

Exposure to Dust via Gastrointestinal Tract 

EPC soil * IR S0 „ * EF * ED * EP * RAF ora , nc * Cl 

BW * AP nc 

ADD soi ,^ ra , |_| | _ 

RfD 

HQ S0l |_ 0ra | 

COC 

EPC soi i 

EPC1 

(mg/kg) 

RAF ora i_ nc 

(unitless) 

ADD S0 j|_ 0ra | 

(mg/kg-day) 

RfD 

SubChronic 

(mg/kg-day) 

HQsoil-oral 

(unitless) 

2-Butanone 

0.018 

i 

1.2E-10 

6.0E-01 

2.0E-10 

Acetone 

0.083 

i 

5.6E-10 

2.7E+00 

2. IE-10 

Carbon Disulfide 

0.015 

i 

9.8E-11 

1.0E-01 

9.8E-10 

Xylene (Total) 

0.0067 

i 

4.5E-11 

4.0E-01 

1.IE-10 

2-Methylnaphthalene 

0.95 

0.3 

1.9E-09 

4.0E-03 

4.8E-07 

Acenaphthene 

0.82 

0.3 

1.7E-09 

2.0E-01 

8.3E-09 

Acenaphthylene 

1.1 

0.3 

2.2E-09 

3.0E-01 

7.3E-09 

Anthracene 

1.6 

0.3 

3.3E-09 

1.0E+00 

3.3E-09 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

2.8 

0.3 

5.7E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.9E-08 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

1.6 

0.3 

3.3E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.1E-08 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

1.7 

0.3 

3.4E-09 

3.0E-01 

1. IE-08 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

0.86 

0.3 

1.7E-09 

3.0E-01 

5.8E-09 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

2.0 

0.3 

4.1E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.4E-08 

Chrysene 

2.2 

0.3 

4.4E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.5E-08 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

0.59 

0.3 

1.2E-09 

3.0E-01 

4 0E-09 

Dibenzofuran 

0.97 

1 

6.5E-09 

4.0E-03 

1.6E-06 

Fluoranthene 

5.1 

0.3 

1.0E-08 

4.0E-01 

2.6E-08 

Fluorene 

1.2 

0.3 

2.4E-09 

4.0E-01 

6.0E-09 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

0.93 

0.28 

1.8E-09 

3.0E-01 

5.9E-09 

Naphthalene 

0.56 

0.3 

1.1E-09 

2.0E-01 

5.7E-09 

Phenanthrene 

5.1 

0.3 

1.0E-08 

3.0E-01 

3.4E-08 

Pyrene 

3.6 

0.3 

7.4E-09 

3.0E-01 

2.5E-08 

Cl 1-C22 Aromatic Fraction 

456 

0.3 

9.2E-07 

3.0E-01 

3. IE-06 

C19-C36 Aliphatic Fraction 

1790 

1 

1.2E-05 

6.0E+00 

2.0E-06 

C9-C18 Aliphatic Fraction 

313 

1 

2.1E-06 

1.0E+00 

2. IE-06 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

295 

0.3 

5.9E-07 

3.0E-01 

2.0E-06 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

0.20 

1 

1.4E-09 

5.0E-05 

2.7E-05 

Antimony 

2.9 

1 

2.0E-08 

4.0E-04 

4.9E-05 

Arsenic 

1532 

0.5 

5.2E-06 

3.0E-04 

1.7E-02 

Barium 

149 

1 

1 0E-06 

7.0E-02 

1.4E-05 

Beryllium 

0 

1 

2.2E-09 

5.0E-03 

4.4E-07 

Cadmium 

20 

1 

1.4E-07 

1.0E-03 

1.4E-04 

Chromium (total) 

22 

1 

1.5E-07 

2.0E-02 

7.4E-06 

Copper 

30 

0.7 

1.4E-07 

3.7E-02 

3.8E-06 

Cyanide 

0 

1 

1.5E-09 

6.0E-03 

2.6E-07 

Lead 

1437 

0.3 

2.9E-06 

7.5E-04 

3.9E-03 

Mercury 

17 

0.5 

5.7E-08 

3.0E-04 

1.9E-04 

Nickel 

61 

1 

4. IE-07 

2.0E-02 

2. IE-05 

Selenium 

24 

1 

1.6E-07 

5.0E-03 

3.3E-05 

Silver 

4 

1 

2.5E-08 

5.0E-03 

4.9E-06 

Vanadium 

44 

1 

3.0E-07 

9.0E-03 

3.3E-05 

Zinc 

530 

1 

3.6E-06 

3.0E-01 

1.2E-05 





m soil-oral — 

2.2E-02 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern. 

3. A default value of 1 is used when an RAF is otherwise unavailable. 


J:\170,000-179999\171521\171521-00DEL\2015 PM10 Denvation'.Dust Monitormg\High As Area\171521.10 Risk (FW-DEP parameters)Soil Ingest (Non-Cancer) 


QA: CL Date 4/15/15 













TABLE 1-1 IB (Continued) 

CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY DOSES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR EXPOSURE TO DUST VIA GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT 
CES-2 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 2 of 2 
4/17/2015 


RECEPTOR: Commercial/Industrial Workers 
CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-5B for Exposure Variables 
and Rationale 

See TABLE I-4B for Exposure Point 
Concentration Derivation 

LAD Dgoii-orai — 

ELCR so j|-oral — 

Exposure to Dust via Gastrointestinal Tract 

EPCsoii * IRsoil * EF * ED * EP * RAF orak; * Cl 

BW * AP C 

LADD sol |_ orat * CSF Total ELCR soi |_o ra i = 

^ ELCR S oil-oral 

COC 

EPC soil 

EPC1 

(mg/kg) 

RAF ora |_ c 

(unitless) 

L-ADD S0 j|-oral 

(mg/kg-day) 

CSF 

(mg/kg-day)' 1 

ELCR S oil-oral 

(unitless) 

2-Butanone 

0.018 

i 

8.70E-13 

NA 

NC 

Acetone 

0.083 

i 

4.02E-12 

NA 

NC 

Carbon Disulfide 

0.015 

i 

7.01E-13 

NA 

NC 

Xylene (Total) 

0.0067 

i 

3.20E-13 

NA 

NC 

2-Methylnaphthalene 

0.95 

i 

4.56E-11 

NA 

NC 

Acenaphthene 

0.82 

i 

3.96E-11 

NA 

NC 

Acenaphthylene 

1.1 

i 

5.18E-11 

NA 

NC 

Anthracene 

1.6 

i 

7.78E-11 

NA 

NC 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

2.8 

0.3 

4.08E-11 

7.3E-01 

3.0E-11 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

1.6 

0.3 

2.35E-11 

7.3E+00 

1.7E-10 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

1.7 

0.3 

2.43E-11 

7.3E-01 

1.8E-11 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

0.86 

1 

4.14E-11 

NA 

NC 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

2.0 

0.3 

2.92E-11 

7.3E-02 

2.1E-12 

Chrysene 

2.2 

0.3 

3.1 IE-11 

7.3E-02 

2.3E-12 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

0.59 

0.3 

8.56E-12 

7.3E+00 

6.2E-11 

Dibenzofuran 

0.97 

1 

4.65E-11 

NA 

NC 

Fluoranthene 

5.1 

1 

2.43E-10 

NA 

NC 

Fluorene 

1.2 

1 

5.76E-11 

NA 

NC 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

0.93 

0.28 

1.26E-11 

7.3E-01 

9.2E-12 

Naphthalene 

0.56 

1 

2.69E-11 

NA 

NC 

Phenanthrene 

5.1 

1 

2.45E-10 

NA 

NC 

Pyrene 

3.6 

1 

1.75E-10 

NA 

NC 

Cl 1-C22 Aromatic Fraction 

456 

1 

2.19E-08 

NA 

NC 

C19-C36 Aliphatic Fraction 

1790 

1 

8.61 E-08 

NA 

NC 

C9-C18 Aliphatic Fraction 

313 

1 

1.51 E-08 

NA 

NC 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

295 

1 

1.42E-08 

NA 

NC 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

0.20 

1 

9.65E-12 

2.0E+00 

1.9E-11 

Antimony 

2.9 

1 

1.39E-10 

NA 

NC 

Arsenic 

1532 

0.5 

3.68E-08 

1.5E+00 

5.5E-08 

Barium 

149 

1 

7.17E-09 

NA 

NC 

Beryllium 

0 

1 

1.59E-11 

NA 

NC 

Cadmium 

20 

1 

9.70E-10 

NA 

NC 

Chromium (total) 

22 

1 

1.06E-09 

NA 

NC 

Copper 

30 

1 

1.43E-09 

NA 

NC 

Cyanide 

0 

1 

1.1 IE-11 

NA 

NC 

Lead 

1437 

1 

6.91 E-08 

NA 

NC 

Mercury 

17 

1 

8.18E-10 

NA 

NC 

Nickel 

61 

1 

2.93E-09 

NA 

NC 

Selenium 

24 

1 

1.16E-09 

NA 

NC 

Silver 

4 

1 

1.76E-10 

NA 

NC 

Vanadium 

44 

1 

2.12E-09 

NA 

NC 

Zinc 

530 

1 

2.55E-08 

NA 

NC 





Total ELCRso,i-or a i 

|1 5.6E-08 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern; NA = Not Applicable/Not Available; NC = Not Calculated. 

3. A default value of 1 is used when an RAF is otherwise unavailable 


J:\170.000-179.999\171521\171521-00 DEL\2015 PM10 DenvationVDust Monitoring\High As Area\171521.10 Risk (FW-DEP parameters)Soil Ingest (Cancer) 


QA CL Date 4/15/15 









File No. 171521.10 
Page 1 of 2 
4/17/2015 


TABLE 1-12B 

CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY EXPOSURES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR INHALATION OF FUGITIVE DUST 


CES-2 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


RECEPTOR: Commercial/Industrial Workers 
SUBCHRONIC NON-CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-5B for Exposure Variables and 
Rationale. See TABLE I-4B for Exposure 
Point Concentration Derivation 

Inhalation of Soil-derived Fugitive Dust 

EPC dust * EF * ED * EP * C2 

2 HQ dust 

''‘-'‘-dust 

HO i i - 

ADE dust 

AP nc 

HI, , = 


RfC 


COC 

EPCdust 

ADE dust 

RfC 

HQ dus t 


EPC3 


SubChronic 



(mg/m 3 ) 

(mg/m 3 ) 

(mg/m 3 ) 

(unitless) 

2-Butanone 

1.4E-09 

2.6E-10 

5.0E+00 

5.2E-11 

Acetone 

6.3E-09 

1.2E-09 

8.0E-01 

1.5E-09 

Carbon Disulfide 

1. IE-09 

2.IE-10 

7.0E-01 

3.0E-10 

Xylene (Total) 

5.0E-10 

9.5E-11 

4.0E-01 

2.4E-10 

2-Methyl naphthalene 

7.1E-08 

1.4E-08 

5.0E-01 

2.7E-08 

Acenaphthene 

6.2E-08 

1.2E-08 

5.0E-01 

2.4E-08 

Acenaphthylene 

8. IE-08 

1.5E-08 

5.0E-01 

3. IE-08 

Anthracene 

1.2E-07 

2.3E-08 

5.0E-01 

4.6E-08 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

2. IE-07 

4.0E-08 

5.0E-01 

8 IE-08 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

1.2E-07 

2.3E-08 

5.0E-01 

4.7E-08 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

1.3E-07 

2.4E-08 

5.0E-01 

4.8E-08 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

6.5E-08 

1.2E-08 

5.0E-01 

2.5E-08 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

1.5E-07 

2.9E-08 

5.0E-01 

5.8E-08 

Chrysene 

1.6E-07 

3.1E-08 

5.0E-01 

6.2E-08 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

4 4E-08 

8.5E-09 

5.0E-01 

1.7E-08 

Dibenzofuran 

7.2E-08 

1.4E-08 

NA 

NC 

Fluoranthene 

3.8E-07 

7.2E-08 

5.0E-01 

1.4E-07 

Fluorene 

9.0E-08 

1.7E-08 

5.0E-01 

3.4E-08 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

7.0E-08 

1.3E-08 

5.0E-01 

2.7E-08 

Naphthalene 

4.2E-08 

8.0E-09 

3.0E-03 

2.7E-06 

Phenanthrene 

3.8E-07 

7.3E-08 

5.0E-01 

1.5E-07 

Pyrene 

2.7E-07 

5.2E-08 

5.0E-01 

1 0E-07 

Cl 1-C22 Aromatic Fraction 

3.4E-05 

6.5E-06 

5.0E-01 

1.3E-05 

C19-C36 Aliphatic Fraction 

1.3E-04 

2.6E-05 

NA 

NC 

C9-C18 Aliphatic Fraction 

2.3E-05 

4.5E-06 

6.0E-01 

7.5E-06 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

2.2E-05 

4.2E-06 

5.0E-01 

8.4E-06 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

1.5E-08 

2.9E-09 

2.0E-05 

1.4E-04 

Antimony 

2.2E-07 

4. IE-08 

1.0E-02 

4. IE-06 

Arsenic 

1. IE-04 

2.2E-05 

2.0E-05 

1.1E+00 

Barium 

1. IE-05 

2.1E-06 

5.0E-03 

4.3E-04 

Beryllium 

2.5E-08 

4.7E-09 

2.0E-05 

2.4E-04 

Cadmium 

1.5E-06 

2.9E-07 

2.0E-05 

1.4E-02 

Chromium (total) 

1.6E-06 

3.1E-07 

3.0E-04 

1.0E-03 

Copper 

2.2E-06 

4.2E-07 

3.0E-03 

1.4E-04 

Cyanide 

1.7E-08 

3.3E-09 

3.0E-03 

1. IE-06 

Lead 

1. IE-04 

2.1E-05 

1.0E-03 

2. IE-02 

Mercury 

1.3E-06 

2.4E-07 

3.0E-04 

8. IE-04 

Nickel 

4.6E-06 

8.7E-07 

1.0E-03 

8.7E-04 

Selenium 

1.8E-06 

3.5E-07 

3.0E-03 

1 2E-04 

Silver 

2.7E-07 

5.2E-08 

1.4E-04 

3.7E-04 

Vanadium 

3.3E-06 

6.3E-07 

1.0E-03 

6.3E-04 

Zinc 

4.0E-05 

7.6E-06 

1.4E-03 

5.4E-03 




Hldustf 

1E+00 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern; NA = Not Applicable/Not Available; NC = Not Calculated. 


J:\170,000-179,999\171521\171521-00.DEL\2015 PM10 DenvationVDust MonitoringVHigh As Area\171521.10 Risk (FW-DEP parametersJFugitive Dust (Non-Cancer) 


QA CL Date: 4/15/15 
















File No 171521 10 
Page 2 of 2 
4/17/2015 


TABLE 1-12B (Continued) 

CALCULATION OF LIFETIME AVERAGE DAILY EXPOSURES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR INHALATION OF FUGITIVE DUST 
CES-2 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


RECEPTOR: Commercial/Industrial Workers 


CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-5B for Exposure Variables and 
Rationale and TABLE I-4B for Exposure 
Point Concentration Derivation 

Inhalation of Soil-derived Fugitive Dust 

EPC dust * EF * ED * EP * C2 *C3 

LADt dust 

AP C 

ELCR dust = LADE dust * UR Total ELCR dus , = 

S ELCR dust 

COC 

EPC dust 

EPC3 

(mg/m 3 ) 

LADE dus t 

(Mg/m 3 ) 

UR 

(pg/m 3 )' 1 

ELCR dgst 

(unitless) 

2-Butanone 

1.4E-09 

1.8E-09 

NA 

NC 

Acetone 

6.3E-09 

8.5E-09 

NA 

NC 

Carbon Disulfide 

1. IE-09 

1.5E-09 

NA 

NC 

Xylene (Total) 

5.0E-10 

6.8E-10 

NA 

NC 

2-Methyl naphthalene 

7.1E-08 

9.7E-08 

NA 

NC 

Acenaphthene 

6 2E-08 

8.4E-08 

NA 

NC 

Acenaphthylene 

8.1E-08 

1. IE-07 

NA 

NC 

Anthracene 

1.2E-07 

1.7E-07 

NA 

NC 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

2.1E-07 

2.9E-07 

2.1E-04 

6.0E-11 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

1.2E-07 

1.7E-07 

2. IE-03 

3.5b-1U 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

1.3E-07 

1.7E-07 

2.1E-04 

3.6E-11 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

6.5E-08 

8.8E-08 

NA 

NC 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

1.5E-07 

2.1E-07 

2.1E-05 

4.3E-12 

Chrysene 

1.6E-07 

2.2E-07 

2.1E-05 

4 6E-12 

Dibenzo(a, h)anthracene 

4.4E-08 

6.1E-08 

2. IE-03 

1.3E-10 

Dibenzofuran 

7.2E-08 

9.9E-08 

NA 

NC 

Fluoranthene 

3.8E-07 

5.2E-07 

NA 

NC 

Fluorene 

9.0E-08 

1.2E-07 

NA 

NC 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

7.0E-08 

9.5E-08 

2.1E-04 

2.0E-11 

Naphthalene 

4.2E-08 

5.7E-08 

NA 

NC 

Phenanthrene 

3.8E-07 

5.2E-07 

NA 

NC 

Pyrene 

2.7E-07 

3.7E-07 

NA 

NC 

C11-C22 Aromatic Fraction 

3.4E-05 

4.7E-05 

NA 

NC 

C19-C36 Aliphatic Fraction 

1.3E-04 

1.8E-04 

NA 

NC 

C9-C18 Aliphatic Fraction 

2.3E-05 

3.2E-05 

NA 

NC 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

2.2E-05 

3.0E-05 

NA 

NC 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

1.5E-08 

2.0E-08 

1.0E-04 

2 OE-12 

Antimony 

Arsenic 

2.2E-07 

1. IE-04 

3.0E-07 

1.6E-04 

NA 

3.0E-03 

NC 

4.7E-07 

Barium 

1. IE-05 

1.5E-05 

NA 

NC 

Beryllium 

Cadmium 

2.5E-08 

1.5E-06 

3.4E-08 

2. IE-06 

2.4E-03 

1 8E-03 

8. IE-11 
3.7E-09 

Chromium (total) 

1.6E-06 

2.2E-06 

1.2E-02 

2.7E-08 

Copper 

2.2E-06 

3.0E-06 

NA 

NC 

Cyanide 

Lead 

1.7E-08 

1. IE-04 

2.3E-08 

1.5E-04 

NA 

NA 

NC 

NC 

Mercury 

Nickel 

1.3E-06 

4 6E-06 

1.7E-06 

6.2E-06 

NA 

4.8E-04 

NC 

3.0E-09 

Selenium 

1.8E-06 

2.5E-06 

NA 

NC 

Silver 

2.7E-07 

3.7E-07 

NA 

NC 

Vanadium 

3.3E-06 

4.5E-06 

NA 

NC 

4.0E-05 

54E-05 

NA 

NC 




Total ELCR dust :| 5.0E-07 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern; NA = Not Applicable/Not Available; NC = Not Calculated. 


V170.000-179,999\171521\171521-00 I 


DEU2015 PM 10 DenvationlDust Monitoring\High As Area\171521.10 Risk (FW-DEP parameters)Fug,tive Dust (Cancer) 


QA: CL Date 4/15/15 









TABLE 1-13B 

CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY DOSES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR EXPOSURE TO DUST VIA GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT 
CES-2 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 1 of 4 
4/17/2015 


RECEPTOR: Resident (Young Child, age 1<2) 
SUBCHRONIC NON-CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-6B for Exposure Variables 
and Rationale 

See TABLE I-4B for Exposure Point 
Concentration Derivation 

Exposure to Dust 

* dd - Ep C S0 ,| * 

soil-oral 

ur\ _ ADD so j|_ ora | 

RfD 

via Gastrointestinal Tract 

IR SO ii * EF * ED * EP * RAF oral nc * Cl 

BW * AP nc 

X HQ S0 j|_ 0ra | 

COC 

EPC soi , 

EPC1 

(mg/kg) 

RAF ora |-nc 

(unitless) 

ADD S0 j|_ 0ra i 

(mg/kg-day) 

RfD 

Subchronic 

(mg/kg-day) 

^^soil-oral 

(unitless) 

2-Butanone 

0.018 

1 

2.0E-11 

6.0E-01 

3.3E-11 

Acetone 

0.083 

1 

9.0E-11 

2.7E+00 

3.3E-11 

Carbon Disulfide 

0.015 

1 

1.6E-11 

1.0E-01 

1.6E-10 

Xylene (Total) 

0.0067 

1 

7.2E-12 

4.0E-01 

1.8E-11 

2-Methylnaphthalene 

0.95 

0.3 

3.IE-10 

4.0E-03 

7.7E-08 

Acenaphthene 

0.82 

0.3 

2.7E-10 

2.0E-01 

1.3E-09 

Acenaphthylene 

1.1 

0.3 

3.5E-10 

3.0E-01 

1.2E-09 

Anthracene 

1.6 

0.3 

5.2E-10 

1.0E+00 

5.2E-10 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

2.8 

0.3 

9.2E-10 

3.0E-01 

3.1E-09 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

1.6 

0.3 

5.3E-10 

3.0E-01 

1.8E-09 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

1.7 

0.3 

5.5E-10 

3.0E-01 

1.8E-09 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

0.86 

0.3 

2.8E-10 

3.0E-01 

9.3E-10 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

2.0 

0.3 

6.6E-10 

3.0E-01 

2.2E-09 

Chrysene 

2.2 

0.3 

7.0E-10 

3.0E-01 

2.3E-09 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

0.59 

0.3 

1.9E-10 

3.0E-01 

6.4E-10 

Dibenzofuran 

0.97 

1 

1.0E-09 

4.0E-03 

2.6E-07 

Fluoranthene 

5.1 

0.3 

1.6E-09 

4.0E-01 

4.1E-09 

Fluorene 

1.2 

0.3 

3.9E-10 

4.0E-01 

9.7E-10 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

0.93 

0.28 

2.8E-10 

3.0E-01 

9.4E-10 

Naphthalene 

0.56 

0.3 

1.8E-10 

2.0E-01 

9. IE-10 

Phenanthrene 

5.1 

0.3 

1.6E-09 

3.0E-01 

5.5E-09 

Pyrene 

3.6 

0.3 

1.2E-09 

3.0E-01 

3.9E-09 

Cl 1-C22 Aromatic Fraction 

456 

0.3 

1.5E-07 

3.0E-01 

4.9E-07 

C19-C36 Aliphatic Fraction 

1790 

1 

1.9E-06 

6.0E+00 

3.2E-07 

C9-C18 Aliphatic Fraction 

313 

1 

3.4E-07 

1.0E+00 

3.4E-07 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

295 

0.3 

9.6E-08 

3.0E-01 

3.2E-07 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

0.20 

1 

2.2E-10 

5.0E-05 

4.3E-06 

Antimony 

2.9 

1 

3. IE-09 

4.0E-04 

7.8E-06 

Arsenic 

1532 

0.5 

8.3E-07 

3.0E-04 

2 8E-03 

Barium 

149 

1 

1.6E-07 

7.0E-02 

2.3E-06 

Beryllium 

0.33 

1 

3.6E-10 

5.0E-03 

7. IE-08 

Cadmium 

20 

1 

2.2E-08 

1.0E-03 

2.2E-05 

Chromium (total) 

22 

1 

2.4E-08 

2.0E-02 

1.2E-06 

Copper 

30 

0.7 

2.3E-08 

3.7E-02 

6. IE-07 

Cyanide 

0.23 

1 

2.5E-10 

6.0E-03 

4. IE-08 

Lead 

1437 

0.3 

4.7E-07 

7.5E-04 

6.2E-04 

Mercury 

17 

0.5 

9.2E-09 

3.0E-04 

3. IE-05 

Nickel 

61 

1 

6.6E-08 

2.0E-02 

3.3E-06 

Selenium 

24 

1 

2.6E-08 

5.0E-03 

5.2E-06 

Silver 

3.7 

1 

4.0E-09 

5.0E-03 

7.9E-07 

Vanadium 

44 

1 

4.8E-08 

9.0E-03 

5.3E-06 

Zinc 

530 

1 

5.7E-07 

3.0E-01 

1.9E-06 





Hl 0 ral = 

| 3.5E-03 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern. 

3. A default value of 1 is used when a RAF is otherwise unavailable. 


J:\170.000-179.999\171521\171521-00 DEL\2015 PM10 Denvation\Dusl MomtoringVHigh As Area\171521.10 Risk (Residenf)Soil Ingest (1<2) 


QA CL Date 4/15/15 
















File No. 171521.10 
Page 2 of 4 
4/17/2015 


TABLE 1-13B (Continued) 

CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY DOSES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR EXPOSURE TO DUST VIA GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT 
CES-2 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


RECEPTOR: Resident (Child, age 7<8) 
SUBCHRONIC NON-CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-6B for Exposure Variables 
and Rationale 

See TABLE I-4B for Exposure Point 
Concentration Derivation 


ADD S0l)K)ra i - 

HQsoil-oral “ 

Exposure to Dust 

EPC soil * 

via Gastrointestinal Tract 

IR S01| * EF * ED * EP * RAF 

oral-nc * Cl 

S HQ so ,i_ ora i 

ADDsod.orai 

BW * AP nc 

RUoil-oral — 

RfD 


EPCsoii 

RAF ora i_ nc 

A D D soil-oral 

RfD 

RQsoil-oral 

EPC1 



SubChronic 


(mg/kg) 

(unitlessl 

(mg/kg-day) 

(mg/kg-day) 

/unit! ess) 

0.018 

1 

8.4E-11 

6.0E-01 

1.4E-10 

0.083 

1 

3.9E-10 

2.7E+00 

1 4E-10 

0.015 

1 

6.7E-11 

1.0E-01 

6.7E-10 

0.0067 

1 

3. IE-11 

4.0E-01 

7.7E-11 

0.95 

0.3 

1.3E-09 

4.0E-03 

3.3E-07 

0.82 

0.3 

1. IE-09 

2.0E-01 

5.7E-09 

1.1 

0.3 

1.5E-09 

3.0E-01 

5 0E-09 

1.6 

0.3 

2.2E-09 

1.0E+00 

2.2E-09 

2.8 

0.3 

3.9E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.3E-08 

1.6 

0.3 

2.3E-09 

3.0E-01 

7.5E-09 

1.7 

0.3 

2.3E-09 

3.0E-01 

7.8E-09 

0.86 

0.3 

1.2E-09 

3.0E-01 

4 0E-09 

2.0 

0.3 

2.8E-09 

3.0E-01 

9.3E-09 

2.2 

0.3 

3.0E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.0E-08 

0.59 

0.3 

8.2E-10 

3.0E-01 

2.7E-09 

0.97 

1 

4.5E-09 

4.0E-03 

1.1E-06 

5.1 

0.3 

7.0E-09 

4.0E-01 

1.8E-08 

1.2 

0.3 

1.7E-09 

4.0E-01 

4. IE-09 

0.93 

0.28 

1.2E-09 

3.0E-01 

4.0E-09 

0.56 

0.3 

7.7E-10 

2.0E-01 

3.9E-09 

5.1 

0.3 

7.0E-09 

3.0E-01 

2.3E-08 

3.6 

0.3 

5.0E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.7E-08 

456 

0.3 

6.3E-07 

3.0E-01 

2. IE-06 

1790 

1 

8.3E-06 

6.0E+00 

1.4E-06 

313 

1 

1.4E-06 

1.0E+00 

1.4E-06 

295 

0.3 

4. IE-07 

3.0E-01 

1.4E-06 

0.20 

1 

9.3E-10 

5.0E-05 

1.9E-05 

2.9 

1 

1.3E-08 

4.0E-04 

3.3E-05 

1532 

0.5 

3.5E-06 

3.0E-04 

1.2E-02 

149 

1 

6.9E-07 

7.0E-02 

9.8E-06 

0.33 

1 

1.5E-09 

5.0E-03 

3.0E-07 

20 

1 

9.3E-08 

1.0E-03 

9.3E-05 

22 

1 

1.0E-07 

2.0E-02 

5. IE-06 

30 

0.7 

9.7E-08 

3.7E-02 

2.6E-06 

0.23 

1 

1. IE-09 

6.0E-03 

1.8E-07 

1437 

0.3 

2.0E-06 

7.5E-04 

2.7E-03 

17 

0.5 

3.9E-08 

3.0E-04 

1.3E-04 

61 

1 

2.8E-07 

2.0E-02 

1.4E-05 

24 

1 

1. IE-07 

5.0E-03 

2.2E-05 

3 7 

1 

1.7E-08 

5.0E-03 

3.4E-06 

44 

1 

2.0E-07 

9.0E-03 

2.3E-05 

530 

1 

2.4E-06 

3.0E-01 

8.2E-06 



^0131 — 

II 1.5E-02 


COC 


2-Butanone 

Acetone 

Carbon Disulfide 

Xylene (Total) 

2-Methylnaphthalene 

Acenaphthene 

Acenaphthylene 

Anthracene 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

Chrysene 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

Dibenzofuran 

Fluoranthene 

Fluorene 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 
Naphthalene 
Phenanthrene 
Pyrene 

C11-C22 Aromatic Fraction 

C19-C36 Aliphatic Fraction 

C9-C18 Aliphatic Fraction 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

Antimony 

Arsenic 

Barium 

Beryllium 

Cadmium 

Chromium (total) 

Copper 

Cyanide 

Lead 

Mercury 

Nickel 

Selenium 

Silver 

Vanadium 

Zinc 


Notes: 

1 Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern. 

3. A default value of 1 is used when a RAF is otherwise unavailable. 


J:\170.000-179.999\171521\171521-00 


DEL12015 PM10 Derivation\Dust Monitoring\High As Area\171521.10 Risk (Resident)Soil Ingest (7<8) 


QA CL Date 4/15/15 




















TABLE 1-13B (Continued) 

CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY DOSES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR EXPOSURE TO DUST VIA GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT 
CES-2 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No 171521.10 
Page 3 of 4 
4/17/2015 


RECEPTOR: Resident (Adult, age 65) 
SUBCHRONIC NON-CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-6B for Exposure Variables 
and Rationale 

See TABLE I-4B for Exposure Point 
Concentration Derivation 

ADD soj |_o ra | - 

HQsoil-oral “ 

Exposure to Dust via Gastrointestinal Tract 

EPC soii * IR soj | * EF * ED * EP * RAF 

BW * AP nc 

ADD SO j|o ra | 

RfD 

* Pi 

aral-nc ^ 1 

^soil-oral “ 

^ HQ S0 ||_ 0ra i 

COC 

EPCsoii 

EPC1 

(mg/kg) 

RAF ora |_ nc 

(unitless) 

ADD SO j|_o ra i 

(mg/kg-day) 

RfD 

SubChronic 

(mg/kg-day) 

HQsoil-oral 

(unitless) 

2-Butanone 

0.018 

i 

1.6E-10 

6.0E-01 

2.6E-10 

Acetone 

0.083 

i 

7.2E-10 

2.7E+00 

2.7E-10 

Carbon Disulfide 

0.015 

i 

1.3E-10 

1.0E-01 

1.3E-09 

Xylene (Total) 

0.0067 

i 

5.7E-11 

4.0E-01 

1.4E-10 

2-Methylnaphthalene 

0.95 

0.3 

2.5E-09 

4.0E-03 

6. IE-07 

Acenaphthene 

0.82 

0.3 

2. IE-09 

2.0E-01 

1. IE-08 

Acenaphthylene 

1.1 

0.3 

2.8E-09 

3.0E-01 

9.3E-09 

Anthracene 

1.6 

0.3 

4.2E-09 

1.0E+00 

4.2E-09 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

2.8 

0.3 

7.3E-09 

3.0E-01 

2.4E-08 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

1.6 

0.3 

4.2E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.4E-08 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

1.7 

0.3 

4.4E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.5E-08 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

0.86 

0.3 

2.2E-09 

3.0E-01 

7.4E-09 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

2.0 

0.3 

5.2E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.7E-08 

Chrysene 

2.2 

0.3 

5.6E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.9E-08 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

0.59 

0.3 

1.5E-09 

3.0E-01 

5. IE-09 

Dibenzofuran 

0.97 

1 

8.3E-09 

4.0E-03 

2. IE-06 

Fluoranthene 

5.1 

0.3 

1.3E-08 

4.0E-01 

3.3E-08 

Fluorene 

1.2 

0.3 

3. IE-09 

4.0E-01 

7.8E-09 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

0.93 

0.28 

2.3E-09 

3.0E-01 

7.5E-09 

Naphthalene 

0.56 

0.3 

1.5E-09 

2.0E-01 

7.3E-09 

Phenanthrene 

5.1 

0.3 

1.3E-08 

3.0E-01 

4.4E-08 

Pyrene 

3.6 

0.3 

9.4E-09 

3.0E-01 

3. IE-08 

Cl 1-C22 Aromatic Fraction 

456 

0.3 

1.2E-06 

3.0E-01 

3.9E-06 

C19-C36 Aliphatic Fraction 

1790 

1 

1.5E-05 

6.0E+00 

2.6E-06 

C9-C18 Aliphatic Fraction 

313 

1 

2.7E-06 

1.0E+00 

2.7E-06 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

295 

0.3 

7.6E-07 

3.0E-01 

2.5E-06 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

0.20 

1 

1.7E-09 

5.0E-05 

3.5E-05 

Antimony 

2.9 

1 

2.5E-08 

4.0E-04 

6.3E-05 

Arsenic 

1532 

0.5 

6.6E-06 

3.0E-04 

2.2E-02 

Barium 

149 

1 

1.3E-06 

7.0E-02 

1.8E-05 

Beryllium 

0.33 

1 

2.9E-09 

5.0E-03 

5.7E-07 

Cadmium 

20 

1 

1.7E-07 

1.0E-03 

1.7E-04 

Chromium (total) 

22 

1 

1.9E-07 

2.0E-02 

9.5E-06 

Copper 

30 

0.7 

1.8E-07 

3.7E-02 

4.9E-06 

Cyanide 

0.23 

1 

2.0E-09 

6.0E-03 

3.3E-07 

Lead 

1437 

0.3 

3.7E-06 

7.5E-04 

5.0E-03 

Mercury 

17 

0.5 

7.4E-08 

3.0E-04 

2.5E-04 

Nickel 

61 

1 

5.3E-07 

2.0E-02 

2.6E-05 

Selenium 

24 

1 

2.1E-07 

5.0E-03 

4.2E-05 

Silver 

3.7 

1 

3.2E-08 

5.0E-03 

6.3E-06 

Vanadium 

44 

1 

3.8E-07 

9.0E-03 

4.2E-05 

Zinc 

530 

1 

4.6E-06 

3.0E-01 

1.5E-05 





floral ~ 

2.8E-02 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern. 

3. A default value of 1 is used when a RAF is otherwise unavailable. 


J:\170,000-179,999\171521V171521-00 DEL\2015 PM10 Denvation\Dust Monitoring\High As Area\171521.10 Risk (Resident)Soil Ingest (65) 


QA CL Date 4/15/15 






















TABLE 1-13B (Continued) 

CALCULATION OF LIFETIME AVERAGE DAILY DOSES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR EXPOSURE TO DUST VIA GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT 
CES-2 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 4 of 4 
4/17/2015 


RECEPTOR: Resident (Adut, age 65) 
CANCER EFFECTS 


r 


See TABLE I-6B for Exposure Variables 
and Rationale 

See TABLE I-4B for Exposure Point 
Concentration Derivation 


COC 


Exposure to Dust via Gastrointestinal Tract 


LADD S0 |i_o ra i = 


ELCR 


soil-oral ' 


EPC S01| 

EPC1 

(mg/kg) 


EPC S oi| IRsoil 

* EF * ED * EP * 

RAF oral ^ * Cl 

2 ELCR so ,i_ ora i 

LADD soi |_ ora i * CSF 

BW * AP C 

Total ELCRgoji^jrai — 

RAForai.c 

LADD SO j|_o ra i 

CSF 

ELCR SO ii_ ra i 

(unitless) 

(mg/kg-day) 

(mg/kg-day)' 1 

(unitless) 

1 

1.IE-12 

NA 

NC 

1 

5.2E-12 

NA 

NC 

1 

9.0E-13 

NA 

NC 

1 

4.IE-13 

NA 

NC 

1 

5.9E-11 

NA 

NC 

1 

5.IE-11 

NA 

NC 

1 

6.6E-11 

NA 

NC 

1 

1.0E-10 

NA 

NC 

0.3 

5.2E-11 

7.3E-01 

3.82E-11 

0.3 

3.0E-11 

7.3E+00 

2.20E-10 

0.3 

3.1E-11 

7.3E-01 

2.27E-11 

1 

5.3E-11 

NA 

NC 

0.3 

3.7E-11 

7.3E-02 

2.74E-12 

0.3 

4.0E-11 

7.3E-02 

2.91E-12 

0.3 

1.IE-11 

7.3E+00 

8.02E-11 

1 

6.0E-11 

NA 

NC 

1 

3.IE-10 

NA 

NC 

1 

7.4E-11 

NA 

NC 

0.28 

1.6E-11 

7.3E-01 

1.18E-11 

1 

3.5E-11 

NA 

NC 

1 

3.1E-10 

NA 

NC 

1 

2.2E-10 

NA 

NC 

1 

2.8E-08 

NA 

NC 

1 

1. IE-07 

NA 

NC 

1 

1.9E-08 

NA 

NC 

1 

1.8E-08 

NA 

NC 

1 

1.2E-11 

2.0E+00 

2.48E-11 

1 

1.8E-10 

NA 

NC 

0.5 

4.7E-08 

1.5E+00 

7.09E-08 

1 

9.2E-09 

NA 

NC 

1 

2.0E-11 

NA 

NC 

1 

1.2E-09 

NA 

NC 

1 

1.4E-09 

NA 

NC 

1 

1.8E-09 

NA 

NC 

1 

1.4E-11 

NA 

NC 

1 

8.9E-08 

NA 

NC 

1 

1. IE-09 

NA 

NC 

1 

3.8E-09 

NA 

NC 

1 

1.5E-09 

NA 

NC 

1 

2.3E-10 

NA 

NC 

1 

2.7E-09 

NA 

NC 

1 

3.3E-08 

NA 

NC 



Total ELCR ora i 

7.IE-08 


2-Butanone 

Acetone 

Carbon Disulfide 

Xylene (Total) 

2-Methylnaphthalene 

Acenaphthene 

Acenaphthylene 

Anthracene 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

Chrysene 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

Dibenzofuran 

Fluoranthene 

Fluorene 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 
Naphthalene 
Phenanthrene 
Pyrene 

C11-C22 Aromatic Fraction 

C19-C36 Aliphatic Fraction 

C9-C18 Aliphatic Fraction 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

Antimony 

Arsenic 

Barium 

Beryllium 

Cadmium 

Chromium (total) 

Copper 

Cyanide 

Lead 

Mercury 

Nickel 

Selenium 

Silver 

Vanadium 

Zinc 


0.018 

0.083 

0.015 

0.0067 

0.95 

0.82 

1.1 

1.6 

2.8 

1.6 

1.7 

0.86 

2.0 

2.2 

0.59 

0.97 

5.1 

1.2 
0.93 
0.56 
5.1 

3.6 
456 
1790 
313 
295 
0.20 
2.9 
1532 
149 
0.33 

20 

22 

30 

0.23 

1437 

17 

61 

24 

3.7 
44 
530 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern; NA = Not Applicable/Not Available; NC = Not Calculated. 

3. A default value of 1 is used when a RAF is otherwise unavailable. 


\170,000-179.999\171521\171521-00 DEL\2015 


PM10 DerivationtDust Momtoring\High As Area\171521.10 Risk (Resident)Soil Ingest (Lifetime) 


QA CL Date: 4/15/15 























TABLE 1-14B 

CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY EXPOSURES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR INHALATION OF FUGITIVE DUST 


CES-2 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No 171521.10 
Page 1 of 4 
4/17/2015 


RECEPTOR: Resident (Young Child, age 1<2) 
SUBCHRONIC NON-CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-6B for Exposure Variables and 
Rationale 

See TABLE I-4B for Exposure Point 
Concentration Derivation 

AHF - 

Inhalation of Fugitive Dust 

EPC dust * EF * ED * EP * C2 

^ ^Qinh-dust 

ML -' t inh-dust 

ADE| n h d US t 

AP nc 


RfC 


COC 

EPCdust 

ADEj n h.<j US t 

RfC 

HQinh-dust 


EPC3 


Subchronic 



(mg/m 3 ) 

(mg/m 3 ) 

(mg/m 3 ) 

(unitless) 

2-Butanone 

1.4E-09 

2.4E-11 

5.0E+00 

4.8E-12 

Acetone 

6.3E-09 

1.IE-10 

8.0E-01 

1.4E-10 

Carbon Disulfide 

1. IE-09 

2.0E-11 

7.0E-01 

2.8E-11 

Xylene (Total) 

5.0E-10 

8.9E-12 

4.0E-01 

2.2E-11 

2-Methylnaphthalene 

7.1E-08 

1.3E-09 

5.0E-01 

2.5E-09 

Acenaphthene 

6.2E-08 

1. IE-09 

5.0E-01 

2.2E-09 

Acenaphthylene 

8. IE-08 

1.4E-09 

5.0E-01 

2.9E-09 

Anthracene 

1.2E-07 

2.2E-09 

5.0E-01 

4.3E-09 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

2. IE-07 

3.8E-09 

5.0E-01 

7.6E-09 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

1.2E-07 

2.2E-09 

5.0E-01 

4.4E-09 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

1.3E-07 

2.3E-09 

5.0E-01 

4.5E-09 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

6.5E-08 

1.2E-09 

5.0E-01 

2.3E-09 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

1.5E-07 

2.7E-09 

5.0E-01 

5.4E-09 

Chrysene 

1.6E-07 

2.9E-09 

5.0E-01 

5.8E-09 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

4.4E-08 

7.9E-10 

5.0E-01 

1.6E-09 

Dibenzofuran 

7.2E-08 

1.3E-09 

NA 

NC 

Fluoranthene 

3.8E-07 

6.8E-09 

5.0E-01 

1.4E-08 

Fluorene 

9.0E-08 

1.6E-09 

5.0E-01 

3 2E-09 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

7.0E-08 

1.3E-09 

5.0E-01 

2.5E-09 

Naphthalene 

4.2E-08 

7.5E-10 

3.0E-03 

2.5E-07 

Phenanthrene 

3.8E-07 

6.8E-09 

5.0E-01 

1.4E-08 

Pyrene 

2.7E-07 

4.9E-09 

5.0E-01 

9.8E-09 

Cl 1-C22 Aromatic Fraction 

3.4E-05 

6.1E-07 

5.0E-01 

1.2E-06 

C19-C36 Aliphatic Fraction 

1.3E-04 

2.4E-06 

NA 

NC 

C9-C18 Aliphatic Fraction 

2.3E-05 

4.2E-07 

6.0E-01 

7.0E-07 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

2.2E-05 

3.9E-07 

5.0E-01 

7.9E-07 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

1.5E-08 

2.7E-10 

2.0E-05 

1.3E-05 

Antimony 

2.2E-07 

3.9E-09 

1.0E-02 

3.9E-07 

Arsenic 

1. IE-04 

2. IE-06 

2.0E-05 

1.0E-01 

Barium 

1. IE-05 

2.0E-07 

5.0E-03 

4.0E-05 

Beryllium 

2.5E-08 

4.4E-10 

2.0E-05 

2.2E-05 

Cadmium 

1.5E-06 

2.7E-08 

2.0E-05 

1.4E-03 

Chromium (total) 

1.6E-06 

2.9E-08 

3.0E-04 

9.8E-05 

Copper 

2.2E-06 

4.0E-08 

3.0E-03 

1.3E-05 

Cyanide 

1.7E-08 

3.IE-10 

3.0E-03 

1.0E-07 

Lead 

1.IE-04 

1.9E-06 

1.0E-03 

1.9E-03 

Mercury 

1.3E-06 

2.3E-08 

3.0E-04 

7.6E-05 

Nickel 

4.6E-06 

8.2E-08 

1.0E-03 

8.2E-05 

Selenium 

1.8E-06 

3.2E-08 

3.0E-03 

1. IE-05 

Silver 

2.7E-07 

4.9E-09 

1.4E-04 

3.5E-05 

Vanadium 

3.3E-06 

5.9E-08 

1.0E-03 

5.9E-05 

Zinc 

4.0E-05 

7.1E-07 

1.4E-03 

5. IE-04 




mjnh-dust|f 

1.IE-01 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern; NA = Not Applicable/Not Available; NC = Not Calculated. 


J:\170.000-179.999\171521\171521-00 DEL\2015 PM10 DerivationVDust Monitoring\High As Area\171521.10 Risk (Resident)Fug Dust (1<2) 


QA CL Date 4/15/15 


















TABLE M4B (Continued) 

CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY EXPOSURES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR INHALATION OF FUGITIVE DUST 
CES-2 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No 171521.10 
Page 2 of 4 
4/17/2015 


RECEPTOR: Resident (Child, age 7<8) 
SUBCHRONIC NON-CANCER EFFECTS 


Inhalation of Fugitive Dust 

EPC dust * EF * ED * EP * C2 

^‘-'^inh-dust 

HO . , . - 

ADE, nh ^j US t 

AP nc 

^ HQjnh-dust 


RfC 


^P^dust 

ADEjnh.dust 

RfC 

^Qinh-dust 

EPC3 


SubChronic 


(mg/m 3 ) 

(mg/m 3 ) 

(mg/m 3 ) 

(unitless) 

1.4E-09 

8.9E-11 

5.0E+00 

1.8E-11 

6.3E-09 

4.IE-10 

8.0E-01 

5.IE-10 

1. IE-09 

7.2E-11 

7.0E-01 

1.0E-10 

5.0E-10 

3.3E-11 

4.0E-01 

8.2E-11 

7.1E-08 

4.7E-09 

5.0E-01 

9.3E-09 

6.2E-08 

4.0E-09 

5.0E-01 

8 IE-09 

8.1E-08 

5.3E-09 

5.0E-01 

1. IE-08 

1.2E-07 

7.9E-09 

5.0E-01 

1.6E-08 

2. IE-07 

1.4E-08 

5.0E-01 

2.8E-08 

1.2E-07 

8.0E-09 

5.0E-01 

1.6E-08 

1.3E-07 

8.3E-09 

5.0E-01 

1.7E-08 

6.5E-08 

4.2E-09 

5.0E-01 

8 5E-09 

1.5E-07 

9.9E-09 

5.0E-01 

2.0E-08 

1 6E-07 

1. IE-08 

5.0E-01 

2. IE-08 

4 4E-08 

2.9E-09 

5.0E-01 

5.8E-09 

7.2E-08 

4.7E-09 

NA 

NC 

3.8E-07 

2.5E-08 

5.0E-01 

5.0E-08 


See TABLE I-6B for Exposure Variables and 
Rationale 

See TABLE I-4B for Exposure Point 
Concentration Derivation 


COC 


2-Butanone 

Acetone 

Carbon Disulfide 

Xylene (Total) 

2-Methylnaphthalene 

Acenaphthene 

Acenaphthylene 

Anthracene 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

Chrysene 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

Dibenzofuran 

Fluoranthene 

Fluorene 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 
Naphthalene 
Phenanthrene 
Pyrene 

Cl 1-C22 Aromatic Fraction 

C19-C36 Aliphatic Fraction 

C9-C18 Aliphatic Fraction 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

Antimony 

Arsenic 

Barium 

Beryllium 

Cadmium 

Chromium (total) 

Copper 

Cyanide 

Lead 

Mercury 

Nickel 

Selenium 

Silver 

Vanadium 

Zinc 


9.0E-08 

7.0E-08 

4.2E-08 

3.8E-07 

2.7E-07 

3.4E-05 

1.3E-04 

2.3E-05 

2.2E-05 

1.5E-08 

2.2E-07 

1. IE-04 

1. IE-05 

2.5E-08 

1.5E-06 

1.6E-06 

2.2E-06 

1.7E-08 

1. IE-04 

1.3E-06 

4.6E-06 

1.8E-06 

2.7E-07 

3.3E-06 

4.0E-05 


5.9E-09 

4.6E-09 

2.7E-09 

2.5E-08 

1.8E-08 

2.2E-06 

8.8E-06 

1.5E-06 

1 4E-06 

9.9E-10 

1 4E-08 

7.5E-06 

7.3E-07 

1 6E-09 

9.9E-08 

1. IE-07 

1.5E-07 

1. IE-09 

7.1E-06 

8.4E-08 

3.0E-07 

1.2E-07 

1.8E-08 

2.2E-07 

2.6E-06 


5.0E-01 

5.0E-01 

3.0E-03 

5.0E-01 

5.0E-01 

5.0E-01 

NA 

6.0E-01 

5.0E-01 

2.0E-05 

1.0E-02 

2.0E-05 

5.0E-03 

2.0E-05 

2.0E-05 

3.0E-04 

3.0E-03 

3.0E-03 

1.0E-03 

3.0E-04 

1.0E-03 

3.0E-03 

1 4E-04 

1.0E-03 

1 4E-03 


1.2E-08 

9.2E-09 

9.2E-07 

5.0E-08 

3.6E-08 

4.5E-06 

NC 

2.6E-06 
2.9E-06 
4.9E-05 
1 4E-06 
3.8E-01 
1.5E-04 
8. IE-05 
5.0E-03 
3.6E-04 
4.9E-05 
3.8E-07 
7. IE-03 
2.8E-04 
3.0E-04 
4.0E-05 
1.3E-04 
2.2E-04 
1.9E-03 


FHinh-dust- 


3.9E-01 


J 


Notes. 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern; NA = Not Applicable/Not Available; NC = Not Calculated. 


J:\170.000-179.999\171521\171521-OO DEL\2015 PM10 


DenvatiomDust MonrtonngVHigh As Area\171521 10 Risk (Resident)Fug Dust (7<8) 


QA CL Date 4/15/15 




























TABLE I-14B (Continued) 

CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY EXPOSURES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR INHALATION OF FUGITIVE DUST 
CES-2 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 3 of 4 
4/17/2015 


RECEPTOR: Resident (Adult, age 65) 
SUBCHRONIC NON-CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-6B for Exposure Variables and 
Rationale 

See TABLE I-4B for Exposure Point 
Concentration Derivation 

AD^inh-dust 

HQinh-dust ” 

Inhalation of Fugitive Dust 

EPCd US t * EF * ED * EP * C2 


AF 

A^^inh-dust 

3 nc 

^inh-dust “ 

^ ^Qinh-dust 

RfC 

COC 

m 

“0 

o 

CL 

C 

</> 

^^^inh-dust 

RfC 

^Qinh-dust 


EPC3 


SubChronic 



(mg/m 3 ) 

(mg/m 3 ) 

(mg/m 3 ) 

(unitless) 

2-Butanone 

1 4E-09 

2.0E-10 

5.0E+00 

4.0E-11 

Acetone 

6.3E-09 

9.3E-10 

8.0E-01 

1.2E-09 

Carbon Disulfide 

1. IE-09 

1.6E-10 

7.0E-01 

2.3E-10 

Xylene (Total) 

5.0E-10 

7.4E-11 

4.0E-01 

1.8E-10 

2-Methylnaphthalene 

7. IE-08 

1.IE-08 

5.0E-01 

2. IE-08 

Acenaphthene 

6.2E-08 

9.1E-09 

5.0E-01 

1.8E-08 

Acenaphthylene 

8. IE-08 

1.2E-08 

5.0E-01 

2.4E-08 

Anthracene 

1.2E-07 

1.8E-08 

5.0E-01 

3.6E-08 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

2. IE-07 

3.1E-08 

5.0E-01 

6.3E-08 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

1 2E-07 

1.8E-08 

5.0E-01 

3.6E-08 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

1.3E-07 

1.9E-08 

5.0E-01 

3.7E-08 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

6.5E-08 

9.6E-09 

5.0E-01 

1.9E-08 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

1.5E-07 

2.2E-08 

5.0E-01 

4.5E-08 

Chrysene 

1.6E-07 

2.4E-08 

5.0E-01 

4.8E-08 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

4.4E-08 

6.6E-09 

5.0E-01 

1.3E-08 

Dibenzofuran 

7.2E-08 

1. IE-08 

NA 

NC 

Fluoranthene 

3.8E-07 

5.6E-08 

5.0E-01 

1. IE-07 

Fluorene 

9.0E-08 

1.3E-08 

5.0E-01 

2.7E-08 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

7.0E-08 

1.0E-08 

5.0E-01 

2. IE-08 

Naphthalene 

4.2E-08 

6.2E-09 

3.0E-03 

2. IE-06 

Phenanthrene 

3.8E-07 

5.6E-08 

5.0E-01 

1. IE-07 

Pyrene 

2.7E-07 

4.0E-08 

5.0E-01 

8. IE-08 

Cl 1-C22 Aromatic Fraction 

3.4E-05 

5. IE-06 

5.0E-01 

1.0E-05 

C19-C36 Aliphatic Fraction 

1.3E-04 

2.0E-05 

NA 

NC 

C9-C18 Aliphatic Fraction 

2.3E-05 

3.5E-06 

6.0E-01 

5.8E-06 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

2.2E-05 

3.3E-06 

5.0E-01 

6.5E-06 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

1.5E-08 

2.2E-09 

2.0E-05 

1. IE-04 

Antimony 

2.2E-07 

3.2E-08 

1 0E-02 

3.2E-06 

Arsenic 

1. IE-04 

1.7E-05 

2.0E-05 

8.5E-01 

Barium 

1. IE-05 

1.7E-06 

5.0E-03 

3.3E-04 

Beryllium 

2.5E-08 

3.7E-09 

2.0E-05 

1.8E-04 

Cadmium 

1.5E-06 

2.2E-07 

2.0E-05 

1. IE-02 

Chromium (total) 

1.6E-06 

2.4E-07 

3.0E-04 

8. IE-04 

Copper 

2.2E-06 

3.3E-07 

3.0E-03 

1. IE-04 

Cyanide 

1.7E-08 

2.5E-09 

3.0E-03 

8.5E-07 

Lead 

1. IE-04 

1.6E-05 

1.0E-03 

1.6E-02 

Mercury 

1.3E-06 

1.9E-07 

3.0E-04 

6.3E-04 

Nickel 

4.6E-06 

6.8E-07 

1.0E-03 

6.8E-04 

Selenium 

1.8E-06 

2.7E-07 

3.0E-03 

8.9E-05 

Silver 

2.7E-07 

4.1E-08 

1.4E-04 

2.9E-04 

Vanadium 

3.3E-06 

4.9E-07 

1.0E-03 

4.9E-04 

Zinc 

4.0E-05 

5.9E-06 

1 4E-03 

4.2E-03 




Hljnh-dust 

8.8E-01 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern; NA = Not Applicable/Not Available; NC = Not Calculated. 


J:\170,000-179,999\171521\171521-00 DEL\2015 PM10 Derivation\Dust Momtoring\High As Area\171521.10 Risk (Resident)Fug Dust (65) 


QA CL Date 4/15/15 













TABLE 1-14B (Continued) 

CALCULATION OF LIFETIME AVERAGE DAILY EXPOSURES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR INHALATION OF FUGITIVE DUST 
CES-2 Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 4 of 4 
4/17/2015 


RECEPTOR: Resident (Adut, age 65) 
CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-6B for Exposure Variables and 
Rationale 

See TABLE I-4B for Exposure Point 
Concentration Derivation 

LAD^inh-dust 

ELCRjnh-dust — 

Inhalation of Fugitive Dust 

EPC dust * EF * ED * EP * C2 * C4 

AP C 

LADE, n h_dust UR Total ELCRj n h_dust = 

2 ELCR, nh ^ us t 

COC 

E p C dust 

EPC3 

(mg/m 3 ) 

EADEj n h-(just 

(Mg/m 3 ) 

UR 

(Mg/m 3 )' 1 

ELCR m h-dust 

(unitless) 

2-Butanone 

1.4E-09 

1.4E-09 

NA 

NC 

Acetone 

6.3E-09 

6.6E-09 

NA 

NC 

Carbon Disulfide 

1. IE-09 

1.2E-09 

NA 

NC 

Xylene (Total) 

5.0E-10 

5.3E-10 

NA 

NC 

2-Methylnaphthalene 

7.1E-08 

7.5E-08 

NA 

NC 

Acenaphthene 

6.2E-08 

6.5E-08 

NA 

NC 

Acenaphthylene 

8. IE-08 

8.5E-08 

NA 

NC 

Anthracene 

1.2E-07 

1.3E-07 

NA 

NC 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

2.1E-07 

2.2E-07 

2.1E-04 

4.7E-11 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

1.2E-07 

1.3E-07 

2.1E-03 

2.7E-10 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

1.3E-07 

1.3E-07 

2.1E-04 

2.8E-11 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

6.5E-08 

6.8E-08 

NA 

NC 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

1.5E-07 

1.6E-07 

2.1E-05 

3.3E-12 

Chrysene 

1.6E-07 

1.7E-07 

2.1E-05 

3.6E-12 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

4.4E-08 

4.7E-08 

2. IE-03 

9.8E-11 

Dibenzofuran 

7.2E-08 

7.6E-08 

NA 

NC 

Fluoranthene 

3.8E-07 

4.0E-07 

NA 

NC 

Fluorene 

9.0E-08 

9.5E-08 

NA 

NC 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

7.0E-08 

7.4E-08 

2. IE-04 

1.5E-11 

Naphthalene 

4.2E-08 

4.4E-08 

NA 

NC 

Phenanthrene 

3.8E-07 

4.0E-07 

NA 

NC 

Pyrene 

2.7E-07 

2.9E-07 

NA 

NC 

Cl 1-C22 Aromatic Fraction 

3.4E-05 

3.6E-05 

NA 

NC 

C19-C36 Aliphatic Fraction 

1.3E-04 

1 4E-04 

NA 

NC 

C9-C18 Aliphatic Fraction 

2.3E-05 

2.5E-05 

NA 

NC 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

2.2E-05 

2.3E-05 

NA 

NC 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

1.5E-08 

1.6E-08 

1.0E-04 

1.6E-12 

Antimony 

2.2E-07 

2.3E-07 

NA 

NC 

Arsenic 

1.1E-04 

1.2E-04 

3.0E-03 

3.6E-07 

Barium 

1. IE-05 

1.2E-05 

NA 

NC 

Beryllium 

2.5E-08 

2.6E-08 

2.4E-03 

6.3E-11 

Cadmium 

1.5E-06 

1.6E-06 

1.8E-03 

2.9E-09 

Chromium (total) 

1.6E-06 

1.7E-06 

1.2E-02 

2. IE-08 

Copper 

2.2E-06 

2.4E-06 

NA 

NC 

Cyanide 

1.7E-08 

1.8E-08 

NA 

NC 

Lead 

1. IE-04 

1. IE-04 

NA 

NC 

Mercury 

1.3E-06 

1.3E-06 

NA 

NC 

Nickel 

4.6E-06 

4.8E-06 

4.8E-04 

2.3E-09 

Selenium 

1.8E-06 

1.9E-06 

NA 

NC 

Silver 

2.7E-07 

2.9E-07 

NA 

NC 

Vanadium 

3.3E-06 

3.5E-06 

NA 

NC 

Zinc 

4.0E-05 

4.2E-05 

NA 

NC 




Total ELCR m h-dust | 

3.9E-07 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern; NA = Not Applicable/Not Available; NC = Not Calculated. 


J:\170.000-179.999\171521\171521-00 DEL\2015 PM10 Denvation\Dust Monitoring\High As Area\171521 10 Risk (Residenl)Fug Dust (Lifetime) 


QA CL Date 4/15/15 





































































































































































































LOW PH AREA 







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J:\170.OO0-179.999\171521\171521-00.DEL\2015 PM10 DerivationVDust MonitoringMow PH Area\171521.10 Risk Summary low pH\SUM_RISK 

































File No. 171521.10 
Page 1 of 1 
4/17/2015 


TABLE I-3C 

SUMMARY OF ANALYTICAL DATA FOR SOIL SAMPLES (Low pH Area) 
Low pH Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett. Massachusetts 


Analytical Parameter 1 

All Soil 2 

Background 5 

Exposure Point 
Concentration for 
Human Health Risk 
Characterization 2 4,6 

Frequency of 
Detection 3 

Range Detected 3 

Median 

Concentration 4 

Arithmetic Mean 
Concentration 4 

Maximum Detected 
Concentration 

Location 

Depth 

(feet) 

Volatile Oruanic Compounds fVOCsI 











Acetone 

1 12 


0.100 


0.17 

0.17 

CES-TP-4 

5-8 

NA 

0.100 

Benzene 

1 / 2 


0.0020 


0.013 

0.013 

CES-TP-4 

5-8 

NA 

0.0020 

Butanone, 2- (MEK) 

1 12 


0.025 


0.13 

0.13 

CES-TP-4 

5-8 

NA 

0025 

Carbon disulfide 

1 / 2 


0.80 


052 

0.52 

CES-TP-4 

5-8 

NA 

0 80 

Ethylbenzene 

1 12 


0 014 


0.019 

0.019 

CES-TP-4 

5-8 

NA 

0.014 

Methylene Chloride 

1 12 


0.022 


0.069 

0.069 

CES-TP-4 

5-8 

NA 

0.022 

Styrene 

1 / 2 


00020 


0.013 

0.013 

CES-TP-4 

5-8 

NA 

0 0020 

Toluene 

1 12 


0.0030 


0.019 

0.019 

CES-TP-4 

5-8 

NA 

0.0030 

Xylene, Total 

1 12 


0.0020 


0.013 

0.013 

CES-TP-4 

5-8 

NA 

00020 

Extractable Petroleum Hydrocarbons tEPH) 











C9-C18 Aliphatics 

2 1 8 

15 

- 

118 

11 

34 

S-15 

0-0.5 

NA 

34 

C19-C36 Aliphatics 

7 / 8 

27 

- 

1670 

107 

358 

S-19 

0-0.5 

NA 

358 

C11-C22 Aromatics 

8 / 8 

20 

- 

252 

108 

122 

S-19 

0-0.5 

NA 

122 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) 











Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

3 / 3 

30 

- 

360 

280 

223 

CES-4 

5-7 

NA 

360 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) 











Aroclor 1248 

1 / 3 


3.9 


0.070 

1.3 

C-21 

8 

NA 

NCC 

Aroclor 1262 

1 / 3 


0.33 


0.070 

0.15 

C-21 

8 

NA 

NCC 

Total PCBs 

2 / 3 

0.38 

- 

4.1 

0.38 

1.5 

C-21 

8 

NA 

4.1 

Metals. Total 











Antimony 

1 / 5 


16 


1.3 

4.1 

BOR-103 

12 

1 

16 

Arsenic 

34 / 34 

3.2 

- 

1050 

52 

191 

TP301 

5-10 

20 

191 

Barium 

11 / 11 

16 

-• j 

650 

33 

115 

C-22 

6 

50 

115 

Beryllium 

5 / 5 

0.23 

- 

0.49 

0.26 

0.30 

BOR-103 

12 

0 

0.49 

Cadmium 

2/11 

0.14 

- 

2.1 

0.23 

0.40 

C-22 

6 

2 

040 

Chromium 

11 / 11 

4.2 

- 

40 

16 

16 

S-17 

0-0.5 

30 

16 

Copper 

1 / 1 


294 


294 

294 

B217 

6-9 

40 

294 

Lead 

26 / 27 

14 

- 

24700 

108 

2181 

C-22 

6 

100 

2181 

Mercury 

5 / 11 

0.090 

- 

65 

0.22 

8.1 

C-21 

8 

0.3 

8.1 

Nickel 

5 / 5 

7.1 

- 

26 

13 

14 

S-17 

0-0.5 

20 

26 

Selenium 

3 / 11 

29 

- 

110 

4.4 

22 

C-22 

6 

0.5 

22 

Silver 

3 / 11 

2.4 

- 

18 

0 35 

2.4 

C-22 

6 

0.6 

2.4 

Vanadium 

5 / 5 

19 

- 

35 

23 

26 

S-17 

0-0.5 

30.0 

35 

Zinc 

5 / 5 

38 

- 

350 

67 

120 

S-17 

0-0.5 

100.0 

350 

Other 











Cyanide, total 

1 / 1 


0.27 


0.27 

0.27 

B217 

6-9 

NA 

0.27 

Analytes Reported with Multiple MethodsA 











Acenaphthene 

1 / 9 


1.0 


0.27 

0.43 

BOR-103 

9 

0.5 

0.43 

Anthracene 

3 / 9 

040 

- 

1.8 

0.38 

0.58 

BOR-103 

9 

1 

0.58 

Benzo(a)anthracene 

3 / 9 

1.7 

- 

2.1 

0.38 

0.89 

C-21 

8 

2 

0 89 

* Benzo(a)pyrene 

3 / 9 

1.1 

- 

1.2 

0.38 

0.65 

C-21 

8 

2 

065 

Benzo(b)fluoranthene 

3 / 9 

1.3 

- 

2.8 

0.38 

0.92 

C-21 

8 

2 

0.92 

* Benzo(ghi)perylene 

2 / 9 

0.70 

- 

0.90 

0.38 

0.49 

C-21 

8 

1 

049 

Benzo(k)fluoranthene 

3 / 9 

1.4 

- 

3.0 

0.38 

0.93 

C-21 

8 

1 

0.93 

Chrysene 

4 / 9 

044 

- 

2.6 

0.44 

0.99 

C-21 

8 

2 

0.99 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

2 / 9 

0.40 

- 

1.1 

0.38 

0.48 

C-21 

8 

0.5 

048 

Fluoranthene 

4 / 9 

0.55 

- 

4.4 

0.55 

1.6 

C-21 

8 

4 

1.6 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene 

2 / 9 

050 

- 

1.1 

0.38 

0.49 

C-21 

8 

1 

0.49 

Naphthalene 

1 / 9 


0.60 


0.35 

0.38 

C-21 

8 

0.5 

0 38 

Phenanthrene 

3 / 9 

1.8 

- 

3.4 

0.38 

1.1 

C-21 

8 

3 

1.1 

* Pyrene 

4 / 9 

0.52 


3.7 

0.52 

1.4 

C-21 

8 

4 

1.4 


Notes: 


1 Only detected analytes are listed 

2 All data collected within the top 15 feet soil from the Low pH Area Proposed Remediation Area are included in the statistics. 

3. These statistics only include analytical results for constituents detected above the laboratory reporting limit (RL). 

4 These statistics include all detected constituent concentrations and one-half the RL for constituents not detected above the RL. 

5 Background concentration from MassDEP, 2002. Technical Update: Background Levels of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Metals in Soil. May. 

Values for natural soil were used * indicates the maximum detected concentration is below the MassDEP-identified background concentration. 

6 EPCs for human health risk characterization were based on the arithmetic means of all soil samples collected within the top 15 feet soil from the Low pH Area Proposed Remediation Area. 

For all VOCs, TPH, PCBs, antimony, beryllium, nickel, vanadium, and zinc, the maximum detected concentrations were used as the EPCs as a conservative approach due to the relatively small 
sample size. 

7. Total polychlorinated biphenyl was calculated as sum of all the aroclors analyzed. 

8. Concentrations reported in milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg). 

A These analytes were analyzed by multiple analytical methods. If the analyte was detected via at least one method, the maximum detected concentration is listed to represent the sample result. 
If the analyte was not detected via any analytical method, the minimum RL is listed as the RL for the non-detected sample result. 

NCC = Not a Constitute of Concern: EPC = Exposure Point Concentration. 

VOC = Volatile Organic Compound; TPH = Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon; PCB = Polychlorinated Biphenyl 


J:\170.000-179,999\171521\171521-00 DEL\2015 PM10 DerivationVSoil Data HighlighhSoil Summary_Low pH 


QA: CL Date: 4/15/15 























File No. 171521.10 
Page 1 of 1 
4/17/2015 


TABLE I-4C 

SUMMARY OF EXPOSURE POINT CONCENTRATIONS 
Low pH Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


r 

EPC1 EPC3 

COC 

Arithmetic Estimated 

Mean Concentration 

Concentration in Fugitive 

in Soil 3 Dust 6 

(mg/kg) (mg/m 3 ) 

2-Butanone 

Acetone 

Benzene 

Carbon Disulfide 

Ethylbenzene 

Methylene Chloride 

Toluene 

Xylene (Total) 

Styrene 

Acenaphthene 

Anthracene 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

Chrysene 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

Fluoranthene 
lndeno( 1 ,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

Naphthalene 

Phenanthrene 

Pyrene 

Cl 1-C22 Aromatic Fraction 

C19-C36 Aliphatic Fraction 

C9-C18 Aliphatic Fraction 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

Antimony 

Arsenic 

Barium 

Beryllium 

Cadmium 

Chromium (total) 

Copper 

Cyanide 

Lead 

Mercury 

Nickel 

Selenium 

Silver 

Vanadium 

Zinc 

0.025 3.75E-09 

0.100 1.50E-08 

0.0020 3.00E-10 

0.80 1.20E-07 

0.014 2.10E-09 

0.022 3.30E-09 

0.0030 4.50E-10 

0.0020 3.00E-10 

0.0020 3.00E-10 

0,43 6.48E-08 

0.58 8.73E-08 

0.89 1.34E-07 

0.65 9.73E-08 

0.92 1.37E-07 

0.49 7.31 E-08 

0.93 1.39E-07 

0.99 1.48E-07 

0.48 7.14E-08 

1.6 2.43E-07 

0 49 7.31 E-08 

0.38 5.73E-08 

1.1 1.62E-07 

1.4 2.1 IE-07 

122 1.83E-05 

358 5.37E-05 

34 5.07E-06 

360 5.40E-05 

4 1 6.08E-07 

16 2.36E-06 

191 2.86E-05 

115 1.73E-05 

0 49 7.35E-08 

0.40 6.06E-08 

16 2.44E-06 

294 4 41E-05 

0.27 4.05E-08 

2181 3.27E-04 

8.1 1.21E-06 

26 3.90E-06 

22 3.28E-06 

2.4 3.67E-07 

35 5.25E-06 

350 5.25E-05 


a. The soil exposure point concentration is based on the arithmetic mean concentration from all soil samples obtained from within the Low 
pH Area Proposed Remediation Area. 

For all VOCs, TPH, PCBs, antimony, beryllium, nickel, vanadium, and zinc, the maximum detected concentrations were used as the 
EPCs as a conservative approach due to the relatively small sample size. 

Although the maximum detected concentrations of benzo(a)anthracene, benzo(g,h,i)perylene, and pyrene were within the MassDEP 
(2002) established background; all detected analytes were included as COCs in the nsk evaluation. 
b The soil-bome fugitive dust exposure point concentrations were estimated from the soil exposure point concentrate according to the 

following equation: 

EPC dust = EPCsoii * PM 10 * Cl 


EPCdust Exposure Point Concentration in Fugitive Dust (mg/m 3 ) 

EPCsoii Exposure Point Concentration in Soil (mg/kg) 

PM 10 Respirable Particle Concentration - Commercial/Industrial Workers/Residents (mg/m ) 

Cl Unit Conversion Factor (kg/mg) 


Calculated 

Calculated 

0.15 

IE-06 


Abbreviations: 

COC = constituent of concern. 

J \ 170 , 000 - 179 ,999\171521\171521-00 DEL\2015 PM10 Denvation\Dust Monitonngllow PH Area\171521 10 Exp Con\EPC 


QA: CL Dale 4/15/15 
















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TABLE I-6C File No 171521 10 

RESIDENT EXPOSURE PROFILE ^*7/2015 

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TABLE I-10C 

RELATIVE ABSORPTION FACTORS 
Low pH Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 1 of 1 
4/17/2015 



Exposure Pathways 

COC 

Carcinogen 

Oral Soil 

Non-Carcinogen 

2-Butanone 


1 a 

Acetone 


1 a 

Benzene 

1 a 

1 a 

Carbon Disulfide 


1 b 

Ethylbenzene 


1 a 

Methylene Chloride 

1 a 

1 a 

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1 a 

Xylene (Total) 


1 a 

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1 a 

1 a 

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0.3 a 

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0.3 a 

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0.3 a 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

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0.3 a 

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0.3 a 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 


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0.3 a 

0.3 a 

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0.3 a 

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0.3 a 

Pyrene 


0.3 a 

Cl 1-C22 Aromatic Fraction 


0.3 a 

C19-C36 Aliphatic Fraction 


1 a 

C9-C18 Aliphatic Fraction 


1 a 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 


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1 a 

1 a 

Antimony 


1 a 

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0.5 a 

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1 a 

Beryllium 


1 a 

Cadmium 


1 a 

Chromium (total) 


1 a 

Copper 


0.7 b 

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1 a 

Lead 


0.3 c 

Mercury 


0.5 a 

Nickel 


1 a 

Selenium 


1 a 

Silver 


1 a 

Vanadium 


1 a 

Zinc 


1 a 


Notes: 

a MassDEP 2014 ShortForm (v0414.xlsx). 

b. RAF calculated from Table B-11 Default Absorption Efficencies 
presented in MassDEP Guidance for Disposal Site Risk Characterization 

c. USEPA 2007. User’s Guide for the Integrated Exposure Uptake 
Biokinetic Model for Lead in Children (IEUBK) Windows. 

f. Value for Cl 1-C22 aromatic hydrocarbons used for total petreleum 
hydrocarbon (TPH). 

Notes: 

1 A blank space indicates no data found. 

2. Where data are lacking, a default value of 1 is used in subsequent risk 
calculations. 

Abbreviations: 

COC = Constituent of Concern; RAF = Relative Absorption Factors. 


J:\170,000-179,999\171521V171521 -00 DEl\2015 PM10 Derivation\Dust MomtoringUow PH Area\171521.10 Chem InfoVRAF 


QA: CL Date: 4/15/15 








File No. 171521.10 
Page 1 of 2 
4/17/2015 


TABLE MIC 

CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY DOSES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR EXPOSURE TO DUST VIA GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT 
Low pH Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


RECEPTOR: Commercial/Industrial Workers 
SUBCHRONIC NON-CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-5C for Exposure Variables 
and Rationale 

See TABLE I-4C for Exposure Point 
Concentration Derivation 

ADD SO j|-oral 

RQsoil-oral 

Exposure to Dust via Gastrointestinal Tract 

EPC soil * IR soil * EF * ED * EP * RAF ora , nc * Cl 

BW * AP nc 

ADD S0l |^ ra i |_j| _ 

RfD 

^ RQsoil-oral 

COC 

E PC soil 

EPC1 

(mg/kg) 

RAF ora |_ nc 

(unitless) 

ADD S0 j|_ 0ra | 

(mg/kg-day) 

RfD 

SubChronic 

(mg/kg-day) 

RQsoil-oral 

(unitless) 

2-Butanone 

0.025 

i 

3.4E-10 

6.0E-01 

5.6E-10 

Acetone 

0.100 

i 

1.3E-09 

2.7E+00 

5.0E-10 

Benzene 

0.0020 

i 

2.7E-11 

1.0E-02 

2.7E-09 

Carbon Disulfide 

0.80 

i 

1.1E-08 

1.0E-01 

1. IE-07 

Ethylbenzene 

0.014 

i 

1.9E-10 

5.0E-02 

3.8E-09 

Methylene Chloride 

0.022 

i 

3.0E-10 

6.0E-03 

4.9E-08 

Toluene 

0.0030 

i 

4.0E-11 

8.0E-01 

5. IE-11 

Xylene (Total) 

0.0020 

i 

2.7E-11 

4.0E-01 

6.7E-11 

Styrene 

0.0020 

i 

2.7E-11 

2.0E+00 

1.3E-11 

Acenaphthene 

0.43 

0.3 

1.7E-09 

2.0E-01 

8.7E-09 

Anthracene 

0.58 

0.3 

2.4E-09 

1.0E+00 

2.4E-09 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

0.89 

0.3 

3.6E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.2E-08 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

0.65 

0.3 

2.6E-09 

3.0E-01 

8.7E-09 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

0.92 

0.3 

3.7E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.2E-08 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

0.49 

0.3 

2.0E-09 

3.0E-01 

6.6E-09 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

0.93 

0.3 

3.7E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.2E-08 

Chrysene 

0.99 

0.3 

4.0E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.3E-08 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

0.48 

0.3 

1.9E-09 

3.0E-01 

6.4E-09 

Fluoranthene 

1.6 

0.3 

6.5E-09 

4.0E-01 

1.6E-08 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

0.49 

0.28 

1.8E-09 

3.0E-01 

6. IE-09 

Naphthalene 

0.38 

0.3 

1.5E-09 

2.0E-01 

7.7E-09 

Phenanthrene 

1.1 

0.3 

4.4E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.5E-08 

Pyrene 

1.4 

0.3 

5.7E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.9E-08 

C11-C22 Aromatic Fraction 

122 

0.3 

4.9E-07 

3.0E-01 

1.6E-06 

C19-C36 Aliphatic Fraction 

358 

1 

4.8E-06 

6.0E+00 

8.0E-07 

C9-C18 Aliphatic Fraction 

34 

1 

4.6E-07 

1.0E+00 

4.6E-07 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

360 

0.3 

1.5E-06 

3.0E-01 

4.8E-06 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

4.1 

1 

5.5E-08 

5.0E-05 

1. IE-03 

Antimony 

16 

1 

2.1E-07 

4.0E-04 

5.3E-04 

Arsenic 

191 

0.5 

1.3E-06 

3.0E-04 

4.3E-03 

Barium 

115 

1 

1.6E-06 

7.0E-02 

2.2E-05 

Beryllium 

0.49 

1 

6.6E-09 

5.0E-03 

1.3E-06 

Cadmium 

0.40 

1 

5.4E-09 

1.0E-03 

5.4E-06 

Chromium (total) 

16 

1 

2.2E-07 

2.0E-02 

1. IE-05 

Copper 

294 

0.7 

2.8E-06 

3.7E-02 

7.6E-05 

Cyanide 

0.27 

1 

3.6E-09 

6.0E-03 

6. IE-07 

Lead 

2181 

0.3 

8.8E-06 

7.5E-04 

1.2E-02 

Mercury 

8.1 

0.5 

5.4E-08 

3.0E-04 

1.8E-04 

Nickel 

26 

1 

3.5E-07 

2.0E-02 

1.8E-05 

Selenium 

22 

1 

2.9E-07 

5.0E-03 

5.9E-05 

Silver 

2.4 

1 

3.3E-08 

5.0E-03 

6.6E-06 

Vanadium 

35 

1 

4.7E-07 

9.0E-03 

5.2E-05 

Zinc 

350 

1 

4.7E-06 

3.0E-01 

1.6E-05 





^soil-oral “ 

1.8E-02 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern. 

3. A default value of 1 is used when an RAF is otherwise unavailable 


J:\170.000-179.999\171521\171521-00 DEL\2015 PM10 Derivation\Dust Monltoringllow PH Area\171521 10 Risk (FW-DEP parameters)Soil Ingest (Non-Cancer) 


QA CL Date 4/15/15 












TABLE 1-11C (Continued) 

CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY DOSES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR EXPOSURE TO DUST VIA GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT 
Low pH Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 2 of 2 
4/17/2015 


RECEPTOR: Commercial/Industrial Workers 
CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-5C for Exposure Variables 
and Rationale 

See TABLE I-4C for Exposure Point 
Concentration Derivation 

LADD so n_ ora | 

ELCR S oii-oral “ 

Exposure to Dust via Gastrointestinal Tract 

EPC soil * IR soil * EF * ED * EP * RAF orak; * Cl 

BW * AP C 

LADD S0 j|_ 0ra | CSF Total ELCR SO j|_o ra | = 

X ELCR solk)ra | 

COC 

EPCsoii 

EPC1 

(mg/kg) 

RAF 0 ral-c 

(unitless) 

LADDson^rai 

(mg/kg-day) 

CSF 

(mg/kg-day)" 1 

ELCRsojl-oral 

(unitless) 

2-Butanone 

0.025 

i 

2.40E-12 

NA 

NC 

Acetone 

0.100 

i 

9.62E-12 

NA 

NC 

Benzene 

0.0020 

i 

1.92E-13 

5.5E-02 

1.IE-14 

Carbon Disulfide 

0.80 

i 

7.70E-11 

NA 

NC 

Ethylbenzene 

0.014 

i 

1.35E-12 

NA 

NC 

Methylene Chloride 

0.022 

i 

2.12E-12 

2.0E-03 

4.2E-15 

Toluene 

0.0030 

i 

2.89E-13 

NA 

NC 

Xylene (Total) 

0.0020 

i 

1.92E-13 

NA 

NC 

Styrene 

0.0020 

i 

1.92E-13 

3.0E-02 

5.8E-15 

Acenaphthene 

0.43 

i 

4.15E-11 

NA 

NC 

Anthracene 

0.58 

i 

5.60E-11 

NA 

NC 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

0.89 

0.3 

2.58E-11 

7.3E-01 

1.9E-11 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

0.65 

0.3 

1.87E-11 

7.3E+00 

1.4E-10 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

0.92 

0.3 

2.64E-11 

7.3E-01 

1.9E-11 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

0.49 

1 

4.69E-11 

NA 

NC 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

0.93 

0.3 

2.67E-11 

7.3E-02 

2.0E-12 

Chrysene 

0.99 

0.3 

2.84E-11 

7.3E-02 

2.1E-12 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

0.48 

0.3 

1.37E-11 

7.3E+00 

1.0E-10 

Fluoranthene 

1.6 

1 

1.56E-10 

NA 

NC 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

0.49 

0.28 

1.31E-11 

7.3E-01 

9.6E-12 

Naphthalene 

0.38 

1 

3.67E-11 

NA 

NC 

Phenanthrene 

1.1 

1 

1.04E-10 

NA 

NC 

Pyrene 

1.4 

1 

1.35E-10 

NA 

NC 

Cl 1-C22 Aromatic Fraction 

122 

1 

1.17E-08 

NA 

NC 

C19-C36 Aliphatic Fraction 

358 

1 

3.44E-08 

NA 

NC 

C9-C18 Aliphatic Fraction 

34 

1 

3.25E-09 

NA 

NC 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

360 

1 

3.46E-08 

NA 

NC 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

4.1 

1 

3.90E-10 

2.0E+00 

7.8E-10 

Antimony 

16 

1 

1.51E-09 

NA 

NC 

Arsenic 

191 

0.5 

9.17E-09 

1.5E+00 

1.4E-08 

Barium 

115 

1 

1.1 IE-08 

NA 

NC 

Beryllium 

0.49 

1 

4.71 E-11 

NA 

NC 

Cadmium 

0.40 

1 

3.89E-11 

NA 

NC 

Chromium (total) 

16 

1 

1.57E-09 

NA 

NC 

Copper 

294 

1 

2.83E-08 

NA 

NC 

Cyanide 

0.27 

1 

2.60E-11 

NA 

NC 

Lead 

2181 

1 

2.10E-07 

NA 

NC 

Mercury 

8.1 

1 

7.77E-10 

NA 

NC 

Nickel 

26 

1 

2.50E-09 

NA 

NC 

Selenium 

22 

1 

2.10E-09 

NA 

NC 

Silver 

2.4 

1 

2.36E-10 

NA 

NC 

Vanadium 

35 

1 

3.37E-09 

NA 

NC 

Zinc 

350 

1 

3.37E-08 

NA 

NC 





Total ELCR S0 j| 0ra |.[p 

1.5E-08 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern; NA = Not Applicable/Not Available; NC = Not Calculated. 

3. A default value of 1 is used when an RAF is otherwise unavailable. 


J:\170.000-179,999\171521\171521-00.DEL\2015 PM10 DerivationVDust MonitonngMow PH Area\171521.10 Risk (FW-DEP parameters)Soil Ingest (Cancer) 


QA: CL Date: 4/15/15 























TABLE 1-12C 

CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY EXPOSURES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR INHALATION OF FUGITIVE DUST 


Low pH Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 1 of 2 
4/17/2015 


RECEPTOR: Commercial/Industrial Workers 
SUBCHRONIC NON-CANCER EFFECTS 




Inhalation of Soil-derived Fugitive Dust 


See TABLE I-5C for Exposure Variables 
and Rationale. See TABLE I-4C for 

ADE dust - 

EPCdusf * 

EF * ED * EP * C2 



AP nc 


Exposure Point Concentration Derivation 



HQdust = 

ADE dust 

HI i i = 

S HQ dust 


RfC 


COC 

EPC dust 

ADE dust 

RfC 

HQdust 


EPC3 


SubChronic 



(mg/m 3 ) 

(mg/m 3 ) 

(mg/m 3 ) 

(unitless) 

2-Butanone 

3.8E-09 

7.IE-10 

5.0E+00 

1.4E-10 

Acetone 

1.5E-08 

2.9E-09 

8.0E-01 

3.6E-09 

Benzene 

3.0E-10 

5.7E-11 

1.0E-02 

5.7E-09 

Carbon Disulfide 

1.2E-07 

2.3E-08 

7.0E-01 

3.3E-08 

Ethylbenzene 

2.1E-09 

4.0E-10 

9.0E+00 

4.4E-11 

Methylene Chloride 

3.3E-09 

6.3E-10 

6.0E-01 

1.0E-09 

Toluene 

4.5E-10 

8.6E-11 

5.0E+00 

1.7E-11 

Xylene (Total) 

3.0E-10 

5.7E-11 

4.0E-01 

1.4E-10 

Styrene 

3.0E-10 

5.7E-11 

3.0E+00 

1.9E-11 

Acenaphthene 

6.5E-08 

1.2E-08 

5.0E-01 

2.5E-08 

Anthracene 

8.7E-08 

1.7E-08 

5.0E-01 

3.3E-08 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

1.3E-07 

2.6E-08 

5.0E-01 

5. IE-08 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

9.7E-08 

1.9E-08 

5.0E-01 

3.7E-08 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

1 4E-07 

2.6E-08 

5.0E-01 

5.2E-08 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

7.3E-08 

1.4E-08 

5.0E-01 

2.8E-08 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

1.4E-07 

2.6E-08 

5.0E-01 

5.3E-08 

Chrysene 

1.5E-07 

2.8E-08 

5.0E-01 

5.6E-08 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

7. IE-08 

1.4E-08 

5.0E-01 

2.7E-08 

Fluoranthene 

2.4E-07 

4.6E-08 

5.0E-01 

9.3E-08 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

7.3E-08 

1.4E-08 

5.0E-01 

2.8E-08 

Naphthalene 

5.7E-08 

1. IE-08 

3.0E-03 

3.6E-06 

Phenanthrene 

1.6E-07 

3.1E-08 

5.0E-01 

6.2E-08 

Pyrene 

2.1E-07 

4.0E-08 

5.0E-01 

8.0E-08 

Cl 1-C22 Aromatic Fraction 

1.8E-05 

3.5E-06 

5.0E-01 

7.0E-06 

C19-C36 Aliphatic Fraction 

5.4E-05 

1.0E-05 

NA 

NC 

C9-C18 Aliphatic Fraction 

5. IE-06 

9.7E-07 

6.0E-01 

1.6E-06 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

5.4E-05 

1.0E-05 

5.0E-01 

2. IE-05 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

6.1E-07 

1.2E-07 

2.0E-05 

5.8E-03 

Antimony 

2.4E-06 

4.5E-07 

1.0E-02 

4.5E-05 

Arsenic 

2.9E-05 

5.4E-06 

2.0E-05 

2.7E-01 

Barium 

1.7E-05 

3.3E-06 

5.0E-03 

6.6E-04 

Beryllium 

7.4E-08 

1.4E-08 

2.0E-05 

7.0E-04 

Cadmium 

6. IE-08 

1.2E-08 

2.0E-05 

5.8E-04 

Chromium (total) 

2.4E-06 

4.7E-07 

3.0E-04 

1.6E-03 

Copper 

4.4E-05 

8.4E-06 

3.0E-03 

2.8E-03 

Cyanide 

4. IE-08 

7.7E-09 

3.0E-03 

2.6E-06 

Lead 

3.3E-04 

6.2E-05 

1.0E-03 

6.2E-02 

Mercury 

1.2E-06 

2.3E-07 

3.0E-04 

7.7E-04 

Nickel 

3.9E-06 

7.4E-07 

1.0E-03 

7.4E-04 

Selenium 

3.3E-06 

6.2E-07 

3.0E-03 

2. IE-04 

Silver 

3.7E-07 

7.0E-08 

1 4E-04 

5.0E-04 

Vanadium 

5.3E-06 

1.0E-06 

1.0E-03 

1.0E-03 

Zinc 

5.3E-05 

1.0E-05 

1.4E-03 

7. IE-03 




Hldustf 

3.6E-01 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern; NA = Not Applicable/Not Available; NC = Not Calculated. 


J '170,000-179,999M71521M71521-00 DEL\2015 PM10 Derivation\Dust Monitoring\low PH Area\171521.10 Risk (FW-DEP parameters)Fugitive Dust (Non-Cancer) 


QA CL Date 4/15/15 















TABLE I-12C (Continued) 

CALCULATION OF LIFETIME AVERAGE DAILY EXPOSURES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR INHALATION OF FUGITIVE DUST 
Low pH Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No. 171521 10 
Page 2 of 2 
4/17/2015 


RECEPTOR: Commercial/Industrial Workers 
CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-5C for Exposure Variables 
and Rationale and TABLE I-4C for Exposure 
Point Concentration Derivation 

In 

LADE dust 

ELCRdust = 

halation of Soil-derived Fugitive Dust 

EPC dus , * EF * ED * EP * C2 *C3 


AP C 

LADE dust * UR Total ELCR dust = 

2 ELCR(j US t 

COC 

EPC dust 

LADE dust 

UR 

ELCR dust 


EPC3 





(mg/m 3 ) 

(pg/m 3 ) 

(pg/m 3 )' 1 

(unitless) 

2-Butanone 

3.8E-09 

5.1E-09 

NA 

NC 

Acetone 

1.5E-08 

2.0E-08 

NA 

NC 

Benzene 

3 0E-10 

4.IE-10 

7.8E-06 

3.2E-15 

Carbon Disulfide 

1.2E-07 

1.6E-07 

NA 

NC 

Ethylbenzene 

2.1E-09 

2.9E-09 

NA 

NC 

Methylene Chloride 

3.3E-09 

4.5E-09 

1.0E-08 

4.5E-17 

Toluene 

4.5E-10 

6.IE-10 

NA 

NC 

Xylene (Total) 

3.0E-10 

4.1E-10 

NA 

NC 

Styrene 

3.0E-10 

4. IE-10 

5.7E-07 

2.3E-16 

Acenaphthene 

6.5E-08 

8.8E-08 

NA 

NC 

Anthracene 

8.7E-08 

1.2E-07 

NA 

NC 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

1.3E-07 

1.8E-07 

2.1E-04 

3.8E-11 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

9.7E-08 

1.3E-07 

2. IE-03 

2.8E-10 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

1.4E-07 

1.9E-07 

2. IE-04 

3.9E-11 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

7.3E-08 

9.9E-08 

NA 

NC 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

1.4E-07 

1.9E-07 

2. IE-05 

3.9E-12 

Chrysene 

1.5E-07 

2.0E-07 

2.1E-05 

4.2E-12 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

7.1E-08 

9.7E-08 

2.1E-03 

2.0E-10 

Fluoranthene 

2.4E-07 

3.3E-07 

NA 

NC 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

7.3E-08 

9.9E-08 

2. IE-04 

2.IE-11 

Naphthalene 

5.7E-08 

7.8E-08 

NA 

NC 

Phenanthrene 

1.6E-07 

2.2E-07 

NA 

NC 

Pyrene 

2. IE-07 

2.9E-07 

NA 

NC 

C11-C22 Aromatic Fraction 

1.8E-05 

2.5E-05 

NA 

NC 

C19-C36 Aliphatic Fraction 

5.4E-05 

7.3E-05 

NA 

NC 

C9-C18 Aliphatic Fraction 

5.1E-06 

6.9E-06 

NA 

NC 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

5.4E-05 

7.3E-05 

NA 

NC 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

6.1E-07 

8.3E-07 

1.0E-04 

8.3E-11 

Antimony 

2.4E-06 

3.2E-06 

NA 

NC 

Arsenic 

2.9E-05 

3.9E-05 

3.0E-03 

1.2E-07 

Barium 

1.7E-05 

2.4E-05 

NA 

NC 

Beryllium 

7.4E-08 

1.0E-07 

2.4E-03 

2.4E-10 

Cadmium 

6.1E-08 

8.2E-08 

1.8E-03 

1.5E-10 

Chromium (total) 

2.4E-06 

3.3E-06 

1.2E-02 

4.0E-08 

Copper 

4.4E-05 

6.0E-05 

NA 

NC 

Cyanide 

4.1E-08 

5.5E-08 

NA 

NC 

Lead 

3.3E-04 

4.5E-04 

NA 

NC 

Mercury 

1.2E-06 

1.6E-06 

NA 

NC 

Nickel 

3.9E-06 

5.3E-06 

4 8E-04 

2.5E-09 

Selenium 

3.3E-06 

4.5E-06 

NA 

NC 

Silver 

3.7E-07 

5.0E-07 

NA 

NC 

Vanadium 

5.3E-06 

7.1E-06 

NA 

NC 

Zinc 

5.3E-05 

7.1E-05 

NA 

NC 




Total ELCR dus1 

1.6E-07 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern; NA = Not Applicable/Not Available; NC = Not Calculated. 


\170,000-179.999M 71521 \171521 -00 DEL\2015 PM10 Denvation\Dust MomtonngUow PH Area\171521 10 Risk (FW-DEP parametersJFugitive Dust (Cancer) 


QA: CL Date: 4/15/15 










File No 171521.10 
Page 1 of 4 
4/17/2015 


TABLE 1-13C 

CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY DOSES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR EXPOSURE TO DUST VIA GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT 
Low pH Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


RECEPTOR: Resident (Young Child, age 1<2) 
SUBCHRONIC NON-CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-6C for Exposure Variables 
and Rationale 

See TABLE I-4C for Exposure Point 
Concentration Derivation 

ADD SO j|-oral 

^Qsoil-oral ” 

Exposure to Dust 

EPC S0I| * 

ADD SO j|_Q ra | 

RfD 

via Gastrointestinal Tract 

IRsoi, * EF * ED * EP * RAF oral . ne * Cl 

BW * AP nc 

^ HQsoil-oral 

COC 

EPC soi | 

EPC1 

(mg/kg) 

RAF ora i_ nc 

(unitless) 

ADD SO j|_o ra | 

(mg/kg-day) 

RfD 

Subchronic 

(mg/kg-day) 

RQsoil-oral 

(unitless) 

2-Butanone 

0.025 

i 

5.4E-11 

6.0E-01 

9.0E-11 

Acetone 

0.100 

i 

2.2E-10 

2.7E+00 

8.0E-11 

Benzene 

0.0020 

i 

4.3E-12 

1.0E-02 

4.3E-10 

Carbon Disulfide 

0.80 

i 

1.7E-09 

1.0E-01 

1.7E-08 

Ethylbenzene 

0.014 

i 

3.0E-11 

5.0E-02 

6. IE-10 

Methylene Chloride 

0.022 

i 

4.8E-11 

6.0E-03 

7.9E-09 

Toluene 

0.0030 

i 

6.5E-12 

8.0E-01 

8.IE-12 

Xylene (Total) 

0.0020 

i 

4.3E-12 

4.0E-01 

1.IE-11 

Styrene 

0.0020 

i 

4.3E-12 

2.0E+00 

2.2E-12 

Acenaphthene 

0.43 

0.3 

2.8E-10 

2.0E-01 

1.4E-09 

Anthracene 

0.58 

0.3 

3.8E-10 

1.0E+00 

3.8E-10 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

0.89 

0.3 

5.8E-10 

3.0E-01 

1.9E-09 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

0.65 

0.3 

4.2E-10 

3.0E-01 

1.4E-09 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

0.92 

0.3 

5.9E-10 

3.0E-01 

2.0E-09 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

0.49 

0.3 

3.2E-10 

3.0E-01 

1.1E-09 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

0.93 

0.3 

6.0E-10 

3.0E-01 

2.0E-09 

Chrysene 

0.99 

0.3 

6.4E-10 

3.0E-01 

2. IE-09 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

0.48 

0.3 

3. IE-10 

3.0E-01 

1.0E-09 

Fluoranthene 

1.6 

0.3 

1. IE-09 

4.0E-01 

2.6E-09 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

0.49 

0.28 

3.0E-10 

3.0E-01 

9 8E-10 

Naphthalene 

0.38 

0.3 

2.5E-10 

2.0E-01 

1.2E-09 

Phenanthrene 

1.1 

0.3 

7.0E-10 

3.0E-01 

2.3E-09 

Pyrene 

1.4 

0.3 

9. IE-10 

3.0E-01 

3.0E-09 

Cl 1-C22 Aromatic Fraction 

122 

0.3 

7.9E-08 

3.0E-01 

2.6E-07 

C19-C36 Aliphatic Fraction 

358 

1 

7.7E-07 

6.0E+00 

1.3E-07 

C9-C18 Aliphatic Fraction 

34 

1 

7.3E-08 

1.0E+00 

7.3E-08 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

360 

0.3 

2.3E-07 

3.0E-01 

7.8E-07 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

4.1 

1 

8.8E-09 

5.0E-05 

1.8E-04 

Antimony 

16 

1 

3.4E-08 

4.0E-04 

8.5E-05 

Arsenic 

191 

0.5 

2. IE-07 

3.0E-04 

6.9E-04 

Barium 

115 

1 

2.5E-07 

7.0E-02 

3.6E-06 

Beryllium 

0.49 

1 

1. IE-09 

5.0E-03 

2. IE-07 

Cadmium 

0.40 

1 

8.7E-10 

1.0E-03 

8.7E-07 

Chromium (total) 

16 

1 

3.5E-08 

2.0E-02 

1.8E-06 

Copper 

294 

0.7 

4.5E-07 

3.7E-02 

1.2E-05 

Cyanide 

0.27 

1 

5.8E-10 

6.0E-03 

9.7E-08 

Lead 

2181 

0.3 

1.4E-06 

7.5E-04 

1.9E-03 

Mercury 

8.1 

0.5 

8.7E-09 

3.0E-04 

2.9E-05 

Nickel 

26 

1 

5.6E-08 

2.0E-02 

2.8E-06 

Selenium 

22 

1 

4.7E-08 

5.0E-03 

9.4E-06 

Silver 

2.4 

1 

5.3E-09 

5.0E-03 

1. IE-06 

Vanadium 

35 

1 

7.6E-08 

9.0E-03 

8.4E-06 

Zinc 

350 

1 

7.6E-07 

3.0E-01 

2.5E-06 





Hloral = 

2.9E-03 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern. 

3. A default value of 1 is used when a RAF is otherwise unavailable. 


J:\170.000-179.999\171521\171521-00 DEU2015 PM10 DenvationVDust MomtonngVIow PH Area\171521.10 Risk (Resident)Soil Ingest (1<2) 


QA CL Date 4/15/15 









TABLE 1-13C (Continued) 

CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY DOSES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR EXPOSURE TO DUST VIA GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT 
Low pH Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No 171521 10 
Page 2 of 4 
4/17/2015 


RECEPTOR: Resident (Child, age 7<8) 
SUBCHRONIC NON-CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-6C for Exposure Variables 
and Rationale 

See TABLE I-4C for Exposure Point 
Concentration Derivation 

ADDsoil-oral — 

^Qsoil-oral — 

Exposure to Dust 

EPC S01| * 

via Gastrointestinal Tract 

IR S0 ,i * EF * ED * EP * RAF 

* Pi 

oral-nc ^ 1 

X HQ S0 j|_ 0ra i 

ADD SO j|o ra i 

BW * AP nc 

™soil-oral — 

RfD 


COC 

EPC soil 

RAF ora i_ nc 

ADD SO j|_o ra i 

RfD 

HQsoil-oral 


EPC1 



SubChronic 



(mg/kg) 

(umtless^ 

(mg/kg-day) 

(mg/kg-day) 

(unitless) 

2-Butanone 

0.025 

1 

2.3E-10 

6.0E-01 

3.8E-10 

Acetone 

0.100 

1 

9.2E-10 

2.7E+00 

3.4E-10 

Benzene 

0.0020 

1 

1.8E-11 

1.0E-02 

1.8E-09 

Carbon Disulfide 

0.80 

1 

7.4E-09 

1.0E-01 

7.4E-08 

Ethylbenzene 

0.014 

1 

1.3E-10 

5.0E-02 

2.6E-09 

Methylene Chloride 

0.022 

1 

2.0E-10 

6.0E-03 

3.4E-08 

Toluene 

0.0030 

1 

2.8E-11 

8.0E-01 

3.5E-11 

Xylene (Total) 

0.0020 

1 

1.8E-11 

4.0E-01 

4.6E-11 

Styrene 

0.0020 

1 

1.8E-11 

2.0E+00 

9.2E-12 

Acenaphthene 

0.43 

0.3 

1.2E-09 

2.0E-01 

6.0E-09 

Anthracene 

0.58 

0.3 

1.6E-09 

1.0E+00 

1.6E-09 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

0.89 

0.3 

2.5E-09 

3.0E-01 

8.2E-09 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

0.65 

0.3 

1.8E-09 

3.0E-01 

6.0E-09 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

0.92 

0.3 

2.5E-09 

3.0E-01 

8.5E-09 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

0.49 

0.3 

1.4E-09 

3.0E-01 

4.5E-09 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

0.93 

0.3 

2.6E-09 

3.0E-01 

8.6E-09 

Chrysene 

0.99 

0.3 

2.7E-09 

3.0E-01 

9. IE-09 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

0.48 

0.3 

1.3E-09 

3.0E-01 

4.4E-09 

Fluoranthene 

1.6 

0.3 

4.5E-09 

4.0E-01 

1 IE-08 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

0.49 

0.28 

1.3E-09 

3.0E-01 

4.2E-09 

Naphthalene 

0.38 

0.3 

1. IE-09 

2.0E-01 

5.3E-09 

Phenanthrene 

1.1 

0.3 

3.0E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.0E-08 

Pyrene 

1.4 

0.3 

3.9E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.3E-08 

Cl 1-C22 Aromatic Fraction 

122 

0.3 

3.4E-07 

3.0E-01 

1. IE-06 

C19-C36 Aliphatic Fraction 

358 

1 

3.3E-06 

6.0E+00 

5.5E-07 

C9-C18 Aliphatic Fraction 

34 

1 

3. IE-07 

1.0E+00 

3. IE-07 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

360 

0.3 

1.0E-06 

3.0E-01 

3.3E-06 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

4.1 

1 

3.7E-08 

5.0E-05 

7.5E-04 

Antimony 

16 

1 

1.4E-07 

4.0E-04 

3.6E-04 

Arsenic 

191 

0.5 

8.8E-07 

3.0E-04 

2.9E-03 

Barium 

115 

1 

1. IE-06 

7.0E-02 

1.5E-05 

Beryllium 

0.49 

1 

4.5E-09 

5.0E-03 

9.0E-07 

Cadmium 

0.40 

1 

3.7E-09 

1.0E-03 

3.7E-06 

Chromium (total) 

16 

1 

1.5E-07 

2.0E-02 

7.5E-06 

Copper 

294 

0.7 

1.9E-06 

3.7E-02 

5.2E-05 

Cyanide 

0.27 

1 

2.5E-09 

6.0E-03 

4.2E-07 

Lead 

2181 

0.3 

6.0E-06 

7.5E-04 

8.1E-03 

Mercury 

8.1 

0.5 

3.7E-08 

3.0E-04 

1.2E-04 

Nickel 

26 

1 

2.4E-07 

2.0E-02 

1.2E-05 

Selenium 

22 

1 

2.0E-07 

5.0E-03 

4.0E-05 

Silver 

2.4 

1 

2.3E-08 

5.0E-03 

4.5E-06 

Vanadium 

35 

1 

3.2E-07 

9.0E-03 

3.6E-05 

Zinc 

350 

1 

3.2E-06 

3.0E-01 

1. IE-05 





^Ural ~ 

1.2E-02 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 
2 COC = Constituent of Concern. 

3. A default value of 1 is used when a RAF is otherwise unavailable. 


J:\ 170 , 000-179,999\171521\171521-0O.DEL\2O15 PM10 DenvationVDust MonitoringUow PH Area\171521 10 Risk (Resident)Soil Ingest (7<8) 


QA: CL Date: 4/15/15 












TABLE 1-13C (Continued) 

CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY DOSES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR EXPOSURE TO DUST VIA GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT 
Low pH Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 3 of 4 
4/17/2015 


RECEPTOR: Resident (Adut, age 65) 
SUBCHRONIC NON-CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-6C for Exposure Variables 
and Rationale 

See TABLE I-4C for Exposure Point 
Concentration Derivation 

ADDsoji^rai 

RQsoil-oral “ 

Exposure to Dust 

EPC soil * 

ADD SO j|_o ra i 

RfD 

via Gastrointestinal Tract 

IR S0 „ * EF * ED * EP * RAF 

BW * AP nc 

* Pi 

oral-nc 1 

'■'soil-oral ” 

X HQ so ,i_ ora i 

COC 

EPCsoii 

EPC1 

(mg/kg) 

RAF ora |- nc 

(unitless) 

ADD SO j|^j ra i 

(mg/kg-day) 

RfD 

SubChronic 

(mg/kg-day) 

HQsoil-oral 

(unitless) 

2-Butanone 

0.025 

t 

4.3E-10 

6.0E-01 

7.2E-10 

Acetone 

0.100 

1 

1.7E-09 

2.7E+00 

6.4E-10 

Benzene 

0.0020 

1 

3.5E-11 

1.0E-02 

3.5E-09 

Carbon Disulfide 

0.80 

1 

1.4E-08 

1.0E-01 

1.4E-07 

Ethylbenzene 

0.014 

1 

2.4E-10 

5.0E-02 

4.8E-09 

Methylene Chloride 

0.022 

1 

3.8E-10 

6.0E-03 

6.3E-08 

Toluene 

0.0030 

1 

5.2E-11 

8.0E-01 

6.5E-11 

Xylene (Total) 

0.0020 

1 

3.5E-11 

4.0E-01 

8.6E-11 

Styrene 

0.0020 

1 

3.5E-11 

2.0E+00 

1.7E-11 

Acenaphthene 

0.43 

0.3 

2.2E-09 

2.0E-01 

1.1E-08 

Anthracene 

0.58 

0.3 

3.0E-09 

1.0E+00 

3.0E-09 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

0 89 

0.3 

4.6E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.5E-08 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

0.65 

0.3 

3.4E-09 

3.0E-01 

1. IE-08 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

0.92 

0.3 

4.7E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.6E-08 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

0 49 

0.3 

2.5E-09 

3.0E-01 

8.4E-09 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

0.93 

0.3 

4.8E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.6E-08 

Chrysene 

0.99 

0.3 

5. IE-09 

3.0E-01 

1.7E-08 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

0.48 

0.3 

2.5E-09 

3.0E-01 

8.2E-09 

Fluoranthene 

1.6 

0.3 

8.4E-09 

4.0E-01 

2.1E-08 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

0.49 

0.28 

2.4E-09 

3.0E-01 

7.9E-09 

Naphthalene 

0.38 

0.3 

2.0E-09 

2.0E-01 

9.9E-09 

Phenanthrene 

1.1 

0.3 

5.6E-09 

3.0E-01 

1.9E-08 

Pyrene 

1.4 

0.3 

7.3E-09 

3.0E-01 

2.4E-08 

Cl 1-C22 Aromatic Fraction 

122 

0.3 

6.3E-07 

3.0E-01 

2.1E-06 

C19-C36 Aliphatic Fraction 

358 

1 

6.2E-06 

6.0E+00 

1.0E-06 

C9-C18 Aliphatic Fraction 

34 

1 

5.8E-07 

1.0E+00 

5.8E-07 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

360 

0.3 

1.9E-06 

3.0E-01 

6.2E-06 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

4.1 

1 

7.0E-08 

5.0E-05 

1.4E-03 

Antimony 

16 

1 

2.7E-07 

4.0E-04 

6.8E-04 

Arsenic 

191 

0.5 

1.6E-06 

3.0E-04 

5.5E-03 

Barium 

115 

1 

1. IE-06 

7.0E-02 

1.5E-05 

Beryllium 

0.49 

1 

4.5E-09 

5.0E-03 

9.0E-07 

Cadmium 

0.40 

1 

3.7E-09 

1.0E-03 

3.7E-06 

Chromium (total) 

16 

1 

1.5E-07 

2.0E-02 

7.5E-06 

Copper 

294 

0.7 

1.9E-06 

3.7E-02 

5.2E-05 

Cyanide 

0.27 

1 

2.5E-09 

6.0E-03 

4.2E-07 

Lead 

2181 

0.3 

6.0E-06 

7.5E-04 

8. IE-03 

Mercury 

8.1 

0.5 

3.7E-08 

3.0E-04 

1.2E-04 

Nickel 

26 

1 

2.4E-07 

2.0E-02 

1.2E-05 

Selenium 

22 

1 

2.0E-07 

5.0E-03 

4.0E-05 

Silver 

2.4 

1 

2.3E-08 

5.0E-03 

4.5E-06 

Vanadium 

35 

1 

3.2E-07 

9.0E-03 

3.6E-05 

Zinc 

350 

1 

3.2E-06 

3.0E-01 

1. IE-05 





HI oral = 

1.6E-02 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern. 

3. A default value of 1 is used when a RAF is otherwise unavailable. 


J:\170,000-179,999\171521\171521-00 DEL\2015 PM10 DerivationVDust MonitoringVow PH Area\171521 10 Risk (Resident)Soil Ingest (65) 


QA CL Date: 4/15/15 











TABLE I-13C (Continued) 

CALCULATION OF LIFETIME AVERAGE DAILY DOSES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR EXPOSURE TO DUST VIA GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT 
Low pH Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No 171521.10 
Page 4 of 4 
4/17/2015 


RECEPTOR: Resident (Adut, age 65) 
CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-6C for Exposure Variables 
and Rationale 

See TABLE I-4C for Exposure Point 
Concentration Derivation 

L-ADD S0 ||_ 0ra i — 

ELCR SO j|_o ra i — 

Exposure to Dust via Gastrointestinal Tract 

EPCsoh * IR S oii * EF * ED * EP * RAF oraU * Cl 

BW * AP C 

LADD SO j|_ ora | * CSF Total ELCRsci^rai — 

^ ELCR so ,i_ ora i 

COC 

EPCsoi, 

EPC1 

(mg/kg) 

RAF oral< 

(unitless) 

L-ADD sol |_ ora | 

(mg/kg-day) 

CSF 

(mg/kg-day)' 1 

ELCR SO j|_ ra i 

(unitless) 

2-Butanone 

0.025 

i 

3.IE-12 

NA 

NC 

Acetone 

0.100 

i 

1.2E-11 

NA 

NC 

Benzene 

0.0020 

i 

2.5E-13 

5.5E-02 

1.36E-14 

Carbon Disulfide 

0.80 

i 

9.9E-11 

NA 

NC 

Ethylbenzene 

0.014 

i 

1.7E-12 

NA 

NC 

Methylene Chloride 

0.022 

i 

2.7E-12 

2.0E-03 

5.43t-15 

Toluene 

0.0030 

i 

3.7E-13 

NA 

NC 

Xylene (Total) 

0.0020 

i 

2.5E-13 

NA 

NC 

Styrene 

0 0020 

i 

2.5E-13 

3.0E-02 

7.41E-15 

Acenaphthene 

0.43 

i 

5.3E-11 

NA 

NC 

Anthracene 

0.58 

i 

7.2E-11 

NA 

NC 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

0.89 

0.3 

3.3E-11 

7.3E-01 

2 41E-11 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

0.65 

0.3 

2.4E-11 

7.3E+00 

1.75E-10 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

0.92 

0.3 

3.4E-11 

7.3E-01 

2.47E-11 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

0.49 

1 

6.0E-11 

NA 

NC 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

0.93 

0.3 

3.4E-11 

7.3E-02 

2.50E-12 

Chrysene 

0.99 

0.3 

3.6E-11 

7.3E-02 

2.66E-12 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

0.48 

0.3 

1.8E-11 

7.3E+00 

1 29E-10 

Fluoranthene 

1.6 

1 

2.0E-10 

NA 

NC 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

0.49 

0.28 

1.7E-11 

7.3E-01 

1.23E-11 

Naphthalene 

0.38 

1 

4.7E-11 

NA 

NC 

Phenanthrene 

1.1 

1 

1.3E-10 

NA 

NC 

Pyrene 

Cl 1-C22 Aromatic Fraction 

1.4 

122 

1 

1 

1.7E-10 

1.5E-08 

NA 

NA 

NC 

NC 

C19-C36 Aliphatic Fraction 

358 

1 

4.4E-08 

NA 

NC 

C9-C18 Aliphatic Fraction 

34 

1 

4.2E-09 

NA 

NC 

Total Petroleum Flydrocarbons 
Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

Antimony 

Arsenic 

360 

4.1 

16 

191 

1 

1 

1 

0.5 

4.4E-08 

5.0E-10 

1.9E-09 

1.2E-08 

NA 

2.0E+00 

NA 

1.5E+00 

NC 

1.00E-09 

NC 

1.77E-08 

Barium 

115.455 

1 

1.4E-08 

NA 

NC 

Beryllium 

Cadmium 

0.490 

0.404 

1 

1 

6.0E-11 

5.0E-11 

NA 

NA 

NC 

NC 

Chromium (total) 

16.291 

1 

2.0E-09 

NA 

NC 

Copper 

Cyanide 

Lead 

294.000 

0.270 

2181 498 

1 

1 

1 

3.6E-08 

3.3E-11 

2.7E-07 

NA 

NA 

NA 

NC 

NC 

NC 

Mercury 

Nickel 

8.079 

26.000 

1 

1 

1.0E-09 

3.2E-09 

NA 

NA 

NC 

NC 

Selenium 

Silver 

Vanadium 

21.836 

2 448 
35.000 
350.000 

- 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2.7E-09 

3.0E-10 

4.3E-09 

4.3E-08 

NA 

NA 

NA 

NA 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 




Total ELCRo,ai: 

1.9E-08 


Notes: 

1 Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern; NA = Not Applicable/Not Available; NC = Not Calculated. 

3. A default value of 1 is used when a RAF is otherwise unavailable. 


J:\170.000-179.999\171521\171521-00 DEL\2015 


PM10 DerivationVDusI Momtonng\low PH Area\171521.10 Risk (Residenl)Soil Ingest (Lifetime) 


QA: CL Date 4/15/15 


























TABLE 1-14C 

CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY EXPOSURES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR INHALATION OF FUGITIVE DUST 


Low pH Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 1 of 4 
4/17/2015 


RECEPTOR: Resident (Young Child, age 1<2) 
SUBCHRONIC NON-CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-6C for Exposure Variables 
and Rationale 

See TABLE I-4C for Exposure Point 
Concentration Derivation 

adf - 

Inhalation of Fugitive Dust 

EPC dust * EF * ED * EP * C2 

^ ^Qinh-dust 

ML - ,t 'inh-dust 

ADfEjnh-dust 

AP nc 


RfC 


COC 

EPC dust 

AD^inh-dust 

RfC 

HQinh-dust 


EPC3 


Subchronic 



(mg/m 3 ) 

(mg/m 3 ) 

(mg/m 3 ) 

(unitless) 

2-Butanone 

3.8E-09 

6.7E-11 

5.0E+00 

1.3E-11 

Acetone 

1.5E-08 

2.7E-10 

8.0E-01 

3.3E-10 

Benzene 

3.0E-10 

5.4E-12 

1.0E-02 

5.4E-10 

Carbon Disulfide 

1.2E-07 

2.1E-09 

7.0E-01 

3. IE-09 

Ethylbenzene 

2.1E-09 

3.8E-11 

9.0E+00 

4.2E-12 

Methylene Chloride 

3.3E-09 

5.9E-11 

6.0E-01 

9.8E-11 

Toluene 

4.5E-10 

8.0E-12 

5.0E+00 

1.6E-12 

Xylene (Total) 

3.0E-10 

5.4E-12 

4.0E-01 

1.3E-11 

Styrene 

3.0E-10 

5.4E-12 

3.0E+00 

1.8E-12 

Acenaphthene 

6.5E-08 

1.2E-09 

5.0E-01 

2.3E-09 

Anthracene 

8.7E-08 

1.6E-09 

5.0E-01 

3. IE-09 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

1.3E-07 

2.4E-09 

5.0E-01 

4.8E-09 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

9.7E-08 

1.7E-09 

5.0E-01 

3.5E-09 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

1.4E-07 

2.5E-09 

5.0E-01 

4.9E-09 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

7.3E-08 

1.3E-09 

5.0E-01 

2.6E-09 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

1.4E-07 

2.5E-09 

5.0E-01 

5.0E-09 

Chrysene 

1.5E-07 

2.6E-09 

5.0E-01 

5.3E-09 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

7. IE-08 

1.3E-09 

5.0E-01 

2.6E-09 

Fluoranthene 

2.4E-07 

4.3E-09 

5.0E-01 

8.7E-09 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

7.3E-08 

1.3E-09 

5.0E-01 

2.6E-09 

Naphthalene 

5.7E-08 

1.0E-09 

3.0E-03 

3.4E-07 

Phenanthrene 

1.6E-07 

2.9E-09 

5.0E-01 

5.8E-09 

Pyrene 

2. IE-07 

3.8E-09 

5.0E-01 

7.5E-09 

Cl 1-C22 Aromatic Fraction 

1.8E-05 

3.3E-07 

5.0E-01 

6.5E-07 

C19-C36 Aliphatic Fraction 

5.4E-05 

9.6E-07 

NA 

NC 

C9-C18 Aliphatic Fraction 

5.1E-06 

9. IE-08 

6.0E-01 

1.5E-07 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

5.4E-05 

9.6E-07 

5.0E-01 

1.9E-06 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

6. IE-07 

1. IE-08 

2.0E-05 

5.4E-04 

Antimony 

2.4E-06 

4.2E-08 

1.0E-02 

4.2E-06 

Arsenic 

2.9E-05 

5.1E-07 

2.0E-05 

2.6E-02 

Barium 

1.7E-05 

3.1E-07 

5.0E-03 

6.2E-05 

Beryllium 

7.4E-08 

1.3E-09 

2.0E-05 

6.6E-05 

Cadmium 

6.1E-08 

1.1E-09 

2.0E-05 

5.4E-05 

Chromium (total) 

2.4E-06 

4.4E-08 

3.0E-04 

1.5E-04 

Copper 

4.4E-05 

7.9E-07 

3.0E-03 

2.6E-04 

Cyanide 

4.1E-08 

7.2E-10 

3.0E-03 

2.4E-07 

Lead 

3.3E-04 

5.8E-06 

1.0E-03 

5.8E-03 

Mercury 

1.2E-06 

2.2E-08 

3.0E-04 

7.2E-05 

Nickel 

3.9E-06 

7.0E-08 

1.0E-03 

7.0E-05 

Selenium 

3.3E-06 

5.8E-08 

3.0E-03 

1.9E-05 

Silver 

3.7E-07 

6.6E-09 

1.4E-04 

4.7E-05 

Vanadium 

5.3E-06 

9.4E-08 

1.0E-03 

9.4E-05 

Zinc 

5.3E-05 

9.4E-07 

1.4E-03 

6.7E-04 




^^inh-dust-J^ 

3.3E-02 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern; NA = Not Applicable/Not Available; NC = Not Calculated. 


J:\170,0O0-179,999\171521\171521-00DEL\2015 PM10 DenvationVDust MonitonngVIow PH Area\171521.10 Risk (Residenl)Fug Dust (1<2) 


QA CL Date 4/15/15 









TABLE 1-14C (Continued) 

CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY EXPOSURES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR INHALATION OF FUGITIVE DUST 
Low pH Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No 171521.10 
Page 2 of 4 
4/17/2015 


RECEPTOR: Resident (Child, age 7<8) 
SUBCHRONIC NON-CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-6C for Exposure Variables 
and Rationale 

See TABLE I-4C for Exposure Point 
Concentration Derivation 

AD^inh-dust 

HQinh-dust 

Inhalation of Fugitive Dust 

EPC dust * EF * ED * EP * C2 


ADE| n h dust 

O 

c 

Q_ 

< 

Hljnh-dust — 

^ ^Qinh-dust 

RfC 


COC 

EPCdust 

ADEj n h-dust 


RfC 

^Qinh-dust 


EPC3 



SubChronic 



(mg/m 3 ) 

(mg/m 3 ) 


(mg/m 3 ) 

(unitless) 

2-Butanone 

3.8E-09 

2.5E-10 


5.0E+00 

4.9E-11 

Acetone 

1.5E-08 

9.8E-10 


8.0E-01 

1.2E-09 

Benzene 

3.0E-10 

2.0E-11 


1.0E-02 

2.0E-09 

Carbon Disulfide 

1.2E-07 

7.9E-09 


7.0E-01 

1. IE-08 

Ethylbenzene 

2.1E-09 

1.4E-10 


9.0E+00 

1.5E-11 

Methylene Chloride 

3.3E-09 

2.2E-10 


6.0E-01 

3.6E-10 

Toluene 

4.5E-10 

2.9E-11 


5.0E+00 

5.9E-12 

Xylene (Total) 

3.0E-10 

2.0E-11 


4.0E-01 

4.9E-11 

Styrene 

3.0E-10 

2.0E-11 


3.0E+00 

6.5E-12 

Acenaphthene 

6.5E-08 

4.2E-09 


5.0E-01 

8.5E-09 

Anthracene 

8.7E-08 

5.7E-09 


5.0E-01 

1. IE-08 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

1.3E-07 

8.8E-09 


5.0E-01 

1.8E-08 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

9.7E-08 

6.4E-09 


5.0E-01 

1.3E-08 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

1.4E-07 

9.0E-09 


5.0E-01 

1.8E-08 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

7.3E-08 

4.8E-09 


5.0E-01 

9.6E-09 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

1.4E-07 

9.1E-09 


5.0E-01 

1 8E-08 

Chrysene 

1.5E-07 

9.7E-09 


5.0E-01 

1.9E-08 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

7.1E-08 

4.7E-09 


5.0E-01 

9 4E-09 

Fluoranthene 

2.4E-07 

1.6E-08 


5.0E-01 

3.2E-08 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

7.3E-08 

4.8E-09 


5.0E-01 

9.6E-09 

Naphthalene 

5.7E-08 

3.8E-09 


3.0E-03 

1.3E-06 

Phenanthrene 

1.6E-07 

1. IE-08 


5.0E-01 

2. IE-08 

Pyrene 

2. IE-07 

1.4E-08 


5.0E-01 

2.8E-08 

C11-C22 Aromatic Fraction 

1.8E-05 

1.2E-06 


5.0E-01 

2.4E-06 

C19-C36 Aliphatic Fraction 

5.4E-05 

3.5E-06 


NA 

NC 

C9-C18 Aliphatic Fraction 

5.1E-06 

3.3E-07 


6.0E-01 

5.5E-07 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

5.4E-05 

3.5E-06 


5.0E-01 

7. IE-06 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

6. IE-07 

4.0E-08 


2.0E-05 

2.0E-03 

Antimony 

2.4E-06 

1.5E-07 


1.0E-02 

1.5E-05 

Arsenic 

2.9E-05 

1.9E-06 


2.0E-05 

9.4E-02 

Barium 

1.7E-05 

1. IE-06 


5.0E-03 

2.3E-04 

Beryllium 

7.4E-08 

4.8E-09 


2.0E-05 

2.4E-04 

Cadmium 

6. IE-08 

4.0E-09 


2.0E-05 

2.0E-04 

Chromium (total) 

2.4E-06 

1.6E-07 


3.0E-04 

5.3E-04 

Copper 

4.4E-05 

2.9E-06 


3.0E-03 

9.6E-04 

Cyanide 

4. IE-08 

2.7E-09 


3.0E-03 

8.8E-07 

Lead 

3.3E-04 

2.1E-05 


1.0E-03 

2. IE-02 

Mercury 

1.2E-06 

7.9E-08 


3.0E-04 

2.6E-04 

Nickel 

3.9E-06 

2.6E-07 


1.0E-03 

2.6E-04 

Selenium 

3.3E-06 

2. IE-07 


3.0E-03 

7. IE-05 

Silver 

3.7E-07 

2.4E-08 


1 4E-04 

1.7E-04 

Vanadium 

5.3E-06 

3.4E-07 


1.0E-03 

3.4E-04 

Zinc 

5.3E-05 

3.4E-06 


1.4E-03 

2.5E-03 





•■linh-tlust 

1.2E-01 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern; NA = Not Applicable/Not Available; NC = Not Calculated. 


J:\170,000-179,999\171521\171521-00 DEL\2015 PM10 Denvation\Dust MonitoringUow PH Area\171521 10 Risk (Resident)Fug Dust (7<8) 


QA CL Date 4/15/15 





















TABLE 1-14C (Continued) 

CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY EXPOSURES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR INHALATION OF FUGITIVE DUST 
Low pH Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 3 of 4 
4/17/2015 


RECEPTOR: Resident (Adult, age 65) 
SUBCHRONIC NON-CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-6C for Exposure Variables 
and Rationale 

See TABLE I-4C for Exposure Point 
Concentration Derivation 

adf - 

Inhalation of Fugitive Dust 

EPC dus t * EF * ED * EP * C2 

^ ^Qinh-dust 

MUC mh-dust 

AD^inh-dust 

AP nc 


RfC 


COC 

EPC dus t 


RfC 

^Qinh-dust 


EPC3 


SubChronic 



(mg/m 3 ) 

(mg/m 3 ) 

(mg/m 3 ) 

(unitless) 

2-Butanone 

3.8E-09 

5.5E-10 

5.0E+00 

1.IE-10 

Acetone 

1.5E-08 

2.2E-09 

8.0E-01 

2.8E-09 

Benzene 

3.0E-10 

4.4E-11 

1.0E-02 

4.4E-09 

Carbon Disulfide 

1.2E-07 

1.8E-08 

7.0E-01 

2.5E-08 

Ethylbenzene 

2.IE-09 

3.IE-10 

9.0E+00 

3.4E-11 

Methylene Chloride 

3.3E-09 

4.9E-10 

6.0E-01 

8. IE-10 

Toluene 

4.5E-10 

6.7E-11 

5.0E+00 

1.3E-11 

Xylene (Total) 

3.0E-10 

4.4E-11 

4.0E-01 

1.IE-10 

Styrene 

3.0E-10 

4.4E-11 

3.0E+00 

1.5E-11 

Acenaphthene 

6.5E-08 

9.6E-09 

5.0E-01 

1.9E-08 

Anthracene 

8.7E-08 

1.3E-08 

5.0E-01 

2.6E-08 

Benzo(a) Anth racene 

1.3E-07 

2.0E-08 

5.0E-01 

4.0E-08 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

9.7E-08 

1.4E-08 

5.0E-01 

2.9E-08 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

1.4E-07 

2.0E-08 

5.0E-01 

4.IE-08 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

7.3E-08 

1.IE-08 

5.0E-01 

2.2E-08 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

1.4E-07 

2. IE-08 

5.0E-01 

4.IE-08 

Chrysene 

1.5E-07 

2.2E-08 

5.0E-01 

4.4E-08 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

7. IE-08 

1. IE-08 

5.0E-01 

2. IE-08 

Fluoranthene 

2.4E-07 

3.6E-08 

5.0E-01 

7.2E-08 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

7.3E-08 

1. IE-08 

5.0E-01 

2.2E-08 

Naphthalene 

5.7E-08 

8.5E-09 

3.0E-03 

2.8E-06 

Phenanthrene 

1.6E-07 

2.4E-08 

5.0E-01 

4.8E-08 

Pyrene 

2.1E-07 

3. IE-08 

5.0E-01 

6.2E-08 

Cl 1-C22 Aromatic Fraction 

1.8E-05 

2.7E-06 

5.0E-01 

5.4E-06 

C19-C36 Aliphatic Fraction 

5.4E-05 

7.9E-06 

NA 

NC 

C9-C18 Aliphatic Fraction 

5.1E-06 

7.5E-07 

6.0E-01 

1.2E-06 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

5.4E-05 

8.0E-06 

5.0E-01 

1.6E-05 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

6. IE-07 

9.0E-08 

2.0E-05 

4.5E-03 

Antimony 

2.4E-06 

3.5E-07 

1.0E-02 

3.5E-05 

Arsenic 

2.9E-05 

4.2E-06 

2.0E-05 

2.IE-01 

Barium 

1.7E-05 

2.6E-06 

5.0E-03 

5. IE-04 

Beryllium 

7.4E-08 

1.1E-08 

2.0E-05 

5.4E-04 

Cadmium 

6.1E-08 

9.0E-09 

2.0E-05 

4.5E-04 

Chromium (total) 

2.4E-06 

3.6E-07 

3.0E-04 

1.2E-03 

Copper 

4.4E-05 

6.5E-06 

3.0E-03 

2.2E-03 

Cyanide 

4. IE-08 

6.0E-09 

3.0E-03 

2.0E-06 

Lead 

3.3E-04 

4.8E-05 

1.0E-03 

4 8E-02 

Mercury 

1.2E-06 

1.8E-07 

3.0E-04 

6.0E-04 

Nickel 

3.9E-06 

5.8E-07 

1.0E-03 

5.8E-04 

Selenium 

3.3E-06 

4.8E-07 

3.0E-03 

1.6E-04 

Silver 

3.7E-07 

5.4E-08 

1.4E-04 

3.9E-04 

Vanadium 

5.3E-06 

7.8E-07 

1.0E-03 

7.8E-04 

Zinc 

5.3E-05 

7.8E-06 

1.4E-03 

5.5E-03 




^^nh-dust-| 

2.8E-01 


Notes: 

1. Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern; NA = Not Applicable/Not Available; NC = Not Calculated. 


J:\170,000-179,999\171521\171521-00.DEL\2015 PM10 Derivation\Dust MomtoringUow PH Area\171521.10 Risk (Resident)Fug Dust (65) 


QA CL Date: 4/15/15 














TABLE I-14C (Continued) 

CALCULATION OF LIFETIME AVERAGE DAILY EXPOSURES AND RISK ESTIMATES 
FOR INHALATION OF FUGITIVE DUST 
Low pH Area Proposed Remediation Area 
Everett Staging Yard 
Everett, Massachusetts 


File No. 171521.10 
Page 4 of 4 
4/17/2015 


RECEPTOR: Resident (Adut, age 65) 
CANCER EFFECTS 


See TABLE I-6C for Exposure Variables 
and Rationale 

i a nc — 

Inhalation of Fugitive Dust 

EPC dust * EF * ED * EP * C2 * C4 


L^L'^inh-dust 


AP C 


See TABLE I-4C for Exposure Point 
Concentration Derivation 

ELCR|nh-dust ” 

LADE, nh „ ust *UR 

Total ELCRj n h-dust — 

X ELCR, nh _dust 

COC 

EPC dust 

EPC3 

EADEj n h-dust 

UR 

ELCRj n h-dust 


(mg/m 3 ) 

(Mg/m 3 ) 

(Mg/m 3 )' 1 

(unitless) 


2-Butanone 
Acetone 
Benzene 
Carbon Disulfide 
Ethylbenzene 
Methylene Chloride 
Toluene 
Xylene (Total) 

Styrene 

Acenaphthene 

Anthracene 

Benzo(a)Anthracene 

Benzo(a)Pyrene 

Benzo(b)Fluoranthene 

Benzo(g,h,i)Perylene 

Benzo(k)Fluoranthene 

Chrysene 

Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene 

Fluoranthene 

lndeno(1,2,3-cd)Pyrene 

Naphthalene 

Phenanthrene 

Pyrene 

Cl 1-C22 Aromatic Fraction 

C19-C36 Aliphatic Fraction 

C9-C18 Aliphatic Fraction 

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 

Polychlorinated Biphenyls 

Antimony 

Arsenic 

Barium 

Beryllium 

Cadmium 

Chromium (total) 

Copper 

Cyanide 

Lead 

Mercury 

Nickel 

Selenium 

Silver 

Vanadium 

Zinc 


3.8E-09 

4.0E-09 

NA 

NC 

1.5E-08 

1.6E-08 

NA 

NC 

3.0E-10 

3.2E-10 

7.8E-06 

2.5E-15 

1.2E-07 

1.3E-07 

NA 

NC 

2.1E-09 

2.2E-09 

NA 

NC 

3.3E-09 

3.5E-09 

1.0E-08 

3.5E-17 

4.5E-10 

4.8E-10 

NA 

NC 

3.0E-10 

3.2E-10 

NA 

NC 

3.0E-10 

3.2E-10 

5.7E-07 

1.8E-16 

6.5E-08 

6.8E-08 

NA 

NC 

8.7E-08 

9.2E-08 

NA 

NC 

1.3E-07 

1.4E-07 

2.1E-04 

2.9E-11 

9.7E-08 

1.0E-07 

2. IE-03 

2.IE-10 

1.4E-07 

1.4E-07 

2.1E-04 

3.0E-11 

7.3E-08 

7.7E-08 

NA 

NC 

1.4E-07 

1.5E-07 

2. IE-05 

3.IE-12 

1.5E-07 

1.6E-07 

2. IE-05 

3.3E-12 

7. IE-08 

7.5E-08 

2.1E-03 

1 6E-10 

2.4E-07 

2.6E-07 

NA 

NC 

7.3E-08 

7.7E-08 

2.1E-04 

1.6E-11 

5.7E-08 

6.0E-08 

NA 

NC 

1.6E-07 

1.7E-07 

NA 

NC 

2.1E-07 

2.2E-07 

NA 

NC 

1.8E-05 

1.9E-05 

NA 

NC 

5.4E-05 

5.7E-05 

NA 

NC 

5. IE-06 

5.4E-06 

NA 

NC 

5.4E-05 

5.7E-05 

NA 

NC 

6.1E-07 

6.4E-07 

1.0E-04 

6.4E-11 

2.4E-06 

2.5E-06 

NA 

NC 

2.9E-05 

3.0E-05 

3.0E-03 

9. IE-08 

1.7E-05 

1.8E-05 

NA 

NC 

7.4E-08 

7.8E-08 

2.4E-03 

1.9E-10 

6. IE-08 

6.4E-08 

1.8E-03 

1.2E-10 

2.4E-06 

2.6E-06 

1.2E-02 

3. IE-08 

4.4E-05 

4.7E-05 

NA 

NC 

4. IE-08 

4.3E-08 

NA 

NC 

3.3E-04 

3.5E-04 

NA 

NC 

1.2E-06 

1.3E-06 

NA 

NC 

3.9E-06 

4 IE-06 

4.8E-04 

2.0E-09 

3.3E-06 

3.5E-06 

NA 

NC 

3.7E-07 

3.9E-07 

NA 

NC 

5.3E-06 

5.5E-06 

NA 

NC 

5.3E-05 

5.5E-05 

NA 

NC 



Total ELCR, nh -dust 

1.2E-07 


Notes: 

1 Only COCs that are detected at this exposure point are displayed. 

2. COC = Constituent of Concern; NA = Not Applicable/Not Available; NC = Not Calculated. 


\170,000-179,9991171521X171521-00.DEL12015 PM10 


DenvationIDust Monitoringllow PH Area\171521 10 Risk (ResKlent)Fug Dust (Irfetime) 


QA: CL Date 4/15/15 













































































































































































APPENDIX K 

PUBLIC NOTIFICATION 




... TECHNICAL 
' nONMENTAL 

Ecological 

Water 

Construction 

management 


249 Vanderbilt Avenue 
Norwood, MA 02062 
781.278.3700 
www.gza.com 



August 18, 2015 
File No. 01.0171521.10 

Mayor Carlo DeMaria Jr. 
Mayor's Office 
484 Broadway 
Everett, MA 02149 


Mayor Martin J. Walsh 
Mayor's Office 
1 City Hall Plaza 
Boston, MA 02201 

Mayor Joseph A. Curtatone 
Mayor's Office 
93 Highland Avenue 
Somerville, MA 02143 

Mr. Stephen Crosby, Chair 
Massachusetts Gaming Commission 
101 Federal Street, 23 rd Floor 
Boston, MA 02110 


Ms. Alba Cruz-Davis, Public Health 
Director 

Everett City Hall Room 20 
484 Broadway 
Everett, MA 02149 

Executive Director 
Boston Public Health Commission 
1010 Massachusetts Avenue 
Boston, MA 02118 

Health Department Director 
City Hall Annex 
50 Evergreen Avenue 
Somerville, MA 02145 


Re: Notification Pursuant to the Massachusetts Contingency Plan 

Implementation of a Release Abatement Measure 
(Former) Everett Staging Yard 
1 Horizon Way 
Everett, Massachusetts 
Release Tracking Number 3-13341 


To Whom It May Concern: 

On behalf of Wynn MA, LLC, and in accordance with section 40.1403(3)(d) of the Massachusetts Contingency Plan 
(MCP) GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc. (GZA| is notifying you of the implementation of a Release Abatement 
Measure (RAM) at the above-referenced Disposal Site (the Site). The objective of this RAM is the removal or 
encapsulation of contaminants in soil in certain areas at the Site prior to the commencement of construction of 
the Wvnn Resort in Everett. The RAM activities include in-situ solidification/stabilization (ISS) of contaminated 
soil in one area of the Site, and excavation and off-site disposal of contaminated soil from another area of the 
Site The RAM activities are expected to begin in September 2015, and last two to three months. If you have any 
questions about these upcoming activities to respond to contamination at the Site please do not hesitate to 
contact me at the telephone number above or Bob DeSalvio at 702-770-7000. 

Very truly yours, 

GZA GEOENVIRONMENTAL, INC. 


(7 

Lawrence Feldman, LSP 
Senior Principal 

J:\ 170 ,000-179,999\171521\171521-10. DEL\RAM Plan - Pre-Constructic 

Notice.docx 


n\App K - Public Notice\171S21-l Wynn RAM Plan Public 



































































































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