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GRAY HERBARIUM 

OF 

HARVARD UNIVERSITY 




GIFT OF 

WALTER DEANE 

OF CAMBRIDGE 
Class of 1870 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT .... .... No. 48. 



REPORT 



BOAED OF METROPOLITAN PAEK 
COMIISSIONEES. 



January, 1906. 




BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 

1906. 



Approybd bt 
Thb State Boa&d of Pubuoatiok. 



CONTENTS, 



PAOX 

List of Officers, 6 

Report of the Commissioners, 7 

Report of the Secretary, 18 

Report of the Landscape Architects, 41 

Report of the Engineer, . . . . . . . .44 

Financial Statement, 73 

Appendix: Proceedings of Apportionment Commission: — 
General Apportionment under Chapter 419 of the 

Acts of the Legislature for the Year 1899, . . 97 
Wellington Bridge Apportionment under Chapter 491 

OF the Acts of the Legislature for the Year 1901, 115 



OFFICERS, 



Oommissioners. 
WILLIAM B. DE LAS CASAS, Chairman, 
EDWIN B. HASKELL. EDWIN U. CURTIS. 

DAVID N. SKILLINGS. ELLERTON P. WHITNEY. 

Landscape Architects. 

Advisory, 

OLMSTED BROTHERS. 

Bngrineer. 
JOHN R. RABLIN. 

Law and Claims. 
GEORGE LYMAN ROGERS. 

Secretary. 
JOHN WOODBURY. 

Offices, 14 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. 



(!I)0mm0nfajjeallb 0f iJassatl^ttSjetts. 



KEPOKT. 



The Metropolitan Park Commission presents^herewith" its 
thirteenth annual report. 

The Board has continued its work during the past year 
chiefly along two lines, — the care and maintenance of the 
portions of the Metropolitan Parks System already acquired, 
and the development and extension of other portions under 
the continuing appropriations made available by chapters 
419 and 429 of the Acts of the Legislature for the year 
1903. 

There have been few changes in the acreage of the res- 
ervations and parkways. The most important addition has 
been the acquirement of most of the land required for a 
parkway from Revere Beach toward Winthrop, and of this 
the larger part was a gift of the Boston, Revere Beach & 
Lynn Railroad. Other small pieces of land have been ac- 
quired, and a few transfers have been made for the purpose 
of improving the acquirements previously made or of facili- 
tating their development for public use. Investigations have 
also been made as to the feasibility of purchasing other lands 
at agreed prices, to provide for the completion of other 
portions of the system during the coming year. It is now 
the well-understood policy of the Board under present ap- 
propriations to avoid as far as possible the taking of land by 
power of eminent domain, except in cases where the cost 
has been &st determined, by previous agreement as to the 
price. 

The total area of the holdings in the Metropolitan Parks 
System is 10,053.70 acres, of which 9,380.25 acres are 



8 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

classed as reservations and the remaining 673.45 acres as 
parkways. This includes 7,326.63 acres of woodland, 47 
miles of river frontage, 9.86 miles of beaches and 25.55 
miles of parkways. Further details are given in a table on 
page 20 of this report. 

Land claims amounting to $63,227.87 have been disposed 
of during the year. No large land claim is now in suit, 
and the aggregate of the several small claims remaining 
unpaid is provided for by funds reserved to meet them. 
The condition of the loans on Dec. 1, 1905, is briefly sum- 
marized as follows : — 

Metropolitan Parks Loan : — 

Appropriations and receipts, . . . . 18,188,884 01 
Expenditures, 7,978,880 88 

Balance in hands of State Treasurer, . 1214,508 18 
Metropolitan Parks Loan, Series II. : — 

Appropriations and receipts, $4,514,907 41 

Expenditures, 4,260,745 88 

Balance in hands of State Treasurer, . $254,161 53 
Nantasket Beach Loan : — 

Appropriations and receipts, $705,881 50 

Expenditures, 705,881 50 

Important construction work carried on during the year 
has advanced the system to an increased public use. Blue 
Hills Parkway has been extended from Canton Avenue to 
and through the Blue Hills Reservation to the headquarters 
on Hillside Street in the form of a single woods road, which, 
although only a part of the design for its ultimate comple- 
tion, i^ill be ample for all needs for many years to come, 
and will be more attractive in the mean time because kept 
in its simpler form. An office building, with dormitory and 
detention rooms, and a tool house to replace one destroyed 
by fire, have been finished, and a caretaker's house near by 
has been remodelled. A new path has been built from Hill- 
side Street to the top of Great Blue Hill, and on Canton 
Avenue a refectory has been added to the group of buildings 
about the railway station at the foot of the main path to 
Great Blue Hill. Furnace Brook Parkway has been sub- 






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1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 9 

graded from Adams Street to the Blue Hills, and a bridge 
over the Granite Branch Railroad nearly completed. This 
portion of the parkway will be surfaced during the coming 
year. A short woods road in extension of the parkway is 
also being built, and in connection with the other woods 
roads already built will provide a circuit drive in the easterly 
portion of the reservation and a connection with Randolph 
Avenue. A contract for sub-grading a shore drive along 
Quincy Bay has been let, to be completed during 1906. At 
Boylston Street, Newton Upper Falls, construction has been 
well advanced upon a new bridge and dam of reinforced 
concrete with stone facing, similar in appearance to the 
older arch bridges upon the river. With other incidental 
structures to be completed during the coming year, this dam 
and bridge will replace those formerly at this point, provide 
a greatly needed improvement in the highway and restore 
the beauty of Hemlock Gorge. Construction of a roadway 
along the river front of the United States Arsenal grounds 
will be begun as soon as plans transferring the land have been 
executed by the United States government. Such transfer 
is authorized by special act of Congress, and the plans have 
been approved in preliminary form by the Secretary of War, 
so that it may be reasonably expected that this work will 
begin during the coming year. Lowell Memorial Park, 
Cambridge, which was originally acquired with the aid of 
funds provided by a committee of (Cambridge citizens, has 
been marked, at their request and with the aid of their further 
gifts, as a memorial to James Russell Lowell, by an enclos- 
ing wall of brick and limestone, and at the points where 
Fresh Pond Parkway passes through the park, by posts bear- 
ing tablets with memorial inscriptions by President Charles 
W. Eliot of Harvard College. The driving road, sidewalk 
and planting space and bridges of Revere Beach Parkway 
between Main Street, Everett, and Fellsway near Wellington 
Bridge, have been finished and opened to public use. There 
is now a continuous park drive from Middlesex Fells and 
the surrounding municipalities and from Broadway Park in 
Somerville, a point two miles distant from the State House, 
through Everett, Chelsea and Revere, to Revere Beach. 



10 METROPOLITAN PAEKS. [Jan. 

This parkway and the driveway along Revere Beach, which 
is nearly completed, with the State highway and its exten- 
sion to Ocean Street in the city of Lynn^ will provide the 
shortest and most convenient driving road between Boston 
and the northern suburbs and the North Shore beyond, and 
will in some measure rival the park drives to the south of 
Boston. 

The bath-house which this Commission was directed to 
build at Nahant Beach close by the city of Lynn was built 
and opened in time for a considerable use during the past 
summer. At the same time important changes were made 
in the alignment of the Nahant Road near by, to provide 
that heavy travel and electric cars might pass behind the 
bath-house, and that the road in front of the bath-house upon 
the ocean side might be reserved for pleasure uses. 

King's Beach has been improved by a sea wall and espla- 
nade from the monument in Swampscott to and around Red 
Rock in Lynn, and has already proved so satisfactory that a 
very strong public demand has been made for the extension 
of the improvement along the intervening strip of shore 
between Red Rock and the Nahant-Lynn Bath-house. 
Careful investigation is being made as to the cost of this 
extension. K it is found that it may be provided with 
available funds, it will not only be attractive in itself, but 
also add to the attractiveness of the portion already built, 
and furnish a connection with the Nahant Road which will 
bring into use a continuous ocean driveway six miles long, 
and of almost unrivalled beauty and usefulness. 

Contracts for sub-grading an extension of the Mystic 
Valley Parkway along the banks of Mystic River to Alewife 
Brook, Powder House Boulevard in Somerville, and thence 
as a driveway along the river bank in Medford to Cradock 
Bridge, have been nearly completed. The bridges for this 
driveway are to be built during 1906, but further work can- 
not be done until after a decision is received from the State 
Board of Health upon the petition made in January, 1905, 
by this Board for permission to build a dam across Mystic 
River at Cradock Bridge. A decision in this matter will 
probably not be received until the Board of Health has com- 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 11 

pleted the investigation and report in regard to Alewife 
Brook required of it under chapter 445 of the Acts of 1904. 

Woods roads in Middlesex Fells along the westerly side 
of Winchester South Reservoir and thence to Forest Street 
have been completed. They are built upon permanent lines, 
and open up many beautiful views and provide a conven- 
ient means of crossing the westerly half of the reservation. 
Their cost has been met in part by the gift of $4,000 from 
Messrs. Peter C. and Shepherd Brooks. 

The matter of a street railway location in Fellsway from 
Somerville to and through Middlesex Fells to Stoneham has 
received careful attention during the past year. No formal 
grant has been made, but there is no delay or unwillingness 
on the part of this Board to make grants under reasonable 
regulations for the protection of the reservations and park- 
ways and of the public. Public hearings were held on 
March 30, 1904, on petitions of the Boston Elevated Railway 
Company for a location from its tracks in Broadway, Somer- 
ville, to the Stoneham line, and of the Boston & Northern 
Street Railway Company for a location from that point to its 
tracks in Main Street in Stoneham. Careful and extended 
studies were made by the Landscape Architects and Engineer 
of the Commission, to determine a feasible line ; and on Nov. 
17, 1904, drafts of proposed locations and plans were in- 
formally communicated to the street railways. As a result 
of conferences, on April 5, 1905, an amended form of grant 
was submitted to the Boston Elevated Railway Company, 
preliminary to submitting an amended grant to the Boston 
& Northern Street Railway Company. No reply has been 
received except by informal inquiries and suggestions as to 
minor changes in the route, which have been in general 
informally assented to by this Board. As soon as the inves- 
tigations thus being made are completed to an extent which 
warrants further action, the Board expects to provide for a 
short necessary extension of Fellsway, and to execute the 
formal papers of grant. 

The maintenance and administration of the reservations 
and parkways have presented few new problems which call 
for special comment at this time. This is in a measure 



12 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan, 

evidence that the organization of the forces employed by the 
Board and the services rendered by these forces has been 
satisfactory. The superintendency of Blue Hills Division, 
made vacant by the death of Frank Dings, who for several 
years filled the position with faithfiil zeal, has been, filled 
by advancement of Bartholomew J. Costello, formerly a 
sergeant in the United States Army, and for several years 
past a faithful officer and sergeant of the Metropolitan Park 
Police. 

Nahant Beach Bath-house was opened in July as a branch of 
Revere Beach Bath-house, and was placed under the general 
supervision of Supt. Herbert W. West of Revere Beach 
Division, with an assistant who was advanced after several 
years of faithful service as a life-guard at Revere and Nan- 
tasket. Excellent service was maintained at this bath-house 
as well as at the other bath-houses, and the patronage was 
generally satisfactory, considering the coolness of the month 
of August. 

Very serious problems in the administration and care 
of the roadways have been presented as to their use by 
automobiles. The restraint of reckless drivers, who do not 
understand that the roads of the park system, being provided 
for pleasure driving, ought not to be used by any one class 
of drivers in a manner which will cause danger or nervous 
worry to others, has required the making of rules to restrict 
speed, and has required at times the arrest or smnmons to 
court of those who violate the rules. This course has oc- 
casionally caused annoyance to people whose acts were per- 
haps not evidence of their intentions, and has caused some 
regrettable misunderstandings. It was very satisfactory to 
find during the past summer that a police officer mounted on 
a motor-cycle could restrain most of the reckless driving. 
The Commission, therefore, gladly revised its rules, and 
made them as liberal as even the counsel of the Massa- 
chusetts Automobile Association felt justified in recommend- 
ing. The result has proved generally satisfactory, and since 
the change was made there have been few violations of the 
new rules and consequently few arrests. 

The wear and tear of the roadways have been seriously in- 






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1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 13 

creased by swift-moving automobiles, which tear off the 
surface; and the expense for repairs has correspondingly 
increased beyond what was reckoned upon when the roads 
were built. With a view to securing ah improved surface, 
experiments have been made with tar and petroleum treat- 
ment, but no satisfactory result has been secured thus far. 
It is evident, however, that effective construction and main- 
tenance will require increased expense, and that for the 
present at least the period for watering will have to be 
extended. 

The Legislature of 1905 made maintenance appropriations 
by items instead of as a lump sum. This method permits 
no transfers, and obviously requires that each item of the 
appropriation be large enough to cover the largest probable 
expense in the item for the year, and on the whole cannot 
result in economy in the cost of such maintenance. A good 
example is afforded in the experience of this Board in the 
maintenance of the driveway at Winthrop, where unusual 
repairs have been required during the past year to repair 
damage done by a very severe winter storm. A saving 
in the cost of watering made possible by unusually favorable 
conditions of wind and weather could not be made available 
for these extraordinary repairs ; and, as the money appro- 
priated for repairs was soon exhausted, less than the usual 
amount of roadway repairs could be made in 1905, and a 
larger amount ^of repairs than usual will have to be made 
in 1906. 

Nantasket Beach presents a problem of maintenance in 
regard to its roadway which has not yet been adequately met. 
The loan appropriations have not been sufficient to provide 
for a development of the reservation corresponding to its 
needs, nor to the development provided for at other shore 
reservations. Each year the roadway known as County 
Road requires serious repairs, not only to provide for the 
throngs who come to the beach during the summer, but also 
for the ordinary highway uses which it must serve for the 
town of Hull, to which it is the only approach. The main- 
tenance appropriation for each year provides for only tem- 
porary repairs, and these are greater than they ought to be 



14 METROPOLITAN PAEKS. [Jan. 

because of the bad alignment, grade and construction of 
the roadway. The previous recommendations of the Board 
for an appropriation sufficient to provide for permanent 
reconstruction of this roadway, and for protection of the 
reservation by acquirement of the rocky shore to the south- 
east, are renewed at this time. 

The most serious problem of maintenance before the Board 
at the present time is that presented by the gypsy and brown- 
tail moths. Each year since systematic work by the Board 
of Agriculture was suspended these pests have increased 
everywhere with great rapidity. Meantime, public opinion 
has been divided as to the course of action to be pursued, 
and all action has been sporadic, and, speaking generally, 
ineffective. Various methods of repression have been tried, 
and more or less difference of opinion has developed as to 
which method is most effective. As a result, public opinion 
has been blinded to the real seriousness of the situation, 
and a timidity has governed the action of individuals and 
municipalities and of the State and of this Board in regard 
to the matter. Last year new legislation was enacted, under 
which the State resumed in a measure its responsibility for 
the work of repression, and required co-operation by individ- 
uals and municipalities. This legislation came too late for 
work to check the destructiveness and spread of the pests 
during 1905, but has led to work for repression in 1906 
which is more extended than that of any previous year ; and 
much may be hoped for if this activity is supplemented by 
continuous work and provision therefor as necessity may 
warrant. Last year the Legislature appropriated altogether 
$27,000 for the work in the almost 10,000 acres of the Met- 
ropolitan Parks and Parkways. The amount proved insuffi- 
cient, and was less effective than it would otherwise have been 
because it did not become available until March 17, Yet 
the measures made possible by this appropriation were so 
effective in the localities where complete work could be done 
that the foliage of trees upon the parkways, for example, 
was preserved even in sections where uncared-for trees upon 
immediately surrounding land were completely defoliated. 

In the Middlesex Fells, where the most serious infestation 
existed, the methods adopted were efficient for the localities 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 15 

where thorough work could be done, and where the lands 
were not near outside uncared-for lands, but were not suf- 
ficient to prevent an extended spread of the pests to points 
within the reservation where limited time and money made 
thorough work impossible. The special appropriation was 
exhausted by September. Serious consideration of the 
matter, and conference with Dr. Kirkland, the newly ap- 
pointed Superintendent of the State for work against the 
gypsy and brown-tail moths, resulted in an understanding 
that he should inspect all the reservations and warn this 
Board of any spread of the moths, and that he should use 
his most serious efforts to suppress the moths in the neighbor- 
hood of all the reservations and parkways. Under these 
circumstances, and in view of the strong public feeling that 
it was useless to require work in the outside lands near the 
reservations and parkways unless efficient work was done 
within them, the Commission decided that so serious a con- 
dition existed as to warrant the use of a portion of the 
general funds of the loans until the time when the matter 
could be presented to the Legislature of 1906, and considered 
in connection with the maintenance appropriations for the 
year. In the Blue Hills, where Dr. Kirkland found for the 
first time that several colonies of the gypsy moth had estab- 
lished themselves, the work was immediately turned over to 
his supervision, to be done at the expense of the funds of 
this Board ; but in the other reservations and parkways the 
Commission retained its charge of the work, subject to 
general inspection and advice firom the State Superintendent. 
The result is that the work is in a much more advanced con- 
dition than ever before, and has been so conducted that a 
larger part of the fundamental work preliminary to direct 
work of repression has been done throughout the reserva- 
tions than in any other previous year. In this work it has 
been the eflFort to first protect the surrounding municipalities 
and private lands against a spread of the gypsy moth from 
the reservations, and for that reason work has been done first 
on the outer portions of the reservations. This work will 
be extended to the rest of each reservation, if funds are 
provided in time for such work. It is impossible to make 
absolute predictions as to the efficiency of any class of work 



16 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

against these pests, but it may be stated with certainty that 
there is no possibility of effective repression except by 
thorough work extended over the entire region which may 
afford food and cover to the gypsy moth ; and that it is not 
possible to do progressively effective work if the appropria- 
tion of funds is postponed each year until after effective 
work can be done, nor if it is postponed or done with half- 
way measures until an effective parasite has been developed. 
Delay means a deliberate taking of chances that a large part 
and perhaps all valuable trees will be destroyed. Nor ought 
effective work to be postponed until an agreement is reached 
as to which method of repression is best. Removal of 
diseased and overcrowded trees, creosoting of nests, banding 
trees with such sticky materials as will not injure them, 
destroying the caterpillars, spraying, surrounding the worst 
colonies with lines of oiled hay or boards smeared with 
sticky substances, and even burning over the ground, are all 
effective measures, which must be used as opportunity and 
the necessities of each case seem to warrant. 

The comparative cost and availability under all circum- 
stances of the various methods of work is being gradually 
determined ; and the experience gained is making it certain 
that, while any single locality may be almost absolutely 
protected, yet only prompt, continuous work over the en- 
tire area infested will effectively reduce the amount of work 
to be done in each year, and will bring a general repression 
even equal to that which existed a few years ago. It is 
therefore hardly possible to limit the earnestness of lan- 
guage with which this Commission urges that adequate and 
prompt provision be made for efficient work wherever the 
gypsy moth exists, and that such provision be continued 
until the moth is completely checked ; and that at the same 
time every reasonable effort be made under the State and 
national authority and supervision to find some parasite or 
more effective method of destroying both the gypsy and the 
brown-tail moths. The extreme work and expense now 
required from every land owner is bringing about the de- 
struction of a large part of the woods in the Metropolitan 
District. It is therefore all the more important that the 
reservations of the Metropolitan Parks System be saved. 



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In view of the facts above stated, it is recommended that 
the Metropolitan Parks Loan be recompensed by an appro- 
priation to restore the funds necessarily used before the 
annual appropriations could become available, and that this 
amount be increased by a substantial further amount, to be 
available for the contingencies of this most uncertain work 
whenever the maintenance appropriations are insuflScient for 
the work which seems to be advisable before the maintenance 
appropriations of the following year can become available. 

The work in which this Board is engaged was outlined in 
its general form in the report and plan submitted by a pre- 
liminary commission to the Legislature of 1893. Its be- 
ginning was authorized by chapter 407 of the Acts of 1893, 
known as the Metropolitan Park Act. It has been advanced 
from year to year under additional appropriations and legis- 
lation, of which the most important was that of chapter 288 
of the Acts of 1894, known as the Boulevard or Parkway 
Act, and that of chapter 464 of the Acts of 1899, known as 
the Nantasket- Beach Act. This legislation and the appro- 
priations have generally resulted from public petition and 
hearing before the Legislature to enable or direct the Com- 
mission to carry out detailed plans for some portion of the 
general plan presented by the preliminary commission. 
Singularly few additions or changes have been made except 
in details. In 1903 this work had so far advanced that 
considerable appropriations were made, as above stated in 
this report, to provide for annual work for five years in 
completion of the Metropolitan Parks System. The result 
has been steady, consistent and economically accomplished 
progress, which, at the completion of a work now planned 
and entered upon for the full period of five years, will at 
the expiration of that period in 1907 show a substantial 
completion of the plan of the preliminary commission. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM B. DE LAS CASAS. 

EDWIN B. HASKELL. 

EDWIN U. CURTIS. 

DAVID N. SKILLINGS. 

ELLERTON P. WHITNEY. 
Dec. 13, 1906. 



18 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 



KEPORT OF THE SECRETARY. 



Hon. WiLXiAM B. DE LAS Casas, Chairman, Metropolitan Park Com- 
mission, 

Sir : — I herewith present my report for the year end- 
ing Dec. 1, 1905, It is subdivided as follows : 1. Acquire- 
ment of lands. 2. Administration. 3. Miscellaneous. 
4. Finances. 

1. Acquirement of Lands. 

The area of park lands has not been increased by any 
large additions during the past year. In Revere a strip of 
land 70 feet in width has been acquired, extending from 
Charles Eliot Circle at the south end of Rev^ere Beach to 
Leverett Avenue; and a block of land containing 1.39 
acres, lying between this point and the sea, has also been 
purchased. This extension from Revere Beach Reservation 
is designed to form the first link in the connection by suit- 
able roadways of Revere Beach with the driveway at 
Winthrop Shore. The land between Eliot Circle and 
Leverett Avenue is substantially all contributed to the 
proposed improvement by the owner, the Boston, Revere 
Beach & Lynn Railroad. Nahant Beach Parkway has been 
extended by the purchase of a block of land in Lynn lying 
between the Lynn and Nahant boundary line and Washington 
Street in Lynn. The land thus obtained made it possible to 
lay out a street for traflSc purposes in the rear of the new 
Nahant Beach Bath-house, and to exclude all but pleasure 
travel from the portion of Nahant Road which passes in front 
of the bath-house. A location in this new street was also 
given to the electric railway recently opened between Lynn 
and Nahant, so that it does not interfere with the comfort 
or pleasure of persons using the roadway along the crest of 
the beach. In Winchester a small parcel of land on Bacon 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 19 

Street has been purchased for the purpose of improving the 
entrance into Mystic Valley Parkway at that point. In 
Quincy land has been taken for the slopes to the Granite 
Branch Bridge of the Old Colony Railroad, where it crosses 
Furnace Brook Parkway ; and an exchange of land has been 
made with an adjoining owner at Crescent Street, in order 
to arrange suitably the junction of the street with this park- 
way. In settlement for land taken for Fresh Pond Parkway, 
and as consideration also for the imposition of parkway 
restrictions on abutting lands, two irregular parcels of 
land at the intersection of the parkway with Larch Street 
in Cambridge have been conveyed to the adjoining owner. 
Fellsmere Park in Maiden through which Fellsway East 
passes has been transferred for care and control by the city 
of Maiden to this Commission, and an adjoining estate at 
Vista Street which is needed for future development has been 
bought at private sale. A portion of the land taken in Bos- 
ton for the approach to Mattapan Bridge at the beginning 
of Blue Hills Parkway has been transferred to the control 
of the city of Boston, and has been incorporated in Mattapan 
Square. A few acres of land in Canton have been purchased 
which were needed for improving the boundaries of the land 
given to the public by the late Henry L. Pierce as a part of 
the Blue Hills Reservation, and a taking to confirm the title 
has been made of all the lands in Canton and Randolph 
shown on the Pierce plan. In building a portion of the 
North Border Road of Middlesex Fells Reservation in Stone- 
ham, it was found desirable to acquire a small lot of wild 
land near the Bear Hill Entrance. The construction of the 
driveway at Revere Beach from Revere Street to the Point 
of Pines leaves at several points small strips of land between 
taking and construction lines, and these strips are being sold 
to the abutting owners at a nominal price, for the purpose 
of bringing about an orderly development of the adjoining 
property. Similar strips at Winthrop Shore which were 
not required for the driveway as constructed have also been 
conveyed in the same manner. The remainder of several 
estates which were acquired by purchase at Lynn in the 
acquirement of the Lynn Shore Reservation have also been 



20 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

sold, and will be developed by the purchasers in accordance 
with the plan of the reservation. At Milton a small parcel 
of land at Milton Lower Mills was released to the owners 
of the Chocolate Mills, as it seemed to be necessary for the 
proper development of their manufacturing plant and not 
essential to the park holdings at that point ; and for similar 
reasons, a small strip of river bank in Waltham was recon- 
veyed to the Waltham Gas and Electric Company. 

2 . Administration . 
The method of administration has not been changed. The 
work of the Commission is divided among the departments 
of Landscape Architects (advisory) , Engineering, Law and 
Claims, and Superintendence, each department reporting to 
the Commission through the Secretary. The general office 
and Engineering Department are located at 14 Beacon 
Street, in Boston. The general office force, in addition to 
the Secretary, consists of four clerks and stenographers, 
purchasing clerk, paymaster, telephone clerk and messen- 
ger. Additional clerical assistance has been found neces- 
sary the past year, and the clerical force will need to be 
slightly increased the coming year. Three stenographers 
are employed in the Law and Claims Department. The 
Engineering Department employs 45 persons, in addition 
to the Chief Engineer. The reservations and parkways are 
grouped in seven divisions, each of which is in charge of a 
superintendent who is held responsible for the maintenance 
and policing of his division. The number of laborers em- 
ployed varies with the season of the year and the amount 
of work on hand. A considerable force has been employed 
for a large part of this year in the work of suppression of 
the gypsy and brown- tail moths. The police force consists 
of 7 sergeants, 2 inspectors and 79 patrolmen. The police 
are assigned and transferred in the divisions according to 
the requirements in each from time to time ; and in seasons 
when police work does not necessitate the use of the entire 
force, a portion of the men are required to assist in suitable 
work in the reservations. 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 21 

Landscape Architects. 

The report of Olmsted Brothers, the Landscape Advisers 
of the Commission, is presented in an Appendix to this re- 
port. In it will be found a summary of the matters upon 
which they have been called upon to render service, and the 
explanation they desire to make in regard to the work they 
have done. 

Engineering Department. 

A large amount of important construction work has been 
carried on this year under the direction of this department. 
An extension of Blue Hills Parkway in Milton has been 
built from Canton Avenue to Harland Street, and fipom that 
point a new entrance road to the reservation has been con- 
structed, which brings one into Hillside Street a short dis- 
tance from Hoosicwhisick Pond. There is now, therefore, 
a direct route provided from Grove Hall in Boston to the 
heart of the Blue Hills. The sub-grading of Furnace Brook 
Parkway in Quincy from Adams Street to the Blue Hills 
Reservation is completed. A concrete bridge with rock 
facing has been built to carry the Granite Branch of the 
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad over this park- 
way at West Quincy, and will probably be in use in a few 
weeks. In the Blue Hills a connection between Furnace 
Brook Parkway and Saw Cut Notch Road is already built, 
and an extension of this road is under way which will end 
at the Administration Road which runs through the centre 
of the reservation. The westerly roadway of Neponset 
River Parkway between Brush Hill Road and Blue Hill 
Avenue in Milton is built, and the space reserved for elec- 
tric cars is already occupied by the location of the Blue Hill 
Street Railway, which furnishes a means of transportation 
to the foot of Great Blue from Readville, in addition to its 
earlier route from a connection with the Elevated Railroad 
at Mattapan Square. Work has been begun on sub-grading 
the driveway along Quincy Shore between Squantum Street 
and the National Sailors' Home. This driveway will ulti- 
mately connect with Furnace Brook Parkway, and thus 
with the Blue Hills. The last section of Revere Beach 



22 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

Parkway, between Main Street in Everett and Fellsway in 
Medford, has been finished, and was opened to pablic use 
on August 2. This is now the longest parkway of the Met- 
ropolitan System. It is already laa-gely used, and will un- 
doubtedly be more used when the connecting roadways 
between Revere Beach and Lynn are ready for travel. The 
work of extending the development of Revere Beach from 
Revere Street to the Point of Pines has continued through 
the year. The roadway is substantially completed to a 
point below Oak Island, but considerable sub-grading re- 
mains to be done from that point to the Point of Pines prop- 
erty. The surfacing of this portion and of Lynn way from 
the end of the reservation to Saugus River Bridge will have 
to be postponed until spring. Saugus River Bridge is com- 
pleted, including the installation of a Scherzer roll draw. 
On the Lynn side of the bridge the Massachusetts Highway 
Commission have made good progress in completing the 
approach from Commercial Street to the bridge. The city 
of Lynn has begun the construction of a highway in exten- 
sion of this route from Commercial Street to Broad Street, 
and it seems probable that within a year it will be possible 
to drive over these connecting parkways and highways from 
Broadway Park in Somerville to Broad Street in Lynn, a 
distance of 11 miles. At Lynn Shore the sea wall which 
was constructed last year has been carried around Red Rock 
and to the present boundary line of the reservation. The 
roadway along the top of the bluff and the granolithic 
promenade along the top of the wall have been completed. 
The driveway was opened to public use on September 18. 
At Nahant Beach, Nahant Road in front of the new bath- 
house was relocated and raised so as to permit the construc- 
tion of subways to the beach from the bath-house. The 
portion of the highway transferred to the Commission by the 
town is 1,125 feet long. Concrete edgestone and gutters 
were built on both sides of the road, and a granolithic walk 
laid in front of the bath-house. A traffic road was built in 
the rear of the bath-house, in which also the electric car 
line has its rails. The road in Middlesex Fells from the 
east dam of the Winchester South Reservoir to Porter's 



i 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 23 

Cove at the southwesterly comer of Spot Pond is com- 
pleted, and a spur from this road to the road leading to 
Winchester across the Causeway is also finished. These 
roads offer some of the finest views in the Fells. Consider- 
able work has been done on Mystic River in Medford, Ar- 
lington and Somerville. The work has been dredging and 
straightening of the river channel and depositing the mate- 
rial on the banks, where it will be needed in building the 
extension down river of Mystic Valley Parkway. At New- 
ton Upper Falls on the Charles River a concrete bridge with 
rock facings is under construction to carry the highway 
known in Newton as Boylston Street and in Wellesley as 
Worcester Street. This bridge consists of two arches, of 
50 feet and 14 feet span respectively. The bridge, includ- 
ing parapet walls, is 73 feet wide, and carries the tracks of 
the Boston & Worcester Street Railway Company in the 
centre. The old dam at this point, which was in bad repair, 
is being replaced by a concrete dam of the same height. A 
beginning has been made on a path along the line of the 
future driveway on the northerly bank of the Charles River 
between Arsenal Street in Watertown and the Cambridge 
Hospital. The Engineering Department, in addition to the 
larger work, of which the details are given in the report 
of the Engineer, has furnished engineering supervision for 
minor work in the resei*vations and parkways ; has furnished 
inspection to ensure the compliance with the terms of per- 
mits issued by the Commission to towns, cities, corporations 
and individuals to do work of various kinds on park land ; 
has inspected and reported on condition of bridges ; has pre- 
pared plans and estimates in connection with proposed work 
of the Commission ; and has made the usual variety of plans 
required by the various departments in the course of their 
work. 

Law and Claims Department. 
Outstanding claims for land takings to the amount of 
$63,227.87 have been disposed of during the past year, and 
were divided among the reservations and parkways as fol- 
lows : Charles River Reservation, 1 ; Neponset River Res- 
ervation, 1; Mystic River Reservation, 1; Winthrop Shore 



24 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

Reservation, 1 ; Blue Hills Reservation, 4 ; Revere Beach 
Parkway, 2 ; Middlesex Fells Parkway, 3 ; Furnace Brook 
Parkway, 3 ; Nahant Beach Parkway, 1 ; Winthrop Park- 
way, 2 ; Neponset River Parkway, 1 ; Mystic Valley 
Parkway, 1; Fresh Pond Parkway, 1. There remain to 
be adjusted 33 claims, divided as follows: Blue JHills 
Reservation, 1 ; Charles River Reservation, 9 ; Neponset 
River Reservation, 8 ; Mystic River Reservation, 2 ; Quincy 
Shore Reservation, 1 ; Revere Beach Parkway, 4 ; Middlesex 
Fells Parkway, 4 ; .Mystic Valley Parkway, 1 ; Furnace 
Brook Parkway, 2 ; Neponset River Parkway, 1. The 
policy of the Commission, to avoid as far as practicable 
any further acquirements of land unless satisfactory prices 
therefor are first obtained in the form of binding options, 
has been satisfactorily followed during the past year, and 
no new claim of substantial amount has been created. The 
legal work of this department, outside of the trial of cases, 
has continued to be in the charge of George Lyman Rogers, 
Esq., and his assistant, Stanley M. Bolster, Esq., who are 
designated by the Ajfctorney-General for this purpose. 

Superintendence . 
The reservations and parkways of the Metropolitan Parks 
System are for convenience of administration grouped in 
seven divisions, as follows : Blue Hills Division ; Middlesex 
Fells Division ; Revere Beach Division ; Speedway Division ; 
Riverside Division; Nantasket Beach Division; Beaver 
Brook Division. Each division is in the charge of a super- 
intendent, who reports directly to the Commission through 
the Secretary. The regular work of maintenance and polic- 
ing has been described in previous reports, and requires no 
further mention at this time than to call attention to the fact 
that it steadily increases in detail with the development of 
the system and the increased use of the parks by the public. 
Matters of special interest are as follows : — 

Blue Hills Division: Bartholomew J. Costello, Superintendent, 

Frank Dings, who had been superintendent of the Blue 
Hills Reservation and the other reservations and parkways 
administered with the Blue Hills for a period of ten years, 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 25 

died on April 15. His faithfal service has been noted by 
the Commission on its records, and his deep interest in the 
work in which he was engaged will be remembered by all 
with whom he was brought in contact. Bartholomew J. 
Costello, who had been acting superintendent during Mr. 
Dings' illness, was appointed superintendent on September 
10. The new roads in the Blue Hills and the extension of 
Blue Hills Parkway from Canton Avenue to Harland Street, 
which have already been described, have been built by the 
forces of the reservation under the direction of the superin- 
tendent and with the assistance of the supervisor of con- 
struction. A path has been built from the summit down the 
eastern side of Great Blue. It leaves Charles Eliot Path a 
short distance from the memorial bridge, and passing down 
through Wild Cat Notch leads across the hills to Hillside 
Street a few steps from Hoosicwhisick Pond. In conjunction 
with the old summit path from Canton Avenue it furnishes 
an interesting walk with extensive views. A concrete wall 
and iron fence have been built around the observatory, of a 
design approved by the Commission. A simple refectory 
building has been built at the foot of Great Blue Hill, near 
the car station of the Blue Hill Street Railway Company. 
Roads have been repaired, many of the short bridges have 
been replaced by drain pipe culverts, old and new roads, 
paths and fireguards have been cut out. Considerable for- 
estry work has been done in the line of pruning and thinning, 
and 30,000 pine seedlings have been planted. The stone 
office building, which was in course of erection on Hillside 
Street at the date of the last report, was completed at a most 
convenient time. On the night of February 20 the old 
wooden building used for office and tool house took fire, ap- 
parently from a defective chimney, and it and the contents 
were completely burned. The office and headquarters are 
now conveniently situated in the new building, and a new 
work shop and tool house has been built in a more conven- 
ient location. The completion of the new headquarters 
building has led to the rearrangement and grading of the 
grounds around headquarters, which now have an attractive 
appearance and are conveniently arranged for administrative 
purposes. In connection with these changes an old farm- 



26 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

house near the stable was altered over for a boarding house, 
where several of the police and employees are accommodated. 
The area of the reservation is so large that it is very desir- 
able to have a number of the employees within close call of 
headquarters. In Stony Brook Reservation the dam at the 
skating pond has been repaired and some forestry work 
done. Along Neponset River the park holdings have been 
kept clean, and at Mattapan the fences and walls of the old 
Hollingsworth place have been removed and the grounds 
opened to the public. Fences have been built along the 
boundaries of that portion of Neponset River Parkway be- 
tween Brush Hill Road and Blue Hill Avenue, and a portion 
of this parkway in Hyde Park near the Sturtevant Blower 
Works has been graded, so that the people living near by 
may use the land for a playground until it is required for 
the construction of the parkway. At the junction of Blue 
Hills Parkway and Canton Avenue a rearrangement of the 
roadway and grass spaces has been made in connection with 
the extension of the parkway. Quincy Shore has not called 
for anything but the usual care and policing. The brook in 
Furnace Brook Parkway has been cleared, some fencing has 
been done, and the trees at the Dorothy Q. House given 
attention. The gypsy moth has appeared in the towns and 
cities in the vicinity of the Blue Hills, and some traces have 
been found of this pest in the reservation itself. Work has 
already been started, in the hopes that it may be possible 
to suppress the pest before it gets beyond control and does 
irreparable damage, and to be eflfective must be actively 
continued during the coming year. 

MmDLESEx Fells Division: C. P. Price, Superintendent, 

The most serious problem in the Middlesex Fells Reser- 
vation this year has been that caused by the gypsy and 
brown-tail moths. A large amount of work has been done 
in thinning out the diseased and worthless trees, creosoting 
nests of the gypsy moth, cutting and burning to a limited 
extent the nests of the brown-tail moth, and banding and 
spraying the trees. 

The new road from the east dam of Winchester South 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 27 

Reservoir to a point opposite Porter s Cove at the southerly 
end of Spot Pond has been completed, and a connection has 
been built between this road and the road from Winchester 
which crosses the causeway between the Winchester "reser- 
voirs. These roads aflFord convenient drives to the foot of 
Spot Pond from both West Medford and Winchester, and 
afford some of the most charming views in the Fells. A 
portion of the North Border Road in extension of South 
Street to Bear Hill Entrance in Stoneham has been begun 
and is nearly completed. Woodland Road has been widened 
near the entrance of Quarter Mile Road. The flock of sheep 
in the sheep pasture and the water fowl at Dark Hollow Pond 
have afforded much enjoyment to visitors, and the collection 
of birds and small animals at the headquarters on Pond Street 
has been visited by large numbers of people. During the 
winter season provision has been made for feeding the wild 
birds, many of which seem to remain on the reservation 
through the winter. 

All buildings but two houses occupied by employees have 
been removed from the lands taken for Mystic River Reser- 
vation. These lands have also been cleared of gypsy and 
brown-tail moths. 

Middlesex Fells Parkway and Wellington Bridge have 
called for the usual care and repairs. On one section of the 
parkway experiments are being made in treating the road 
bed with oil in several different ways, the effect of which can 
not yet be determined. The city of Maiden has transferred 
the care and control of Fellsmere Park, through which the 
parkway passes, to this Board, and it has been cared for in 
connection with the parkway. This has involved a con- 
siderable amount of moth work. 

The bed of Aberjona River in Mystic Valley Parkway has 
been thoroughly cleaned. The trees have been cleared of 
gypsy and brown-tail moths. The corner of Bacon Street 
has been rounded at its junction with the parkway, improv- 
ing the approach to the parkway at this point. Water fowl 
have been placed upon the upper Mystic Pond. This pond 
has been largely used by the people of this neighborhood for 
pleasure boating. 



28 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

Revere Beach Division: Herbert W. West, SuperirOendent. 

The use of Revere Beach by the public continues to in- 
crease. During the summer season the forces of the reser- 
vation are completely occupied with the problem of general 
care and policing. The continuance of good order and 
apparent general satisfaction on the part of the people 
visiting the reservation is to be noted. New shelter build- 
ings have been constructed at Revere Street and opposite 
Oak Island, and concrete seats have been built on the sea 
side of the shelter opposite the bath-house. The bath-house 
was opened on June 17 and closed on September 10. The 
total number of bathers was 142,942. The largest number 
on any day was 7,171 on August 13. The receipts for the 
season were 31,255.24, and the expenditures for the year 
$30,502.29. It has been found satisfactory to make a large 
part of the suits required for this and the other bath-houses 
at the bath-house sewing room during the winter season. 

Revere Beach Parkway has been much more in use since 
it was completed through to Medford. Beyond moth work 
and new tree planting only general care has been required. 

The severe storms of last winter threw a large amount of 
material on the roadway at Winthrop Shore, and wrecked a 
large section of the iron fence. This is a contingency to be 
expected at any time, and provision for repairs of this 
character should be estimated in providing for the mainte- 
nance of this exposed reservation. 

The portion of Lynn Shore Reservation already completed 
has been largely used, and on pleasant afternoons and even- 
ings the promenade is thronged with people. The town of 
Swampscott has co-operated with the Commission by im- 
proving the section of Humphrey Street adjoining King's 
Beach, and the relocation of sidewalk and electric poles has 
much improved the appearance of the easterly end of this 
reservation. The wall around the Red Rock section has been 
completed, and a granolithic walk at the top of the wall 
leads to steps down to the ledges. The view of the Nahant 
Beach Bath-house in Nahant Beach Parkway is very attract- 
ive from this point. This bath-house was completed and 



I 
o 

T} 

CO 

I 

O 



m 

CO 

m 

< 




1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 29 

opened on July 10. Although of a different style of archi- 
tecture from either the Revere or Nantasket bath-houses, its 
general arrangement is much the same. The centre building 
contains the accommodations for administration, public sani- 
taries and pob'ce sub-station. On either side are the yards 
containing the bath-houses, of which there are 300 on the 
men's and 215 on the women's side. The yards connect with 
the beach by subways under the Nahant Road, uniting in a 
single exit on the beach. The cost of the bath-house, ex- 
clusive of the changes in roads and grading, was $67,794.55. 
The bath-house was opened on July 10 and closed on Sep- 
tember 10. It was used by 25,065 bathers. The largest 
number on a single day was 1,710, on August 13. The 
receipts for the season were $5,086.55, and the expenditures 
for the year $6,365.19. A section of Nahant Road, upon 
which the bath-house fronts, 1,125 feet in length, was trans- 
ferred by the town to the care and control of this Commission 
in July. This section and also the new traffic road in the 
rear of the bath-house has been kept in repair and lighted 
and watered. In co-opemtion with the town forester of 
Nahant, some planting has been done at points along the 
line of the parkway. Some bulkhead work has been built at 
points where the protection of the roadway made it advisable. 

Riverside Division: Albert N. Habberly, SuperinlendenL 

Considerable has been done to add to the convenience of 
the people using this section of Charles River. Foot paths 
have been built along the shore from Weston Bridge to 
Norumbega Tower, and along the shore of Robert's Cove and 
Cedar Point. Seats have been placed on the bank opposite 
the band stand at Riverside and at other places along the 
shore. Small bath-houses have been built for the use of 
boys and men, at Newton Lower Falls, Auburndale and 
Waltham. In the boating section stumps and stones have 
been removed from channels. During the summer, range 
lights were maintained from Riverside to Waltham, and 
proved to be of much assistance to people using the river in 
the evening. During the skating season a section of the 
river near Weston Bridge was kept cleared and was largely 



30 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

used. The use of the river for canoeing has been greater 
than for several years. Band concerts have been given 
ahnost every Saturday evening, either at the club houses or 
at the band stand on the reservation at Riverside. The 
annual regatta was held at Waltham on June 17, and there 
have been several illumination nights with displays of lanterns 
and fireworks. A large number of church and private picnics 
have been held at Pine Grove, Forest Grove and Hemlock 
Gorge. There has been no drowning accident during the 
year. The total number of accident cases treated at the 
emergency room and by the officers was 178, of which 170 
represent cases of capsizing from canoes, falling into the 
water from the banks or floats and breaking through the ice. 
There have been 43 actual rescues from drowning by the 
police officers, who deserve credit for the courageous and 
judicious manner in which they performed their duties. 

Considerable forestry work has been done along the banks 
of the river, fences have been renewed, paths kept clear and 
rubbish removed from the bank. The brown-tail and gypsy 
moth have appeared in this section, and vigorous work is 
being done to prevent damage from them. 

Speedway Division: John L. Gilman, Superintendent. 

In addition to the spring and fall races, which were held 
under the auspices of the driving clubs, the Speedway was 
largely used during the sleighing season, which continued 
for seven weeks. Soldiers' Field Road and the Speedway 
itself have both been resurfaced this year. The grade has 
been raised of the small pleasure ground for children, which 
was built on the former site of Fuller's Wharf, at the foot 
of Market Street in Brighton. Thirty-six swings and six- 
teen teeter boards have been installed, and the place is used 
by large numbers of children from the neighborhood. At 
the end ot Charles River Road in Watertown the remaining 
buildings formerly belonging to the Walker Pratt Company 
have been torn down. Some forestry work and planting 
has been done, and considerable accomplished in suppres- 
sion of the gypsy and brown-tail moth. At Lowell Me- 
morial Park, which is a part of Fresh Pond Parkway, 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 31 

oraamental posts have been placed at the entrances and a 
low wall built along Brattle and Mount Auburn streets. 
These improvements have been made in co-operation with 
the Lowell Memorial Association, to whose efforts the ac- 
quisition of this land was largely due. Suitable tablets will 
be placed upon the posts as soon as they have been cast. 

Beaver Brook Division: Robert Elder, Superintendent. 

Considerable work was required this year to protect the 
oaks and other interesting tree growth of this reservation 
from the devastation of the brown-tail and gypsy moth, and 
it will be necessary the coming year to do even more exten- 
sive work of this kind. On account of the raising of the 
grade of Trapelo Road by the town of Belmont, the wall 
along this boundary has been built up to correspond with 
the change. This reservation continues to be visited by 
large numbers of picnickers during the summer. In winter 
the ponds are favorite resorts for skating. 

Nantasket Beach Reservation : Moody Leighton, Superintendent. 

There appears to have been a larger use of this reserva- 
tion than for several years preceding, which is probably due 
to the establishment of amusement enterprises on adjacent 
lands. The weather was also favorable, as is shown by the 
increased use of the bath-house, which was opened on July 
1 and closed on September 4. The total number of bathers 
was 30,097, and the largest number on one day 1,594, on 
July 4. The receipts for the season, including amount re- 
ceived from sale of steam to tenants, were $8,705.53, and 
the expenditures for the year $7,111.70. Some slight alter- 
ations in the line of convenience were made in the hotel 
buildings. An additional sanitary was built next to the 
bath-house. A bulkhead was constructed from the bath- 
house to the foot of Atlantic Hill, and the old pond for- 
merly used by the Chutes filled up. Grading was carried 
along Nantasket Avenue in both directions from the hotel 
buildings, which in time will result in giving a much more 
pleasing appearance to the reservation. The hotel buildings 
have also been painted. 



32 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

3. Miscellaneous. 
The Supreme Judicial Court in February appointed com- 
missioners to determine and make award of the proportion 
in which the towns and cities of the Metropolitan Parks 
District should make payments during the next five years 
towards the interest, sinking fund and maintenance require- 
ments of the Metropolitan Pairks System, as required by 
chapter 419 of the Acts of the Legislature for the year 
1899. The same commissioners were also appointed to per- 
form a similar service in relation to the cost of Wellington 
Bridge, as required by chapter 491 of the Acts of the Leg- 
islature for the year 1901. The commissioners have filed 
their awards in both cases, and their reports have been ap- 
proved by the court. The awards, together with such of 
the pleadings and decrees as are necessary for a proper 
understanding of them, are printed in the Appendix to this 
report. Under the provisions of chapter 457 of the Acts 
of the Legislature for the year 1905, the apportionment for 
this year has been made on the basis of the old apportion- 
ment; and in making the assessment for next year addi- 
tions or deductions will be made in order to make the final 
result accord with the new apportionment. 

4. Finances. 
The following tables show in brief form the expenditures 
under the various park loans for the year ending Dec. 1, 
1905 : — 

Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund. 
Blue Hills Reservation : — 

Land, |1,285 25 

Miscellaneous, 16,681 31 

f 17,966 66 

Middlesex Fells Reservation : — 

Land, f 5,000 00 

Miscellaneous 31,652 09 

36,652 09 

Revere Beach Reservation : — 

Miscellaneous, (132,434 71 

132,434 71 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 33 

Stony Brook Reservation : — 

Land, $962 60 

Miscellaneous, 131 18 

$1,093 68 

Beaver Brook Reservation : — 

Miscellaneous, (1,166 74 

1,166 74 

Hemlock Gorge Reservation : — 

Miscellaneous, (164 39 

164 89 

Charles River Reservation : — 

Land, (7,198 78 

Miscellaneous, 4,605 86 

11,804 09 

Neponset River Reservation : — 

Land (13,469 19 

Miscellaneous, 421 94 

13,891 13 

Mystic River Reservation : — 

Land, (822 39 

Miscellaneous, 14,460 69 

15,283 08 

Lynn Shore Reservation : — 

Land, (4,406 93 

Miscellaneous, 94,955 88 

99,862 81 

Quincy Shore Reservation : — 

Miscellaneous, (18,845 72 

18,845 72 

Winthrop Shore Reservation : — 

Land, $8,025 84 

Miscellaneous, 2,674 51 

^. , o ,. « . 1^»700 35 

King's Beach Reservation : — 

Miscellaneous, $70 60 

70 60 

Winthrop Parkway : — 

Land, ....... (15,196 50 

Miscellaneous, 708 33 

15,904 83 

Wellington Bridge : — 

Miscellaneous, $4,578 59 

« , , 4,578 59 

Nahant Bath-house : — 

Miscellaneous, (67,794 58 

,. , o ^ .. 67,794 58 

Boylston Street Bridge : — 

Miscellaneous, $9,292 58 

9,292 58 

General expense, 6,007 02 

(463,013 55 



34 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 



Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund, Series U. 
Blue Hills Parkway : — 

Miscellaneous, $28,873 18 

128,873 18 

Middlesex Fells Parkway : — 

Land f 4,108 76 

Miscellaneous, 8,722 68 

12.881 33 

Mystic Valley Parkway : — 

Land, f 1,000 00 

Miscellaneous, " 24,697 22 

26,697 22 

Revere Beach Parkway : — 

Land f 1,083 79 

Miscellaneous, 62,784 01 

63.867 80 

Neponset River Parkway : — 

Land, ♦1.629 00 

Miscellaneous, 13,332 16 

U.861 16 

Fresh Pond Parkway : — 

Land, |1,800 00 

Miscellaneous, 6,813 64 

7.613 64 

Furnace Brook Parkway : — 

Land |l,720 00 

Miscellaneous 29,766 92 

31.486 92 

Nahant Beach Parkway : — 

Land $16,000 00 

Miscellaneous, 46.628 77 

61,628 77 

Charles River Speedway : — 

Miscellaneous, $4,976 69 

4.976 69 

Blue Hills Roads : — 

Miscellaneous. (713 46 

713 46 

Middlesex Fells Roads : — 

Miscellaneous. $1,667 21 

1,667 21 

Lynn way : — 

Miscellaneous, $34,141 17 

34,141 17 

Middlesex Fells and Lynn Woods : — 

Miscellaneous, $2,676 71 

2,676 71 

Spy Pond Parkway : — 

Miscellaneous. |2 17 

■ A 17 

General expense, ^»^^^ ^2 

$296,720 74 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. ,35 

The following tables show the total amount expended in 
each loan the cost of each reservation and parkway to 
Dec. 1, 1905, and the amounts charged by the Auditor's 
department to meet the sinking fund and interest require- 
ments to Jan. 1, 1900: — 

Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund. 
Blue Hills Reservation : — 

Land, (360,645 04 

Miscellaneous, 282,881 50 

1643,526 54 

Middlesex Fells Reservation : — 

Land 1690,782 43 

Miscellanesmis, 252,949 10 

943,731 53 

Revere Beach Reservation : — 

Land, f 1,162,747 67 

Miscellaneous, 744,596 88 

1,907,344 55 

Stony Brook Reservation : — 

Land $281,243 87 

Miscellaneous, 75,701 52 

356,945 39 

Beaver Brook Reservation : — 

Land, (29,819 29 

Miscellaneous, 23,265 33 

■_ 53,084 62 

Hemlock Gorge Reservation : — 

Land, (53,254 00 

Miscellaneous, 15,475 44 

-^ 68,729 44 

Charles River Reservation : — 

Land (1,475,647 55 

Miscellaneous, 251,567 95 

1,727,215 50 

Neponset River Reservation : -— 

Land 1220,680 37 

Miscellaneous, 46,054 09 

266,734 46 

Mystic River Reservation : — 

Land, . (236,981 87 

Miscellaneous, 50,311 20 

287,293 07 

Lynn Shore Reservation : — 

Land, (231,424 94 

Miscellaneous 142,012 35 

373,437 29 



36 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

Quincy Shore Reservation : — 

Land |70,984 55 

Miscellaneous, 53,854 54 

Winthrop Shore Reservation : — 

Land, 

Miscellaneous, .... 



Hart's Hill Reservation : — 
Land, . . . . 
Miscellaneous, 



King's Beach Reservation : — 
Land, .... 
Miscellaneous, 





f 124,839 09 


•51.067 32 




165,138 06 


^ 




216,205 38 




110,000 00 




103 95 






10,103 95 




$23,847 21 




1,519 28 


9R 51AA J^Q 



West Roxbury Parkway : — 

Land, ^244,976 01 

Miscellaneous, 8,313 67 



Winthrop Parkway : — 

Land, |15,196 50 

Miscellaneous, 780 80 



Wellington Bridge : — 

Miscellaneous, 1184,952 88 



Nahant Bath-house : — 

Miscellaneous, 167,794 58 



Boylston Street Bridge : — 

Miscellaneous, $9,292 58 



25*3,289 68 



15,977 30 



184,952 88 



67,794 58 



9,292 58 



General expense, 147,639 95 



Sinking fund requirements to 1896, . 
Care and maintenance to July 1, 1896, 
Care and maintenance, July 1, 1896, to Jan, 

1, 1897, 

Sinking fund assessment for 1897, 
Sinking fund assessment for 1898, 
Sinking fund assessment for 1899, 
Interest, 



$18,980 18 
85,813 46 

19,604 06 

esfis% 70 

9,755 55 
64,224 00 
28,318 61 


$7,683,504 27 
290,326 56 





Total charged to Dec. 1, 1905, $7,973,830 83 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 37 



Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund, Series II. 
Blue Hills Parkway : — 

Land f 138,492 02 

Miscellaneoas, 269,316 14 

1402,808 16 

Middlesex Fells Parkway : — 

Land, $228,404 39 

Miscellaneous, 457,413 69 

685,817 98 

Mystic Valley Parkway : — 

Land $202,988 40 

Miscellaneous, 239,619 92 

442^08 32 

Revere Beach Parkway : — 

Land, $536,862 35 

Miscellaneous, 831,435 72 

— ; 1,368,288 07 

Neponset River Parkway : — 

Land $46,631 60 

Miscellaneous, 34,289 73 

80,821 33 

Fresh Pond Parkway : — 

Land $44,086 26 

Miscellaneous, 28,027 68 

72,113 88 

Furnace Brook Parkway : — 

Land $137,337 49 

Miscellaneous, 46,766 26 

184,093 74 

Nahant Beach Parkway : — 

Land, $80,940 78 

Miscellaneous, 60,577 98 

131,618 76 

Charles River Speedway : — 

Miscellaneous, $621,817 46 

621,317 46 

Blue Hills Roads : — 

Miscellaneous, $7,660 16 

7,660 16 

Middlesex Fells Roads : -> 

Miscellaneous, $47,704 63 

47,704 63 

Stony Brook Roads : — 

Miscellaneous, $37,183 45 

37,183 45 



38 



METROPOLITAN PARKS. 



[Jan. 



Lynnway : — 

Land, f20,600 00 

Miscellaneous, 98,613 31 

$119,013 31 

Middlesex Fells and Lynn Woods : — 

Miscellaneous, $7,994 36 

7,994:36 

Spy Pond Parkway : — 

Miscellaneous, $89 04 

89 04 

General expense, 92,717 49 



Sinking fund requirement for 1896, 
Sinking fund assessment for 1897, 
Sinking fund assessment for 1898, 
Sinking fund assessment for 1899, 
One-half interest, 



Total charged to Dec. 1, 1905, $4,260,745 88 

Nantasket Beach Loan. 

Land, $603,329 57 

Miscellaneous, 102,551 93 

Total charged to Dec. 1, 1905 $705,881 50 

The appropriations heretofore made are as follows : — 





$4,201,549 99 


$3,650 03 




14.057 10 




3,765 08 




15,396 00 




22,827 68 






59,195 89 





Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund. 

Original appropriation, chapter 407, Acts of 1893, . . $1,000,000 00 

First Revere Beach Act, chapter 483, Acts of 1894, . . 500,000 00 

Charles River Act, chapter 509, Acts of 1894, . . . 800,000 00 

Second Revere Beach Act, chapter 305, Acts of 1895, . 500,000 00 

General appropriation, chapter 466, Acts of 1896, . . 1,000,000 00 

General appropriation, chapter 464, Acts of 1897, . . 500,000 00 

General appropriation, chapter 530, Acts of 1898, . . 1,000,000 00 

Revere Beach Bath-house Act, chapter 142, Acts of 1899, . 125,000 00 

General appropriation, chapter 396, Acts of 1899, . . 300,000 00 

Charles River Improvement Act, chapter 465, Acts of 1900, 50,000 00 

Fuller's Wharf Act, chapter 467, Acts of 1900, . . . 30,000 00 

General appropriation, chapter 445, Acts of 1901, . . 450,000 00 

Mystic River Bridge Act, chapter 492, Acts of 1901, . . 200,000 00 

General appropriation, chapter 290, Acts of 1903, . . 125,000 00 

Newton Upper Falls Bridge Act, chapter 39 1, Acts of 1903, 40,000 00 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. • 39 

ContinuiDg appropriation, chapter 429, Acts of 1903, for 

1903, $300,000 00 

For 1904, 800,000 00 

For 1905 300,000 00 

Nahant Beach Bath-house Act, chapter 326, Acts of 1904, 70,000 00 

$7,090,000 00 
To provide for interest and sinking fund requirements to 
1900, chapter 311, Acts of 1897, 900,000 00 

Total amount of loans, $7,990,000 00 

Amounts received from sales of buildings, receipts from 
bath-house, fines, etc., 198,334 01 

Total, $8,188,334 01 

Total charged to loans, 7,973,830 83 

Balance remaining in hands of State Treasurer, (214,503 18 

Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund, Series II. 

Original boulevard, chapter 288, Acts of 1894, . . . $500,000 00 

General appropriation, chapter 472, Acts of 1896, . . 500,000 00 

General appropriation, chapter 521, Acts of 1897, . . 1,000,000 00 

SaugusBridge Act, chapter 547, Acts of 1898, . . . 100,000 00 

General appropriation, chapter 428, Acts of 1899, . . 500,000 00 

Mattapan Bridge Act, chapter 443, Acts of 1900, . 75,000 00 

Winchester Act, chapter 444, Acts of 1900, . . 50,000 00 

Revere Beach Parkway Act, chapter 445, Acts of 1900, . 200,000 00 

General appropriation, chapter 172, Acts of 1902, . . 450,000 00 

General appropriation, chapter 359, Acts of 1903, . . 110,000 00 
Continuing appropriation, chapter 419, Acts of 1903, for 

1903 300,000 00 

For 1904, 300,000 00 

For 1905, 300,000 00 

$4,385,000 00 
To provide for interest and sinking fund requirements to 

1900, chapter 311, Acts of 1897, 100,000 00 

Total amount of loans, $4,485,000 00 

Receipts from sales, etc., 29,907 41 

Total, $4,514,907 41 

Total of amounts charged to loans, . . 4,260,745 88 

Balance remaining in hands of State Treasurer, . $254,161 53 



40 



METROPOLITAN PARKS. 



[Jan. 



Nantaskbt Beach Loan 
Appropriation, chapter 464, Acts of 1899, 
Appropriation, chapter 456, Acts of 1901, 



Total amount of loans. 
Receipts from rents, etc., 



Total, 

Total of amounts charged to loans. 



$600,000 00 
100,000 00 

$700,000 00 
6.881 50 

$705,881 50 
705,881 50 



Respectfully submitted, 



JOHN WOODBURY, 

Secretary, 



Dec. 1, 1906. 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 41 



REPORT OF THE LANDSCAPE ARCHI- 
TECTS. 



Mr. W. B. DE LAS Casas, Ghxiirman^ Metropolitan Park Commission, 

Sir : — We beg to submit the following report for the 
year ending Nov. 30, 1905 : — 

The reservation which has required the greatest attention 
from this department during the year has again been the 
Middlesex Fells, on account of the critical state of the for- 
est under the attacks of the gypsy and brown-tail moths. 
We have completed the general forest plan referred to in 
previous reports. In the direction of the brush cutting and 
tree cutting that has been done as a part of the work against 
the insects, we have used this plan as a guide, being careful 
to permit no cutting which would hamper the ultimate 
development of the woods in accordance with the plan, 
although in scarcely any cases has cutting been done merely 
for the sake of advancing the sylvan beauty of the reserva- 
tion when not demanded by immediately pressing condi- 
tions. The effect of the plan has been to limit the localities 
and conditions where tree and brush cutting as a part of the 
insect fighting has seemed permissible. 

During the winter of 1904-05 a considerable amount of 
tree cutting was done in badly infested sections, where the 
plan contemplated a relatively open wood ; but in the major 
part of the reservation the plan calls for the close-wood 
type, and the tree cutting done more recently has included 
scarcely more than the dead, diseased and suppressed trees 
and specimens otherwise individually objectionable. 

During the last fourteen weeks the principal work done 
under our direction has been a general removal of worthless 
and encumbering underbrush, to facilitate further operations 
against the insects throughout the reservation. None of the 



42 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

delicate lower ground cover, consisting of plants less than 
three feet high, has been removed at any point ; and even 
the larger woodland shrubs have been generally preserved, 
together with all the youQg seedling trees, the ''brush'' 
consisting almost altogether of small and generally worth- 
less sprouts from old tree stumps. 

In the same reservation we have given further study to 
the perplexing question of how to locate the electric car line 
which is expected to follow the town road through the res- 
ervation from Fellsway West to Stoneham. 

Along the Charles River plans have been made for the 
uncompleted links in the chain of drives extending from 
Watertown to Cambridge, where they will connect with the 
partly completed chain extending to the new Cambridge 
Bridge on the Basin. 

We have been engaged with the Engineer and the Con- 
sulting Architect on the design of a number of important 
bridges required at various points. The practice in this 
matter has been to have preliminary studies prepared by us 
for the types of bridges appropriate to the several situa- 
tions, to have these revised after repeated joint consulta- 
tions between us and the Engineer and the Consulting 
Architect, and then to have the working drawings and 
specifications prepared by the Engineer. 

The details of these and many other matters with which 
we have been concerned during the year are fully discussed 
in the reports of the departments of Engineering and Su- 
perintendence, with which we have been in consultation, 
and need not be further discussed by us here. The accom- 
panying table gives a summary of the plans and reports 
prepared during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

OLMSTED BROTHERS. 

Dec. 1, 1906. 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



43 



Summary of Reports and Plans {exclusive of Sun Prints) prepared by 
the Landscape Architects during the Tear ending Nov. 30, 1905. 





o 


1 




1 


1 


J 


• 


Parh^nays, 
















Blue Hills, , 


. 


1 - 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Fells Parkway, 






i 1 


3 


2 


- 


1 


3 


10 


Revere Beaeb, 






' 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


3 


Mystic Valley, 






* 


* 


- 


- 


e 


S 


9 


Fresh Pond, , 






- 


~ 


- 


2 


1 


4 


7 


Furnace Brook, 






- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


3 


6 


Nahant Beach, 






1 ^ 


2 


1 


' 


2 


1 


6 


Winchester — Wo burn , 




1 


1 


1 


- 


- 


1 


4 


Eeserv^iom 
















Blue Hills, , . . . 


4 


1 


2 


- 


- 


6 


13 


Fells Reservation, 






2 


10 


3 


2 


11 


10 


38 


Stony Brook, . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Beaver Brook, 






- 


1 


- 


- 


5 


6 


12 


Hemlock Gorge, 






- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


1 


4 


Charles River, 






' I 


15 


10 


- 


- 


6 


32 


Mystic River, . 






- 


1 


3 


4 


- 


3 


11 


Lynn Shore, * 






- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Revere Beach, 






i 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Quincy Shore, 






1 


12 


9 


1 


- 


2 


26 


Nantasket Beach, . 






1 ~ 


1 


- 


' 


1 


' 


2 


Totals, . 






10 


48 


32 


14 


30 


63 


187 



44 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 



KEPOKT OF THE ENGINEEE. 



Hon. William B. dk las Casas, Chairman, Metropolitan Park Com- 

mission. 

Sir : — I beg to submit the following report of the work 
of the Engineering Department for the year ending Dec. 1, 
1905. 

The number of employees of the department, which was 
46 at the beginning of the year, was increased during the 
summer months to 54, and later reduced to the present force, 
which is 45. The present organization, in accordance with 
the ratings of the Civil Service Commission, is identical 
with that at the end of last year, less 1 inspector, and is as 
follows : 5 assistant engineers, 2 draftsmen, 8 instrument 
men in charge of parties, 23 rodmen, 5 inspectors, 1 clerk 
and 1 stenographer. 

The construction work, under the supervision of Division 
Engineer 0. Barton Pratt, has been during the past year 
principally grading, filling, surfacing, paving, drainage, 
river and shore work; also, there has been considerable 
stone, concrete and reinforced concrete masonry work in 
sea walls and bridges, and some steel bridge work. 

The preliminary work, including surveys for construction 
plans, surveys and plans for takings, topographical surveys 
and maps, has been under the supervision of Division En- 
gineer David A. Ambrose ; and the general office work and 
preparation of plans under the supervision of Louis V. 
Foster. 

Seventy-two permits and licenses have been issued by the 
Commission to cities, towns, corporations and individuals, 
for the work of construction of electric railways, electric 
light, telephone and telegraph lines, drains, sewers, water 
and gas pipes ; and the general inspection of said work has 
been performed by this department, at a total cost of 
1721.22. 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 45 

During the past year records of the progress of the various 
pieces of construction work have been kept by means of 
photographs taken by this department. 

The total cost of conducting the department has been as 
follows : — 

Services, f 44,632 51 

Equipment, 780 06 

OperatlDg expenses, 2,658 69 

Total, 148,021 26 

The cost of construction work, done under the supervision 
of this department, has amounted to $464,470.23, exclusive 
of the cost of engineering and inspection ; and all engineer- 
ing and inspection incidental to the same, omitting travelling 
and other incidental expenses, has averaged 5.4 per cent. 

An appraisal of the property in charge of the department, 
omitting the value of maps, plans, notes and records, is as 
follows : — 

Equipment : — 

Offices, $2,854 80 

Surveying and drawing instruments, . 3,150 27 

Miscellaneous, 48 15 

$5,553 22 

Supplies : — 
General, 1,574 81 



Total $7,128 03 

Details are given in the following sections of parkway and 
reservation, and in the tables appended. 

Parkways. 
Blue Hills Parkway. — The road from Canton Avenue to 
Hillside Street in Blue Hills Reservation has been completed 
by the construction of the portion from Canton Avenue to 
Harland Street, and the grassed circle at the junction of the 
parkway and Canton Avenue has been removed and replaced 
by macadam, making the driveway of Canton Avenue cross- 
ing direct. The above work has been done by the reserva- 
tion forces, and the engineering services have been furnished 
by this department. 



46 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

Fresh Pond Parkway. — An ornamental fence has been 
constructed, of granite, brick and limestone, around Lowell 
Memorial Park, the work being done in accordance with the 
design and under the supervision of the Architect. Grad- 
ing, made necessary by the construction of this wall, has 
been done by the reservation forces ; engineering services for 
the construction of the wall and for the grading have been 
furnished by this department. 

'Furnace Brook Parkway. — The work of building to 
sub-grade the parkway from Adams Street to Blue Hills 
Reservation, and building a reinforced concrete and stone 
masonry culvert bridge, under contract with Rowe & Perini, 
which was begun on Sept. 26, 1904, was completed Dec. 31, 
1904. The total estimated cost of this work has been as 
follows : — 

Previously reported : — 
Construction and incidentals, contract No. 81, 
Engineering and inspection, . . . , . 



Year ending Dec. 1, 1906 : — 
Construction, contract No. 81, 
Incidentals, .... 
Engineering and inspection, . 



$4,221 40 
878 00 


f 12,254 79 
895 64 
928 48 



14,599 40 



13,578 91 



Total, $18,178 81 

Construction plans and specifications have been prepared 
for a reinforced concrete and stone masonry bridge for the 
Granite Branch of the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad over Furnace Brook Parkway at West Quincy. 
The desiffn is for an elliptical arch of 56-foot span and 31 feet 
in width. It is to be built of Portland cement concrete, 
reinforced by the "Johnson" corrugated bars, the facings 
of the arch and the spandrel and wing walls to be of quarry- 
faced granite ashler. The following bids were received on 
Aug. 21, 1905: — 

Globe Constraction Company, Boston, . . $20,662 90 

Patrick McGovern, Boston, 20,612 76 

D. F. O'Connell Company, Boston, . . . 20,267 26 

John Cashman, Quincy, 19,860 60 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 47 

The contract was awarded to John Cashman. Before 
beginning this work it was necessary to construct a tem- 
porary embankment and pile bridge outside the line of the 
work, to provide for the operation of trains. Under an 
agreement with the railroad company, they were to construct 
the temporary embankments and pile bridge and the per- 
manent approaches to the new masonry arch bridge, and 
to do the refilling and relay the permanent track over the 
new bridge when it is completed, the cost of said work to 
be paid by the Commonwealth. The following bids were 
received by the railroad company on Aug. 28, 1905, for 
building the pile bridge : — 

Lawler Brothers, Charlestown, .... $7,735 00 

T. E. Ruggles, Boston, 7,146 00 

Wm. L. Miller, Boston, 6,783 00 

Cavanagh Brothers, Boston, . . . 6,'835 00 

John Cashman, Quincy, 6,230 00 

With the approval of this Commission the contract was 
awarded to John Cashman, and the work was begun on 
Sept. 7, 1905, and completed on Oct. 3, 1905. The work 
of constructing the new masonry arch bridge was begun on 
Oct. 3, 1905, and is now in progress. The main part of 
the bridge is practically completed excepting the easterly 
spandrel and wing walls, and it is expected to have the track 
laid in its permanent location over the new bridge on or 
before Dec. 31, 1905. On account of winter weather con- 
ditions it will probably be necessary to postpone until spring 
the construction of retaining walls for slopes, culvert and 
other incidental work. The estimated cost of the work, to 
Dec. 1, 1905, has been as follows : — 

Construction, contract No. 91, . . f 14,706 26 

Incidentals, 868 21 

Engineering and inspection, 865 60 

Total |fl6,940 06 

Construction plans are being prepared for reinforced con- 
crete masonry bridge for the main line of the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Eailroad over Furnace Brook Park- 
way, near Newport Avenue, Quincy. 



48 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

Lynn Fells Parkway. — Surveys and plans for takings, 
from Middlesex Fells Reservation to Elm Street, Melrose, 
have been made. Topographical surveys have been made 
of the portion from Elm Street, Melrose, to Lynn Woods, 
an area of about 265 acres. 

Lynnway. — The work of constructing pile bridge and 
concrete masonry draw piers at Saugus River, under con- 
tract with the Metropolitan Contracting Company, which 
was begun on May 31, 1904, was completed on May 13, 
1905. The total cost of this work has been as follows : — 



Previously reported : — 
Construction and incidentals, contract No. 70, $37,863 95 
Engineering and inspection, .... 1,510 60 



Year ending Dec. 1, 1905 : — 

Construction, contract No. 70, . . . f 11,260 08 

Incidentals', 872 45 

Engineering and inspection, .... 1,005 79 



$39,374 55 



13,138 32 



Total $52,512 87 

The work of erecting the steel Scherzer rolling lift bridge 
for the draw, under contract with the American Bridge 
Company, was begun on Jan. 20, 1905, and was completed 
on Aug. 5, 1905. The total cost of this work, to Dec. 1, 
1905, has been as follows : — 

Previously reported : — 
Construction and incidentals, contract No. 74, 
Engineering and inspection, .... 



Tear ending Dec. 1, 1905 : — 
Construction, contract No. 74, 
Incidentals, .... 
Engineering and inspection, . 



1^1,043 85 
37 90 


1^15,295 50 
607 85 
574 10 



$1,081 75 



16,477 45 



Total $17,559 20 

A proposition made by the Olds Gasoline Engine Com- 
pany, for the furnishing and installation of gasoline engines 
and the necessary machinery to operate this bridge, has been 
accepted. As it is proposed to not open the bridge to pub- 
lic travel until next spring, on account of the incompletion 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 49 

of the approaches, it was deemed advisable to not install the 
engines and machinery until that time, and they have been 
delivered at the headquarters of Revere Beach Reservation 
and placed in storage. The cost to Dec. 1, 1905, has been, 
including engineering and inspection, $713.33. 

The work of paving the roadway of the Saugus River 
Bridge with wooden blocks, furnished by the Commission 
under a contract with the United States Wood Preserving 
Company, has been completed by E. W. Everson & Co. as 
a part of the work under their contract for building Revere 
Beach Reservation and surfacing Lynn way. The work of 
surfacing Lynnway has been begun, but has been discon- 
tinued on account of winter weather, and will probably be 
completed early next spring. The estimated cost of this 
work, to Dec. 1, 1905, has been as follows : — 

Construction, contract No. 83, .... $3,276 62 

Wooden block pavement, 6,748 75 

Incidentals, 168 28 

Engineering and inspection, 562 55 

Total, 19,766 20 

Middlesex Fells Parkway. — The work of finishing the 
approaches to the Wellington Bridge and Middlesex Avenue 
from the bridge to Kevere Beach Parkway, under contract 
with Coleman Brothers, was completed Nov. 19, 1904. The 
total cost of this work has been as follows : — 

Previously reported : — 
Construction and incidentals, contract No. 78, $12,358 82 
Engineering and inspection, 524 30 

$12,883 12 

Year ending Dec. 1, 1905 : — 

Construction, contract No. 78, . . . $5,518 89 

Incidentals, 608 64 

Engineering and inspection, .... 303 20 

6,430 73 

Total, $19,318 86 

The work of building drawtender's house for Wellington 
Bridge, which was being done under an agreement with 
Lorenzo Hoy t, has been completed ; and the total cost of 



50 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

the entire work, including cost of foundation for house, 
which was built by the Metropolitan Contracting Company, 
and including also engineering and inspection, has been 
$1,283.31. 

Topographical surveys have been made along Forest Street 
from the present ending of the Parkway to Elm Street, 
covering an area of about 12 acres. Also, surveys have 
been made for takings for the extension of the Parkway to 
Elm Street. 

Mystic Valley Parkway. — Construction plans and speci- 
fications have been prepared for building to sub-grade road- 
ways along the Mystic River from High Street to Main 
Street, Medford, in the Mystic River Reservation. Bids for 
this work are given under the Mystic River Reservation 
section. The contract for the whole work was awarded to 
Coleman Brothers, the lowest bidders, and the work is prac- 
tically completed from High Street to Jerome Street, which 
is the limit of the parkway section. The total estimated 
€ost of this section, to Dec. 1, 1905, has been as follows : — 

Construction, contract No. 85, .... $26,432 06 

Incidentals, 116 31 

Engineering and inspection, 1,406 22 

Total, f 27,964 68 

Studies and construction plans for bridges for this section 
_of the river are being prepared by this department. 

JSTahant Beach Parkway. — Construction plans and speci- 
fications for grading and building roads near the new bath- 
house have been prepared, and the following bids were 
received on April 18, 1905 : — 

M. McDonough, Swampscott, $31,911 60 

T. Stuart & Son Company, Newton, . . . 80,893 60 
Coleman Brothers, Everett . 29,093 76 

The contract was awarded to Coleman Brothers, the work 
begun on April 24, 1905, and completed on Sept. 30, 1905. 
The total estimated cost, including work in addition to the 
amount in the original contract, has been as follows : — 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 51 

Construction, contract No. 89, .... f 41, 689 23 

Incidentals, 840 06 

Engineering and inspection, 1,892 60 

Total, f 44,271 79 

Engineering services and supervision have been furnished 
by this department for the work of construction of an elec- 
tric railway, by the Nahant & Lynn Street Bailway Com- 
pany, through the parkway from Washington Street, Lynn, 
to Castle Eoad, Nahant. The work of constructing the rail- 
way was begun April 19, 1905, and it was opened for public 
travel on July 20, 1905. 

It was provided in the grant of location to the railway 
company that the wires and cables of the Lynn Gas and 
Electric Company, New England Telephone and Telegraph 
Company and Western Union Telegraph Company should 
be combined with the railway company's wires on one line 
of poles located between the track, and by so doing have 
only one line' of poles, in place of four separate lines. This 
work of moving the wires to the new line of poles and re- 
moving the old poles is nearly complete, and the appearance 
of this section very much improved. 

JSFeponset River Parkway. — The work of construction of 
the westerly roadway and street railway reservation from 
Brush Hill Eoad to Blue Hill Avenue, under contract with 
T. H. Gill & Co., has been completed. The total estimated 
cost of this work has been as follows : — 

Previously reported : — 
Construction and incidentals, contract No. 80, f 10,483 60 
Engineering and inspection, .... 363 80 

f 10,847 40 

Year ending Dec. 1, 1905 : — 

Construction, contract No. 80, . . . 19,617 29 

Incidentals, 466 90 

Engineering and inspection, . . . i. 674 20 

10,667 89 

Total, 121,604 79 

A double-track street railway has been built by the Blue 
Hills Street Railway Company on location granted by this 
Commission, from Blue Hill Avenue to Brush Hill Road, 



52 METROPOLITAN PAEKS. [Jan. 

and across the Neponset River Reservation on pile trestle 
and embankment to Milton Street. This line has been in 
operation since May 1, 1905. 

Revere Beach Parkway. — The work of constructing pile 
bridge and concrete masonry draw piers at Maiden River, 
under contract with the Metropolitan Contracting Company, 
which was begun on June 28, 1904, was completed on April 
12, 1905. The total estimated cost of the work under this 
contract has been as follows : — 

Previously reported : — 
CoDstruction and incidentals, contract No. 71, f 15,938 20 
Engineering and inspection, .... 774 20 



Year ending Dec. 1, 1906 : — 

Construction, contract No. 71, . . . $10,776 80 

Incidentals, 794 47 

Engineering and inspection, . . . . 816 80 



$16,712 40 



12,387 07 



Total, $29,099 47 

The work of erecting the steel Scherzer rolling lift bridge 
for the draw, under contract with the American Bridge 
Company, was begun on Jan. 14, 1905, and was completed 
May 15, 1905. The total estimated cost of the work under 
this contract, to Dec. 1, 1905, has been as follows : — 

Previously reported : — 
Construction and incidentals, contract No. 74, $1,043 79 
Engineering and inspection, .... 30 00 

$1,073 79 



Year ending Dec. 1, 1906 : — 

Construction, contract No. 74, . . . $16,191 90 

Incidentals 682 49 

Engineering and inspection, .... 617 14 



17,891 63 



Total, $18,466 32 

The proposition made by the Olds Gasoline Engine Com- 
pany, to furnish and install gasoline engines and the neces- 
sary machinery to operate this bridge, has been accepted ; 
the work of installation was completed on Aug. 14, 1905, 
and the bridge has since been operated by this machinery. 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 53 

and it has proved very satisfactory and much more econom- 
ical in this location than electricity, the usual method of 
operating these bridges. The total cost of the engines, 
machinery and pump installed has been $918.87, including 
engineering and inspection. 

Construction plans and specifications for surfacing and 
other work incidental to the completion of the parkway 
from Main Street, Everett, to Fellsway, Medford, have 
been prepared. On April 3, 1905, the following bids were 
received for this work : — 



James DriscoU & Son, Brookline, . 
T. Stuart & Son Company, Newton, 
The H. Gore Company, Boston, 
Coleman Brothers, Everett, . 
James Doherty, Boston, . 
T. H. Gill & Co., Boston, 



1^24,382 00 
20,863 00 
20,178 60 
19,692 00 
18,258 10 
17.407 00 



The contract was awarded to T. H. Gill & Co., the work 
was begun on April 10, 1905, and completed on July 31, 
1905. 

The amount of work done under some of the items of this 
contract was greater than that of the preliminary estimate, 
and the total estimated cost, according to vouchers in this 
oflSce, has been as follows : — 

Construction, contract No. 86, .... $28,213 32 

Wooden block pavement, . ... . . 3,070 00 

Loam and manure, 2,896 00 

Lumber for fence, 1^33 28 

Incidentals, 848 58 

Engineering and inspection, 1,274 10 

Total $33,135 28 

The Welsbach system of lighting has been installed on 
this section of parkway, 29 single lamps being used, at 
about 200 feet average spacing.^ 

Winthrop Parkway. — Surveys and plans have been made 
for conveyances and takings of the land in the portion of 
the parkway between Eliot Circle and Leverett Avenue, 
Kevere. 



54 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

Reservations. 

Blue Hills Reservation. — Engineering services have been 
furnished for the construction of a road from the end of 
Furnace Brook Parkway at the reservation line to Adminis- 
tration Road, a distance of about 1 mile. The work of con- 
struction is being done by the reservation forces, and is now 
in progress. 

Charles River Reservation. — The work of construction 
of a concrete-steel gravity dam, of the Ambursen type, in 
the Charles River at Newton Lower Falls, which was begun 
Aug. 24, 1904, was completed Nov. 16, 1904. The total 
estimated <50st of this work, a portion of which was paid by 
the R. T. Sullivan Company, who hold water rights at this 
point, has been as follows : — 

Previously reported : — 
Constraction and incidentals, contract No. 82, 
Engineering and inspection, .... 

Year ending Dec. 1, 1905 : — 
Construction, contract No. 82, . . . 

Incidentals, 

Engineering and inspection, .... 

Total 17,832 74 

Engineering services and supervision have been furnished 
for the construction of a walk along the westerly side of the 
Charles River from Cambridge Hospital to Arsenal Street, 
Cambridge. An opportunity was offered to obtain from the 
Hood Rubber Company, from grading on their property at 
Watertown, at an advantageous price, a portion of the filling 
material necessary for this work. Only about one-half of 
the material estimated to be furnished by them has been 
delivered to date. 

On account of the rapid construction of Everett Street 
extension during the month of May, 1904, to allow its use 
during the summer months, no time was allowed for the set- 
tlement of the heavy fill of the portion nearest the Soldiers' 
Field Road, and consequently settlement has occurred since 



f 3,760 99 
374 60 


14,135 59 
3,697 16 


$3,595 55 

2 40 

99 20 





1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 55 

it was completed. In April, 1905, this portion was resur- 
faced and brought up to the established grade, the work 
being done by Coleman Brothers, the contractors for the 
original construction; and the total cost, according to 
vouchers in this oflSce, has been $930.13, including engineer- 
ing and inspection. 

Construction plans and specifications have been prepared 
for a concrete and stone masonry dam and a reinforced con- 
crete and stone masonry bridge over the Charles River at 
Boylston Street, Newton Upper Falls. The bridge consists 
of one 50-foot span arch and one 14-foot span arch, and is 
70 feet wide between parapet walls. This provides for two 
8-foot sidewalks and a roadway 54 feet wide, with the two 
tracks of the Boston & Worcester Street Railway Company 
located in the centre. The abutments, piers and 14-foot 
arch are constructed of plain Portland cement concrete, and 
the 50-foot arch of reinforced concrete. The entire faces 
of the bridge, including the arch rings, spandrel, wing 
and parapet walls, are constructed of quarry-split granite 
rubble masonry, this class of work being used to give a 
rustic appearance, to correspond to the surroundings. On 
Aug. 7, 1905, bids were received from the following : — 

Atlas Reinforced Concrete Construction Company, 

Boston, f 34,947 50 

Jones & Meehan, Boston 32,266 00 

T. H. Gill & Co., Boston, 31,164 25 

Globe Construction Company, Boston, . . . 30,688 08 

Patrick McGovern, Boston, 29,700 50 

Woodbury & Leighton Company, Boston, . . 25,901 25 

M. McDonough, Swampscott, 25,464 00 

T. E. Ruggles, Boston, 22,879 60 

The lowest bidder, T. E. Ruggles, requested that his bid 
be not considered, as after making it he discovered that he 
had not fully informed himself regarding the conditions 
existing on this work, and had not consulted this depart- 
ment, and, after obtaining full information, thought that he 
would be unable to properly do the work. His request was 
granted by the Commission, and the contract was awarded 
to the next lowest bidder, M. McDonough. The work was 



56 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

begun on Aug. 21, 1905 ; the northerly half of the bridge 
was completed on Nov. 5, 1905, and the public travel turned 
from the old bridge on to it on this date. The street railway 
traflSc was turned over on to the completed portion of the 
new bridge on Nov. 14, 1905. The work of tearing out 
the old timber bridge and constructing the southerly half of 
the new bridge was immediately begun ; and such progress 
has been made that it now seems probable that the entire 
masonry work will be completed by Jan. 1, 1906, if the 
weather conditions remain favorable. The estimated cost 
of this work, to Dec. 1, 1905, according to vouchers in this 
office, has been as follows : — 

Construction, contract No. 92, $17,929 32 

Incidentals, 790 98 

Engineering and inspection, 1,539 12 

Total 120,259 42 

Lynn Shore Reservation. — The work of construction 
of sea wall from Red Kock, Lynn, to Monument Square, 
Swampscott, a total length of about 4,150 feet, and sub- 
grading of the reservation, under contract with Coleman 
Brothers, has been completed ; and it was decided by the 
Commission to extend the wall westerly around the Red 
Rock property, a distance of 632 feet. Construction plans 
were prepared and arrangements were made to do the work 
under an extension of the original contract. No. 76, with 
Coleman Brothers. The whole work under this contract, 
including extensions, was completed Aug. 31, 1905. The 
total estimated cost has been as follows : — 

Previously reported : — 
Construction and incidentals, contract No. 76, f 43,410 82 
Engineering and inspection, .... 2,289 32 

f 45,700 14 

Year ending Dec. 1, 1905 : — 

Construction, contract No. 76, . . . $47,396 68 

Concrete piles, 2,581 00 

Incidentals, 2,860 04 

Engineering and inspection, .... 3,164 14 

56,001 86 

Total. $101,702 00 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



57 



The work of building iron pipe rail fence on the sea wall 
its entire length, the contract for which was awarded to A. 
B. Bobbins in October, 1904, was completed Sept. 30, 1905. 
The portion on the extension of the wall around Bed Bock 
was galvanized, to protect it from rust. The total cost of 
this work has been as follows : — 

Construction, contract No. 84; $6,166 87 

Incidentals, 68 33 

Engineering and inspection, 167 88 

Total, $6,393 08 



Construction plans and specifications have been prepared 
for surfacing and other work necessary to complete the 
drive, promenade, etc., from Prescott Place, Lynn, to the 
northerly end of King's Beach Beservation in Swampscott. 
The lay-out of this work gives a granolithic promenade 15 
feet wide along the top of the sea wall, a grassed slope of 
widths varying from 6 feet to 37 feet, a macadam roadway 
40 feet wide, including a 3-foot concrete gutter, a planting 
space 6 feet wide and a gravel sidewalk 9 feet wide running 
along the land abutting the reservation. Bids were re- 
ceived for this work on April 17, 1905, from the follow- 
ing : — 



Frank Williams & Co., Boston, 
Frederick D. Mayo, Lynn, 
Daniel E. Lynch, Dorchester, . 
Falvey & Kelley, Dorchester, . 
David J. Sheehan & Co., Lynn, 
M. McDonongh, Swampscott, . 
Coleman Brothers, Everett, . 
The H. Gore Company, Boston, 
James Doherty, Boston, . 









. $43,446 60 








30,426 00 








23,666 00 








22,807 60 








22,672 20 








21,865 00 








21,207 76 








20,119 90 








19^71 25 



The contract was awarded to James Doherty, and the 
work was begun April 24, 1905, and was completed Sept. 
15, 1905. Standpipes for watering carts and Welsbach 
lights have been installed, 20 lamp posts of special design, 
with 2 lamps on each post, being required. The total esti- 
mated cost of this work has been as follows : — 



58 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

Construction, contract No. 87, f 22,594 82 

Incidentals, 1,150 86 

Engineering and inspection, 2,143 07 

Total $25388 75 

Surveys, plans and estimates have been made for the ex- 
tension of the reservation from the end of the completed 
work near Prescott Place to Nahant Street. 

Middlesex Fells Reservation. — Engineering services have 
been furnished for the construction of the Brooks Road. 
The work has been done by the reservation forces, and was 
completed Oct. 31, 1905. 

Services were also furnished for the construction, by the 
reservation forces, of the north border road from Main 
Street to Bear Hill Entrance, and the work is now in prog- 
ress. 

Preliminary surveys have been made for road from Forest 
Street, at the end of Brooks Road, to Half-mile Road. Also, 
a topographical survey and plan of this section, an area of 
about 8.5 acres, have been made. 

Mystic River Reservation. — The construction plans and 
specifications for building to sub-grade roads along the 
Mystic River from High Street, at Mystic Valley Parkway, 
to Main Street, Medford, have been completed ; and on Dec. 
27, 1904, bids were received from the following : — 

Ruggles & Perkins, Boston, $53,595 00 

Gow & Palmer, Boston, . . . . . 51,190 00 

Frank Williams, Boston, 42,662 50 

Kowe & Perini, South Framingham, . . . 39,062 50 

T. H. Gill & Co., Boston, 35,230 00 

Coleman Brothers, Everett, 33,580 00 

The contract was awarded to Coleman Brothers, prepara- 
tions were made by them during the winter for doing the 
work, and the actual work was begun on April 3, 1905, and 
is now in progress. 

It was provided in the specifications for this work that the 
filling material required for the work should be excavated 
or dredged from the river; and, as far as was necessary to 
obtain the required amount of material, the work should be 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 59 

done in accordance with the lines and grades for the widen- 
ing, deepening and straightening of the channel recommended 
by Mr. John R. Freeman in his report on the feasibility of 
constructing a dam at Cradock Bridge. By this arrange- 
ment two results would be obtained by the amount of work 
usually required for either one alone. The estimated cost 
of the portion of the work from Jerome Street to Main 
Street, to Dec. 1, 1905, has been as follows : — 

Construction, contract No. 85, f 18,361 80 

Incidentals, 466 56 

Engineering and inspection, 1,701 81 



Total, $15,529 67 

Studies for designs of bridges for this section of the river 
are being prepared. 

Nantxisket Beach Reservation. — Engineering services 
and supervision have been furnished for building bulkhead 
at southerly end of the reservation, and for grading along 
County Road between the easterly line of the road and the 
buildings. The work has been done by the reservation 
forces, and the amount laid out to be done this year was 
completed Nov. 15, 1905. 

Quincy Shore Reservation. — The work of building to 
sub-grade the portion of the reservation from Atlantic Street 
to Squantum Street, under contract with Coleman Brothers, 
was completed Nov. 30, 1904, and the total estimated cost 
has been as follows : — 



Previously reported : — 
Construction and incidentals, contract No. 66, 
Engineering and inspection, .... 

Year ending Dec. 1, 1905 : — 
Construction, contract No. 66, . . . 

Incidentals, 

Engineering and inspection, .... 



130,587 41 
804 01 


131,391 42 


$7,888 06 

6 10 

59 40 


7,953 56 





Total $39,344 98 



60 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

Construction plans and specifications have been prepared 
for building to sub-grade the portion of the reservation from 
Squantum Street to the National Sailors' Home, a distance 
of about 1% miles, and for regrading the section from 
Atlantic Street to Squantum Street, which, during the 
interval of eight months between the two contracts, had 
settled considerably in places. Bids were received for this 
work on Aug. 21, 1905, from the following : — 



T. E. Ruggles, Boston, 



1220,200 00 



Globe Construction Company, Boston, . . . 189,525 00 

Jones & Meehan, Boston, 137,700 00 

Eastern Dredging Company, Boston, . . . 120,100 00 

Coleman Brothers, Boston, 104,900 00 

William H. Ellis, Boston, 102,875 00 

T. H. Gill & Co., Boston, 91,875 00 

Rowe & Perini, South Framingham, . . . 78,375 00 
Newell & Snowling Construction Company, Ux- 

bridge, 65,700 00 

The contract was awarded to Newell & Snowling Con- 
struction Company, the work was begun Sept. 5, 1905, and 
is now in progress. The estimated cost, to Dec. 1, 1905, 
has been as follows : — 

Construction, contract No. 93, .... f7,731 68 

Incidentals, 245 73 

Engineering and inspection, 880 34 

Total $8,857 75 

Construction plans and specifications have been prepared 
for building a reinforced concrete masonry bridge over 
Sachem Brook, and for a reinforced concrete culvert near 
the southerly end of the work. 

Revere Beach Resei^ation. — The work of constructing, 
of concrete, terraces and shelter foundations opposite Revere 
Street and Oak Island Street, under contract with Patrick 
McGovern, was completed June 30, 1905. The total esti- 
mated cost of this work has been as follows : — 



1906.] - PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No, 48. 61 

Previously reported : — 
CoDStructioQ and incidentals, contract No. 77, $17,462 42 
Engineering and inspection, .... 679 35 



f 18,141 77 



Year ending Dec. 1, 1905 : — 

Construction, contract No. 77, . . . f 17,474 88 

Incidentals 836 18 

Engineering and inspection, .... 659 40 



18,969 46 
Total, 187,111 28 

The shelters have been erected on the above foundations, 
under the direction of the Architect. 

A section of the granolithic vralk just north of the bath- 
house was badly damaged by fire in the property abutting 
it, and it was necessary to remove the damaged portion and 
lay a new walk. About 466 square yards were laid to 
repair this damage, and the total cost was $545.90, including 
engineering and inspection. 

Construction plans and specifications have been prepared 
for building, of concrete, tiers of seats or '* bleachers" on 
the beach along the front of the terraces and shelters at the 
bath-house. This location has been much used by the public, 
on account of the shade from the structures behind ; but, on 
account of its rough and stony condition, was both uncom- 
fortable for the people to sit upon and was very difficult to 
keep clean on account of fragments of food, rubbish and 
paper getting in among the stones. The above-mentioned 
work provides for covering this area,Vhich is about 500 feet 
long by 25 feet wide, with concrete, built in the form of 
steps 2 feet 6 inches wide by 6 inches high, with a smooth 
granolithic finished surface. This furnishes comfortable 
seating accommodations for about 1,500 people, and is 
easily cleaned each morning by sweeping, or flushing with 
water from a hose. On May 11, 1905, bids for the above- 
described work were received from the following : — 

Carr & Andrews Corporation, Boston, . . . f5,215 00 

Murdock Corporation, Boston, .... 4,994 00 

Warren Brothers Company, Boston, . . . 4,673 00 

Patrick McGovern, Boston, 4,650 00 



62 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

The contract was awarded to Patrick McGovern, the work 
was begun on April 20, 1905, and was completed July'l, 
1905. The total estimated cost of this work has been as 
follows : — 

Construction, contract No. 90, .... f 5,060 45 

Incidentals, 10 15 

Engineering and inspection, 206 40 

Total, f 5,267 00 

The work of grading, surfacing and other work necessary 
to build complete the portion of the reservation from 
Revere Street to Northern Circle, near the Point of Pines, 
under contract with E. W. Everson & Co., has progressed 
very slowly, and is not yet completed. It will probably 
require two or three months of next spring to complete the 
work. The estimated cost of the work, to Dec. 1, 1905, 
has been as follows : — 

Construction, contract No. 83, .... $90,809 19 

Incidentals, 1,691 12 

Engineering and inspection, 8,629 25 



Total, $96,029 56 

Surveys and plans have been made of the land between 
the taking line and the westerly line of construction, from 
Revere Street to Point of Pines, for convejrance to abutting 
owners. 

General. 

The bridges under the care and control of this Commis- 
sion have been inspected by this department three times 
during the year, — November, 1904, May, 1905, and No- 
vember, 1905, — and reports made to the Secretary of their 
condition. 

Topographical surveys and maps have been made of a 
total area of 288 acres. Thirty-eight plans for record and 
89 duplicate copies of record plans have been made during 
the year. 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 63 

The following tables are appended to this report : — 

Tablb 1. Lengths of parkways. 
Tablb 2. Summary of plan work. 
Table 3. Summary of vouchers. 
Table 4. Summary of cost of eDgineering. 
Table 5. Prices for items of construction. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN R. RABLIN, 

JSngineer. 
Dec. 1, 1906. 



64 



METROPOLITAN PARKS. 



[Jan. 



Table 1. — Length of Parkways, corrected to Dec. 2, 1905. 



DESCRIPTION. 



Constructed 
(Miles). 



Under 
Oonstmc- 

tion 
(Miles). 



Remainder 
(Miles). 



ToUls 
(Miles). 



Blue Hills : Mattapan Square to Har- 
land Street Entrance of Blue Hills 
Reservation, Boston and Milton, . 

Fresh Pond: Mount Auburn Street 
to Huron Avenue, Cambridge, 

Furnace Brook: Merrymount Park 
to Blue Hills Reservation, Quincy, 

Lynnway: Revere Beach Reserva- 
tion to northerly side of Saugus 
River, Revere and Lynn, 

Middlesex Fells : Broadway to Mid- 
dlesex Fells Reservation, Somer- 
ville, Medford and Maiden, . 

Mystic Valley : High Street to Mid- 
dlesex Fells Reservation, Medford 
and Winchester, .... 

Nahant Beach : Lynn Line at Wash- 
ington Street to Spring Road, Na- 
hant, 



Neponset River: junction of River 
Street and Damon Street to Blue 
Hills Reservation, a . . . 

Revere Beach : Revere Beach Reser- 
vation to Middlesex Fells Parkway 
and Mystic River Reservation, Re- 
vere, Chelsea, Everett and Med- 
ford, 



Totals, 



2.27 



.52 



4.60 



.90 



.25 



.58 



5.24 



16.81 



2.83 



.69 



8.02 



1.00 



1.98 



1.71 



4.69 



2.27 

.52 

8.83 

.69 

4.60 
2.90 
2.28 
2.24 

5.24 
24.02 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



65 



Table 2. — Summary of Maps and Plans prepared during the Tear 
ending Deo. 1, 1905, omitting Blue and Other Prints. 





1. 


i 
1 

1 


1 


i 


1 


i 


j 


IP 

iu 


i 

1 
1 


i 

II 


• 

1 


Parkway B. 
Alewife Brook, 

Blue Hills, 

Fresh Pond, . 

Furnace Brook, 

Lynn Fells, 

Lynnway,. 

Middlesex Fells, . 

Mystic Valley, . 

Nahant Beach, . 

Neponset River, 

Revere Beach, . 

Charles River Speedway 

Winthrop, 




1 
2 
6 

8 
2 

7 

1 


1 

3 
4 

10 

2 
4 

1 
6 

5 


1 
2 


1 


1 
2 

1 


- 

1 
1 






1 

1 


1 

17 
2fi 


8 
6 

10 
87 

4 
IS 
15 
li 
fi 

*7 
1 

18 


Totals, 

BesertaHons, 
Blue Hills, 

Charles River, . 

Hemlock Gorge, 

King's Beach, . . 

Lynn Shore, . 

Middlesex Fells, . 

Mystic River, . 

Neponset River, 

Quincy Shore, . 

Revere Beach, . 

Stony Brook, . 

Winthrop Shore, . 


21 

3 
9 

7 
2 

4 

12 

7 


36 

4 
9 

11 
8 
15 

1 
13 

7 


3 

1 
1 


1 

6 




2 

1 
1 


53 
7 

* 


t 

4 

1 
4 


8 
31 

1 
B3 

e 

16 
ID 


13T 

S4 

8» 

3 

I 

82 

%1 

46 

31 

IT 

31 

10 

7 


Totals, 


44 


68 


2 


6 




2 


- 


53 


9 


153 


346 


Grand totals, . 


66 


104 


6 


7 


14 


4 


8 


94 


16 


216 


533 



66 



METROPOLITAN PARKS. 



[Jan. 












8 
•S 

i ^ 



I 



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It 

If 



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i 



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PQ 



'B^BIOX POWf) 



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1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 48. 



67 



$16 85 

1.071 07 

4,991 82 

21,216 05 

935 

20 60 

89,905 89 

360 IS 

17.341 10 


166 47 

325 66 

17,988 48 

121,645 68 

49 95 

7,743 81 


S S 
IS 


ft 

i 


s 

1 


$51 50 

29 90 

30 00 




3 
i 

1 


$16 85 
1,071 07 
1,396 27 
2,551 15 
9 35 
20 60 
7,722 50 

360 13 
3,480 51 

166 47 

325 66 

2,196 94 

5,644 39 

49 95 

401 67 


8 S 


o 

00 

to 


22 

1 


$51 50 
29 90 


$ 
E 


1 


$135 
18 22 
88 51 
42 05 

1 85 
10 

110 12 
4 57 
84 49 

13 15 
31 86 
82 32 

2 25 
10 22 


11 M 


1 


1 ■■■ 


1 


8 


$7 50 
60 00 

342 00 
12 25 
89 00 

850 

74 88 

152 50 

800 


!■ 


1 


s 

i 


■!■ 


1 




$28 75 
86 18 

76 86 

56 28 
80 

84 25 
18 96 

700 


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82,183 89 
18,860 59 

15,741 54 
116,001 29 

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Charles River, 

Total credit, 

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Mvatlc River. 


Kantasket Beach, 
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Quincy Shore, 
Revere Beach, . 
Stony Brook, 
Wellington Bridge (M 



68 



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1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



69 



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Furnishing and setting, curved 

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Concrete (lineal foot), . 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 48. 



71 



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1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 73 



FmANCIAL STATEMENT. 



Dec. 1, 1904, to Dec. 1, 1905. 

Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund, $7,990,000 00 

Beceipts from bath-house, sales, etc., 198,334 01 

$8,188,334 01 

Expenditures, 

Blue Hills Beservation : — 

Land $1,285 2fi 

Construction : — 
Contracts: — 
J. F. Stone, head- 
quarters, . . $6,897 86 
Arthur H. Tucker, 
refectory, . . 2,607 00 

$8,404 36 

Labor and materials, . . . 3,805 82 

12,210 18 

Engineering: — 

Payrolls $1,036 65 

Expenses, 20 72 

1,067 27 

Landscape Architects : — 

Services, $865 36 

Expenses, 37 09 

90245 

Legal, 666 00 

Claims 142 00 

Architects' services, 482 64 

Headquarters, furnishings and fittings, 951 55 

Bepairs of buildings, 871 37 

Sanitary, labor and signs, ..... 47 85 

$17,966 66 

Middlesex Fells Beservation : — 

Land, $6,000 00 

Construction, labor and materials, 26,812 61 

Engineering : — 

Pay rolls $280 88 

Expenses 13 07 

293 96 

Landscape Architects : — 

Services $4,807 70 

Expenses, 216 08 

4,628 78 

Legal, 21 86 

36,652 09 

Amounts carried forward, $64,618 66 $8,188,334 01 



74 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

Amounts brought forward, $54,618 66 $8,188,834 01 

Revere Beach Reservation : — 
Construction : — 
Contracts: — 
E. W. Everson & 

Co., grading, 

etc., . . . $76,839 81 
Patrick Mc- 

Govern, shelter 

foundations, . 20,078 13 
G. W. & F. Smith 

Iron Co., Iron 

and steel work, 

shelters, . . 6,930 72 

John Y. Maln'- 

land, carpenter 

work, shelters, 5,698 00 

Patrick Mc- 

Govern, grano- 
lithic seats, . 5,050 46 
G. W. & F. Smith 

Iron Co., elec- 
tric light posts, 1,575 00 
H. P. Cummlngs 

Co., sanitary 

repairs, . . 696 00 



$116,670 11 



Labor and materials, . . . 1,881 61 

$118,661 72 

Engineering: — 

Payrolls, $4,989 96 

Expenses, 373 62 

6,363 68 

Legal, 77 70 

Claims, 160 00 

Town of Revere, changes In water main, . 3,000 00 

Conduit for electric lighting wires, . . 2,018 98 

One-half cost of automobile truck, . . . 1,208 40 

Architects* services, shelters and sanitary, . 931 88 

Park settees, 480 00 

Watering cart, 362 46 

Drinking fountains for shelters, .... 800 00 



132,434 71 



Stony Brook Reservations — 

Land $962 60 

Engineering : — 

Pay rolls, $47 30 

Expenses 2 26 

49 66 

Landscape Architects, services, .... 25 00 

Legal 56 63 



1,093 68 



Beaver Brook Reservation : — 

Construction, labor and materials, . . . $846 35 

Engineering: — 

Pay rolls $16 50 

Expenses, 1 35 



16 85 



Amounts carried fortoard $863 20 $188,147.04 $8,188,334 01 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 75 

Am<mnt8br<mgMforv}ard, . .' . . • $863 20 $188,147 04 $8,188,334 01 

Landscape Architects : — 

Services, t^flS 13 

Expenses, . , . . . 8 41 

803 64 

1,166 74 

Hemlock Gorge Reservation : — 

Engineering: — 

Pay rolls $7 50 

Expenses, 1 86 

$9 35 

Landscape Architects : — 

Services, $163 04 

Expenses, 2 00 

165 04 

164 39 

Charles River Reservation : — 

Land $7,198 73 

Construction : — 
Contract, Ambursen Hydraulic 
Construction Co., Finlay mill 

dam, $1,026 41 

Labor and materials, . . . 979 21 

2,004 62 

Engineering: — 

Payrolls, $1,504 67 

Expenses, 118 88 

1,623 55 

Landscape Architects: — 

Services $655 42 

Expenses, 16 19 

67161 

Legal, 136 20 

Claims, 160 00 

Advertising contracts, 69 38 

11,804 09 

Neponset River Reservation : — 

Land $13,469 19 

Engineering:— « 

Pay rolls $216 91 

Expenses, ..... 21 40 

238 31 

Legal 33 63 

Land experts, 150 00 

13,891 13 

Mystic River Reservation : — 

Land $822 39 

Construction, contract, Coleman Bros., Jerome 

Street to Main Street, 8,144 02 

Engineering:— 

Payrolls, $2,858 04 

Expenses, 762 99 

3,621 03 

Landscape Architects : — 

Services, $630 38 

Expenses 24 30 

66468 

Land experts 316 00 

Printing Mystic River improvement report, . 1,601 47 

Advertising contracts 124 49 

16,283 03 



Amounts carried forwar $230,456 47 $8,188,334 01 



76 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

Amounts brought forward, $280,406 47 $8,188,834 01 

Lynn Shore Beseryation : — 

I-and $4,406 08 * 

Constrnction : — 
Contracts: — 
Coleman BroB., 
sea wall and 
grading, . 
James Doherty, 
grading and 
surfacing, 
Gow & Palmeri 
concrete piles, 
Alphens B. Bob- 
bins, iron fence, 
Aberthaw Con 
Btmction Co. 
steel for wall. 



$68,672 28 

22,694 82 
2,68100 
6,238 34 

820 67 



Labor and materials. 



Engineering : — 
Pay rolls, 
Expenses, ■ 



Landscape Architects : — 
Services, .... 
Expenses, 



$84,80196 
1,708 86 



$6,840 39 
777 40 



$303 24 
4 88 



Legal 

Watering cart, . 
Advertising contracts, 



86,610 82 



7,617 79 



308 12 

22 05 

362 46 

144 66 



Quincy Shore Reservation : — 
Construction : — 
Contracts : — 

Coleman Bros., 
* giiiding, Atlan- 
tic Street to 
Squantum 
Street, 
Newell & Snow- 
ling Construc- 
tion Co., grad- 
ing. •. - . 



$12,467 84 



3,461 42 



Labor and materials, 



Engineering: — 
Pay rolls, 
Expenses, 



Landscape Architects : — 
Services, .... 
Expenses, 



$16,909 26 
8106 



$1,696 88 
211 07 



$740 16 



Legal, .... 
Land experts, . 
Advertising contracts, 



$16,990 31 



1,906 96 



809 04 

263 

60 00 

86 79 



19,362 81 



18,846 72 



Amounts carHed/orward, $848,666 00 $8,188,334 01 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 77 

Amounts brought forward, $848,666 00 $8,188,331 01 

Wlnihrop Shore Beservation : — 

Land $8,025 84 

Construction, labor and materials, ... 728 91 

Engineering: — 

Pay rolls, $88 60 

Expenses 2 10 

90 70 

Legal, 6 90 

Land experts, 1,847 00 

• 10,700 36 

King's Beach Beservation : — 
Engineering: — 

Pay rolls, $20 60 

Expenses, 10 

$20 60 

Landscape Architects, services, .... 60 00 

70 60 

Winthrop Parkway : — 

Land, $15,196 50 

Engineering:— 

Pay rolls, $446 90 

Expenses, 24 50 

47140 

Landscape Architects : — 

Services, $230 80 

Expenses, 6 63 

286 93 

16,904 88 

Wellington Bridge : — 

Construction, labor and materials^ . . • $1,092 16 
Engineering: — 

Pay rolls, $363 68 

Expenses 48 09 

401 67 

Drawtenders, 448 00 

Power for draw 600 00 

Lighting, 291 83 

Drawtender's house foundations, .... 1,274 71 

Drawtender's house repairs, 279 93 

Loam, 183 80 

Boats, etc., 88 00 

Telephones, 31 49 

Tool house, 17 06 

Miscellaneous, 19 96 

4,678 59 

Nahant Beach Bath-house :— 
Construction, contract, H. P. Cummings Co., 

building, $59,941 83 

Architects' services and plans, .... 3,085 03 

Cutting artificial stone, 500 00 

Extractor motor driver, 600 00 

Furnishings 776 05 

Valuable envelopes, 350 79 

Towels, 337 60 

Supplies 213 40 

Fire alarm 144 69 

Tickets, 140 76 



Amounts carried forward, .... $66,090 04 $879,919 87 $8,188,334 01 



78 



METROPOLITAN PARKS. 



[Jan. 



Amounts brought Jorward^ 

TnmstUes and canceUlng machine, 
Mirrors and frames, .... 
Fire extinguishers, .... 
Wiring, arc lights, .... 

Hardware, 

Baskets, 

Corrugated mauing. 

Cash register 

Hose, 

Stockings 

Engine room Bopplies, . 

Safe, 

Bubber key bands, .... 
Bubbish barrels, .... 

Bubbercaps, 

Disinfectant, 

Bings and snaps, .... 

Stationery 

Brass railings 

Flags, 

Plumbing, 

Boat and oars, 

Wringers, 

Moneybags, 

Window guards, .... 

Brass checks, 

Badges, 

Hairbrushes, 



$66,090 04 $879,919 37 $8,188,334 01 



140 00 


163 60 


137 76 


125 00 


121 00 


109 85 


99 00 


96 10 


87 35 


82 60 


75 96* 


50 00 


48 40 


44 40 


42 00 


40 15 


34 73 


33 80 


30 00 


25 30 


26 00 


2150 


20 00 


17 00 


10 88 


10 00 


6 87 


6 60 



Boylston Street Bridge: — 

Construction, contract, Michael McDonough, 
bridge 

Engineering : — 

Payrolls, $1,600 70 

Expenses 182 86 



Wheelwright & Haven, architects, 
Advertising, contracts, . 



General expense : — 
Engineering : — 
Pay rolls. 
Expenses, 



$706 37 
999 84 



Legal, 

Claims 

Expenses Apportionment Commisdlon, 
Travelling 



$7,021 70 



1,683 56 

646 88 

40 44 



$1,706 23 

2,002 38 

1,54167 

666 76 



67,794 58 



9,292 58 



Amounts charged to Dec. 1, 1904, . 

Balance in hands of State Treasurer, 



6,007 02 

$463,013 66 
7,610,817 28 



7,973,830 83 
$214,503 18 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 79 

Metropolitan Parks Loan Fund, Series II $4,486,000 00 

Receipts from sales, etc 29,907 41 

$4,614,907 41 

Expenditures. 

Blue Hills Parkway : — 
Construction, labor and materials (extension), $28,478 32 
Engineering: — 

Pay rolls $276 30 

Expenses, 113 38 

389 68 

Landscape Architects, services, .... 10 18 

$28,873 18 

Middlesex Fells Parkway : — 

Land, $4,108 75 

Construction, contract, Coleman Bros., Middle- 
sex Avenue to Bevere Beach Parkway, . 7,81127 
Engineering: — 

Pay rolls $969 33 

Expenses, 26 80 

986 18 

Landscape Architects : — 

Services $211 92 

Bxpenses, 16 56 

22848 

Legal, 21 70 

Claims, 175 00 

12,831 33 

Mystic Valley Parkway : — 

Land. $1,000 00 

Construction : — 
Contract, Coleman Bros., grad- 
ing, etc.. $21,862 90 

Labor and materials, . . . 1,166 29 

22,519 19 

Engineering : — 

Pay rolls. $1,461 05 

Expenses, 188 48 

1,584 48 . 

Landscape Architects : — 

Services $110 12 

Expenses 28 41 

138 53 

Legal 97 67 

Land experts, 357 35 

25,697 22 

Bevere Beach Parkway : — 

Land $1,083 79 

Constraction:— 
Contracts : — 
T. Stuart & Son, 
grading and 
surfacing Main 
Street, Everett, 
to Fellsway. . $24,354 32 
American Bridge 
Co., superstruc- 
ture, Maiden 
River Bridge, . 18,768 11 
Metropolitan 
Contracting 
Co., bridge 
abutments, . 9,159 42 

Am*t8 car*dfor*d, $47,276 85 $1,083 79 . $67,401 78 $4,614,907 41 



80 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

Am'ts bro*t/or*d, ^7,276 85 $1,088 79 $67,401 78 $4,514,907 41 

Constraction — Can. 
Contracts— Con. 
U. 8. Wood Pre- 
serving Co., 
wooden paving 
blocks, . . 3.070 00 

Scherzer Boiling 
Lift Bridge Co.. 
draw, ... 600 00 

Wm. H. Graham, 
drawtender's 
house, . . 602 50 

$51,449 85 

Labor and materials. . . 6,029 94 

67,479 29 

Engineering : — 

Pay rolls, $3,161 97 

Expenses 850 04 

8,612 01 

Landscape Architects : — 

Services, $84 28 

Expenses 3 55 

87 88 

Legal 4 40 

Land experts, 420 00 

Watering cart, 400 00 

Footbridge, Mill Creek 200 00 

Advertising contracts. 154 58 

Stone dust, 372 30 

Boat and davits, 114 66 

Miscellaneous, 89 00 

63,867 80 

Neponset River Parkway : — 

Land $1,529 00 

Construction : — 
Contract, T. H. GIU & Co., Brush 

Hill Road to Blue Hill Ave., . $11,082 80 
Labor and materials, ... 552 89 

11,685 69 

Engineering : — 
Payrolls, $810 82 

Expenses, 120 60 

931 32 

Landscape Architects, services. .... 26 00 

Legal 233 70 

Land experts 135 00 

Watering cart, 87146 

14,861 16 

Fresh Pond Parkway : — 

Land, $1,800 00 

Construction, contract. W. A. & H. A. Root, 

fence, Lowell Memorial Park, . . . 5,064 80 

Engineering; — 
Payrolls, $195 20 

Expenses, 4 75 

199 95 

Landscape Architects : — 

Services $166 94 

Expenses 2 50 

168 44 

Legal 18 06 

Architects, 297 90 

Miscellaneous, 65 00 

7.618 64 

Amounts carried /ortoard, $168,744 83 $4,514,907 41 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 81 

Amounts brought forward $153,744 33 $4,614,907 41 

Furnace Brook Parkway : — 

Land $1,720 00 

Construction : — 
Contracts : — 
Rowe & Perinl, 
Adams Street to 
Blue HiUs Res- 
ervation, . . $18,038 60 
John Cashman, 
Granite Branch 
Bridge, . . 3,736 81 

$16,775 41 

Labor and materials, . . . 8,809 69 

26,586 00 

Engineering : — 

Pay rolls $2,676 48 

Expenses, 256 33 

2.981 81 

Landscape Architects : — 

Services $882 26 

Expenses, 7 49 

889 76 

Wheelwright & Haven, architects, ... 788 64 

Legal, 71 72 

81,486 92 

Nahant Beach Parkway : — 

Land $16,000 00 

Construction : — 

Contract, Coleman Bros., surfac- 
ing, etc $41,689 23 

Labor and materials, ... 626 86 

42,166 08 

Engineering:— 

Payrolls, $2,898 59 

Expenses, 208 78 

2,602 32 

Landscape Architects : — 

Services, $96 17 

Expenses, 2 77 

96 17 

Claims, 130 00 

One-half cost of automobile truck, . . . 1,208 40 

Planting, 800 00 

Lighting 25 00 

Advertising contract, 1 80 

61,528 77 

Charles River Speedway : — 

Construction : — 
Contract, Coleman Bros., play- 
ground $2,964 05 

Labor and materials, . . . 1,087 00 

$4,061 06 

Engineering : — 

Pay rolls, $183 28 

Expenses, 76 88 

260 11 

Heater, headquarters, 466 00 

Swings, seats, etc., playground, .... 169 68 

Shelter, 80 00 

4,976 69 

Amounts carried forward^ ....... $251,786 71 $4,514,907 41 



82 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

Amounts brougM forward $251,786 71 $4,614,907 41 

Blue Hills Roads: — 
Engineering : — 

Pay rolls, $704 00 

Expenses, 9 45 

$718 45 

718 45 

Middlesex Fells Roads : — 
Construction, labor and materials, . . . $981 25 

Engineering:— # 

Pay rolls $572 00 

Expenses, 13 96 

58596 

1,567 21 

Lynnway : — 

Construction : — 
Contracts: — 
American Bridge 

Co., superstruc- 
ture, SauguB 

River Bridge, . $18,001 17 
Metropolitan 

Contracting 

Co., bridge 

abutments, . 9,571 07 

U. 8. Wood Pre- 
serving Co., 

wooden paving 

blocks, . . 5,748 75 

Scherzer Rolling 

Lift Bridge Co., 

draw, . . 500 00 

Wm. H. Graham, 

drawtender*s 

house, . . 602 50 

E. W. Everson & 

Co., grading, 

surfacing, etc., 1,268 63 

30,687 12 

Labor and materials, ... ^^ "^^ ^ , , _ 

$81,654 88 

Engineering: — 

Pay rolls, $2,012 42 

Expenses 182 70 

2,195 12 

Boats and davits, 114 65 

Steps to float, 85 00 

Miscellaneous 79 02 

Architects 12 50 

84,141 17 

Lynn Fells Parkway : — 
Engineering: — 

Payrolls $2,068 77 

Expenses, 182 94 

$2,251 71 

Landscape Architects, services, .... 25 00 

Claims 800 00 

2,576 71 

Spy Pond Parkway : — 

Engineering, pay roll $2 17 

2 17 

Ammtnts carried forward, . $290,737 42 $4,514,907 41 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 83 

Amounts brought forward, $290,737 42 $4,514,907 41 

General expense : — 
Engineering: — 

Pay rolls $737 68 

. Expenses, 611 35 



Landscape Architects: — 

Services $130 32 

Expenses, 8 36 



$1,349 03 



138 68 



Legal 2,768 79 

Claims, . . . • 726 82 



4,983 32 



$296,720 74 

Amount charged to Dec. 1, 1904 3,965,025 14 

4,260,745 88 



Balance in liands of State Treasurer $264,161 53 



Metropolitan Parks System Maintenance. 

Appropriation for 1905, $185,415 00 

Expenditures. 

General expense : — 
Police: — 

PayroUs $46,303 18 

Uniforms and equipment, . . 4,648 99 

$50,952 17 

Travelling 364 90 

Salaries, 10,425 00 

Rent, 2,413 88 

Stationery, 913 65 

Maps and books, 568 93 

Telephones 590 72 

Annual report, 1,229 27 

Extra clerical assistance, 220 47 

Postage, etc., 270 17 

Advertising rules, 109 64 

Photographs and slides, 86 87 

Rent of typewriter 27 50 

Towel supply 24 40 

Typewriter repairs, 25 10 

Card cabinet, 35 00 

Report on zoological garden 18 00 

Social law library, 20 00 

Rubber stamps, 11 20 

Fountain pens, 10 00 

Brooms, dusters, etc 11 24 

Spring water 8 25 

Account books, 8 75 

Cleaning carpet, 8 04 

Motor bicycle licenses, 8 00 

Desk lamp, 4 65 

Office repairs, 6 60 

Frames, 5 00 

Repairing clock, 3 50 

Sharpening erasers, etc., 1 25 

Chair 1 60 



Amounts carried forward, .... $68,382 65 $185,416 00 



84 



METROPOLITAN PAKKS. 



[Jan. 



$68,896 50 



Amounts brought forward, .... t68,8»2 65 $185,415 00 

Bag, 5 00 

Bronze bolts, 2 00 

Miscellaneous, 6 85 

Blue Hills Reservation : — 

Labor, $16,837 19 

Teaming, 321 25 

Keep of horses, 2,129 S3 

$18,287 77 

Travelling, 3 90 

General supplies, 2,342 25 

Horses, carriages, etc., 559 18 

Telephones, 471 38 

Bepairs, 243 18 

Tool house, IJSOO 00 

Water rates, 212 12 

Lighting office, 138 29 

Hydrants 132 85 

Express 76 93 

Johnson pump 62 46 

Pumps, 57 00 

Laundry, 35 45 

Clock, 18 00 

Furnishings, headquarters, 39 81 

Duck suits 9 00 

Letterpress stand, 8 00 

Money bag 8 00 

Signs, 7 05 

Blankets, 6 75 

Physician, 8 00 

Miscellaneous, 2 20 

Middlesex Fells Beservation : — 
Labor and supplies, gypsy and brown-tail moth 

work, $24,212 35 

Labor, $11,549 25 

Teaming 1,883 00 

Keep of horses, 1,077 86 

14,510 11 

Travelling, 97 58 

Lighting, 538 46 

General supplies, 1,012 36 

Horses, carriages, etc 183 01 

Telephones, 116 82 

Bepairs, 91 46 

Sanitary, 84 05 

Johnson pump, 62 46 

Express 57 64 

Lighting office 53 36 

Hydrant, 9 78 

Miscellaneous, 5 45 

Bevere Beach Beservation : — 

Labor, $7,334 94 

Teaming 15 75 

Keep of horses 389 15 

$7,739 84 

Lighting 2,77135 

Watering, 975 00 

Travelling, 70 61 

Amounts carried forward $11,556 80 $133,655 96 $185,415 00 



24,224 57 



41,034 89 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



85 



13,176 12 



8,620 40 



Amounts brought forward, .... $11,556 80 $133,655 96 $185,415 00 

General supplies, 596 30 

Horses, carriages, etc., 872 59 

Telephones 419 30 

Repairs, 36 65 

Photographs 60 45 

Loam, etc., 37 75 

Shelters, 80 70 

Water rates, 22 00 

Express 13 40 

Heater, 12 40 

Anto truck license and number 4 00 

Miscellaneous 11 78 

Stony Brook Reservation : — 

Labor, $3,027 95 

Teaming, 91 50 

Keep of horses, 234 74 

$3,854 19 

General supplies, 129 04 

^orses, etc 54 60 

Telephones 49 82 

Repairs, 29 60 

Lighting office, 2 25 

Sand, 90 

Beaver Brook Reservation : — 

Labor, $1,418 98 

Teaming, 25 00 

Keep of horses 81 47 

$1,525 45 

Travelling 6 50 

General supplies 64 24 

Horses, carriages, etc 55 11 

Telephones 51 40 

Repairs, 57 25 

Labor and supplies, gypsy and brown-tail moth 

work, 187 35 

Plumbing, superintendent's house, ... 80 52 

Lockers for officers, 20 75 

Sewer assessment, . 4 50 

Water rates, 16 00 

Charles River Reservation : — 
Riverside Section : — 

Labor, $3,504 58 

Teaming 99 50 

» $3,694 08 

Lighting 8 50 

Travelling 108 71 

General supplies, 849 26 

Horses, carriages, etc., 85 75 

Telephones, 162 72 

Repairs, 13 50 

Labor and supplies, gypsy and brown-tail moth 

work, 99 85 

Lighting office 153 94 

Water rates, 50 36 

Loam 36 00 

Express 20 60 

Life buoys 20 59 



2,069 07 



Amotmta carried forward, 



$5,303 86 $152,521 55 $185,415 00 



6,342 36 



86 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

Amounts brought forward, .... $5,303 86 $102,621 66 $186,415 00 

Covering cuBhions, 15 00 

Flag, 10 60 

Chair 7 00 

Physician's services 6 00 

Charles River Reservation : — 
Speedway Section : — 

Labor $9,179 96 

Teaming 1,819 75 

Keep of horses, 1,888 88 

$12,388 68 

Watering 2,182 91 

Lighting, 2,089 46 

General supplies, 711 62 

Horses, carriages, etc., 202 03 

Telephones 141 34 

Repairs, 64 10 

Labor and supplies, gypsy and brown-tail moth 

work, 600 00 

Travelling, 13 46 

Loam, 133 00 

Water rates 79 60 

Lighting office, etc., 78 04 

Fence, 77 00 

Watchman's clock, 76 00 

Shrubs 38 46 

Laundry, 33 86 

Awnings, 19 26 

Express, 3 60 

Miscellaneous 10 04 

Neponset River Reservation : — 

Labor, $724 20 

Teaming, 106 00 

$829 20 

Telephones 34 70 

Mystic River Reservation : — 

Labor, $466 76 

Teaming, 36 00 

$492 76 

Telephones, 39 66 

Lynn Shore Reservation :— 

Labor, $662 21 

Lighting, 337 05 

General supplies 84 88 

Travelling, 6 80 

Telephones, 3 00 

Advertising rules, 21 15 

Quincy Shore Reservation : — 

Labor, $11 20 

Winthrop Shore Reservation : — 

Payrolls, $894 76 

Teaming, 104 60 

$999 26 

Watering 736 31 

Lighting, 620 68 

General supplies, 396 69 

Amounts carried forward, .... $2,751 93 $179,226 73 $186,415 00 



18,84123 



863 90 



682 40 



1.114 09 



11 20 , 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. • 87 

Amounts brought forward, .... $2,751 93 $179,226 73 $186,416 00 

Bepairs to granolithic walk, 96 00 

Telephones, 68 06 

Horses, carriages, etc., 40 00 

Water rates 9 00 

Travelling, 1 60 

2,966 68 

182,192 31 

Balance, $8,222 69 



Metropolitan Parks Boulbtard Maintenance. 

Appropriation for 1906, $88,824 00 

ET^enditures. 

General expense : — 
Police: — 

Pay rolls, $17,466 60 

Uniforms and equipment, . . 2,627 21 

$19,983 71 

Salaries, ,279 81 

Rent, 2,696 03 

Telephones, 669 19 

Stationery 1,166 09 

Extra clerical assistance 278 60 

Travelling, 187 19 

Maps and books, 219 49 

Safe, 136 00 

Advertising rules, 130 49 

Postage, etc., 217 37 * 

Towel supply, 44 96 

Rent of typewriter, 33 00 

Office supplies, 34 66 

Typewriter supplies, 30 60 

Typewriter repairs, 26 89 

Office repairs, 28 11 

Card cabinet and cards, 34 76 

Ice 23 00 

Spring water, 4 76 

Binding records, 6 00 

Frames, 6 76 

Chair 6 40 

Lettering books, 6 00 

Sharpening erasers, etc., 1 37 

Cases, 2 30 

Letter boxes, 9 26 

Motor bicycle licenses, 4 00 

Lantern slides, 1 35 

$34,048 00 

Blue Hills Parkway : — 

Labor $1,978 25 

Teaming, 261 60 

Keep of horses, .... 363 60 

$2,693 26 

Watering, 1,990 44 

Lighting, 2,676 71 

Police signal system, 406 00 

General supplies 361 48 

Horses, carriages, eto., 44 76 

Telephones, 61 97 

Repairs, 4 34 

8,036 89 

AmountB carried forward, . $42,079 89 $88,824 00 



88 METROPOLITAN PAEKS. [Jan. 

Amounts brought forward, $42,079 89 $88,824 00 

Middlesex Fells Parkway : ~ 

Labor, $5,059 61 

Teaming, 1,298 75 

Keep of horses, 18 50 

$6,871 76 

Watering, 1,997 60 

Lighting, 6,232 90 

General supplies, 609 76 

Horses, carriages, etc., 173 79 

Telephones, 89 60 

Repairs 61 45 

Labor and supplies, gypsy and brown-tail moth 

work, 326 60 

Sand, 42 60 

Shrubs, 33 50 

Lighting office, 14 03 

Water rates, 4 50 

Express, 2 68 

15,960 57 

Mystic Valley Parkway : — 

Labor $2,383 96 

Teaming, 421 50 

Keep of horses 107 35 

$2,912 81 

Watering, 1,024 96 

Lighting 2,634 49 

General supplies 302 99 

Horses, carriages, etc., 55 05 

Telephones, 98 45 

Repairs 18 38 

Labor and supplies, gypsy and brown -tail moth 

work 1,649 58 

Shrubs 6 80 

Express, 5 35 

Miscellaneous, 13 69 

8,722 55 

Revere Beach Parkway : — 

Labor $4,338 IS 

Teaming, 86 50 

Keep of horses, ..... 119 13 

$4,543 76 

Watering 4,711 53 

Lighting, 4,925 82 

General supplies, 749 97 

Horses, carriages, etc., 189 04 

Telephones, 2 72 

Broken stone, 165 58 

Furnishings, 23 60 

Photographs, 15 30 

Heater 12 45 

15,339 77 

Neponset River Parkway : — 

Labor $341 50 

Watering . . 290 00 

Lighting, 270 94 

General supplies, 6 81 

90925 

Nahant Beach Parkway :— 

Labor $1,605 50 

Teaming 66 00 

$1,670 50 

Amounts carried forward $1,670 50 $83,012 03 $88,824 00 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 89 

Amounts brought fortoard, .... $1,670 50 $83,012 Oa $88,824 00 

Watering 200 88 

Lighting, 426 46 

General supplieB 212 27 

Telephones 156 08 

HorseB, carriages, etc., 103 60 

Travelling, 31 86 

Stone dust, 76 00 

Express 4 73 

2,879 37 

Fresh Pond Parkway : — 

Labor,. $465 60 

Teaming, 9 00 

$474 60 

Watering, 242 96 

Lighting 448 50 

General supplies, 170 62 

Labor and supplies, gypsy and brown-tail moth 

work 4 50 

Crushed stone, 16 41 

1,367 38 

. 87,248 78 

Balance $1,675 22 . 

Nantaskbt Beach Maintenance. 

Appropriation for 1906, $17,900 00 

Eocpenditures, 

Labor, $3,007 77 

Teaming, 260 00 

Keep of horses, 91 83 

$3,359 60 

Police;— 

Payrolls $9,897 44 

Uniforms and equipment, 1,256 09 

11,153 53 

General supplies, 189 78 

Watering, 712 90 

Lighting 1,438 33 

Horses, carriages, etc., 92 60 

Telephones, 113 20 

Repairs 50 25 

Travelling 39 05 

Water rates, 319 70 

Bent, superintendent's house 266 64 

Loam, etc., 66 76 

Shades for dormitory, 16 87 

Express, 36 25 

Miscellaneous 6 00 

17,860 40 

Balance, $49 60 



90 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 



Wellington Bbidgb Maintenance. 

Appropriation for 1906, $2,661 00 

Expenditures, 

^f^^OT, ^1^569 50 

Teaming 42 oo 

$1,611 60 

Watering 120 61 

Lighting 524 00 

General supplies 92 95 

Telephones, 37 74 

Repairs g2 22 

Shrubs 172 97 

Water rates 15 35 

2,667 34 

Balance ^ 6g 

Metropolitan Parks Expense Fund. 

Balance Jan. 1,1906 $64,403 66 

Receipts, 1905 87,46176 

$141,866 31 

Expenditures, 
General expense ; — 
Preparing statement of fines $10 00 

Blue Hills Reservation ; — ^ 

Repairs to and moving buildings, . . . $4,408 12 

— ^— .— — — 4. Ana 12 

Middlesex Fells Reservation : - ' 

Motor bicycles, $476 60 

Animals 199 66 

Repairs on stone crusher, etc., .... 162 61 

Telephone, 41 46 

Supplies 36 88 

Water rates 22 00 

Electric Ught fixtures, headquarters, ... 16 84 

Repairs to buildings 9 80 

Express 9 30 

Miscellaneous, 46 68 

Revere Beach Reservation : — * 

Bath-house : — 

Pay rolls $16,430 68 

Laundry machinery, . . . 6,003 76 

Lighting, 1,888 42 

Bathing suits 1,465 34 

Coal, 1,170 00 

Lumber 426 58 

Engine room supplies, ... 426 67 

Towels 837 60 

Supplies, 291 62 

Ice, 266 25 

Soap, etc., 216 16 

, Repairs 206 98 

Tickets, 164 86 

Medicines and attendance, . . 143 01 

Hardware 187 80 

Water rates, 99 10 

Key bands and rings, ... 93 47 

Amounts carried forward, , $29,766 68 $6,438 26 $141,865 31 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



91 



Amounts brought forward, . $29,756 68 $5,438 25 $141,865 81 

Bath-house— Con. 

DlBinfectant, 88 50 

Findings 78 01 

Caps, 72 75 

Paint 68 72 

Plumbing, 67 00 

Castors and rubbers, ... 64 72 

Brass bathing checks, ... 54 00 

Hose 49 75 

Telephones, 47 54 

Furnishings, 86 50 

Stockings 27 50 

Pointing, 25 85 

Stationery, 14 62 

Brass door kicks, .... 13 50 

Clock 6 50 

Miscellaneous, .... 36 15 

$80,502 29 

Horse 275 00 

Motor for boat, 246 00 

Dory, oars, etc., 92 00 

Lumber, 24 81 

Life buoys, 6 41 

81,146 01 

Stony Brook Reservation : — 

Sepairs to buildings, $61 08 

Water rates, 42 00 

108 08 

Beaver Brook Beservatton : — 

Bepairs, superintendent's house $186 82 

186 82 

Hemlock Gorge Beservatton : — 

Sewer connection, $87 96 

Water rates, 15 87 

5883 

Charles River Reservation : — 

Riverside Section : — 

Fence, Quinnobequin Road, $428 00 

Emergency boats 871 90 

Bath-houses and sanitary, 868 89 

Labor, 801 18 

Bent, superintendent's house 285 00 

Forest Grove, repairs and improvement, . . 152 05 

Shrubs, 12149 

Planting, 93 75 

Seats 81 98 

Typewriter 80 00 

Stony Brook improvement, 66 70 

Water rates 53 73 

Repairs, 37 51 

2,487 08 

Speedway Section : — 

Horse, $850 00 

Tool house 825 00 

Street roller 170 00 

Advertising sale of buildings, .... 6 00 

851 00 . 

Mystic River Reservation :— 

Repairs to buildings, $208 12 

Plumbing 60 00 

Miscellaneous labor, 83 75 

Water rates, 81 00 

Advertising sale of buildings, .... 10 50 

838 37 

Amounts carried forward, $40,508 44 $141,865 81 



92 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

Amounts brought/orward $40,508 44 $141,866 31 

Lynn Shore Reservation: — 

Police signal boxes ^^qq qq 

Cleaning beach ' ' ^ qq 

Scraping fence . ! 41 00 

Advertising sale of buildings, .... s 26 

Miscellaneous [ [ 3 0^ 

Wlnthrop Shore Reservation : — *^ ^ 

?P«: $7 64 

^^^ 700 

Blue HiUs Parkway : - ^* " 

Cement lined pipe $279 29 

'^—'——^ 279 29 

Middlesex Fells Parkway : — 

^^*'"'- • • ' $22600 

Repairs to office 4^ 37 

Commission, sale of Chad^vick house, ... 25 00 

Mystic Valley Parkway : - ^ ^ 

^etr *^^^ 

Xf ^ 10 00 

Water rates g 5q 

Revere Beach Parkway;— ^^ ^ 

Watering cart ^352^ 

^^*°"^«' 307 50 

JS'ence J53 g3 

Repairs, buildings * 133 3^ 

Lawn mower, gQ qq 

Water rates, * * jg qq 

Neponset River Parkway : — ^'^^ ^ 

Grading of playground^ ^314 00 

Water rates 12 00 

Nahant Beach Parkway : — *^ ^ 

Bath-house : — 

Payrolls, $3,14115 

Bathing suits 2,477 00 

P^'^^t, 294 01 

Lighting, 162 64 

Gasolene 66 24 

Telephones 6033 

Medicines and attendance, . . 35 oo 

Coal, 35 QQ 

Galvanized wire, .... 31 25 

Lumber 27 20 

Hardware 16 21 

Supplies . 14 39 

^^ 12 37 

Mirrors 5 40 

Express, ...... 4 40 

Stationery 3 25 

Bulkhead 44443 

Police signal system 335 00 

Sl^elters '. ^^ ^ 

Railroad ties 104 79 

Plan for bath-houses. Short Beach, ... 75 00 

^a^or 16 00 

7,486 21 

Amounts carried/ortaard $50,504 66 $141,866 31 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 93 

Amounts brought forward $50,504 66 $141,865 31 

Wellington Bridge ; — 
Repairs to bridge house $28 46 



Nantasket Beach Reservation: — 
Bath-house : — 

PayroUs $4,689 44 

Coal 1,221 00 

Water rates, ..... 88721 

Paint 309 48 

Engine room supplies, ... 74 84 

Lighting 67 74 

Towels, 60 75 

Ice 52 SO 

Soap 6168 

Tickets, 47 40 

Stockings 41 26 

Bathing suits 26 61 

Rubbish barrels, .... 22 20 

Medicines and attendance, . 21 72 

Caps 21 00 

Telephones, 20 26 

Hose 18 10 

Findings, 17 00 

Laundry 12 48 

Supplies 10 67 

Hardware 6 80 

Stationery, 6 30 

Hair brushes, * 50 

Repairs, 3 60 

liiscellaneous, .... 20 18 



$7,111 70 

Repairs and alterations to buildings, . . . 6,767 19 

Sanitary 4,757 26 

Loam and grading, *,878 20 

Bulkhead, 1»^^ 67 

Dormitory supplies, 366 16 

Labor, 297 60 

Engineering : — 

Payrolls, $166 67 

Expenses, 80 



Landscape Architects : — 

Services $137 84 

Expenses, 5 88 



166 47 



143 22 



Horse 137 60 

Fire extinguishers 134 50 

Repairs, Nantasket Avenue, 117 00 

Fire escapes 98 05 

Plumbing. 90 19 

Cesspool, 73 84 

Pipe privilege, 5 00 

Miscellaneous, 7 39 



28 46 



26,644 84 
77,177 86 



Balance in hands of State Treasurer $64,687 45 

Metropolitan Parks Trust Fund. 

Balance Jan. 1,1906, ^8^*^* 



APPENDIX. 



PROCEEDII^^GS OF APPORTIONMENT 
COMMISSION. 



General Apportionment, under Chapter 419 of 
THE Acts of the Legislature for the Year 
1899. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
Suffolk County. Supbbmb Judiciaii Coubt. In Equity. 

In the matter of the petition of William B. de las Casas et aZ., 
Metropolitan Park Commissioners, for appointment of commis- 
sioners to determine payments by cities and towns under Acts of 
1899, chapter 419. 

Petition. 

Respectfully represent William B. de las Casas, Edwin B. Has- 
kell, Edwin U. Curtis, David N. Skillings and Ellerton P. Whitney, 
your petitioners : — 

That they constitute the Board of Metropolitan Park Commis- 
sioners, duly established under and by virtue of an act of the 
Legislature of Massachusetts, entitled " An Act to establish a 
Metropolitan Park Commission," being chapter 407 of the acts 
passed in the year A.D. 1893, and acting under said act and acts 
in amendment thereof and in addition thereto. 

That in and by section 1 of chapter 419 of the Acts of the 
Legislature of the year 1899 (a copy of which, together with a 
copy of section 2 of said last-mentioned act, is hereto annexed, 
marked "Exhibit A") it is provided that, in order to determine 
the proportionate sums annually to be paid into the treasury of the 
Commonwealth by the various cities and towns within the Metro- 
politan Parks District, beginning with the first day of January in 
the year 1905, and continuing until the first day of January in the 
year in which a new award is made, as therein provided, to meet 
the interest and sinking fund requirements therein provided for, 
and to provide the amount required to meet the expenses of said 
Board, and of the care, maintenance and operation of the parks, 
reservations, boulevards and other works acquired, cared for and 
controlled by said Board, as therein provided, there shall be three 



98 METEOPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

commissioners appointed for that purpose by this honorable court, 
on petition of this Board. 

That for the purpose of carrying out the provisions of said acts 
it is necessary and expedient that said commissioners be appointed 
by the court as aforesaid. 

They therefore pray that after such notice as this honorable 
court shall order, if any, there may be three commissioners ap- 
pointed in the manner and •for the purposes, and with all the 
rights, powers, privileges, duties and obligations in said act of 
J899 mentioned or referred to. 

And for greater certainty in all matters and things connected 
with this petition and the subject-matter thereof, your petitioners 
crave leave to refer to the Acts of 1893, chapter 407, and all acts 
in amendment thereof and in addition thereto. 

WILLIAM B. DE LAS CASAS, 
EDWIN B. HASKELL, 
EDWIN U. CURTIS, 
DAVID N. SKILLINGS, 
ELLERTON P. WHITNEY, 
Board of Metropolitan Park Commissioners 

Arthur W. DeGoosu, 

Assistant Attorney- en cral, of Counsel. 

Exhibit A. 

[St. 1899, Chafteb 419.] 

Section 1. In the year nineteen hundred and in every fifth year 
thereafter the supreme judicial court in equity, on application of the 
metropolitan park commission or of the attorney-general, or of any city 
or town of the metropolitan parks district by its attorney, and after such 
notice as the said court may order to each city and town of that district, 
shall appoint three commissioners, neither of whom shall be a resident 
of any city or town in said district, who shall, after such notice and hear- 
ing as they deem sufficient and in such manner as they deem just and 
equitable, determine and make award of the proportions in which each 
of the cities and towns of said district shall annually pay money into the 
treasury of the Commonwealth, beginning with the first day of January 
of the year in which such commissioners are required to be appointed, 
until the first day of January of the year in which a new award is made 
hereunder, to provide the amount for that year as estimated by the treas- 
urer of the Commonwealth to meet the interest and sinking fund require- 
ments of the appropriations and loans authorized by chapter four hundred 
and seven of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and ninety-three, 
chapter two hundred and eighty-eight of the acts of the year eighteen 
hundred and ninety-four, chapter three hundred and five of the acts of 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 99 

the year eighteen hundred and ninety-five, and all acts in addition thereto 
and in amendment thereof, and the amount required to meet the expenses 
for that year of said board of metropolitan park commissioners, and of 
the care, maintenance and operation for that year of the parks, reserva- 
tions, boulevards and other works, acquired, cared for or controlled by 
said board under said acts, as annually authorized by the general court, 
and the deficiency, if any, in the estimates and payments for the pre- 
ceding year as found by said treasurer, and shall return their award thus 
determined into said court : provided^ however, that the commissioners 
shall fix and return the proportion to be paid by the city of Boston for 
each year of the first of said terms at fifty per cent. Every such award 
when accepted by said court shall be a final and conclusive adjudication 
for the term for which it is made, of all matters referred to the commis- 
sioners, and shall be binding upon all parties. 

Section 2. The treasurer shall in the year nineteen hundred and in 
each year thereafter estimate the several amounts required for that year 
from each city and town of said district, in accordance with said award, 
to provide the entire amount needed to meet the interest and sinking 
fund requirements of the appropriations and loans authorized by said 
chapter four hundred and seven of the acts of the year eighteen hundred 
and ninety-three, and acts in addition thereto and in amendment thereof, 
and to meet the expenses for that year of said metropolitan park com- 
mission incurred under said acts, and of the care, maintenance and opera- 
tion of the parks, reservations and works acquired, cared for and controlled 
by said board under said acts, and the deficiency in the estimates and pay- 
ments for these purposes for the previous year ; and the treasurer shall 
also in the same manner estimate the several amounts required for that 
year from each city and town of said district, to provide one-half of the 
entire amount needed to meet the interest and sinking fund requirements 
of the appropriations and loans authorized by chapter two hundred and 
eighty-eight of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and ninety-four, 
and acts in addition thereto and in amendment thereof, and one-half of 
the expenses for that year of said metropolitan park commission under 
said acts, and of the care, maintenance and operation of the roads, 
boulevards and other works acquired, cared for and controlled by said 
board under said acts, and one-half of the deficiency in the estimates and 
payments under said acts for these purposes for the preceding year, and 
shall include the several amounts thus estimated to be needed each year 
from each city and town of said district in the sum to be paid by each as 
its state tax for that year, and shall charge the remaining one-half of the 
entire amount required for that year for interest, sinking fund require- 
ments, and for expenses and deficiency, as aforesaid, under said chapter 
two hundred and eighty-eight of the acts of the year eighteen hundred 
and ninety-four to the Commonwealth, and shall include the same in the 
annual state tax for that year ; and the amounts thus required in each 
year of the several cities and towns of said district and of the Common- 
wealth shall be paid by each into the treasury of the Commonwealth at 
the time required for the payment and as a part of the state tax of each 
for that year. 



100 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
Suffolk, ss. Supbbmb Judicial Coubt. In Equity. 

Id the matter of the petition of William B. de las Casas et oZ., 
Metropolitan Park Commissioners, for the appointment of com- 
missioners to determine payments by cities and towns under Acts 
of 1899, chapter 419. 

Decree. 

And now, upon the above-entitled petition, it appearing to the 
court that due notice thereof was given to all cities and towns, 
respondents, according to the order of the court, and after due 
hearing thereof, no person objecting, it is ordered that Arthur T. 
Rugg of Worcester, James F. Jackson of Fall River and John J. 
Flaherty of Gloucester be and they are hereby appointed commis- 
sioners under section 1 ^of chapter 419 of the Acts of the year 
1899, to determine and make award of the proportions in which 
each of the cities and towns of said district shall annually pay 
money into the treasury of the Commonwealth, beginning with the 
first day of January in the year 1905, until the first day of January 
of the year in which a new award is made as provided for by said 
act, to provide the amount for each of said years as estimated 
by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth to meet the interest and 
sinking fund requirements therein provided for, and to provide 
the amount required to meet the expenses of said Board of Met- 
ropolitan Park Commissioners, and of the care, maintenance and 
operation of the parks, reservations, boulevards and other works 
acquired, cared for and controlled by said Board as therein pro- 
vided, and the deficiency, if any, in the estimates and payments 
for the preceding year as found by said Treasurer ; and to do and 
perform all the other duties prescribed for them by said act and all 
other acts of the Legislature imposing powers and duties upon said 
commissioners, aud to exercise all the powers thereby and by law 
reposed upon the said commissioners by any and all acts of the 

Legislature. 

By the court, 

WALTER F. FREDERICK, 

Assistant Clerk, 
Fbb. 21, 1906. 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 101 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

Suffolk, ss. Supbbme Judicial Court. In Equity. 

No. 9159. 

William B. de las Casas et aZ., petitioners, under Acts of 1899, 

chapter 419. 

Report of the Determination and Award of Commissioners 
FOR Apportionment. 

The undersigned, Arthur P. Rugg, James F. Jackson and John 
J. Flaherty, duly appointed commissioners in the above cause, to 
determine and make award of the proportions in which each of the 
cities and towns in the Metropolitan Parks District shall annually 
pay money into the treasury of the Commonwealth, as more fully 
appears in the decree, have attended to their duties, and make the 
following report of their determination and award. 

The commissioners met on March 3, 1905, appointed a time and 
place for hearing all parties interested in the matters submitted to 
their determination, and gave due notice thereof. The notice, 
with return of service, is filed herewith. Hearings were held at 
Boston on the sixteenth day of March, and by adjournment upon 
the twenty-third, twenty-fourth, twenty-fifth and twenty-sixth days 
of May, and upon the fourteenth, fifteenth, sixteenth and nine- 
teenth days of June, 1905. The Attorney-General, for the Com- 
monwealth and the petitioners, and all the cities and towns in the 
Metropolitan Parks District, with the exception of Chelsea and 
Dover, by their representatives, appeared at the hearings, and 
presented such evidence, briefs and arguments as they desired, 
and they and all other persons interested have been fully heard. 
The commissioners have visited such of the parks, reservations 
and boulevards under the control of the Metropolitan Park Com- 
mission, and such of the local parks of the several municipalities, 
as they believed necessary, in order to properly perform their 
duties, or as they have been especially requested to visit. The 
views were taken on the tenth, eleventh and twentieth days of 
May, and the twenty-third, twenty-fourth and twenty-eighth days 
of June. Further meetings were held on the thirty-first day of 
May, the nineteenth and twenty-ninth days of June, the seven- 
teenth day of July and the second and thirtieth days of August. 

Parks. 
By decrees of this court in 1894, George F. Richardson, 
Charles W. Clifford and Hiram P. Harriman were appointed com- 
missioners for apportionment, under the Metropolitan Parks Acts. 



102 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

These commissioners made an elaborate report of award, con- 
elading witb a schedule of proportions of contribution to be made 
by each municipality, which was the result of combining percent- 
ages based upon population and valuation, with computations of 
special benefits determined by them to have been received by the 
several municipalities. This award was confirmed by the court, 
but never became operative, by reason of section 4, chapter 550, 
Acts of 1896. In 1900 Charles Francis Adams, Thomas M. Stet- 
son and John C. Hammond were appointed commissioners for ap- 
portionment, under chapter 419, Acts of 1899, and made their 
award, which was approved by the court. The report of these 
commissioners states that they rejected population and special 
park betterments, and adopted valuation as the basis of their 
determination, made allowance for local contributions to parks, 
and modified the result by taking into consideration the wealth of 
the different municipalities, dividing them into three classes : I.) 
those whose valuation was less than $1,000 per capita; II., those 
in which it was between $1,000 and $2,000 ; and III., those in ex- 
cess of $2,000 ; and deducted 25 per cent, of the amount which 
would otherwise have fallen upon the municipalities in Class I., 
and added it to those in Class III. This apportionment has been 
in force. The theories upon which these awards were made were 
supported in reports by vigorous discussions from the eminent 
lawyers on each commission. 

It is apparent from this review that no special rule has so 
commended itself to previous commissioners as to have become 
a precedent of binding or even strongly persuasive authority. 
Moreover, for the first time the mandate of the statute abso- 
lutely fixing the contribution of Boston at 50 per cent, is no 
longer operative. It becomes the duty of the present commission- 
ers to determine the proportions of contribution from all the mu- 
nicipalities, Boston as well as the other cities and towns interested 
in the apportionment, ^^ in such manner as they deem just and 
equitable," without legislative limitation upon the exercise of their 
sound judgment. This fact presents the problem in a new light. 

The question lying at the threshold of the inquiry is, whether 
any arbitrary percentage of contribution ought to be fixed for 
Boston. Boston has made a large expenditure for parks on its 
own account, and has established and maintains a noble park sys- 
tem, which is necessarily wholly within its own limits. This fact 
is urged as the decisive reason for some special concession. But 
other municipalities in the district have established park systems, 
which in area and cost and comparison to density of population 
are proportionately at least as much entitled to a special conces- 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 103 

sioD as is Boston. Boston's per capita valuation is the largest of 
all the cities in the district, and larger than that of most of the 
towns. In proportion of net debt to valuation it stands sixth 
among the cities in the district, while its tax rate has for several 
consecutive years been lower than that of any other city in the 
district. It would fall in the third or wealthy class of municipali- 
ties established by the last commissioners for apportionment. In 
density of population, which is one of the tests by which to gauge 
the need for parks, it is third in the district ; or, if its large sub- 
urban districts of Brighton, Dorchester and West Roxbury are 
omitted, it has far the greatest density of population to be found 
in the district. While it is true that its local parks are open to 
the general public and are of appreciable special advantage to 
Brookline, their existence does not reduce to the level of many of 
the towns of the district its proportionate need for the broader 
areas of the Metropolitan Parks System. The g^oss expense in- 
curred in this regard is probably materially reduced by the assess- 
ments collected of neighboring real estate, and there must be a 
considerable additional revenue from increased valuations. More- 
over, the purpose of the establishment of a Metropolitan Parks 
System appears to have been not to furnish local breathing or rec- 
reation places in particular cities or towns, but to take into State 
preservation such commanding features of great natural beauty as, 
by reason of location and extent, lay beyond the confines of ordi- 
nary municipal acquirement. The policy of the Metropolitan 
Park Commission, in its takings, has been in pursuance of this 
purpose. The various municipalities are left free to establish 
such local park systems as their wealth, tastes and endowments 
of nature make wise ; while the takings of the Metropolitan Park 
Commission have been of tracts of land forming particular park 
units, but lying in most instances within the territory of two or 
more municipalities. No theory for a special concession to Bos- 
ton has been suggested, and the commissioners have been unable 
to formulate any whiqh does not appear to be unjust and oppress- 
ive to other municipalities. Indeed, the brief for the city of 
Boston concedes the impracticability of establishing a just general 
principle for a concession, by asserting that its share of the con- 
tributions ''must be fixed by some arbitrary percentage, and the 
rest of the sum to be raised divided among the other cities and 
towns by some rule ;" or, again, that its percentage must be " a 
purely arbitrary one." The special limitation of Boston's contri- 
bution to 50 per cent., which has bound previous commissioners, 
was undoubtedly wholly arbitrary. It has been asserted, without 
contradiction, that this special limitation was placed in the statute 



104 ' METROPOLITAN PAKKS. [Jan. 

as the result of an understanding reached at the suggestion of the 
then mayor of Boston, that, if this limitation were inserted, no 
^ opposition would be made by the representatives of Boston to the 
enactment of the Metropolitan Parks Act. An arbitrary fixing 
for Boston of a smaller percentage, as an exception to a general 
rule, equitable for all other muuicipalities, fails to find a sufiScient 
basis in the evidence presented. Taking into account all the cir- 
cumstances which affect the situation, and giving due weight to 
all the considerations urged, the commissioners are unable to find 
ground, in justice or equity, for establishing a special concession 
to Boston ; but they believe that whatever general rule may be 
found fairly applicable to the district as a whole shouTd include 
Boston in its scope. 

There has been no consensus of opinion as to the proper basis 
for apportionment, but various theories have been elaborated by 
the able counsel who have represented the several municipalities. 
The general proposition is that the commissioners may adopt any 
rule of apportionment, whether simple or complicated, which in 
the exercise of a reasonable discretion seems to best accomplish 
what is just and equitable. 

It has been urged that the apportionment should be according 
to the special benefits received by the several cities and towns 
from the acquisition and maintenance of the various park reserva- 
tions. No evidence was offered upon which to found an opinion 
as to the amount or the existence of such special benefits. No 
statistics were presented showing where the people who use the 
parks live or come from. It did not appear that in any locality 
there had been any appreciable increase in real estate values due 
to this cause. The view afforded the commissioners no proof of 
such benefits. Some municipalities, in which were large areas of 
park reservations, claimed that the exemption of this property 
from taxation had wrought them harm ; others, that the existence 
of the reservation brought large crowds of noisy and undesirable 
persons from the congested centres of population, especially on 
holidays and summer evenings, within their otherwise quiet and 
orderly territory, causing annoyance to their residents and expense 
for police protection. No city or town admitted any special bene- 
fit from the presence of a reservation within its borders. The 
commissioners have endeavored to ascertain whether, and to what 
extent, such special benefits exist ; but are convinced that data 
suflacient to warrant a satisfactory conclusion upon this point are 
wanting, and in the nature of things must continue to be beyond 
reach for the present. Therefore, the special benefit theory of 
apportionment has been rejected. 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 105 

Some municipalities urged that population should be adopted as 
the basis of apportionment. The commissioners have had tables 
prepared to show the result of such an apportionment, and have 
given them careful consideration. This theory is not generally 
recognized as the rule for the distribution of public burdens. It 
has few attractive features when considered abstractly, and when 
applied concretely to municipalities composing the Parks District, 
it does not work out satisfactory results. Its effect is to place a 
disproportionate burden upon the poor but populous communities, 
and to relieve from its just share the wealthy ones. As it does 
not appear to the commissioners just and equitable, they have 
declined to adopt it. 

Density of population was also urged as the theory best adapted 
to the existing conditions. Tables have been prepared showing 
the result of an apportionment upon this basis. The argument in 
its support is ingenious and plausible, as the necessity for park 
reservations must exist largely in proportion to the number of 
people dwelling in any restricted area. It is open to many of the 
objections which apply to the population theory, and when used as 
the sole rule for apportionment, it does not, in the opinion of the 
commissioners, work out equitable results. 

It has been strongly argued that the rule of apportionment and 
classification of cities and towns according to wealth, adopted by 
the commissioners of 1900, should be followed. No one can read 
the final full report of the doings of these commissioners without 
recognizing the important part which the limitation to 50 per cent, 
upon Boston's contribution sustained in supporting the theory of 
apportionment then adopted, and in furnishing the groundwork for 
justifying the division of these municipalities into the three classes 
according to the per capita valuation. Essentially, it was in the 
distribution among the other cities and towns of the 12 or 13 per 
cent, which under the general valuation rule adopted by the com- 
mission would have been assessed upon Boston but for the statu- 
tory limitation, that the additional burdens were placed upon certain 
wealthier municipalities. The fact that this amount was necessarily 
to be taken from Boston, and that Boston could not be affected by 
the classification according to per capita valuation, made it possi- 
ble to avoid some unsatisfactory results which might have been 
otherwise reached in following out this theory of apportionment. 
Per capita valuation, although an important, is not an exact, test 
of municipal wealth; the ratio of indebtedness to valuation, and 
tax rates, are significant considerations in determining the ques- 
tion. A low tax rate, small ratio of indebtedness to valuation, 
and large jpcr capita valuation, or any of them, may be indicative 



106 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

in part of wise municipal administration through a series of years. 
Laws ought not to be so executed, nor the discretion of tribunals 
so exercised, as to discourage sagacity and thrift in the manage- 
ment of civic affairs. Moreover, any classification of municipali- 
ties according to wealth must always be arbitrary, and not based 
upon a general rule of continuing or wide application. The same 
is true of the amount of deduction to be made from the poorer 
towns and addition to wealthier ones. While the action of the 
commissioners of 1900 may. have abundant justification in the 
statutory limitation arbitrarily imposed upon Boston, making it 
desirable that the inequalities of burdens thus thrown upon the 
poorer communities be lightened, the present commissioners con- 
ceive that, under the free conditions now surrounding the problem, 
it is not equitable to adopt classifications dependent upon their 
individual notions, and not founded upon a generally recognized 
principle. Any arbitrary discriminations between the contribu- 
tions of different municipalities is quite as strongly warranted in 
behalf of some of the fringe towns of the district, included in it 
solely for geographical considerations, as for any other reason. 

The commissioners have had prepared tables of percentages 
based upon valuation, one of real, one of personal, and a third 
of both real and personal, property, upon population and upon 
density of population, and have studied the results so obtained, 
both independently and in various combinations. They have in- 
vestigated the history of the Metropolitan Parks System, and 
have considered the park reservations from a geographical stand- 
point, from that of local contribution to and appropriations for 
parks, and from that of ability to meet the expenditure. They 
have formulated, discussed and considered other rules than those 
herein enumerated. "The basis and method of apportionment 
should be simple, definite, easily understood and of familiar appli- 
cation.'* (170 Mass. 117.) Novel conceptions as to the distri- 
bution of this taxation should not be formulated and approved, 
in preference to general rules which have stood the test of expe- 
rience, merely because a wide discretion is conferred upon the 
commissioners. Unless justice will be wrought, it is wise to keep 
within the ancient landmarks of taxation. The distribution of 
public burdens according to property valuation, including both 
real and personal, is the policy of this Commonwealth, approved 
by long usage. As applied to all the municipalities affected by 
this apportionment, and tested by all the schedules mentioned 
and all the arguments presented, the commissioners believe that 
this principle of apportionment on the whole is the nearest ap- 
proach to justice and equity. It is, therefore, adopted. It is 
singularly appropriate to the present apportionment, for the 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 107 

reason that the Metropolitan Parks District is a new political 
entity, established for a specific, definite purpose, the territorial 
limits of which were based upon geographical and social consider- 
ations. The district was created to preserve for all time for the 
use of a crowded population the open areas in which the beauties 
of nature can best be enjoyed. In the last analysis, this is the 
most permanent and enduring form of public improvement. These 
reservations will never be outgrown, worn out or discarded by the 
progress of civilization. They will continue to be an increasingly 
valuable asset of the district as a whole, as long as it continues to 
be a centre of commercial, financial, manufacturing and educa- 
tional activity, and add to the opportunities for pleasurable and 
wholesome living upon every dwelling site within its borders. 
Thus the advantages of the reservations are not so essentially 
present and local as lasting and general. Present and local con- 
siderations, which may turn out to be temporary and fleeting, are 
therefore deserving less weight in the apportionment of this than 
of most public charges. 

It has been urged that deductions from whatever general basis 
might be adopted should be made in favor of certain municipalities, 
for various reasons. Several cities and towns have established 
local park systems, and some have expended large sums for this 
purpose ; and it has been argued that special allowance should be 
made, on this account, in the percentages of contributions to be 
framed. The view taken of these local parks, as well as the other 
evidence and the arguments, has failed to convince the commis- 
sioners that such deductions ought to be made in any case. Gen- 
erally, these park expenditures have been made to meet local 
necessities, are of great local benefit, and have not in a calculable 
degree lessened the expense of or necessity for the Metropolitan 
Parks System. All parks, whether established by the municipality 
or the district, are open to the whole public ; and, as one commu- 
nity; becomes a centre of trade or other attraction, its parks will be 
more generally used. Nevertheless, the paramount reason for 
expenditures for parks by individual municipalities has been the 
desire for local improvement, and the extent of such expenditures 
has been largely in proportion to the wealth or density of popula- 
tion of the respective cities and towns. An expenditure of this 
sort is good municipal investment, as the local parks are ordinarily 
so located as to increase real estate values in the immediate neigh- 
borhood. At first view, the Lynn woods seems to be an exception. 
But, while this reservation is metropolitan in size, character, beauty 
and location, it also serves an important use in conserving the 
purity of the sources of Lynn's water supply. Moreover, Lynn, 
with its large and rapidly increasing population, is a close approach 



108 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

to being in the enjoyment of special benefits from the Metropolitan 
Parks System, by reason of its proximity to the Revere Beach 
Reservation. Furthermore, the adoption of valuation as the basis 
of apportionment gives to each municipality the benefit or credit 
for its investment in parks to the extent that such property is ex- 
empt from taxation and valuation. This is all the concession 
which the commissioners think can, in view of all the circumstances, 
equitably be made. 

Some towns, in which are large areas of Metropolitan Park 
Reservations, have urged that the removal of this land from local 
taxation was a consideration entitling it to a special deduction. 
This argument is wholly out of harmony with the theory of exemp- 
tion from taxation of property devoted to public uses, which is a 
cardinal principle of the general tax scheme that has long prevailed 
in this Commonwealth. No evidence or argument for a special 
deduction has commended itself to the commissioners as on the 
whole likely to result in ultimate justice. 

It has been strenuously urged that population should be 
adopted as the rule of apportionment of expense of park main- 
tenance, on the ground that maintenance is based on use, and use 
on population, and that those who use should pay for this luxury 
of parks. From the view-point of civic foresight and administra- 
tive wisdom, parks are quite as necessary as the more obviously 
imperative demands for municipal expenditure. Use of parks is 
probably not directly proportionate to population. The opportu- 
nity of a given population for leisure is quite as important upon 
this issue as the number of people within a specific area. A 
substantial part of the maintenance expenditure is for purposes 
not directly dependent upon use of the parks, but for their 
permanent development and preservation. Therefore, the argu- 
ment does not seem to the commissioners of sufficient weight to 
cause the abandonment of the valuation basis, which has all the 
grounds of support, when viewed with reference to this item of 
expense, that it possesses as the general rule. 

It appears, from information furnished by the State Treasurer, 
that the Metropolitan Parks Loan, issued in pursuance of the 
several Park Statutes, exclusive of the Boulevards and Nantasket 
Beach and the Charles River Basin loans and of incidental receipts, 
amounted, on Jan. 1, 1905, to $7,620,000. This amount is likely 
to be increased $300,000 annually until 1907, with an additional 
increase of 870,000 in 1905 for the Nahant Bath-house. The es- 
timated requirements for 1905 for sinking funds were $102,026.99, 
for interest $243,744.99, and for maintenance $186,370.49, making 
a total of $532,142. 37, 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



109 



Having fully considered the evidence and arguments and all 
circumstances and conditions, the commissioners deem it just and 
equitable, and therefore determine and make award of the pro- 
portions in which each of the cities and towns in the Metropol- 
itan Parks District shall annually pay money into the treasury 
of the Commonwealth during the term of this award, to provide 
the amount for each year, as estimated by the Treasurer of the 
Commonwealth, to meet the interest and sinking fund requirements 
of the appropriations and loans authorized by chapter 407, Acts 
of the year 1893, chapter 305, Acts of the year 1895, and all acts 
in addition thereto and in amendment thereof, except chapter 288, 
Acts of the year 1894, chapter 464, Acts of the year 1899, chapter 
465, Acts of the year 1903, and all acts in amendment of and in 
addition to said three last-named acts, and the amount required 
for each year to meet the expenses of said Board of Metropolitan 
Park Commissioners, and of the care, maintenance and operation 
of the parks, reservations and other works acquired, cared for or 
controlled by said Board under said acts, except as aforesaid, and 
the deficiency, if any, in the estimates of payments for the pre- 
ceding year as found by said Treasurer, and all other contributions 
required by law for Metropolitan Parks, except as herein otherwise 
provided, as shown by the percentages set against the names of 
said cities and towns respectively in the following Table A : — 



Table A. 



Boston, . 
Cambridge, 
Chelsea, . 
Everett, . 
Lynn, 
Maiden, . 
Medford, 
Melrose, . 
Newton, , 
Quincy, . 
Somerville, 
Waltham, 
Woburn, . 
Arlington, 
Belmont, 
Brain tree, 
Brookline, 
Canton, . 
Dedham, . 
Dover, . 



.62237 
.06405 
.01203 
.01037 
.02733 
.01613 
.01081 
.00772 
.03479 
.01166 
.02866 
.01136 
.00666 
.00503 
.00306 
.00258 
.04988 
.00206 
.00566 
.00066 



Hingham, 

Hull, 

Hyde Park, 

Milton, . 

Nahant, . 

Needham, 

Revere, . 

Saugus, . 

Stoneham, 

Swampscott, 

Wakefield, 

Watertown, 

Wellesley, 

Weston, . 

West wood, 

Weymouth, 

Winchester, 

Winthrop, 



.00244 
.00214 
.00605 
.01240 
.00368 
.00209 
.00583 
.00208 
.00252 
.00531 
.00410 
.00630 
.00585 
.00341 
.00109 
.00347 
.00532 
.00426 

1.00000 



110 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 



Boulevards. 

The advantages from the coDstruction and maintenance of boule- 
vards stand upon a somewhat different basis from parks. High- 
ways have for many decades been regarded in this Commonwealth 
as proper foundation for the assessment of betterments. The 
benefits springing from them are tangible and appreciable. One- 
half the interest and sinking fund requirements and one-half of 
the expense of care and maintenance and one-half the ofl9ce and 
running expenses of the Metropolitan Park Commissioners occa- 
sioned by roadways and boulevards are by the statute to be paid 
by the Commonwealth, and the other half by the cities and towns 
in the Metropolitan Parks District. The commissioners believe it 
fair, on an examination both of the effect of the distribution of 
the burden and of the history of the apportionment of the last 
commissioners, to apportion upon the municipalities in which the 
boulevards are constructed 25 per cent, of the half to be appor- 
. tioned to the district (being 12 J per cent, of the total expense), 
and the remaining 75 per cent, (being 37J per cent, of the entire 
amount) upon the district in proportion to valuation. 

It appears, from a statement of the State Treasurer, that the 
Metropolitan Parks Loan, Series Two, being the Boulevard Loans, 
issued under the authority of the several Boulevard Statutes, 
amounted, on Jan. 1, 1905, to $4,485,000, and that this amount is 
likely to be increased $300,000 each year until and including 1907. 
The one-half of the Metropolitan Parks Loans, Series Two, to be 
paid for by the district, was on the same date $2,242,500. The 
sinking fund requirement to be collected of the district for 1905 is 
estimated at $28,605.48, the interest account at $67,098.13 and the 
maintenance at $44,802.96, making a total of $140,506.57. 

Having fully considered the evidence and arguments and all the 
circumstances and conditions attending the subject-matter, the 
commissioners deem it just and equitable, and therefore make 
award of the proportions in which each of the cities and towns in 
the Metropolitan Parks District shall annually pay money into the 
treasury of the Commonwealth during the term of this award, to 
provide the amount each year required by law to be assessed upon 
the district for said Boulevards and their maintenance under chap- 
ter 288, Acts of the year 1894, and all acts in amendment thereof 
and in addition thereto, as shown by the percentages set against 
the names of said cities and towns respectively in the following 
Table B : — 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 



Ill 



Table B. 



Boston, . 
Cambridge, 
Chelsea, . 
Everett, . 
Lynn, . 
Maiden, . 
Medford, 
Melrose, . 
Newton, . 
Quincy, . 
Somerville, 
Waltham, 
Woburn, . 
Arlington, 
Belmont, 
Braintree, 
Brookline, 
Canton, . 
Dedham, 
Dover, . 



.46716 
.04668 
.02482 
.03986 
.02166 
.02936 
.06678 
.00678 
.02610 
.02064 
.02994 
.00862 
.00416 
.00378 
.00230 
.00194 
.03740 
.00164 
.00424 
.00042 



Hingham, 

Hull, . 

Hyde Park, 

Milton, . 

Nahant, . 

Needham, 

Revere, . 

Saugus, . 

Stoneham, 

Swampscott, 

Wakefield, 

Watertown, 

Wellesley, 

Weston, . 

Westwood, 

Weymouth, 

Winchester, 

Winthrop, 



.00184 
.00160 
.00618 
.04168 
.00822 
.00166 
.05432 
.00166 
.00188 
.00398 
.00308 
.00472 
.00438 
.00266 
.00082 
.00260 
.02394 
.00320 

1.00000 



The percentages in Table B apply only to the half of the Boule- 
vard charges and expenses, which by law is to be paid by the 
district. 

Under chapter 178 of the Acts of 1904, Boston paid $360.05 
per thousand of the State tax. 

Nantasket Beach, 

For the reasons hereinbefore stated, the commissioners believe 
that apportionment of the contributions to sinking fund, interest 
and maintenance for the Nantasket Beach Reservation should be 
made between the cities and towns in the Metropolitan Parks Dis- 
trict and Cohasset in proportion to valuation. 

It appears, from a statement of the State Treasurer, that the 
Nantasket' Beach Loans amounted, on Jan. 1, 1905, to $700,000. 
The sinking fund requirement for the year 1905 was estimated at 
$8,332.29, the interest account at $21,498.21 and maintenance at 
$18,079.92, making a total of $47,910.42. The commissioners, 
having fully considered the evidence and arguments and the at- 
tendant circumstances and conditions, deem it just and equitable, 
and therefore make award of the proportions in which each of the 
cities and towns in the Metropolitan Parks District, deeming and 
treating Cohasset as a part of the Metropolitan Parks District for 
this purpose, shall annually pay money into the treasury of the 



112 



METROPOLITAN PARKS. 



[Jan. 



Commonwealth daring the term of this award, to provide the 
amount required each year under chapter 464, Acts of the year 
1899, and all acts in amendment thereof and in addition thereto, 
as shown by the percentages set against the cities and towns in 
said district, in the following Table C : — 



Table C. 



Boston, . 
Cambridge, 
Chelsea, . 
Everett, . 
Lynn, . 
Maiden, . 
Medford, 
Melrose, . 
Newton, . 
Quincy, . 
Somerville, 
Waltham, 
Woburn, . 
Arlington » 
Belmont, 
Braintree, 
Brookline, 
Canton, . 
Cohasset, 
Dedham, . 
Dover, . 



.62009 
.05386 
.01198 
.01033 
.02723 
.01607 
.01077 
.00769 
.03467 
.01161 
.02855 
.01132 
.00554 
.00501 
.00305 
.00257 
.04970 
.00206 
.00366 
.00563 
.00056 



Hingham, 

Hull, . 

Hyde Park, 

Milton, . 

Nahant, . 

Needham, 

Revere, . 

Saugus, . 

Stoneham, 

Swampscott, 

Wakefield, 

Watertown, 

Wellesley, 

Weston, . 

Westwood, 

Weymouth, 

Winchester, 

Winthrop, 



.00243 
.00213 
.00603 
.01236 
.00366 
.00208 
.00580 
.00207 
.00251 
.00529 
.00409 
.00628 
.00583 
.00340 
.00109 
.00346 
.00530 
.00424 

1.00000 



The Charles River Dam, {Chapter 465, Acts of 1903.) 
This chapter is entitled " An Act to authorize the construction 
of a dam across the Charles River between the cities of Boston 
and Cambridge." Section 9 provides that : — 

The commissioners next appointed under the provisions of chapter 
four hundred and nineteen of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and 
ninety-nine, and amendments thereof, in apportioning the expenses of 
maintaining the metropolitan parks system shall include as part thereof 
the expense of maintenance incurred under the preceding sections of 
this act ; shall also determine, as they shall deem just and equitable, what 
portion of the total amount expended for construction under sections 
three, four, five and six of this act shall be apportioned to the cities of 
Boston and Cambridge as the cost of removal of Craigie bridge and the 
construction of a suitable bridge in place thereof, and the remainder 
shall be considered and treated as part of the cost of construction of 
the metropolitan park system. The treasurer and receiver general shall 
determine the payments to be made each year by said cities, one-half by 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 113 

each, to meet the interest and sinking fund requirements for the amounts 
apportioned to them as the cost of such bridge, and the same shall be 
paid by each city into the treasury of the Commonwealth as part of its 
state tax. 

After arguments by counsel, the commissioners for apportion- 
ment interpreted this section to apply to them and to impose 
duties upon them. They therefore held hearings respecting the 
subject-matter of said chapter 465, of which due notice was given, 
and at which the Charles River Basin Commission, through its 
secretary and chief engineer, and all other parties interested, so 
far as they desired, were heard. 

The undisputed evidence at these hearings showed that there 
had been no expense of maintenance incurred under sections 1 
to 8, both inclusive ; that the Charles River Basin Commission 
had let a contract for the construction of a portion of the dam 
between the cities of Boston and Cambridge, but that very sub- 
stantial parts of the structure were omitted from this contract, 
such as the draw, the paving of the roadway and some other items, 
the cost of which would undoubtedly aggregate many thousands 
of dollars, and that no estimate of what expenses would be in- 
curred in completing the structure for public use had been or 
could at the present time reasonably be made ; that the prices for 
several distinct subject-matters in the contract for the dam were 
by quantities, which might vary materially from estimates, as the 
character of the river bottom and the soil in the vicinity disclosed 
itself in construction, and that this could be determined with cer- 
tainty only as the work progressed ; that the dredging and other 
work authorized by the last paragraph of section 4 was not only 
not done and not contracted for, but the Basin Commission was 
not then possessed of sufficient knowledge to enable it to determine 
the amount and character of dredging which ought to be done, or 
the extent of the other work required ; that the construction of the 
marginal conduit authorized by section 5 upon the north side of 
the basin has not been begun nor contracted for, nor the expense 
of it estimated, and the construction of the marginal conduit upon 
the south side of the basin had been contracted for only for a 
distance of about 2,400 feet, and that the Basin Commission has 
not yet determined the length of this conduit, within the limits 
authorized by section 5, and hence no estimate of its expense was 
possible ; that the taking of lands authorized by section 6 had not 
yet been completed, and it was obviously impossible to estimate 
the expense of takings and the damages which may be recovered 
therefor ; that the additional dredging in the basin for deepening 
the channel to Bracket's Wharf, which may be required by the 



114 METEOPOLITAN PAKKS. [Jan, 

War Department of the United States, had not been contracted 
for, nor the cost of it estimated ; and that a considerable amount 
of tilling, required in connection with the construction of the dam 
and the preservation of public health around the basin, had not 
been contracted for, nor any definite estimate of its cost made. 

After careful consideration of the evidence and the arguments 
of counsel, the commissioners for apportionment are of the opinion 
that the work in connection with the Charles River Dam and Basin 
has not yet progressed far enough, and that sufficient facts are not 
now obtainable to enable them at the present time to make a just and 
equitable determination of the portion of the total amount ex- 
pended for construction under sections 3, 4, 5 and 6 to be appor- 
tioned ^' to the cities of Boston and Cambridge as the cost of 
removal of Craigie Bridge and the construction of a suitable 
bridge in place thereof," and to make a just and equitable appor- 
tionment " of the cost of construction of the Metropolitan Park 
System," by considering and treating as a part thereof the 
remainder of the " total amount expended for construction under" 
said chapter 465. 

They are also of the opinion that they cannot make an intelligent 
apportionment of the expense of maintaining the Metropolitan 
Parks System by including the expense of maintenance incurred 
under sections 1 and 8, both inclusive, inasmuch as no such ex- 
penses have been incurred, and the amount of them in. connection 
with the character and use of the constructions would be special 
circumstances, to be given weight in an apportionment. 

These conclusions were unanimously agreed to by the represent 
tatives of all persons taking part in the hearings, including the 
city solicitors of Boston and Cambridge and many other cities and 
towns in the Metropolitan Parks District, and they requested that 
the matter be left open for future consideration. 

The commissioners for apportionment, therefore, report to the 
court that they have not included in the preceding portions of thi& 
report any part of the expense, either of construction or mainte- 
nance, authorized by chapter 465 of the laws of 1903 ; and that, in 
their opinion, the matter should be considered at some time in the 
future, when the necessary information may have become obtain- 
able. 

ARTHUR P- RUGG, 
JAMES F. JACKSON, 
JOHN J. FLAHERTY, 

Commissioners for Apportionment. 

Sbpt. 21, 1906. 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 115 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

Suffolk, ss. Suprbmb Judicial Court. In Equity. 

No. 9169. 

In the matter of the petition of William B. de las Casas et al.^ 
Metropolitan Park Commissioners, for appointment of commis- 
sioners to determine payments by cities and towns under Acts of 
1899, chapter 419. 

Decree accepting Award of Commissioners. 
This cause came on to be heard on motion of the petitioners for 
the acceptance of the award of the commissioners at this sitting, 
and was argued by counsel ; and it appearing that notice of the 
motion of the petitioners for the acceptance of the award of the 
commissioners had been published in accordance with the order 
of the court, thereupon, upon consideration thereof, it is ordered, 
adjudged and decreed that the report of the commissioners, Ar- 
thur P. Rugg, James F. Jackson and John J. Flaherty, be and 
the same hereby is accepted. 

By the court, 

JOHN NOBLE, 

Clerk. 
Nov. 10, 1906. 



"Wellington Bridge Apportionment, under 
Chapter 491 of the Acts of the Legisla- 
ture FOR THE Year 1901. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
Suffolk, ss. Suprbmb Judicial Court. In Equitt 

In the matter of the petition of William B. de las Casas et cU.^ 
Metropolitan Park Commissioners, for appointment of commission- 
ers to determine payments by cities and towns under Acts of 1901, 
chapter 491. 

PETmON. 

Respectfully represent William B. de las Casas, Edwin B. Has- 
kell, Edwin U. Curtis, David N. Skillings and Ellerton P. Whitney, 
your petitioners : — 

That they constitute the Board of Metropolitan Park Commis- 
sioners, duly established under and by virtue of an act of the 



116 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

Legislature of Massacbosetts, entitled ^'An Act to establish a 
Metropolitan Park Commission," being chapter 407 of the acts 
passed in the year A.D. 1893, and acting under said act and acts 
in amendment thereof and in addition thereto. 

That by section 1 of chapter 491 of the Acts of 1901 (a copy of 
which act is hereto annexed, marked " Exhibit A") the Metropol- 
itan Park Commission was required to build a bridge with a suit- 
able draw and with suitable approaches across Mystic Kiver, 
between the city of Somerville and the city of Medford, at or near 
the site of the so-called Middlesex Avenue bridge. 

That by section 2 of said act it was provided that the cost of 
the bridge ^^ shall not exceed the sum of two hundred thousand 
dollars, and shall be paid in the manner hereinafter provided, in 
part by such cities and towns in the county of Middlesex as shall 
be found to be specially benefited by the use of said bridge for 
highway purposes, and in part by the Metropolitan Parks District, 
to such extent as said district shall be found to be benefited by the 
use of the bridge for park purposes, and in the proportion to be 
determined by a special commission appointed as hereinafter pro- 
vided." 

That your petitioners have built the bridge, with a suitable draw 
and suitable approaches, upon plans approved by the county com- 
missioners of Middlesex County, at a cost of less than the sum of 
$200,000, as required by said act, and that said bridge and its 
approaches were completed on the seventh day of December, A.D. 
1904. 

That in and by sections 6 and 7 of said chapter 491 it is pro- 
vided that, in order to determine which of said cities and towns in 
the county of Middlesex are specially benefited by the use of said 
bridge for highway purposes, and the extent of such benefit, and 
to what extent the Metropolitan Parks District by the use of said 
bridge for park purposes, and to determine in proportion to such 
benefits the part of the cost of said bridge and approaches to be 
paid by each of said cities and towns and by the Metropolitan 
Parks District, and in order to determine the proportion in which 
said cities and towns, or any of them, and said district shall bear 
the cost of the maintenance of said bridge, there shall be three 
commissioners appointed by this honorable court, upon petition of 
this Board. 

Thiat for the purpose of carrying out the provisions of said act 
it is necessary and expedient that said commissioners be appointed 
by the court, as aforesaid. 

They therefore pray that after such notice as this honorable court 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No, 48. 117 

shall order, if any, there may be three commissioners appointed, 
in the manner and for the purposes, and with all the rights, powers, 
privileges, duties and obligations in said act of 1901 mentioned or 
referred to. 

WILLIAM B. DE LAS CASAS, 
EDWIN B. HASKELL, 
EDWIN U. CURTIS, 
DAVID N. SKILLINGS, 
ELLERTON P. WHITNEY, 
Board of Metropolitan Park Commissioners, 

Arthur W. DeGoosh, 

Assistant Attorney- General, of Counsel, 

Exhibit A. 

[Acts of 1901, Ghaptbb 491.] 

An Act to direct the Metropolitan Park Commission to con- 
struct A Bridge over the Mystic River between the Cities 

OP SOMERVILLE AND MeDPORD. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. The metropolitan park commission shall build a bridge, 
with a suitable draw and with suitable approaches, across the Mystic 
river between the city of Somerville and the city of Medford, at or near 
the site of the so-called Middlesex Avenue bridge, subject to the pro- 
visions of chapter nineteen of the Public Statutes. The plans of said 
bridge shall be approved by the county commissioners of Middlesex 
county, and the bridge shall be constructed and maintained for the joint 
use of the highways of said cities and the metropolitan reservations, 
roads and boulevards along and near said river in said cities, and the 
said board shall maintain and operate the same for any purposes for 
which either the said highways or the said park roads may be used. 

Section 2. The cost of the bridge and approaches thereto shall not 
exceed the sum of two hundred thousand dollars, and shall be paid 
in the manner hereinafter provided, in part by such cities and towns 
in the county of Middlesex as shall be found to be specially benefited 
by the use of said bridge for highway purposes, and in- part by the 
metropolitan parks district, to such extent as said district shall be found 
to be benefited by the use of the bridge for park purposes, and in the 
proportion to be determined by a special commission appointed as heire- 
inafter provided. 

Section 3. For the purpose of carrying out the provisions of this act 
the said board shall have, in addition to the powers hereby conferred, the 
same powers and shall be subject to the same duties and liabilities in 
regard to said bridge as are provided in regard to roads and highways 
by chapter two hundred and eighty- eight of the acts of the year eighteen 
hundred and ninety-four and acts in addition thereto and in amendment 



118 METROPOLITAN PARKS. [Jan. 

thereof, or by any other provisions of law applicable thereto, except as 
herein otherwise provided, and in addition thereto said board may remove 
the existing Middlesex Avenue bridge, so-called, or use any part thereof 
for the new bridge. 

Section 4. The said board shall have authority to grant locations to 
street railways in and over said bridge, upon the same terms and condi- ^ 
tions upon which it is now authorized to grant locations to street rail- 
ways within the roads, boulevards, parks and reservations in its care and 
control, under the provisions of chapter four hundred and thirteen of the 
acts of the year nineteen hundred, and any moneys received from said 
grants shall be applied to the cost of or to the care and maintenance of 
the new bridge. 

Section 5. To meet the expenses incurred under this act the treasurer 
and receiver-general is hereby authorized, with the approval of the gov- 
ernor and council, to issue scrip or certificates of indebtedness to an 
amount not exceeding two hundred thousand dollars, as an addition to 
the amounts already authorized under the provisions of chapter four 
hundred and seven of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and ninety- 
three and acts in addition thereto and in amendment thereof, and as 
part of the Metropolitan Parks Loan. Such scrip or certificates of in- 
debtedness shall be issued as registered bonds, and shall bear interest at 
a rate not exceeding four per cent, per annum, payable semi-annually, 
on the first days of January and July of each year. 

Section 6. The supreme judicial court sitting in equity shall, upon 
application of said board and after such notice as it may order, appoint 
three commissioners, who shall, after due notice and hearing, in such 
manner as they shall deem just and equitable, determine which of said 
cities and towns in the county of Middlesex are especially benefited by 
the use of said bridge for highway purposes, and the extent of such benefit, 
and to what extent the metropolitan parks district is benefited by the use 
of said bridge for park purposes^ and shall further determine in propor- 
tion to such benefits the part of the cost of said bridge and approaches 
to be paid by each of said cities and towns and by the metropolitan parks 
district, and shall return their award into said court, and when the same 
has been accepted by said court it shall be a final adjudication of all mat- 
ters herein referred to said commissioners, and shall be binding on all 
parties ; and in like manner said commissioners shall determine and file 
their award as to the payment of the cost of maintenance of said bridge, 
and determine the proportion in which said cities and towns or any of 
them and said district shall bear the same. 

Section 7. Upon the filing and acceptance of said awards the treas- 
urer and receiver-general of the Commonwealth shall estimate and de- 
termine the amount to be paid in accordance with said award by each of 
said cities and towns as their proportion of the cost of said bridge, and 
shall include one-fifth part thereof with interest at the current rates in 
the sum charged to each of said cities and towns in the apportionment 
and assessment of its state tax for the succeeding five years, until the sum 
to be paid by such city or town has been fully paid. The sums thus paid 
by said cities and towns shall be credited and added to the Metropolitan 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 119 

Parks Loan Sinking Fund. In like manner the treasurer and receiver- 
general shall estimate and determine the amount to be paid in each year 
by any city or town according to the award of said commissioners for 
the care and maintenance of said bridge, and shall include the same in 
the annual state tax of such city or town, and the sums thus collected 
shall be credited to and paid into the funds available by the metropolitan 
park commission for the maintenance of said bridge, and may be ex- 
pended by them for that purpose, in addition to any loans or appropria- 
tions authorized for park purposes. 

Section 8. This act shall take effect upon its passage. [Approved 
June 13, 1901. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
Suffolk, ss. Supbbms Judicial Court. In Equitt. 

In the matter of the petition of William B. de las Casas and 
others, Metropolitan Park Commissioners, for the appointment of 
commissioners to determine payments by cities and towns under 
Acts of 1901, chapter 491. 

Decree. 
And now, upon the above-entitled petition, it appearing to the 
court that due notice thereof was given to all cities and towns, 
respondents, according to the order of the court, and after due 
hearing thereof, no person objecting, it is ordered that Arthur P. 
Rugg of Worcester, James F. Jackson of Fall River and John J. 
Flaherty of Gloucester be and they hereby are appointed commis- 
sioners under section 6 of chapter 491 of the Acts of the year 
1901, to determine which of the cities and towns in the county of 
Middlesex are specially benefited by the use of the bridge, which 
is the subject of said act, for highway purposes, and to what 
extent the Metropolitan Parks District is benefited by the use of 
the bridge for park purposes, determine and make award the 
proportions of the cost of said bridge and approaches which each 
shall pay, and also to determine and make award of the propor- 
tions in which each of said cities and towns shall pay the cost of 
maintenance of said bridge, and to do and perform all of the other 
duties prescribed for them by said act, and to exercise all the 
powers thereby and by law reposed upon the said commissioners 
as provided for by said act. 

By the court, 

WALTER F. FREDERICK, 

Assistant Clerk, 
Fbb. 21, 1905. 



120 METROPOLITAN PAEKS. [Jan. 



COMMONWEALTH OP MASSACHUSETTS. 

Suffolk, ss. Supbemb Judicial Oou&t. In Equity. 

No. 9168. 

William B. de las Casas et aZ., petitioners, under chapter 491, 

Acts of 1901. 

Repobt op the Determination and Awabd op Cohmissionerjs. 

Tbe undersigned commissioners, Arthur P. Rugg, James F. 
Jackson and John J. Flaherty, duly appointed in the above cause 
to make a determination and award as to an apportionment of the 
cost of the construction and maintenance of the Wellington, or 
Middlesex Avenue, Bridge, built across the Mystic River between 
the cities of Somerville and Medford, under the provisions of 
chapter 491, Acts of 1901, have attended to their duties, and 
respectfully present the following report of their doings and of 
their determination and award. 

After due notice given to all parties in interest, several hearings 
were held, at which opportunity was given to the petitioners and 
to all cities and towns and to all other persons interested in the 
matter to be fully heard, such hearings having been held at Boston 
on tbe sixteenth day of March, and twentieth, twenty-first, twenty- 
second, twenty-sixth and twenty-seventh days of April. Said 
notice, with the return of service thereon, is filed herewith. A 
view of this bridge and of the highways connecting therewith was 
taken. The commissioners also met for conference on the third 
days of March and May. After the submission of all the evidence 
and arguments which parties desired to present, and upon full con- 
sideration thereof, the commissioners make the following findings 
and award : — 

1. They find that, under the authority conferred by chapter 187, 
Acts of 1869, a bridge for highway purposes alone was constructed, 
known as the Middlesex Avenue Bridge, which spanned the river 
at substantially the same place as the present bridge. Section 3, 
chapter 491, Acts of 1901, authorized the Metropolitan Park Com- 
mission to remove this old bridge, or use any part of it for the new 
bridge. The old was somewhat narrower than the new structure, 
and from age and use its strength and durability had become im- 
paired. No street railway track had ever been laid upon it, audit 
was not strong enough, without extensive and expensive repairs, 
to bear street railway traflac. The Metropolitan Park Commission 
acted upon the authority conferred by section 3 of said chapter 
491, and removed the old bridge, after using it until the new one 
was completed. The new bridge was constructed during the year 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 48. 121 

1903, at a total expense, incloding its approaches, of 8184,261.61. 
The annual expense of maintenance of the bridge has since been 
appi*oximately $2,661. 

2. The commissioners are of the opinion and find that the his- 
tory of the taking and removal of the Middlesex Avenue Bridge 
(sections, chapter 491, Acts of 1901) and the building of this 
bridge, the type and dimensions of the structure, the uses now 
made of it and those which will in the future in all probability be 
made of it, the relation which it bears to the surrounding cities ^ 
and towns and to the part of the Metropolitan Parks District lying 
north of Boston, all go to show that the benefits to be received 
from the bridge and its approaches, so far as such benefits may 
be measured, are shared in equal proportion by those who use and 
will use the bridge for the ordinary highway purposes, and by 
those who use and will use it in connection with travel to and from 
important park resei-vations within the Metropolitan Parks Dis- 
trict. In accordance with these views, they determine that the 
Metropolitan Parks District is benefited by the use of said bridge 
for park purposes to the extent of one-half its cost for construc- 
tion; and they apportion upon the Metropolitan Parks District 
one-half, or 50 per cent., of the expense of constryiction of the 
bridge with its approaches, and the other half upon the cities and 
towns hereinafter named, which determination is to their minds 
just and equitable. 

3. They are of the opinion and find that the present and future 
uses of the Wellington Bridge for highway purposes are of special 
benefit to the cities of Somerville, Medford and Maiden, and the 
towns of Stoneham and Reading. The view and the oral and 
written evidence conclusively prove that, besides the present uses 
of this highway, there will be an additional and very important 
use of it in connection with a proposed street railway service, for 
which provision has been made in the construction of the bridge 
and approaches, and for the inauguration of which steps have 
already been taken by companies which expect to perform this 
service. The value of such street railway facilities to the town of 
Stoneham, and in a smaller degree to the town of Reading, con- 
stitute in large part the basis for the finding that these towns 
are to receive special benefit from the new bridge. The cities of 
Somerville, Medford and Maiden receive material benefit from the 
improved means of communication with each other, in the in- 
creased convenience for mutual business relations between these 
communities, and, especially in the case of the two cities last 
named, a direct benefit in the probably larger value of lands at 
present unoccupied. 



122 METROPOLITAN PAEKS. [Jan. 

Accordingly, the commissioners believe it to be just and equi- 
table, and find that the extent of the special benefits received by 
these cities and towns are in proportion to the percentages which 
follow, and which represent the manner in which they apportion 
among them the one-half, or 50 per cent., of the cost of construc- 
tion of this bridge and its approaches, not hereinbefore appor- 
tioned upon the Metropolitan Parks District : — 

Per Cent. 

Somerville, 12} 

Medford, 19 

Maiden, 14 

Stoneham, 8} 

Reading, 1 

60 

The commissioners are unable to find, upon the evidence pre- 
sented or from their own observation, any difference in the effect 
of the various uses of this highway upon the bridge and its ap- 
proaches. The same considerations which govern their deter- 
mination as to the division of the cost of the construction of the 
bridge and its approaches lead to the same conclusions as to the 
division of the cost of the maintenance of the bridge. Taking 
into consideration the present and prospective uses of said bridge, 
it is just and equitable, and they therefore in like manner, and for 
the reasons hereinbefore stated, determine the proportion in which 
said cities and towns and said Metropolitan Parks District shall 
bear the cost of maintenance of said bridge as follows : — 

Per Cent. 

Somerville, 12} 

Medford, 19 

Maiden, . . 14 

Stoneham, 3} 

Reading, 1 

Metropolitan Parks District, 60 

100 

ARTHUR P. RUGG, 
JAMES F. JACKSON, 
JOHN J. FLAHERTY, 

Commissioners. 
Sept. 16, 1905. 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 48. 123 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

Suffolk, ss. Supbsmb Judicial Court. In Equitt. 

No. 9168. 

In tbe matter of the petition of William B. de las Casas et aZ., 
Metropolitan Park Commissioners, for appointment of commis- 
sioners to determine payments by cities and towns under Acts of 
1901, chapter 491. 

Decree accepting Award of Commissioners. 
This caase came on to be heard on motion of the petitioners for 
the acceptance of the award of the commissioners at this sitting, 
and was argued by counsel ; and, it appearing that notice of the 
motion of the petitioners for the acceptance of the award of the 
commissioners had been published and served in accordance with 
the order of the court, thereupon, upon consideration thereof, it is 
ordered, adjudged and decreed that the report of the commission- 
ers, Arthur P. Rugg, James F. Jackson and John J. Flaherty, be 
and the same hereby is accepted. 

By the court, 

JOHN NOBLE, 

Clerk. 
Nov. 10, 1906. 



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